West Haven Community House
227 Elm St
West Haven CT 06516-4635
Contact Information
Address 227 Elm St
West Haven, CT 06516-4635
Telephone (203) 934-5221 x
Fax 203-937-9052
E-mail west.comm.house@snet.net
Web and Social Media
The main administative building including Head Start pre-school classrooms.
Mission

The West Haven Community House exists to facilitate healthy, productive, independent and meaningful lives for individuals with disabilities, and children, adolescents, and families.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1941
Former Names
Group Work Council of West Haven
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Patricia Stevens
Board Chair Stacie Phan
Board Chair Company Affiliation Associate Director/Public Policy - Boehringer-Ingelheim
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $6,651,626.00
Projected Expenses $6,625,627.00
Statements
Mission

The West Haven Community House exists to facilitate healthy, productive, independent and meaningful lives for individuals with disabilities, and children, adolescents, and families.

Background In 1939 a group of community minded individuals, led by Social Worker Pauline Lang saw a need for a community center in West Haven to facilitate positive activities for the city’s children and enhance the quality of life for all citizens. With funds from a capital campaign, the group purchased a property at 227 Elm Street and in 1941 obtained incorporation of the West Haven Community House Association, Inc. Seven decades later, tens of thousands of West haven children and families, as well as adult with developmental disabilities have benefited from the valuable services the Community House provides. Our focus areas include: Early Childhood Education and Family Support; Positive Youth Development, Child Care and Enrichment for Elementary School Children; and, Residential and Day Servces for Adults with Developmental Disabilities.

While our mix of programs and services has grown and changed over the past 71 years, our commitment has remained the same: to help individuals and families achieve success in their lives and realize bright futures. We pursue our mission by offering high-quality social service programs that respond to the changing need of our community; encourage individual development and positive group relationships; promote inclusion, and advocate for positive social change.
 
Currently, we have established a board committee to update our Strategic Plan, with an eye toward tying in our agency plans with our 75th anniversary in 2016. Our last Strategic Plan covered the years 2004-2009, so we are in a sense "catching up." Among the major issues we are addressing in the Strategic Plan update: viability of existing services; viability of existing funding sources; structural and capital needs of the agency; community assessment of its needs going forward; our endowment; our board structure; our agency management structure and succession planning; staffing needs, among others.
 
Impact

TOP ACCOMPLISHMENTS - FY 2013-2014, which ended June 30, 2014:

** HEAD START (HS): Successfully reconfigured our Head Start program per the federal sequestration budget changes for school year 2013-14 including eliminating 19 pre-school slots and laying off staff. Our program served 144 children during the school year.
** SCHOOL AGE PROGRAMS (SAP): We continued to refine and integrate program componants, especially the Positive Youth Development / Kids in the Neighborhood (PYD-KIN) enrichment program for at-risk youth into the overall SAP program mix. 
** DISABILITY SERVICES: We continued to expand and improve our Community Connections "Day" program for adults with disabilities located at 622 Campbell Ave., West Haven, CT. Our client census has risen to nearly 100 per day.
** RESIDENTIAL: Several important capital improvements were made in 2013-14 to our group home facilities, including installation of new heating system, new windows and two emergency standby electric generators. In the current 2014-15 fiscal year, we have replaced the heating system at 228 Elm St. with a new high efficiency condensate boiler. At 40-42 Wood St. we installed brand new handicapped ramp and repaved our driveway. At our Savin Avenue residence we remodeled our 3rd floor residence in the summer of 2014.
** SMILE: Our "Day" program for adults over age 50 with disabilities called "SMILE" - created in 2011 to specifically offer age appropriate activities and daily skills training to this older population - continues to evolve for this population who are living longer lives due to advances in medical care. Through December 2014, the program met M-F in the Upper Lang room at 227 Elm St.  As of January 2015, our SMILE program moved to its new home at 840 Boston Post Rd., West Haven.

