Jewish Family Service of New Haven
1440 Whalley Ave.
New Haven CT 06515
Contact Information
Address 1440 Whalley Ave.
New Haven, CT 06515-
Telephone (203) 389-5599 x
Fax 203-389-5904
E-mail jgarfinkle@jfsnh.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
The mission of JFS is to improve the quality of life for families and individuals of all ages through an integrated program of social services in accordance with basic Jewish values and precepts.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1940
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jonathan Garfinkle
Board Chair Cindy Papish-Gerber
Board Chair Company Affiliation freelance
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $2,453,864.00
Projected Expenses $2,453,864.00
Statements
Mission The mission of JFS is to improve the quality of life for families and individuals of all ages through an integrated program of social services in accordance with basic Jewish values and precepts.
Background The mission of Jewish Family Service of New Haven is to improve the quality of life for families and individuals of all ages, without regard to their religious preference, through an integrated program of social services in accordance with basic Jewish values and precepts. JFS has been a part of the New Haven community since 1881. JFS offers programs and services in the following areas: Emergency, Supplemental and Holiday Food Assistance; Mental Health and Counseling for Adults and Children; Older Adult Services; Inter-country, Domestic and Infant Adoption; Adoption of Older Children; Therapeutic and Medically Complex Foster Care, Respite for Children; Permanency Placement Services; Volunteer Opportunities; Empowering People for Success (program for residents on state welfare/unemployment); and a Holocaust Survivor’s Program. JFS programs and services reach all throughout Connecticut, although the majority of our clients are from New Haven County. JFS serves people of all faiths, backgrounds and ethnicities, and turns no one away based upon an ability to pay for services. 
Impact

Accomplishments

1. JFS received reaccreditation this year from the Council on Accreditation for Children and Family Services (COA), a distinction highly valued among social service agencies. The reaccreditation runs through June, 2018.

2. JFS launched new or expanded programs in the areas of domestic violence, elderly outreach, themed support groups, emergency food assistance, services for adults with developmental disabilities, family reunification services, pastoral care, and homelessness prevention.

3. JFS received over $400,000 in grant funding from a combination of 17 separate Foundation and Government Grants this past year. This funding primarily helps the most vulnerable, at-risk, and disadvantaged individuals and families in our local community, including the food insecure, the frail elderly, the disabled, the unemployed, children living in poverty, and families in danger of losing their homes, to name a few.

4. JFS provided services to over 9,500 individuals and families this past year, a 12% increase over the previous year.

Additional Goals: 

1. Continue to develop new and innovative programming that serves the ever changing needs of our community’s most vulnerable individuals and families.

2. Increase outreach and core program offerings to a wider geographical area within Greater New Haven, including the Shoreline.

3. Grow unrestricted endowments and effectively launch a planned giving program

4. Reduce the agency’s dependence on the vicissitudes of state funding and achieve greater financial health and independence through income diversification.

5. Develop a new five-year Strategic Plan that will guide the agency and lay out a path toward our future.

 
Needs

1. Emergency Assistance Fund for families and individuals in crisis – to provide help with essential needs, such as food, housing, utilities, etc. - $15,000
2. Funds to hire a part-time geriatric social worker to help meet the ever increasing needs of Greater New Haven’s aging population - $20,000
3. IT upgrade – JFS sorely needs data management software and a new website design - $20,000
4. Increased capacity to offer social services on the Shoreline, including a satellite office space in the Guilford area - $10,000
5. The development of a new comprehensive Strategic Plan that will help the agency to produce decisions and actions that will guide and shape what we do over the next five years - $10,000

CEO Statement Through its programs and services, JFS endeavors to reach out to and assist area residents in need, including (but not limited to) the homebound elderly, the chronically ill, single parent families, families with special needs children, widows and widowers, food insecure families, and family caregivers. JFS also provides assistance to those who are threatened by problems such as poverty, unemployment, food insecurity, evictions, foreclosures, and utilities shut-offs. The overarching goal of JFS' programs and services is to provide its clients not only with short-term stability but also, through individually-tailored, comprehensive social work services, long-term sustainability.

JFS is a licensed and fully accredited multi-service social service agency supported in part by the Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven. We are a member of the Association of Jewish Family and Children's Agencies (AJFCA), the CT Council of Family Service Agencies (CCFSA), and the CT Association of Non-Profit Organizations (CAN). Jewish Family Service is accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Services for Families & Children (COA). JFS Foster Care and Adoption programs are funded in part by the CT Department of Children & Families (DCF).
Board Chair Statement

In my present role as Board President of Jewish Family Service of New Haven, I am reminded daily of the impact of or agency upon those who rely upon our many services. But past circumstances also plays a part in my personal JFS narrative.

