Consultation Center
389 Whitney Avenue
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 389 Whitney Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 789-7645 x
Fax 203-562-6355
E-mail info@theconsultationcenter.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The Consultation Center seeks to promote health, wellness, and positive social change and to prevent individual and social problems and inequities.  It does so by partnering with community stakeholders to: develop, implement, and evaluate community-based programs; train and consult to health and human service professionals, agencies, and systems; advocate for underserved, victimized, or marginalized children, adults, and families; and conduct community-based research.  Stakeholder partners of the Center include parents, youth, health and social service professionals and agencies, schools, coalitions, policymakers, and community leaders.  The Consultation Center, Inc. is affiliated with the Yale University Department of Psychiatry and the Connecticut Mental Health Center to carry out this mission.  The Youth Development Training and Resource Center (YDTRC) and Elder Services are programs of The Consultation Center.  YTDRC focuses on adolescents, their families, and youth-serving organizations and communities, and Elder Services focuses on seniors, the organizations that serve them, and their communities.  

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1982
Former Names
Community Consultation Board, Inc.
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Jacob K. Tebes Ph.D
Board Chair Ronald Shea
Board Chair Company Affiliation St. Mary's Church, Branford, CT
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $1,794,551.00
Projected Expenses $1,794,551.00
Statements
Mission

The Consultation Center seeks to promote health, wellness, and positive social change and to prevent individual and social problems and inequities.  It does so by partnering with community stakeholders to: develop, implement, and evaluate community-based programs; train and consult to health and human service professionals, agencies, and systems; advocate for underserved, victimized, or marginalized children, adults, and families; and conduct community-based research.  Stakeholder partners of the Center include parents, youth, health and social service professionals and agencies, schools, coalitions, policymakers, and community leaders.  The Consultation Center, Inc. is affiliated with the Yale University Department of Psychiatry and the Connecticut Mental Health Center to carry out this mission.  The Youth Development Training and Resource Center (YDTRC) and Elder Services are programs of The Consultation Center.  YTDRC focuses on adolescents, their families, and youth-serving organizations and communities, and Elder Services focuses on seniors, the organizations that serve them, and their communities.  

Background

Founded and located in New Haven, for more than 35 years the Center has been a cooperative endeavor of the Yale Department of Psychiatry, the Connecticut Mental Health Center, and The Consultation Center, Inc., a private, nonprofit community organization.  With more than 100 full- and part-time staff, students, and volunteers from all walks of life and professional disciplines, the Center carries out its work at multiple levels – individuals, families, peers, schools, workplaces, neighborhoods, community organizations, municipalities, and states.  Many of the Center’s staff serve on federal, state, and/or municipal advisory boards and most volunteer their time to support the work of philanthropic or charitable organizations consistent with the Center’s mission.  The Center’s work is supported by a variety of sources, including grants and contracts from federal, state, and municipal agencies and foundations; fees from businesses and private organizations, and individuals donors.  Although based in New Haven, Center staff carry its mission all over Connecticut and in other states and countries. 

 

The Youth Development Training and Resource Center (YDTRC) is the Center’s largest initiative involving adolescents, their families, and their community.  In collaboration with the Citywide Youth Coalition and other community agencies that serve adolescents and their families, YDTRC was founded in 1994 as Connecticut’s only training center focused exclusively on youth development, thus filling a unique gap in the youth-serving system in New Haven and across the state. YDTRC is especially important locally as a respected intermediary capable of providing a range of essential supports for youth leaders, staff and agency supervisors, as well as funders of youth programs.  Since its inception, YDTRC has been an advocate for youth and committed to involving youth in issues that affect their futures, such as relations with police, preventing underage drinking, and addressing violence.  Of note, is YDTRC's ability to secure both public and private sector support to keep youth development a high priority in Connecticut. 

 

Elder Services at The Consultation Center, which is part of the Adult Services Program, is one of the oldest programs of the Center.  Elder Services includes a variety of support and capacity building services to elder-serving agencies and service providers, and also provides support and respite services to seniors raising grandchildren.  This longstanding intergenerational program helps grandparents navigate the challenges of parenting while providing mutual support through various educational and social activities to reduce subsequent health risks for children and grandparents.

 

Impact

Top accomplishments in the past year include: 1) extensive capacity building initiatives to carry out the Center’s mission in New Haven, throughout Connecticut, and in various cities and states;  2) implementation of prevention programs and services, including program development, monitoring of fidelity and impact, and dissemination of findings; 3) carrying out community-based participatory research and evaluation initiatives in Connecticut, the U.S., and internationally; 4) continued excellence in collaboration with Yale University to support interdisciplinary training programs focused on culturally-grounded prevention, health promotion, and community-based services and research; and, 5) ability to leverage funding from multiple sources for work in prevention, positive youth development, and health promotion.