GOALS FOR 2014-2015 fiscal year ending June 30, 2015:
** SCHOOL AGE PROGRAMS: Continue to explore program space options, as we are continually competing with existing public school programs for the same in-school spaces, resulting in some crowding and lessening of overall programmatic options. The West Haven school administration has also proposed adding full-day kindergartent district-wide, which would effectively end our complementary half-day kindergarten program that we operate out of the fomer Molloy School, KinderKlub.
** Achieve greater levels of parent engagement - SAP and HS.
** Disability Services: increase outside recreational and community integration opportunities.
** Strengthen our Board, management and program leadership staff and update our Strategic Plan.
Needs  Top needs for FY 2014-15: 
  1. Continue to reorganize and rebuild our building and grounds maintenance staff, policies and procedures, the completion of projects to upgrade and maintain buildings, our exterior grounds, residential homes, including upgrading our HVAC mechanical and lighting systems.
  2. Continue to meet with all possible partners and collaborators as we work to resolve our ongoing space issues, including our Head Start classroom needs at 227 Elm Street, and our critical space needs within the public schools.
  3. Continue the progress made on our safety and security initiatives in 2014-15 at all sites, including upgrades to our automatic door-locking and camera security systems, educational efforts to reduce accidents, continuing the work of the newly reorganized Emergency Preparedness Committee, which among other initiatives is finalizing revised evacuation and lock-down procedures as well as ways to make all our facilities more secure. We are also working with police and neighbors to reduce the incidents of vandalism and trespass.   
  4. Finish the revision to the agency's Strategic Plan, including SWOT analysis of programs, financials, staffing, succession planning, capacity,  fundraising and the effectiveness of board & other oversight committees. As part of this effort, continue the ongoing efforts to broaden the diversity of the Board of Directors.
  5. Complete materials inventory & storage reorganization at all program sites.
CEO Statement

With more than 73 years of experience, the West Haven Community House (WHCH) has evolved to become a leader in identifying, collaborating and implementing services that meet the changing needs of the City of West Haven: its families, educational structure and socio-economic challenges.  

The Community House has been at the forefront of meeting local needs through direct service provision and collaboration. We were responsible for West Haven’s first group licensed child care, the city’s first and only Head Start program, and the first residential living and vocational training facilities for adults with developmental disabilities. 

The regional Big Brothers/Big Sisters program and West Haven Emergency Assistance Taskforce were launched by the Community House and we were instrumental in the creation of the West Haven Interagency Network for Children, the West Haven Family Resource Center, and West Haven Early Childhood Council.

In 2012, we are at the forefront of a collaboration with local providers and the Graustein Foundation’s Discovery program to improve the delivery of services to young children and their families in West Haven, and in April and May 2012 we have been working with local providers, local businessman Andy Eder, and Diane Frankenstein, author of “Reading Together,” to bring Ms. Frankenstein back to the region in October and November 2012 in a unified effort to increase the reading and comprehension skills of children, focusing on parents. 

We continued our leadership in these areas in 2013-14, including our Read Aloud program, our memberships on school readiness, policy and government boards and agencies, all with an eye on best practices and effective outcomes. 

We are proud of our accomplishments, of our dedicated staff, and most of all, of the children and families, and adults with disabilities, who have moved forward with our assistance. 

We will always strive to be the premier social service agency that our residents can rely on to provide leadership, innovation and assistance for the betterment of our entire community and we thank everyone for their ongoing support of our efforts.

Patricia Stevens
Executive Director

Board Chair Statement

With the onset of 2014, it is an opportune time to look back on the events of the past year at the West Haven Community House and report to our constituents on our progress and accomplishments, as well as our challenges.

In January 2013, the federal government announced its sequestration budget cuts that resulted in cutbacks to our Head Start pre‐school program resulting in a reduction of pre‐school openings from 163 to 144 children. The good news remains, however, that in June, we successfully “graduated” 100 children into Kindergarten with a real “head start” in life.

Our before and after school Child Care program continued to help working parents meet the challenges of arranging for care for their children before and/or after school hours. We served more than 300 children in this program. The afternoon hours between school closing and a parent returning home from work are especially critical, with many studies confirming what common sense already tells us – that unsupervised children home alone after school face many health, safety and physical risks. This is why our School Age Child Care and our Positive Youth Development enrichment programs are so valuable. Both programs fill that void for families, offering the supervision of caring adults, as well as timely and important program opportunities that include homework help, social skills development, physical play and exposure to the arts.

