Agency on Aging of South Central Connecticut
One Long Wharf Drive, Suite 1L
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address One Long Wharf Drive, Suite 1L
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 785-8533 x
Fax 203-785-8873
E-mail info@aoascc.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
The Mission of the Agency on Aging of South Central Connecticut is to empower adults to remain as independent and engaged as possible within their communities through advocacy, information and services.  
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1974
Former Names
South Central Connecticut Agency on Aging
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Theodore Surh
Board Chair Ms. Joanne McGloin
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale University
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
The Mission of the Agency on Aging of South Central Connecticut is to empower adults to remain as independent and engaged as possible within their communities through advocacy, information and services.  
Background

The Agency on Aging of South Central Connecticut (AASCC) is an independent non-profit agencies on aging in Connecticut serving older adults, individuals with disabilities and caregivers. Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) were established under the Older Americans Act (OAA) in 1973 to provide a range of options that allow older adults 60 and over to choose the home and community-based services and living arrangements that suit them best.

AASCC was the first AAA established in Connecticut and began with just three staff in 1974. In 40 years AASCC has grown to a 150 staff agency that now serves older adults, individuals with disabilities and caregivers. The reach of our programs has also grown to include a wide-range of services and information to help individuals remain safely at home and opportunities for older adults to stay active and engaged in their community.

Impact

2017 Highlights

TEARS™ Elder Abuse Program gained national recognition – received an “Aging Innovations Award” from National Association of Area Agencies on Aging.

Completed a four-year plan (2017-2021) identifying goals for activities under direction and funding of the federal Older Americans Act. The five goals cover community based services, economic security, protection from elder-abuse, healthy aging and elimination of ageism.

Assisted 3,800 older adults and persons with disabilities to remain at home by providing community based services through care management or self-directed programs.

200,000 hours of service were provided by volunteers identified, trained and placed through AOASCC programs.

We celebrated the Experience Corps inter-generational volunteer literacy tutoring program’s 10th year at AOASCC. Because of generous community financial support, including a three-year grant from CFGNH, we will not only be able to continue this program, but also improve outcomes for students and volunteers and expand literacy tutoring at after-school sites.

Highlight of Goals for 2017

Secure funding for continuation of senior employment program that assists older adults through individualized job training, job development and benefits counseling.

Develop a statewide council of members of the aging network to work together to eliminate ageism.

To work with state partners in identifying and providing opportunities for person-centered planning for all individuals that are assisted through AOASSCC.

To expand Care Network Link, a program that connects individuals to trusted home-based services when they do not qualify for government funded programs.

Needs

1) To be able to continue providing an excellent level of services for older adults and individuals with disabilities, enabling them to live safely at home, in this climate of decreasing government funding.

2) To identify revenue sources that will increase future sustainability as the population of older adults increases.

3) Keeping pace with the baby boomer generation, expand types of opportunities for older adults to stay healthy and remain active within their communities.

4) To challenge the ageism stereotype, ultimately changing people’s perception of older adults.

5) To extend and strengthen our partnerships with other community organizations serving older adults, individuals with disabilities and caregivers.

CEO Statement

AOASCC’s reach extends to thousands of older adults, individuals with disabilities and caregivers in the greater New Haven and lower valley areas of Connecticut each year.  The number of programs and the different groups reached through our services are more than can fit in a paragraph.  We are constantly looking for opportunities to better serve the individuals who come to us for assistance.  As advocates for independence, our staff are dedicated to helping individuals remain safely at home and to stay active and engaged in their communities.

AOASCC is also committed to seeing the society’s conception of older adults to evolve to encompass the full range represented by those populations. To this end, AOASCC offers opportunities to volunteer, an annual celebration for centenarians and an annual art show. Now these efforts are being focused as a way to impact our advocacy through fighting ageism and its negative impact on society, individual health and welfare.

Board Chair Statement

 

Data Haven projects the largest population growth in Greater New Haven will be among people age 65 and older, from approximately 70,000 in 2014 to 100,000 by 2025. Never before has long life for large numbers of people been a reality. The years between age 65 and 110 bring a wide array of resources, such as knowledge and free time, as well as the challenges of chronic illness and loss. I have worked in the field of aging – as a volunteer, service provider, researcher, and advocate – for almost 50 years. The Agency on Aging serves as a grass roots focal point for identifying local priorities to address the needs of older people and those who care for them. At the same time, we treasure the wisdom and experience older people have gathered over their lifetimes. Aging is a big tent – whether you are of the Greatest Generation, a Baby Boomer, Gen-Xer or Millennial – the Agency needs your insights, your energy, your technical expertise, and your compassion to meet the challenge of this tremendous populations shift.

