Lower Naugatuck Valley Parent Child Resource Center
30 Elizabeth Street
Derby CT 06418
Contact Information
Address 30 Elizabeth Street
Derby, CT 06418-
Telephone (203) 954-0543 x130
Fax 203-954-0544
E-mail Vparsloe@LNVPCRC.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The mission of the Lower Naugatuck Valley Parent Child Resource Center is "Saving Lives by Passionately Caring for Children, Families, and Community."

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1975
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Michael J. Wynne
Board Chair Ms. Susan Garcia Nofi Esq.
Board Chair Company Affiliation New Haven Legal Association
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $2,614,320.00
Projected Expenses $2,614,320.00
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Lower Naugatuck Valley Parent Child Resource Center is "Saving Lives by Passionately Caring for Children, Families, and Community."

Background

The Lower Naugatuck Valley Parent Child Resource Center, Inc., (PCRC) was established in 1975 through collaboration among area educators, mental health professionals and Griffin Hospital. Its purpose was to provide a mental health resource for Valley parents and children, using a multi-disciplinary approach including psychiatry, psychology, social work and allied professional and paraprofessional orientations. Services were to be essentially family oriented with a focus on individual child behavior and the challenges of parenting.

PCRC originally provided services on a part-time basis in various schools through a contract with the Clifford Beers Guidance Clinic in New Haven. In 1977, the agency expanded to three full-time psychiatric social workers and in 1980, the Parent Aide program, now called the Family Enrichment Service, was added to provide experienced outreach workers for in-home services to parents needing skill building, support and advocacy. In 1993, the Local Systems of Care Program began providing intensive case management services to children at risk of out of home placement.

Today, PCRC has grown into a dynamic and thriving organization, and is the leading provider of behavioral health services to children and families in the Lower Naugatuck Valley. We serve approximately 1,200 children and their families annually who suffer from severe emotional and behavioral issues, most of whom have experienced trauma, abuse and neglect. Our services have now expanded to allow us to serve individuals from all over Connecticut.

Impact

The Parent Child Resource Center (PCRC) has experienced a number of programmatic successes. Overall, the agency received a record number of requests for service and case assignments. Specific program achievements include:

  • In 2014, our Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) client numbers increased 30% June through August.
  • PCRC hired a new Director of Development and Marketing, Veronica Parsloe, to lead our fundraising and marketing efforts. She may be reached at 203.954.0543 x130 or at Vparsloe@LNVPCRC.org
  • CT DCF renewed our license as an Outpatient Psychiatric Clinic for Children in August, 2014
  • Electronic Health Records (EHR) were implemented in Fall of 2014 thanks to a grant by The Katharine Matthies Foundation, and went live in February, 2015

Goals for the current year include continue growth of our clinical programs, and other specific goals:

  • Implement new marketing efforts, including a new logo and website
  • Increasing all of our attendance and fundraising at events by 20%
  • Continuing our Valley Kids Belong (VKB) program that provides after school programs, summer programs, police trauma trainings, and Triple P Parenting workshops
  • Enhancing the Therapeutic Mentoring Program, IMPACT, and increasing funding for this program to grow outside of DCF-identified adolescents, but to also cater towards PCRC clients and other community members
Needs
Contributions and community support ensure that we are able to meet the needs of children in our community. Though PCRC receives state grants and insurance reimbursements, these funds simply do not cover the full cost of providing care.  Additionally, many of our families are uninsured or under-insured and cannot afford the cost of fees and insurance co-pays. We could not provide the comprehensive range of programs and services to those who need them most without the generosity of individuals, foundations, and businesses that support our work.
CEO Statement In our Clinic, we provide treatment for individual children and families. And, we also can be found working in homes, schools, police departments, child care centers, physicians’ offices, recreation centers, libraries and other places that impact the lives of families. We expand and adapt services to meet the needs of individual children, families and entire communities.

There are many changes and challenges in our future, including HealthCare Reform, Federal and State budget issues, the poverty faced by our clients and communities, and the increased challenge of raising funds to sustain our efforts. All the while, we need to listen to our children, our families and our community so that we don’t lose sight of their needs.

Our Board of Directors has reaffirmed its commitment to keeping this a strong organization. The Board spent the past year, examining and articulating the roles, responsibilities and expectations of Board Members and our Members are excited about the part they can play in the future of this organization.

With the combined passion, expertise and commitment of our staff and Board of Directors we will continue Saving Lives and Restoring Hope. We invite you to contribute your time, your talent and your treasure to support our mission.