Particularly sad for us, during the blizzard of 2013, the agency family lost one of its own with the passing of long‐time Disability Services client Nick Pergolotti – referred to by many in our community as the “mayor of West Haven.” Nick was our client since 1984, and his life and personal situation is an excellent example of how our continuum of programs for adults with developmental disabilities has helped these individuals age in place. As a result of advances in medicine, individuals like Nick are living longer lives, many into their 70s. We have been fortunate to be able to adjust living quarters within our residential program to account for increased age and decreasing mobility – all to great success, as Nick’s many friends and family can attest. We have also been able to provide new services and programming to meet the needs of our clients, regardless of their individual circumstances, age or physical conditions. We currently serve more than 100 clients in our Disability Services component.

This is but a small sampling of the wonderful work that continues every day at the West Haven Community House. I know that you will agree with me that the West Haven Community House is dedicated to providing the citizens of West Haven with the best possible services.

On behalf of our Board of Directors, I ask you to please consider supporting us with a donation to ensure that we serve our community for many more years to come. Best wishes for a safe, healthy and happy year in 2014 and beyond. Thank you for your support.

Stacie Phan, President
Board of Directors, January 2014
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Education / Preschools
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers
Tertiary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Areas Served
West Haven
Greater West Haven, CT 06516
 
Our Community Connections Day Service program also is open to adults with disabilities outside of West Haven, including (March 2014) New Haven, Hamden, Milford, Orange, Ansonia, Derby, Shelton, North Haven, Branford and Wallingford. All other programs serve West Haven only.
Programs
Description
For school year 2014-15, we continue to engage at-risk children (grades 1-6) in after-school activities that build social skills and encourage involvement in positive pursuits such as science, drama, global literacy, leadership development and sports. The twice-weekly program is held for two hours after school at three West Haven public schools (Savin Rock, Forest, Carrigan Intermediate). Among the challenges we face is that the demand for our program is greater than the available space that the West Haven Board of Education can provide us. The 2010-2011 consolidation of school sites in West Haven, which closed several schools and redistricted the others, did have a negative impact on our ability to deliver this service to all who desire it. In addition, our program evaluation form filled out by clients and parents indicate that many would utilize this service five days a week were we to offer it. Currently, in order to increase our capacity, we offer two separate sessions per school at two days a week each (four total days per week per school). Our program census in the Spring of 2014 is 99 students. the 2014-15 program year begins in late September.
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / At-Risk Populations /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
One short-term goal and success measure of the KIN program is to help students keep current with their studies and specifically through our homework help and mentoring aspect of our program.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
One overall long-term goal of the PYD/KIN program is to prevent and decrease the rate of high school-age student "dropouts" later in a students' respective educational career. The high school dropout rate in West Haven remains at a relatively high rate and continues to run above the state average. By offering a variety of services including homework help, health screenings and social/emotional training and peer counseling, we seek to keep students engaged and safe in the hours after school, where many studies show is a time of great risk for adolescents who may be left home alone for parents who work.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
We measure success through a combination of tools:
 
1. student self-assessment
2. parent assessement
3. feedback from school personnel including teachers, principals and guidance counselors
 
Staff at KIN and CHAMPS used a variety of tools and processes including client and parent surveys, one-on-one meetings, and in-class observations of clients. Our client survey asked 15 questions, among them: Do you feel safe in the program?, Do the activities interest you?, Do you have friends in the program?, Would you recommend to a friend?, Would you participate in program again?, Do the workers care about you?, If you have a problem with a friend, are you able to work it out?, among others.
A second survey tool attempts to identify social and interactional issues by asking respondents to reply to certain statements, including: I don't know how to make good choices. I don't know how to calm myself down when I get upset. I have problems getting along with people. I get into trouble at school. I don't listen to my parents. When I have a problem with someone, I fix it by fighting. I don't know how and where to find help when I have a problem or need advice, among others. All of these assessment tools, as well as day-to-day observations and interactions are useful in measuring outcomes.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

The following are from past parents comments sections on our parent surveys:

1. he loves it ... Thank you!