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Senior Centers/Services
Secondary Organization Category Philanthropy,Voluntarism & Grantmaking Foundations / Voluntarism Promotion
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / In-Home Assistance
Areas Served
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other

The agency serves the twenty towns of Greater New Haven.  Additionally, the agency also administers the Connecticut Homecare Program in Centerbrook, Chester, Clinton, Cromwell, Deep River, Durham, East Haddam, East Hampton, Essex, Haddam, Higganum, Ivoryton, Killingworth, Lyme, Middlefield, Middletown, Moodus, Northford, Old Lyme, Old Saybrook, Portland, Rockfall, Westbrook

Programs
Description

The Care Management Department administers the Connecticut Home Care Program for Elders and Persons with Disabilities, the Money Follows the Person Program, the Community First Choice program, the PCA Waiver Program and the Veteran’s Home and Community Based Services program.  These programs empower older adults and persons with disabilities to remain in the community or return to the community and live as independently as possible with the highest personal quality of life.  The Department provides comprehensive assessments, advocacy, information, and care management services addressing both short and long term needs.  

Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled / Other Health/Disability / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

To support client's preference to live in their own homes and maintain their independence to the greatest extent possible, by providing a wide range of services, thus supporting individualized plans of service and allowing client choice and self-direction to the greatest extent possible.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

To support frail elders and individuals with disabilities to remain in the community as functionally independent as possible with the highest personal quality of life.   

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
  • All programs are monitored by state and federal funders;
  • Clients are visited regularly to review services and client satisfaction;
  • Client satisfaction surveys are administered on an ongoing basis;
  • The Quality Assurance Department provides regular quality oversight and reports to the Board of AASCC.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Currently supporting approximately 3,800 older adults and persons with disabilities to remain at home by providing community based services through care management or self-directed programs.

Description

A hub of information & services for older adults, individuals with disabilities across the lifespan, caregivers, and professionals in the aging network. The information topics include benefits such as SNAP, Medicare Savings Program, rent rebate, energy assistance, caregiving, dementia resources, and other community resources, fraud prevention, housing, Medicaid, Medicare, Long-Term Care health insurance and a wide variety of topics related to aging and independent living. Services include assistance in applying and tracking benefit applications; Long Term Care Support and Services planning; mental health counseling, disease prevention and health promotion.

Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled / Adults /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

 

  • To streamline consumers’ access to information and referral by responding to requests for information and assistance from callers, providing workshops in the community, and providing person centered planning to consumers with disabilities and their family caregivers.
  • Through Benefits Quick Link screening and counseling, increase participation of eligible individuals in benefit programs.
  • Through a partnership with the National Coalition on Aging, to target and enroll low income older adults in the SNAP program.
  • To improve outlook and capabilities of family caregivers through training, support and provision of respite breaks.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Most people want to live at home for as long as possible. The ADRC supports individuals and their families in acquiring the information and assistance needed to make this dream a reality.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

 

  • Quarterly/Bi-Annual program and service reports to the State Department on Aging and Department of Public Health.
  • Social Assistance Management System (SAMS) reporting to the SDA for caregiver training and nutrition assessments.
  • Grant reporting to private funders per requirements.
  • Monthly reporting to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for health insurance counseling, fraud and safety counseling, and outreach.
  • Quarterly client satisfaction surveys

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

From October 2016-September 2017

  • Assistance was provided to 7,320 callers: 4,016 were assisted with Medicare issues; 3,304 were assisted with Information and Assistance community resources.
  • Education either in person or through written materials was provided to 241,300 individuals. 
  • 550 individuals were assisted in enrolling to receive SNAP benefits and 18 infoion presentations we given.
  • 648 individuals received assessments for Meals on Wheels.
  • 350 individuals received assistance with Social Security Disability issues.
  • 2,049 family caregivers were assisted with information about community resources and benefits, respite care, and training.
  • Public education either in person or through written materials was provided to 3,140 grandparents and kinship caregivers caring for children.
  • 350 family caregivers attended a national conference sponsored by AOASCC.
  • Website and video materials were viewed approximately 8,501 times.
Description

AOASCC matches older adults with opportunities to make a difference.. Volunteering can help individuals meet new people, share their knowledge and skills, make a difference in people's lives and even improve their health and outlook on life.  