Board Chair Statement

These are challenging times and PCRC faces many of the same issues we all do in our everyday businesses. Loss of funding, increasing costs to meet the challenges of changing regulations, and even weather related issues that keep our clients home have caused our resources to be strained during the past year. Our staff have been terrific in dealing with the difficulties in the non-profit world and continue to provide exceptional service to the children we serve.

There is a lot of work to be done and many challenges ahead. We look for help from individuals, corporations and foundations to help us sustain or work.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Mental Health Treatment
Secondary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Community Mental Health Centers
Areas Served
Ansonia
Derby
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
PCRC serves approximately 1,200 children ages with behavioral, emotional and learning problems, as well as their families. Referrals come from schools, physicians, the Department of Children and Families and other professionals and social service agencies. Individuals also request services for themselves. 

Our clients reside primarily in Ansonia, Derby, Oxford, Seymour and Shelton and the surrounding areas, although increasingly clients from outside these towns seek out our services. While there is equal representation among male and female clients, single parent families are more likely to have a female head of household.

Programs
Description The Child Guidance Clinic is a state-licensed outpatient psychiatric clinic for children providing a multi-disciplinary approach to problems associated with behavioral, emotional and learning difficulties of children and youth aged 2 to 18. Treatment is based on a comprehensive mental health evaluation and is intended to diminish the interference of psychiatric problems in everyday life while fostering age appropriate development. Treatment is focused on the principals of child development and supportive of family preservation. Clinical services include diagnostic evaluation, individual, family or group therapy, medication evaluation and management, crisis intervention, substance abuse counseling, as well as consultations to schools, courts and other institutions. Additionally, the Child Guidance Clinic offers a Rapid Response Service to provide urgent evaluation and psychiatric care for children and families in crisis.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
For short-term, more acute cases, 60% of children seen for more than five sessions will show significant improvement in functioning indicated by a 10-point or more increase in Global Assessment of Functioning at discharge.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
For longer-term cases involving managment and treatment of more chronic conditions, 60% of children seen for more than five sessions will show some improvement in function indicated by an increase of at least one point in Global Assessment of Functioning at discharge.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Each program supervisor oversees service inquiries and monitors treatment/service plans and objectives. Treatment/service plans are established within 3-4 weeks of intake and are reviewed at least every 12 weeks. Depending on experience, direct service staff receive weekly or biweekly individual superivsion, and clinical questions are presented at a weekly staff meeting convened by the Medical Director. Upon completion of services, clients complete satifsfaction surveys regarding the services at PCRC.  And agency-wide Program Steering Committee, chaired by the Director of Clinical Services and consisting of Supervisors/Coordinators of all programs, meets weekly to coordinate services, inform staff of programmatic changes, and ensure that there is individual family service coordination for families enrolled in multifple agency programs. In addition, two clinical assessment tools (the Ohio and Beers Scales) are completed on each Clinic client at the beginning and end of treatment.
Description The Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) is a clinical program that focuses on children between the ages of 6-18 who are having difficulty meeting school, family or social expectations due to serious emotional, behavioral and social disturbances. Children attend daily group sessions for approximately 8-12 weeks which emphasize problem solving and relaxation skills, emotional expression and learning how emotions and actions work together, and identifying behavioral alternatives. Treatment also involves play, art and drama therapy, psychiatric services, and active parent/family involvement.
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
In the short-term, children and youth participating in the IOP program will stabilize, remain in the community and maintain at least a 90% attendance rate.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Upon completion of the IOP program, children and youth are expected to utilize the skills they learned to improve emotional regulation.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Treatment/service plans are established for each participant. Program staff receive individual supervision by PCRC's clinicial leadership, and clinicial questions are presented at a weekly staff meeting convened by the Medical Director. An agency-wide Program Steering Committee, chaired by the Director of Clinical Services and consisting of Supervisors/Coordinators of all programs, meets weekly to coordinate services, inform staff of programmatic changes, and ensure that there is individual family service coordination for families enrolled in multiple agency programs. In addition, two clinical assessment tools (the Ohio and Beers Scales) are completed on each Clinic client at the beginning and end of treatment.  These scales provide an indication of the client's functioning and whether improvement has occurred during treatment. Results from these assessment tools demonstrate an improvement in functioning for clients who complete treatment.
Description
The Intensive Mentoring for Adolescent and Child Treatment (IMPACT) program is a therapeutic service for children ages 5-18 with emotional and/or behavioral problems who need more intensive and specialized services and are at risk of entering a residential level of care or who are being discharged from residential care. The mentoring program is expanding to also serve PCRC clients and other community members.
Clinicians work with individual children on therapeutic, educational and recreational activities related to treatment goals, including social, academic and communication skills, activities of daily living, anger management and positive decision making.
 