2. He had fun. He likes the crafts things he does and gets to bring home. He looks forward to this every year.

3. It keeps him extra busy, giving him a chance to interact with other children.

The adults who work with my son are just great, full of patience and understanding of my son's special needs.

4. I like the way they help for homework, and the crafts. Would like to see a little more activities, like music and dance.

5. My daughter loves the program and the price is right.

6. I would like to see the program extended longer and also more days throughout the week. It should be $25 for both sessions.

7. She has fun and has made a lot of friends. She likes how she's helped with her homework. I think it was a great idea for the Kids in the Neighborhood to be at the school.

8. He never complains about going. He would go more if it were offered. I hope this program continues for my child to go to while he is attending this school.

9. I wish it lasted until summer.

10. She loves Mr. Mike. He is helpful and friendly. All the staff is wonderful.

11. My child has a lot of fun playing with other kids and with the projects they do.

12. My son loves Kids in the Neighborhood. He looks forward to it.

13. The staff helped the children with their homework. I wish there was a summer program so children have something to do and not hang out in the streets.

14. Would like more days and longer time period. Looking forward to next season!

15. The program should be extended to five days a week. A few times his homework was not completed before play time. I think this is a wonderful program.

16. Very satisfied with program.

17. I like the fact that he is at an after-school program that I feel he's safe in and he really enjoys. I wish I could have him in more after-school activities but most are not affordable like this program.

Description

WHCH School Age Child Care (SACC) program provides high quality, affordable before and after school care for working families in West Haven. The program is open to children enrolled in theWest Havenpublic elementary schools. Care is provided from 7 a.m. to school start, and from school dismissal until 6 p.m. The KinderKlub component for half-day kindergarten students operates from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Care is also provided during school recesses and most holidays. Sites operate in six elementary schools. The program provides a safe, constructive place for children while their parents work or attend school. A mix of individual and group activities foster cognitive, social, emotional and physical development of the children. Activities include: homework help, computer use, arts & crafts; science; cultural explorations; free play with age-appropriate games and toys; gym and outdoor play; language, drama, music, service learning and leadership development. Children receive a healthy breakfast and snack.

Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Same as the long term program success: We provide parents/guardians a safe environment for their child both before and after school so that the parent/guardian can focus on their own job or schooling. Our program curriculum is geared toward having productive and educational activities that complement the school experience.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long term program success: We provide parents/guardians a safe environment for their child both before and after school so that the parent/guardian can focus on their own job or schooling. Our program curriculum is geared toward having productive and educational activities that complement the school experience.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Our outcomes measurement focused on three major areas: Socialization, Cognitive and Physical abilities. In the “Socialization” subheading, children were scored on a scale of “Improved,” “Same” or “Negative Improvement” on the following criteria: “Overall” interaction with other children versus not participating; “Initiation” of positive age appropriate social interaction; “Ability to comfort others” who are sad or afraid; “Encouragement” of others; “Willingness” to continue to work on a skill or something that is difficult; “Ability” to teach others a new skill; “Cooperation” with others in the selection of activities; “Conflict resolution” skills, and, “Sportsmanship” in a competitive situation. In the “Cognitive” sub-heading, children were scored on the following criteria: Ability to follow three-step directions; Ability to communicate clearly in sentences; Listening skills; Ability to complete tasks begun; Ability to work alone; Use of board games, strategy games and puzzles; Follow and devise rules; Ability to relate events/stories in logical manner; Ability to predict what happens next in stories; Make age appropriate choices in social and recreational situations; Ability to adapt to a change of plans, and, Ability to handle disappointment. In the third category, “Physical,” children were scored on the following criteria: Age appropriate agility; age appropriate balance; age appropriate eye-hand coordination; ability to build and dismantle Legos, Mobilos, Construx, etc.; use of scissors; use of thread beads; use of a variety of drawing instruments and writing skills; use of large outdoor play structures; play in team ball games; participation in organized games, such as relay races and capture the flag. We also utilize both child and parent surveys to complement the outcome topics above. Daily interaction with parents and teachers are also important indicators.