Growing up in Brooklyn as the oldest of three children, the threads of our family life came apart at the seams on the day our father unexpectedly died at the age of 44. My young mom was suddenly an unemployed widow---without any siblings to turn to for support. Shorty afterwards, her father (my grandfather) suffered a stroke. Overwhelmed by the weight of mounting financial and emotional pressures, she could not provide food, clothing, or shelter for her family.

Thankfully, the local Jewish Family Service was there to help. They set up emergency assistance, offered counseling, employment leads, and carefully navigated her through the tangle of social service forms. JFS became her friend.

Here in New Haven, JFS works tirelessly to improve lives. Chances are, you already know someone who has greatly benefitted by the wide range of quality social and human services provided by our “agency without walls”.

Perhaps your neighbor has attended one of our Bereavement or Unemployment Support Groups? Has a relative obtained counseling, adopted or fostered a child, requested emergency fuel assistance or inquired about our Social Work Outreach Services? Is a co-worker dealing with a developmentally disabled adult, domestic violence, substance abuse, or seeking services for an aging parent, grandparent or Holocaust survivor? Way too many in our midst include families who depend upon the resources of our newly expanded Food Pantry.

Our agency strives to meet the needs of those who have come to depend upon our counseling, outreach, educational and human services. But day after day,

throughout Greater New Haven, the list of those who need us grows longer. The statistics say it all: More than 31,000 children in Greater New Haven under age 18 are living below the federal poverty level. Their families are struggling to make ends meet without food, heat or electricity in their homes or clothes to keep them warm. Also at risk are community members who are dealing with depression, stress, sudden loss, broken families or unemployment.

Our newer programs, such as Food4Kids (in partnership with the Women’s Philanthropy of the Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven), have had enormous impact within a very short time frame. We are fortunately providing many more backpacks loaded with food/snacks to young children who are at risk of going hungry on weekends. Yet so much more can be done.

As we continue to launch new programs within our community, I am fully confident that our agency will work even harder to provide good, services and cheer to those who need it the most.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Community Service Clubs
Secondary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Counseling
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services /
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Cheshire
New Haven
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
JFS's main catchment area is New Haven County, however, JFS serves anyone within Connecticut. 
Programs
Description We offer services in: Infant & International Adoption, Yes 2 Kids Adoption for Older Children; Specialized Foster Care (Therapeutic and Medically Complex Foster Care); Permanency Placement Services; Elderly Services; Counseling & Mental Health; Holocaust Survivor Program, ESP Program; Supplemental, and Emergency Food Programs, Volunteer Program; Shalom Group for Jewish Adults with Developmental Disabilities; and Children's Respite Program.
Population Served / /
Description
To provide mental health/counseling services to individuals and families in the Greater New Haven area.  Services include concerns and issues such as (but are not limited to):  stress, anxiety, depressive symptoms, unemployment issues, hopelessness, and/or helplessness; marital concerns, family dynamics, relationship concerns, coping strategies, divorce, death and dying, among other issues.   This is accomplished through our professional staff which includes LCSW, MSW and Pastoral Counseling clinicians. 
Population Served Adults / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. 70% of clients will report improvement in their mental health indicated by improved family relationships and work success.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Client satisfaction surveys; Monthly case reviews.
Description There is a constant need for foster and adoptive individuals and families in CT to help the hundreds of children now in foster care.  JFS offers therapeutic foster care and medically complex foster care for children under the care of the Connecticut Department of Children & Families (DCF). JFS recruits and trains families/individuals to become foster and adoptive parents, and we provide intensive case managment and support to foster/adoptive families.  
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Foster families will gain a better understanding of trauma and neglect and how it relates to youth and their behaviors.

Youth will gain a better understanding of their history and how it applies to their current functioning. 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Dashboard, family, youth and DCF bi-yearly surveys, by the State of CT licensing board and COA accreditation.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

In 2014, 14 youth successfully transitioned into an independent living situation. 

Longevity of foster homes.  Many of our families became approved as foster parents over 10 years ago and have become quite experienced and versed in caring for youth in need.