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Upon completion of the program, 80% of the youth served will show significant improvement in his/her individual goals which include but are not limited to social skills, activities of daily living, anger management, academic skills and communication skills.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Upon completion of the program, 80% of the youth served will show significant improvement in his/her individual goals which include but are not limited to social skills, activities of daily living, anger management, academic skills and communication skills.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Treatment/service plans are established for each IMPACT participant. Program staff receive individual supervision by PCRC's clinicial leadership and clinicial questions are presented at a weekly staff meeting convened by the Medical Director. An agency-wide Program Steering Committee, chaired by the Director of Clinical Services and consisting of Supervisors/Coordinators of all programs, meets weekly to coordinate services, inform staff of programmatic changes, and ensure that there is indivdual family service coordination for families enrolled in multiple agency programs. In addition, two clinical assessment tools (the Ohio and Beers Scales) are completed on each Clinic client at the beginning and end of treatment.  These scales provide an indication of the client's functioning and whether improvement has occurred during treatment. Results from these assessment tools demonstrate an improvement in functioning for clients who complete treatment.
Description

Triple P In-Home Services provide in-home support and parent training to address issues of parenting skills, nurturing behavior, positive discipline techniques, and communication skills, with the goal of preventing child abuse and neglect. Through this accredited program, staff are trained to be able to deliver an evidence-based curriculum.


Population Served Families / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Upon completion of the program, 70% of families served will demonstrate improved family functioning and decrease risk of child abuse/neglect.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Upon completion of the program, 70% of families served will demonstrate improved family functioning and decreased risk of child abuse/neglect.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Treatment/service plans are established for each family. Program staff receive individual supervision by PCRC's clinicial leadership and clinicial questions are presented at a weekly staff meeting convened by the Medical Director. An agency-wide Program Steering Committee, chaired by the Director of Clinical Services and consisting of Supervisors/Coordinators of all programs, meets weekly to coordinate services, inform staff of programmatic changes, and ensure that there is indivdual family service coordination for families enrolled in multiple agency programs. In addition, two clinical assessment tools (the Ohio and Beers Scales) are completed on each Clinic client at the beginning and end of treatment.  These scales provide an indication of the client's functioning and whether improvement has occurred during treatment. Results from these assessment tools demonstrate an improvement in functioning for clients who complete treatment.
Description

The Prevention through Early Intervention Program (PEIP) was established to help reduce problem behaviors in children enrolled in preschools in the Lower Naugatuck Valley Region and to prevent their expulsions. The program works to support teachers and families in helping children with social and emotional challenges remain in preschool and gain valuable skills needed to succeed in kindergarten and beyond through expert consultation and professional development for staff and through social skills groups and small group interventions for young children.

Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
80% of targeted children who participate in small group interventions and social skills groups will show some reduction in problems at home as reported by parents and some improvement in behavior at the child care center as reported by center staff.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
100% of the children served will not have been suspended or expelled from their pre-school program due to social and emotional behavioral problems. Additionally, 80% of childcare staff will report and improved ability to work with children with identified behavioral health problems.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The PEIP program utilizes a one-group, pretest-postest design. Teachers and parents complete forms regarding the children's problem behaviors before and after the PEIP social emotional groups are commenced. The strength of using this type of design is that date is collected before and after the intervention. The program also uses various outcome evaluation methods to meausure a decrease in negative behaviors and an increased ability to stay in a mainstreamed preschool program. These include Devereux Early Childhood Assessments, the Achenbach Teacher Report Form and the Caregiver/Teacher Report Form.  Additionally, feedback forms are completed by childcare staff and parents.
Program Comments
CEO Comments

The impact of PCRC programs and services are best stated in the words of the parents, children and service providers who have experienced them first hand:

"Our son was very fortunate to have had you as a therapist during the IOP program. We are very impressed by all of the IOP program staff. We believe he benefitted from this level of intervention because it helped him to begin to develop an awareness of other people’s perspectives."

"The counselor worked with our family and the school to get my daughter back into school and complete her freshman year."

"You guys go above and beyond and are so generous with your time in collaborating with us."

"My child has done a complete 180 in her behavior due to the treatment plans implemented"

"The Parent Child Resource Center not only realized immediately the severity of my son’s case, but the terrible strain on the whole family. They moved immediately to service our needs."