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Our collaboration with the West Haven Health Dept. on a number of topics including health and wellness and prevention of childhood obesity were particularly successful this past year (2010-2011). We have also expanded our efforts to attract and utilize volunteer interns, and have partnerships with the University of New Haven, Quinnipiac and Southern CT State University. We have found that the college interns are especially engaged to the needs of our children.

The introduction of the Zumba exercise program has also been particularly successful and well received by both the children but also the parents.
An area that we have identified through our parent surveys is for more time to be spent on homework help. As alluded to above, as we discover that working parents generally need child care help from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., a corollary to this is that there is less time available for parents to adequately oversee homework completion in the remaining evening time. We have also identified financial stress and the difficulty of some families to afford our program as a barrier for some. Also, in analyzing our youth performance measures, one survey result particularly stands out: the number of youth who answered that there is NO adult at home "who cares about them." Nearly 11% of the youth surveyed responded this way, which we believe is reflective of both the challenging economic times and the fact that so many adults are working longer hours away from the home. In an effort to address this, we believe that the increased utilization of college interns and other volunteers can increase the overall pool of “mentors” and “friends” that the youth can relate to and confide in.
Description
Assists families with low-incomes and their pre-school-aged children. Focus is on the social, cognitive, physical and psychological development of children so that they enter kindergarten prepared to learn. Development of parents' capacity to serve as their child's first teacher is also emphasized. Full-day, full-year and part-day, part-year classes are offered.
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / Families /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Children enter Kindergarten after being enrolled in our program with the skills needs to be successful in a post pre-school learning environment.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

The Progress and Outcomes Report that details each Head Start students’ progress is generated through application of the Creative Curriculum Assessment Tool. The tool addresses the following areas: Social / Emotional Development, Physical Development, Cognitive Development, Language Development and Emergent Literacy. Our assessment tool is directly aligned with Connecticut’s Preschool Curriculum Framework, and the Head Start Child Development & Early Learning Framework. The step levels are identified, as follows, with the initial assessment of each student made each Fall, with progress assessments all completed in the following Spring.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

In June 2011, a total of 94 children were successfully prepared and transitioned to Kindergarten. Assessment Tool statistics show that steady progress was made in all areas of development and that Head Start children were being well prepared for entry into Kindergarten based on individualized plans prepared for each child. For a full report of outcomes, please contact us.

 

Description
Community Connections is a Day service program that operates out of our facility at 622 Campbell, Ave., West Haven, which enables adults with developmental disabilities to participate in social and vocational activities that increase their independence and community integration success.
Population Served Adults / Elderly and/or Disabled /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Successful participation in such activities as individual and group activities that achieve community inclusion, enjoyment and skill building. Typical activities include: bowling, arts & crafts, baking, yoga, movement & exercise, gardening, picnics at the beach, field trips and more. The program also helps participants build skills in socialization and skills of daily living.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long-term success is measured by those individuals who continue to progress in their ability to function in and to positively adjust to situations of being in the community.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Regular family and client case monitoring.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

People with disabilities – despite their challenges – have a lot to offer. During the 2010-2011 agency fiscal year, there were 77 clients served by the West Haven Community House’s “Community Connections” day program and they proved it in more ways than one. “Giving Back to the Community” was a major theme of the past year, and remains a strong emphasis for the program going forward, as it is valuable for everyone to understand that all people, including those with disabilities, are capable of helping others, even if it is in small ways. Indeed, clients put their good intentions into action with several major projects inWest Havenin the past year. This included raising funds for the Center for Disability Rights (CDR) by participating in that organization’s annual Wheelathon. Also, this past June 2011, clients joined withWest Haven’s Beautification Committee in helping clean up a number of city sites, including a flower bed at City Hall, areas within the city ofWest Haven’s historic Green and raking leaves for area veterans. In addition, clients wrote letters to our troops serving overseas and also collected items to send to the soldiers in 2011. The program also helps participants build socialization and daily living skills, and along those lines, other activities include: bowling, arts & crafts, baking, yoga, movement & exercise, gardening, picnics at the beach, field trips and more.