Our program has a very low disruption rate.  Approximately 90% of our youth remain in the same foster placement until they transition out of care. 
Description Through a wide range of social, vocational, outreach and financial services, this program is designed to make a positive difference in the lives of the most economically distressed, vulnerable and at-risk indiviudals and families in the Greater New Haven community.  The primary purpose of the program is to provide this economically distressed population with both short-term stability and, most important, long-term sustainability.
Population Served Adults / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Short term success for our clients would involve some of the following
1. attaining employment-even part time
2. applying for social services
3. being compliant with their mental health and therapy appointments 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long term success of this program ideally would look for 70% of our clients to be maintaining employment that is both fulfilling and able to help them meet their economic needs. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Success in this program is tracked by client satisfaction surverys along with with monthly agency statistics
Description Our Food Pantry provides emergency, supplemental and holiday food for residents of Greater New Haven who are at or below the poverty level and are food insecure. Currently JFS provides monthly supplemental food to more than 250 families (which averages a little more than 6,500 lbs. of perishable and non-perishable foods distributed monthly).  JFS also serves walk-in clients and families in an emergency situation. 
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Families / Africa
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
100 % of people seeking food assistance in an emergency crisis will receive a three day supply of supplemental food.
85% of those visiting the pantry in an emergency crisis will be assessed to see if additional JFS services can be utilized to help the situation 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. JFS conducts client satisfaction surveys.  Program is also monitored for the number of pounds distributed and its equivalent to the number of meals provided.  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Our annual client survey has a 97% response rate. 90% of all clients returning the survey are satisfied with the services they receive from the Food Pantry. 
CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Jonathan Garfinkle
Term Start Feb 2009
Email jgarfinkle@jfsnh.org
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 14
Number of Part Time Staff 23
Number of Volunteers 68
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 97%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 27
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 30
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
ReaccreditationCouncil on Accreditation for Children & Family Services2010
reaccreditationCouncil on Accreditation for Children & Family Services2014
Board Chair
Cindy Papish-Gerber
Company Affiliation freelance
Term June 2014 to June 2016
Email cgerber@optonline.net
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Josef Adler
Carol Agin Coldwell Banker
Lauren Arch Arons Community Volunteer
Hillel Auerbach Community Volunteer
Cary Benjamin
Lori Ann Brass
Dalia Coleman
Laura Elman Coldwell Banker
Louise Epstein
Betsy Fiske
Sandy Friedman
Cindy Papish Gerber Community Volunteer
Shelly Greengarden
Steven Jacobs
Ozzie Levine Community Volunteer
David Ottenstein
Cindy Papish-Gerber
Linda Randell UIL Holdings Corp.
Mike Romeo
Ilene Rosalimsky Bronen
Joel Sachs Konowitz, Kahn, & Co. PC
Susan Skalka Community Volunteer
Rosalyn Sperling Community Volunteer
Hyla Vine
Yonatan Zamir
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 24
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 2 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 9
Female 14
Unspecified 3
Board Co-Chair
Joel Sachs
Company Affiliation Teplitzky and Co., PC
Term July 2014 to June 2016
Email joel@teplitzky.com
Standing Committees
Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
Personnel
Finance
Executive
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2015
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2015
Projected Revenue $2,453,864.00
Projected Expenses $2,453,864.00
Spending Policy N/A
Percentage (if selected) 4%
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$866,693$479,272$312,075
Government Contributions$138,348$249,471$304,417
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$138,348$249,471$304,417
Individual Contributions$181,884$158,300$156,600
------
$1,415,387$1,201,362$1,165,021
Investment Income, Net of Losses$19,114$7,080$4,601
Membership Dues------
Special Events$6,201$9,264$19,442
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$35,390$31,949$32,598
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$1,824,395$1,575,023$1,451,348
Administration Expense$353,351$344,761$346,038
Fundraising Expense$12,910$10,703$9,538
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.221.111.10
Program Expense/Total Expenses83%82%80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue1%1%1%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$2,777,336$2,172,258$1,816,087
Current Assets$969,374$1,137,811$945,912
Long-Term Liabilities$317,303$257,998$212,762
Current Liabilities$139,334$169,803$151,167
Total Net Assets$2,320,699$1,744,457$1,452,158
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountJewish Federation of Greater New Haven $191,600Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven $172,000Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven $196,696
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Council of Family Service Agencies $164,825CT Council of Family Service Agencies $138,042Connecticut Council of Family Service Agencies $173,001
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountJewish Family Services of Greater Hartford $160,189DCF $71,561UCONN Health Center $74,518
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities6.966.706.26
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets11%12%12%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 1440 Whalley Ave.
New Haven, CT 06515
Primary Phone 203 389-5599
Contact Email jgarfinkle@jfsnh.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Jonathan Garfinkle
Board Chair Cindy Papish-Gerber
Board Chair Company Affiliation freelance

 

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