"My child and I have been able to talk openly about our feelings over past issues."

"It has helped me understand why children act the way they do in certain situations"

"They have provided us with valuable tools and educational classes which have been keys to pulling us back in to a healthy, happy family."

"That I got a lot of help when I needed it and I got to get over a lot of bad things."

"Being able to cope when things go wrong."

"I got to say what I wanted to say and it was heard."
CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Michael J. Wynne
Term Start Jan 1997
Email mwynne@LNVPCRC.org
Experience

Michael Wynne has served as the Chief Executive Officer of the Lower Naugatuck Valley Parent Child Resource Center since January 1997.

He received a Bachelors Degree from Fairfield University, a Masters Degree in Social Service Administration from Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, and a Post Masters Certificate in Social Work Administration from Simmons College School of Social Work in Boston.

Michael has thirty-six years of experience in the field of social work. Prior to coming to the Parent Child Resource Center, he held administrative positions at the University of New Haven, the Northwest Connecticut Regional Mental Health Board and the Connecticut Department of Corrections.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 24
Number of Part Time Staff 23
Number of Volunteers 20
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate 90%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 39
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 41
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Medical Director
Title Assistant Medical Director
Title Director of Clinical Services
Title Director of Development & Marketing
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

PCRC collaborates with all programs and organizations providing services to or interacting with children and families in the Lower Naugatuck Valley. We coordinate our services with TEAM, Inc., the Boys and Girls Club, Birmingham Group Health Services, Valley YMCA, Catholic Charities, Family and Children’s Aid, Bridges, Boys and Girls Village, CT Department of Children and Families, Griffin, St Raphael’s, Yale and Waterbury Hospitals, Valley Red Cross, Big Brothers-Big Sisters, Milford Rape Crisis Center, and multiple child care centers, school systems, police departments and Youth Service Bureaus.

We are active members of the Valley Council for Health and Human Services, the Valley Advisory Committee, the Valley Chamber of Commerce, the Department of Children and Families Area Advisory Committee and the Derby-Shelton Rotary Club. The Director of Clinical Services chairs the Valley Community Mental Health Crisis Response Team and the Chief Executive Officer co-chairs the Valley System of Care Collaborative.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Valley United Way1988
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits1990
Board Chair
Ms. Susan Garcia Nofi Esq.
Company Affiliation New Haven Legal Association
Term June 2014 to June 2015
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Freeman Burr Shelton Public Schools
Dr. Matthew Conway Ph.DDerby Public Schools
Mr. Peter Dagostine Esq.Durant, Nichols, Hodgson & Cortese-Costa
Mr. David J. Grant David M. Grant Caterers
Mr. Thomas Kaye Sikorsky Aircraft
Mr. Mark Kirschbaum The United Illuminating Company
Mr. Michael Marcinek Fletcher-Thompson, Inc.
Mr. Ned Miller Ned Miller Associates
Ms. Stephanie Miller Great Oak Middle School
Ms. Heather Walkewicz Ansonia High School
Mr. Robert Zuraw Standard Petroleum
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 9
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Professional Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Employee Benefits Liability
General Property Coverage
Accident and Injury Coverage
Standing Committees
Personnel
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Finance
Executive
Board Governance
Program / Program Planning
Marketing
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $2,614,320.00
Projected Expenses $2,614,320.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$352,455$279,159$241,814
Government Contributions$799,820$785,188$797,568
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$799,820$785,188$797,568
Individual Contributions------
------
$1,002,599$1,129,079$1,062,399
Investment Income, Net of Losses$91$225$526
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$53,588$24,811$13,857
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$2,033,559$1,972,577$1,830,948
Administration Expense$168,102$210,046$225,100
Fundraising Expense$86,790--$38,254
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.971.021.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses89%90%87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue8%0%4%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$652,332$579,030$651,136
Current Assets$224,764$180,562$229,247
Long-Term Liabilities$245,642$148,007$230,156
Current Liabilities$222,757$167,192$192,988
Total Net Assets$183,933$263,831$227,992
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Department of Children and Families $776,112State of Connecticut, DCF $787,194
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Valley Community Foundation $95,000Various Foundations $198,514
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --United Way $45,000Valley United Way $43,300
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.011.081.19
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets38%26%35%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 30 Elizabeth Street
Derby, CT 06418
Primary Phone 203 954-0543 130
Contact Email Vparsloe@LNVPCRC.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Michael J. Wynne
Board Chair Ms. Susan Garcia Nofi Esq.
Board Chair Company Affiliation New Haven Legal Association

 

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