Description
Enables developmentally disabled adults to experience independent living within a safe, structured environment appropriate to their needs and desires. We operate several state-licensed group homes and supported living apartments in West Haven.
Population Served Adults / Elderly and/or Disabled /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Success at living independantly with supports in a group home or apartment setting.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Residents are provided with individualized assistance based on their needs. Support ranges from help with hygiene, nutrition and other tasks of daily living to assistance with more advanced skills such as budgeting and social interaction. Residents are encouraged to set individual goals and to engage in recreational and social activities of interest to them. In addition, all of our residents attend a program that provides community activities or supported employment.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

The most common definition of a “traditional family” is a social unit that consists of parents and children living together and also can include aunts, uncles, grandparents, nieces and nephews. Folks in the West Haven Community House Residential program are lucky to include roommates, staff, friends and other WHCH clients in their definition of “family.” “Celebrating Family & Friends” was the theme this past year (2010-2011) at the annual Residential family event when WHCH residents, family members, friends and staff gathered at Anthony’s Oceanview restaurant to celebrate each other, to remember good times and to make new memories. There, Residential Director Davaul Amin served as the evening’s emcee and dinner program director. He read his own poem, “Babies,” whose message he deftly tied to the evening’s theme and how special it is to have “memories” and to share “good times” with families and friends. Also at the dinner-dance, photographs were taken of both the natural families and the extended Community House family members. At this event, we also remembered past clients who were a part of our extended family during the 26 years that Residential has been an established program at the Community House. Of course, when it comes to sharing a household, the evening dinner and the occasional outdoor picnic in the backyard are typical “family and friend” occurrences, as well as shared vacations. It’s all part of creating a “home” where one feels a part of a family. In the past year (2010-2011), 18 adults lived with their peers in our residential program, either in group homes with 24-hour support, or in supervised apartments with more limited support.

Program Comments
CEO Comments
Our Positive Youth Development / Kids in the Neighborhood (PYD/KIN) offers an age appropriate after school program to at-risk K-4th grade students in two lower income neighborhood schools in West Haven. We also offer an after school program focusing on leadership development and social skills development in the Carrigan Program for 5th and 6th grade students at Carrigan Intermediate School. This expansion of the program is in response to a community need for after school programming for older middle school students in part due to the West Haven Board of Education decision to re-structure elementary and middle schools in 2011. We do ask our donors to especially remember these programs when considering a donation to the West Haven Community House. More than any other of our programs, the low income families that we serve at these schools cannot afford to pay the full fee needed to supported our work. Therefore, we rely on the generosity and foresight of our donors. Please make your check out to: WH Community House, and mail it to: 227 Elm St., West Haven, CT. Please mark "donation" in the notes section. Thank you for your support!
CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Patricia Stevens
Term Start July 2005
Email pattystevens@whcommunityhouse.net
Experience EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR      July 2005 To Present
Provides leadership and direction to not-for-profit multi-service agency with a budget of $7+ million and a staff of 180. 
 
Associate Executive Director, 1984 to 2005   
Responsible for the administration of the daily operations of the agency, primarily in the areas of human resources, program development and management, facilities management, transportation and support services.               
 
The American Red Cross      1973 to 1984
Blood Service Specialist, Connecticut Region, Farmington, CT (1980-84
)
 
Blood Services Director, Waterbury Chapter (1978-80); Southeastern Fairfield County Chapter (1977-78) Southeastern Fairfield County Chapter (1973-77)
Assistant Executive Director
 
EDUCATION:  University of New Haven   M.A. Community Psychology   1986
SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT STATE COLLEGE, New Haven, CT           B.A. Social Welfare   1972       
 MANAGEMENT TRAINING INSTITUTE   Yale University Class of 2001

                       