Through programs supported by the Corporation for National and Community Service, individuals can give time to a non-profit, provide companionship & support to a peer, mentor preschoolers, or tutor children.

Experience Corps is an award-winning literacy program matching trained older adult volunteers with children who are struggling to learn to read and write. EC continues to grow through generous community financial support: CFGNH, AARP Foundation, Senior Corps/RSVP, Liberty Bank, NewAlliance, People’s Bank, DeLuca Foundations.

PAVE (AmeriCorps Vista) members serve at local schools & non-profits to help close the achievement gap by increasing children’s literacy, promoting college readiness, and providing greater wrap-around services.
Population Served Adults / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Other Economic Level
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

 

  • To provide older adults with meaningful ways to volunteer in the community.
  • To enhance income of older adults through volunteer stipends.
  • To promote and publicize the work and volunteer activities of older adults.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

 

  • Volunteers will have an improved outlook on life and express a positive appreciation for being involved in volunteer work.
  • Decrease isolation and increase safety for older adults living alone by providing a caring peer to act as a companion.
  • Improve students' academic achievement by increasing their engagement and providing one-on-one time with a concerned, involved adult.
  • Increase the capacity of local non-profit organizations to meet needs.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

 

  • Annual onsite program visit from Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) staff and annual program progress reports.
  • Annual Experience Corps tutoring effectiveness evaluation.
  • Annual RSVP volunteer surveys and site visits.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

 

Examples of Program Success

From October 2016-September 2017

386 volunteers provided over 200,000 hours of service to children and older adults in the New Haven area.

  • 140 volunteers provided 145,000 hours of services to children with special needs and frail older adults.
  • 35 volunteers provided tutoring services to 1,198 children in 99 classrooms in 13 schools and distributed 2,500 books to families/schools.
  • 20 volunteers provided 37,000 hours of service to 11 not-for-profit organizations.
  • 191 volunteers provided an additional 7,000 hours of services at local non-profits and with older adults and children.

 

Description

Healthy Living

AASCC educates consumers with chronic diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure, arthritis or heart disease about living with their illnesses. People who participate report feeling better and are better able to manage their diseases.

Fall Prevention

Did you know that one in three adults over 65 fall and that falls are the leading cause of injury death for this population? AASCC provides fall risk assessments, education and exercise programs in the community to help older adults maintain strength and agility as they age.

Elder Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation

Despite the accessibility of adult protective services and mandatory reporting laws, an overwhelming number of cases go undetected and untreated each year. AASCC is committed to educating older adults, individuals with disabilities, their families and community organizations.

Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / At-Risk Populations /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

 

  • Increase awareness of risk factors and indicators of elder abuse.
  • To increase awareness of the risks associated with falls and increase participation in fall prevention programs.
  • To provide community workshops to educate and assist individuals with chronic diseases.
  • To provide physical exercise programs to help individuals improve strength and balance.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Most people want to live at home for as long as possible. Through Healthy Aging programs, older adults will live healthy, safe lives in their own homes.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Quarterly client satisfaction surveys

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

From October 2016--October 2017

 
Annual Elder Abuse conference TEARS™: 329 individuals were provided education regarding elder abuse and fraud.

Wellness Programs

  • 19 people were trained as workshop leaders for the Live Well (Chronic Disease Self-Management Program) and 90 individuals participated in training.
  • 90 people participated in the Moving for Better Balance (Tai Chi) training series.

Celebrating Aging

  • 109 artists displayed 314 pieces at the annual Art of Aging exhibition.
  • 25 individuals from were honored at the annual Centenarian Luncheon.
Program Comments
CEO Comments
The economic climate in which we operate has inspired AASCC to to become a more self-sustaining organization.  Our target population continues to be low-income older adults and persons with disabilities but we are expanding our services to encompass all individuals who can use our services.  We are creating and providing programs and opportunities to interact with staff which can become revenue generating sources.  We will  fill an information gap that exists and help ensure the  economic viability of our organiazation well into the future.  Creative use of technology will expand our capacity to serve more people without expanding our organizational base.
CEO/Executive Director
Theodore Surh
Term Start Dec 2012
Email tsurh@aoascc.org
Experience
Ted Surh is the former CFO of AASCC.  He assumed the position of acting director  CEO in August of 2012. He has an MBA and has worked extensively in healthcare and health insurance prior to his employment at AASCC.  He brings an innovative approach to non-profit management which will enable the agency to move forward in a competitive environment.
Co-CEO
Experience
      