 
Goals for the coming year are: 1) to sustain this level of activity despite a difficult funding climate, 2) identify new capacity building initiatives to support organizations that serve vulnerable individuals, especially youth and their families, in Greater New Haven and Connecticut, and 3) strengthen systems that serve children and youth, their families, and seniors.  

 

Needs
The needs identified below focus on our Youth Development Training and Resource Center (YDTRC) and our Elder Services Program.  These needs include: 1) resources to support the capacity-building needs of community youth-serving organizations for staff training, consultation on program planning and program development, on-site technical assistance and agency assessment of outcomes as a result of program operations
2) collaborations with agencies, networks and funders interested in expanding opportunities for youth development and youth leadership opportunities for urban youth, and 3) resources to assure family cohesion for seniors that are raising grandchildren.
CEO Statement

Jacob Kraemer Tebes, Ph.D. is Executive Director of The Consultation Center and a Professor of Psychiatry (Psychology), Child Study Center, and Public Health at the Yale University School of Medicine.  A clinical/community psychologist, he is also the Director of the Division of Prevention and Community Research at Yale and Chief Psychologist of the Connecticut Mental Health Center.  As a local nonprofit organization closely affiliated with an academic medical Center for the past four decades, the Center bridges the university - community divide by devoting cutting-edge knowledge, academic resources, and interdisciplinary skills to the most challenging problems facing our communities, such as interpersonal and family violence, youth substance abuse, childhood trauma, HIV/AIDS, family poverty and its consequences, and school disengagement and underachievement among youth.  The Center addresses these challenges by partnering with community stakeholders -- parents, youth, health and social service professionals and agencies, schools, coalitions, policymakers, and community leaders -- using a strengths–based perspective in which community members and Center staff each contribute unique competencies through which successful solutions are identified.  This partnership ensures that any solutions implemented and/or evaluated are consistent with the cultural values, perspectives, and needs of the local community.  Successful solutions are then sustained through capacity-building efforts, as necessary, with community stakeholders who have already participated in their development.

 

Board Chair Statement


Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Counseling
Secondary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Programs
Description
YDTRC increases the effectiveness of youth organizations through 1) professional development for youth workers and agency supervisors, 2) technical assistance to support local youth agencies, 3) youth leadership development opportunities for middle and high school youth, 4) use of assessment tools, and 5) advocacy for programs that empower youth in their community.  YDTRC works with local, regional and state funders and networks to secure resources for youth-serving programs.  YDTRC has led a 30-hour "Advancing Youth Development" course for frontline youth workers and a 15-hour course "Supervising and Managing in  Youth Organizations" since 1996 for diverse staff across the region. Co-founded with the Citywide Youth Coalition in 1994, YDTRC serves as the capacity-building arm for a wide range of youth programs in GNH, providing support for meaningful youth engagement, youth-adult partnerships, service learning opportunities, and cross-site collaboration to support youth leadership.
Population Served At-Risk Populations / Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Changes resulting from YDTRC training courses and workshops, support services to youth agencies, and direct interventions to promote youth leadership development include:
a. Frontline workers and supervisors complete 30-hour and 15 hour courses who understand the youth development framework and current research on best practices for community youth engagement. Staff  access new resources to bolster program effectiveness and involve more youth in program planning and development. Staff interaction with young people is more respectful of youth voices, perspectives and abilities. Young people are encouraged to take responsibility and try out new leadership roles.
b. Technical assistance from YDTRC qualified staff results in successful pursuit of new program and financial resources in the region or state by agency leaders. Staff teams become more cohesive and focused on one mission.
c. Youth exercise new leadership roles in the agency, school and community and advocate for programs.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
As a result of YDTRC training courses and workshops, consultation with both program advisors and youth leaders, and an array of support services, positive change is evident.  Changes include a) organizational policies that expand opportunties for decision-making and planning by youth, b) outreach and involvement of youth in new leadership roles, c) pursuit of advanced training by staff, d) stronger teamwork between supervisors and frontline staff, and documentation of program effectiveness based on researched program assessment tools.  With support from YDTRC, youth agencies take greater advantage of youth-led mini grant projects, on-site assistance, interagency planning, and commit to engaging and supporting their youth as leaders and important community resources.  Youth use these opportunities to develop a positive sense of self, gain multiple skills (communication, conflict resolution, team-building, peer mentoring), and share their unique talents and energy in the community.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Tools used by YDTRC to measure success include:
1. Pre and Post Surveys for all training courses and topic workshops, including changes in behavior, attitudes, and knowledge of research-based and evaluated youth development practices and model programs
2. Focus Groups with random samples of course participants
3. Interviews with staff teams as part of the technical assistance visits
4. Review of mini grant applications submitted to YDTRC by youth agencies seeking to implement youth development techniques and community youth engagement activities, service-learning, or prevention initiatives.
5. Assessment tools or performance-based reporting systems required by a particular funder as part of a more formal evaluation for YDTRC special projects (e.g. youth and police relations; underage drinking prevention).
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
90% of course participants successfully complete the 30-hour "Advancing Youth Development" and the 15-hour "Supervising and Managing in Youth-Serving Organizations" courses.
75% of staff completing courses request follow up consultation, assistance, or apply for mini grants to implement best practices learned in the training
85% of youth-led mini grant projects show increased youth involvment in planning, program development and expanded leadership roles for teens
Many trained staff secure advanced training, are promoted to more demanding positions in the field of youth work, or are successful in obtaining new outside resources for their programs or overall organization.
Majority of staff trained by YDTRC join CWYC network and become more vocal advocates for services to adolescents, add leadership roles for young people, increase involvement of families and find new partners to support adolescent development.
Description The Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Program (GRG) at The Consultation Center focuses on the special needs of older adults who are simultaneously facing issues of aging and child rearing. Since 1995, GRG has provided grandparents and other relatives raising children with a range of social and emotional support, education, advocacy, health and wellness and respite services.  Our mission is twofold: 1) to support the integrity and resilience of grandfamilies allowing children the opportunity of kinship care as opposed to foster care, and 2) to support caregivers at the intersection of aging and child rearing. GRG is designed to meet needs of older adults who have taken on the job of full time parenting for a second generation of children.
Population Served Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Families / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Selected Short-Term Successes:

  • Offered respite to some 50 grandfamilies annually. Respite is provided in various forms to individuals, families, small groups and large groups. Individual respite provides a temporary safe and meaningful experience for a child while allowing short-term relief for grandparents to attend to their own health, social or emotional needs. Family or group respite offers access to activities or events that might otherwise be financially or logistically unattainable. Respite is a preventive strategy that strengthens families, protects their health and well-being, and allows caregivers to continue care for their grandchild. Respite is helpful for all grandfamilies, especially for those relatives parenting children with special needs, and for those without reliable support systems.
  • Provided referrals to various community resources
  • Selected special short-term programs include the College Culture Program,Grandparent Community Garden and the Health & Wellness Program.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.  The Consultation Center was one of the first programs in the country to recognize the special needs of relative caregivers, and has worked to meet the specific needs of grandfamilies in Greater New Haven since 1995. Some long-term successes:
  • Established a Grandparent Advisory Board comprised of members to increase transparency, oversee equitable respite delivery and assist with program planning and implementation.
  • Continue to build program capacity by collaborating with GRG members and organizations locally, statewide and nationally that are interested in furthering respite, education and advocacy opportunities for grandfamilies.
  • Offer a monthly series of well-attended daytime and evening support groups and educational workshops.
  • Serve as a stable community support for grandfamilies.
  • Provide information and technical assistance training to community organizations about the specific needs of grandparents raising grandchildren.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Satisfaction Surveys and focus groups are done on a formal and informal basis throughout the year. Interviews of grandfamilies, grandchildren and service providers are done randomly and in accord with specific requirements of funders. Outcome measures are established as required by each funder. Members can voice comments and/or concerns at any time.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Mr. A was handling all the caregiving responsibilities in March for two granddaughters aged 5 and 12 years. His wife was in the hospital for two weeks. GRG members visited the hospital and offered childcare, allowing him respite from two kinds of caregiving, for his grandchildren and for his wife. Supporting each other in health crises has become a focus for members.
 
The C family, grandpa, grandma and four grandchildren boarded a bus in August 2011 headed forLakeCompounceAmusement Parkfor a grandfamily day of respite and fun.  Mr. C shared at the end of the day that he and his family had a wonderful time and enjoyed swimming at the water park, the rides and lunch at the food pavilion.  He shared that the price tag for all of them of $250 for the day was so far beyond his family’s reach that without the support from the Grandparent Raising Grandchildren respite program they would never have been able to afford such a day. The children are all hoping they can go again next year. Mr. and Mrs. C said it was so good to be able to leave all the childcare stress behind and just enjoy their grandchildren for a whole day. They are looking forward to the next large group respite activity. 
 