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 101
Number of Part Time Staff 82
Number of Volunteers 55
Staff Retention Rate 62%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 76
Asian American/Pacific Islander 3
Caucasian 81
Hispanic/Latino 23
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 55
Female 128
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Peter Schwartz -
Senior Staff
Title Assistant Executive Director Finance
Title Director of Development & Facilities
Title Director, Human Resources
Title Director of Marketing & Special Events
Title Directof of Head Start
Title Director of Disability Services
Title Director of School Age Programs
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
West Haven Board of Education
West Haven Family Resource Center
University of New Haven
Yale University 
Southern CT State University
Quinnipiac University 
City of West Haven Health Department
Community Foundation of Greater New Haven
United Way of Greater New Haven 
CT Department of Children & Families
CT Department of Social Services
CT Department of Development Services
US Dept. of Health & Human Services
CT Department of Education
US Dept. of Agriculture
West Haven School Readiness Council
West Haven Early Childhood Council 
West Haven Interagency Network for Children
West Haven Chamber of Commerce
West Haven Rotary Club
New Financial Life - VITA Tax program
Access HealthCare 
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits2000
Connecticut Council on Philanthropy2011
United Way of Greater New Haven1990
Success by Six2006
Comments
CEO Comments
Separate and apart from the program space and funding issues discussed in other areas of our profile, there are several other challenges and opportunities facing the West Haven Community House.
 
One issue is staff pay, benefits and retention. The city of West Haven is consistently listed among the 30 or so poorest cities in the state of Connecticut as measure by per capita income of its residents. Our relative municipal tax rate is high while our business tax base that supports the city budget and related services is relatively low. As a result, the relative pay and benefits of our staff remains significantly lower than the state and other more affluent providers can afford. This has a negative effect on staff retention, as staff here who learn and excel while being employed at the Community House often find other employment with higher pay and then leave us. For instance, due to the difficult nature of the job, our staff positions working with adults with disabilities has a higher turnover rate than our two other major program areas. That said, we have a dedicated and solid core of medium- to long-term employees who continue to do their utmost in providing the best possible services for all our clients. However, the trend remains that our various government funders are under increasing economic pressure to cut back on their respective budgets, which does affect our ability to deliver quality and affordable services.
 
Another area of concern is the increasing cost of supporting and maintaining our physical plant, including buildings, grounds, vehicles, energy and other capital related costs. Program fees can only be raised so high before clients in need are forced out. While we do provide a sliding scale fee structure in several programs based on family income, it nevertheless remains a challenge to stay on top of necessary capital repairs and improvements. The last four winters going back to 2011 have stretched our capacity. Similarly, Tropical Storm Irene in September 2011, Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and a series of severe winters including the blizzards of February 2013 and February 2014 and multiple heavy snow and ice events in the winter of 2014 have damaged our facilities and grounds, which siphons funds that otherwise could have been put to other uses.
 