   
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 119
Number of Part Time Staff 28
Number of Volunteers 3
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 80%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 25
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 105
Hispanic/Latino 15
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 136
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Ms. Neysa Stallman Guerino Oct 1989 - Oct 2012
Senior Staff
Title Human Resources Director
Title Aging and Disability Resources Center Director
Title Volunteer and Training Director
Title Care Management Director
Title Director of Business Development
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

AASCC collaborates with a large number and type of agencies:

 

  • Provide grants to community organizations through federal Older American’s Act funding (including new mini-grants which will expand the number of community organization we partner with).
  • Work with  agencies in our provision of care management and respite services for clients
  • Work with community organizations where volunteers are placed through AASCC programs
  • Through H.O.P.E (Hispanic Outreach Program for Elders) offers educational and networking opportunities for providers within the Hispanic/Latino communities.
  • Began a new Ambassador Program that provides information about AASCC to providers serving older adults and individuals with disabilities so that they are better direct the individuals they work with to the help they need.
  • Work closely with our sister area agencies on aging in Connecticut, community agencies who also serve older adults and individuals with disabilities, and state, federal and municipal government agencies.

 

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Changing Systems AwardAdministration on Aging/Center for Medicare and Medicaid2010
Best Senior ServicesNew Haven Living (Hartford Courant)2016
Best Practice Model for SNAP programNational Council on Aging2016
Innovation Award for TEARS (Elder Abuse) ProgramNational Association of Area Agencies on Aging2017
Board Chair
Ms. Joanne McGloin
Company Affiliation Yale University
Term Oct 2017 to Sept 2018
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Elaine Braffman State of CT, Judicial Dept.
Gerald Cohen EsqRetired
Pamela Feinberg Esq.Retired
Robert Haley Leaders for Today
Edward Konowitz Retired
Michael Levine Retired
Donna Levine EsqLaw Office of Donna R. Levine
Edward Mapp Retired
Thomas Penna Elim Park Baptist Home, Inc.
Richard Sviridoff Reitred
Kathleen Tynan-McKiernan RN, MSNYale-New Haven Hospital
Dal Ugrin Retired
Richard Weiss Eder Bros. Inc.
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 N/A
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 6
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Board Development / Board Orientation
Distributions / Grant Making
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Erika Austin Mary Wade
Jean Bowen Retired
Telia Cheever Callahan House Association
Jean Cherni Community Volunteer
Dennis DeMartin Retired
Renee East Personal Care Solutions
Stephanie Evans-Ariker Orchard House
Donna Fedus The Consultation Center
Phillip Giuliano Retired
Rachel Hannas-Metz The Hearth at Gardenside
Karen Herrmann Easter Seals Goodwill Industries
Dawn Marie Hunter VNA/SCC
Stephanie Jacobson Quinnipiac University
Kathy Pontin FSW Inc. CT
Laura Pringleton Retired
Peaches Quinn Community Volunteer
Wendy Santamauro Community Volunteer
Crystal Schindo Yale New Haven Health Systems
Lynn Schmidt Assisted Living Services, Inc
David Schneider Reitred
Bonnie Wilkes Municipal Agent - Town of Seymour
Marsha Ziebell Fairbanks Apartments
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Sept 30 2018
Projected Revenue $12,422,592.00
Projected Expenses $12,643,259.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Revenue$13,815,922$14,727,766$13,624,102
Total Expenses$14,308,469$14,023,172$13,658,053
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$8,847,079$9,384,051$9,501,072
Current Assets$3,477,972$4,053,174$4,134,250
Long-Term Liabilities$194,265$292,972$386,020
Current Liabilities$2,317,297$2,543,082$2,013,603
Total Net Assets$6,335,517$6,547,997$7,101,449
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDSS $6,244,259DSS $5,961,005CT Dept. of Aging $6,143,349
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDept. of Health & Human Services $4,004,326U.S. Dept. of Health & Human Services $4,038,653DSS $3,585,154
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountUS Corp. for National & Community Service $1,124,432Corp. for National & Community Services $1,113,848Corp. for National & Com. Service $1,158,802
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments

We are continuing to seek efficiencies in administration and through investment in technology. Through improvements already made, we have begun making gains toward being less reliant on investments for day-to-day operations.

Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address One Long Wharf Drive, Suite 1L
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 785-8533
Contact Email info@aoascc.org
CEO/Executive Director Theodore Surh
Board Chair Ms. Joanne McGloin
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale University

 

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