Program Comments
CEO Comments
YDTRC at The Consultation Center, Inc., as the only training center in Connecticut to focus exclusively on youth development, fulfills a unique function for youth-serving organizations - especially important for programs in the southern part of the state. Co-founded by The Consultation Center, Inc. and the Citywide Youth Coalition in 1994, YDTRC has become a respected intermediary capable of providing a range of essential services to support youth leaders, youth workers and agency supervisors, as well as funders of youth programs. Since 1994, YDTRC has been a leader in both advocating and delivering high quality staff development training for frontline youth workers and program supervisors. YDTRC training is well-suscribed because it is interactive, relevant, research-based, and committed to assuring that staff learn how to support and partner with young people to reach their goals and contribute to their own community. Staff learn about best practices, how to assess youth outcomes, and connect to a wide range of resources that can enhance both program quality and sustainability. YDTRC works closely with member agencies of the Citywide Youth Coalition to energize the field of youth development and encourage youth leadership in Greater New Haven and the state.  YDTRC's longtime advocacy for youth voice and commitment to involving teens in the real issues that affect their lives - improving relations with police, preventing underage drinking, and addressing violence in their neighborhoods is exemplary. Of note, is YDTRC's ability to secure a wide range of support from the public and private sector to support program development, training, evaluation, capacity-building activities that keep youth development a high priority in Connecicut.
 
The Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Program has been one of The Consultation Center’s flagship Elder Programs since 1995. I applaud those with the vision to establish this program more than 15 years ago, and those who have worked to maintain and expand the program to this day. Each decade, the Census shows dramatic growth in the number of grandparents raising grandchildren. Parenting today is as challenging as ever for relative caregivers given the need to understand technology, educational, medical and legal systems, and children who have experienced early trauma. Added challenges stem from our difficult economy and the caregivers’ need to manage their own aging process. Our GRG program continues to recognize and serve the complex needs of relative caregivers and to support them in their important missions.
CEO/Executive Director
Jacob K. Tebes Ph.D
Term Start June 2011
Email jacob.tebes@yale.edu
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 39
Number of Part Time Staff 21
Number of Volunteers 0
Staff Retention Rate 75%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 18
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 38
Hispanic/Latino 4
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 10
Female 50
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
David L. Snow Ph.D. 1978 - June 2011
Senior Staff
Title Director, Child Development & Epidemiological Research
Title Co-Director, Program & Service System Evaluation
Title Director, Male Development Research & Program
Title Co-Director, Program & Service System Evaluation
Title Director, Adult & Elder Program
Title Director, Family Violence Research & Program
Title Director, Urban Education, Prevention & Policy Research
Title Director, Youth Development Training & Resource Center
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

The Consultation Center, Inc. (TCC) works in partnership with local, state and national organizations and funding sources to support youth and adult development, and provide prevention services, research, and training. Our mission promotes the development of individuals and families, prevents mental disorders, and enhances the effectiveness of mental health and human services. TCC staff, consultants, and trainees have provided services and conducted research for over 30 years. An interdisciplinary approach with both consumers and professionals, and an asset-based, preventive orientation are unique features of our work. We draw on the multiple perspectives of psychology, social work, education, psychiatry, public health, and administration, and serve as a training site for individuals at the Masters, Pre-Doctoral, and Post-Doctoral levels. Collaboration with providers and academic institutions assures quality services in two areas: prevention and health promotion, and service system development or capacity-buildingPrevention programs are designed and tailored for individuals and families across the life span for children, adolescents, and adults. Service system development builds the capacity of various organizations as well as assist broader delivery systems at all levels. 

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Outstanding Youth-Serving Organization Leadership award to YDTRCCitywide Youth Coalition, Inc.2009
Board Chair
Ronald Shea
Company Affiliation St. Mary's Church, Branford, CT
Term Sept 2013 to Sept 2016
Email ronshea@tiac.net
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Evelyn Flamm Fair Haven Community Health Center, Nurturing Families Program
Cheryl Henderson Henderson & Associates
James Jerrell Retired, Regional Water Authority
Jaak Rakfeldt South Connecticut State University
Rhoda Sachs-Zahler Samuel Consultant, Urban Planning and Development
Galit Sharma Coordinating Council for Children in Crisis
Dr. Robert Windom Cornell-Scott Hill Health Center
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 4
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $1,794,551.00
Projected Expenses $1,794,551.00
Spending Policy N/A
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$1,466,788$1,432,293$1,593,915
Administration Expense$402,868$429,307$444,046
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.950.971.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses78%77%78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$993,306$1,047,069$1,347,401
Current Assets$976,658$1,031,313$1,329,963
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$676,553$643,251$892,350
Total Net Assets$316,753$403,818$455,051
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.441.601.49
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments
All financial information pertains to The Consultation Center, Inc.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 389 Whitney Avenue
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 789-7645
CEO/Executive Director Jacob K. Tebes Ph.D
Board Chair Ronald Shea
Board Chair Company Affiliation St. Mary's Church, Branford, CT

 

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