It is on that note that we thank all our donors and supporters who provide us with valuable donation dollars. All our donors can rest assured that we put their donation dollars to work on behalf of our clients and their families that we serve.
Board Chair
Stacie Phan
Company Affiliation Associate Director/Public Policy - Boehringer-Ingelheim
Term July 2014 to June 2015
Email stphan@comcast.net
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Paul Bauer Retired
Jay Brennan community volunteer
Richard Bruno Retired consultant
Heatherly Carlson Research Coordinator, Yale University
Patrick J. Clifford Principal - Notre Dame HS of West Haven
Edward Granfield Oyster river energy
Nancy S Guman Webster Bank
Mark A. Healey Attorney at Law
Katie Heffernan State of CT Public Defender Services
William Heffernan IIIWest Haven Fire Dept.
Patricia Herbert community volunteer
Audrey Jefferson West Haven Police Department
Annette Knobloch Allergy Associates, PC
Dennis E. Kopec Owner, Sea Bluff Accounting LLC
William C Lang retired
Sharon Martin retired CT DCF Deputy Director
Thomas McCarthy Community Volunteer
Cheryl C Milano Milano & Wanat, LLC
Tomas Miranda Consultant
Mary Jane Morrissey Joseph F. Kelly Co.
John F Onofrio Kircaldie, Randall & McNab, LLC
Frank J Paolino Principal, Carrigan School, West Haven
Carole Porto retired
Kenneth Prisco Firefigther/EMT - WH
Ronald Quagliani University of New Haven
Steven B. Rasile Attorney at Law
Gene Sullivan Leslie's Jewelers
Gayle S Tagliatela Chief of Staff, University of New Haven
Barbara Thomas The Lighting Quotient
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 26
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 17
Female 13
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 70%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Boiler and Machinery
Day Care Center/Nursery School
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Board Co-Chair
Kenneth Prisco
Company Affiliation Firefighter/EMT - West Haven Fire Department
Term July 2014 to June 2015
Email kenprisco@aol.com
Standing Committees
Building
Finance
Personnel
By-laws
Endowment
Nominating
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Executive
CEO Comments
From Executive Director Patricia Stevens:
The Community House is often mistakenly perceived as an official department or agency within the City of West Haven, and we are frequently referred to as the Community Center. While we are a private, IRS approved 501(c)3 not-for-profit agency and not legally affiliated with the city of West Haven, we do maintain a strong supportive partnership with the City and its leadership, including the West Haven Board of Education - as they remain our partners in our school-based services in West Haven.
We welcome you to learn more about us!
For more information on the West Haven Community House, please visit our web site at: www.whcommunityhouse.org. 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $6,651,626.00
Projected Expenses $6,625,627.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Other Documents
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$157,214$83,643$90,626
Government Contributions$4,768,282$1,315,451$1,892,967
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$4,768,282$1,315,451$1,892,967
Individual Contributions$35,566$44,651$49,727
------
$1,247,066$4,761,544$3,978,718
Investment Income, Net of Losses$54,333$22,744$1,239
Membership Dues------
Special Events$18,169$23,445$28,600
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$72,053$31,149$90,493
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$5,800,929$5,669,414$5,596,170
Administration Expense$691,600$669,001$638,461
Fundraising Expense$29,300$59,306$53,853
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.970.980.98
Program Expense/Total Expenses89%89%89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue1%4%3%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$3,388,296$3,640,652$3,753,928
Current Assets$547,374$706,804$732,772
Long-Term Liabilities$1,048,448$1,114,679$1,144,791
Current Liabilities$425,982$453,395$419,242
Total Net Assets$1,913,866$2,072,578$2,189,895
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Dev. Services $2,844,492US Dept. of Health & Human Services $1,275,913United Way for Greater New Haven $49,727
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountUS Dept. of Health & Human Services $1,284,064United Way of Greater New Haven $44,651 --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Education $296,799CT Dept. of Social Service $39,538 --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.281.561.75
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets31%31%30%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
As we have in the past, in the new fiscal year 2014-15 beginning on July 1, 2014, we continue to manage our programs, adjust our overall management and governance structures and monitor costs on a continuous basis as slow-to-no-growth in state and federal funding continues to pinch our programs.
 
Our most at-risk program - financially - remains the Positive Youth Development/Kids in the Neighborhood after-school program serving low income families and schools in West Haven. For the 2014-15 fiscal year, we have combined the finances of our PYD-KIN program with that of our other School Age Program components: KinderKlub and the Before and After School Program.
We also continue with another year of aggressive third party fundraising including several major capital improvement related asks, and an emphasis on successfully soliciting "general operating support" grant requests.
 
As we seek to improve our financial position, we also are looking at possible new and appropriate program spaces in the city, as well as investigage potential new areas of program service, possibly in the Birth-to-3 age segment. 
 
Funding our overall general and administrative costs, as well as our various depreciation line items in the annual budget also presents its own unique challenges.
 
 
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 227 Elm St
West Haven, CT 065164635
Primary Phone 203 934-5221
Contact Email west.comm.house@snet.net
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Patricia Stevens
Board Chair Stacie Phan
Board Chair Company Affiliation Associate Director/Public Policy - Boehringer-Ingelheim

 

Related Information

Meet Basic Needs

A strong community not only meets its members’ basic needs but also works to create long-term solutions to their problems. Provide people with affordable housing, enough to eat and access to affordable health care and you enable them to envision a better future for themselves.

Nurture Children & Youth

When families, schools and communities take the view that children and youth are valued and respected assets to society, they necessarily support environments that nurture youth development. Children raised to embrace positive social values, to seek self-understanding, and to value their self-worth grow to become community-minded young adults with a sense of belonging and a belief in their resiliency. See how you can help our community's children grow into tomorrow's leaders.