Fellowship Place
441 Elm St.
New Haven CT 06511-4523
Contact Information
Address 441 Elm St.
New Haven, CT 06511-4523
Telephone (203) 401-4227 x
Fax 203-789-4451
E-mail mholroyd@fellowshipplace.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

Fellowship Place’s mission is to help adults with mental illness lead more meaningful, fulfilling and healthy lives by offering resources, education, and opportunity.

Fellowship is the only agency in the greater New Haven area supporting the severely mentally ill population 365 days per year, offering a comprehensive program of supportive services that includes Homeless Engagement, Supported Education, Employment Services, Supported Housing, Social Rehabilitation, and an alternative to incarceration program. Our campus offers understanding, acceptance, and a safe place where the mentally ill can ask for and receive help overcoming the challenges of living with their illness. Over 600 people are served annually; the majority suffers from schizophrenia, major depression, or bipolar disorder.

The first symptoms of serious mental illness usually occur in one's late teens to early twenties. It is common for one experiencing symptoms for the first time to withdraw from family & friends. Fear, lack of understanding and stigma often interfere with them getting treatment. Common issues include unemployment, homelessness, incarceration, and substance abuse. Without a place to turn for support, many end up alone; sleeping in tents under bridges at night and wandering the streets by day. However, with proper treatment and a wide range of support services, many living with a serious mental illness can lessen the impact it has on their lives, maintain their independence, and lead a productive life in their community. Fellowship provides such services; our programming, which complements our clients’ clinical services, strives to improve an individual's level of functioning and own management of his/her illness through skill building groups, opportunities for socialization, and peer support. Without Fellowship Place, there would be many more homeless, mentally ill individuals wandering the streets of New Haven without a safe place to come to every day.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1978
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mary A. Guerrera LCSW
Board Chair Mr. Ronald A Netter
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $2,540,024.00
Projected Expenses $2,540,024.00
Statements
Mission

Fellowship Place’s mission is to help adults with mental illness lead more meaningful, fulfilling and healthy lives by offering resources, education, and opportunity.

Fellowship is the only agency in the greater New Haven area supporting the severely mentally ill population 365 days per year, offering a comprehensive program of supportive services that includes Homeless Engagement, Supported Education, Employment Services, Supported Housing, Social Rehabilitation, and an alternative to incarceration program. Our campus offers understanding, acceptance, and a safe place where the mentally ill can ask for and receive help overcoming the challenges of living with their illness. Over 600 people are served annually; the majority suffers from schizophrenia, major depression, or bipolar disorder.

The first symptoms of serious mental illness usually occur in one's late teens to early twenties. It is common for one experiencing symptoms for the first time to withdraw from family & friends. Fear, lack of understanding and stigma often interfere with them getting treatment. Common issues include unemployment, homelessness, incarceration, and substance abuse. Without a place to turn for support, many end up alone; sleeping in tents under bridges at night and wandering the streets by day. However, with proper treatment and a wide range of support services, many living with a serious mental illness can lessen the impact it has on their lives, maintain their independence, and lead a productive life in their community. Fellowship provides such services; our programming, which complements our clients’ clinical services, strives to improve an individual's level of functioning and own management of his/her illness through skill building groups, opportunities for socialization, and peer support. Without Fellowship Place, there would be many more homeless, mentally ill individuals wandering the streets of New Haven without a safe place to come to every day.

Background

Founded in 1960 through the collaborative efforts of the Mental Health Association of New Haven, the Jewish Community Center, local psychiatrists, & community volunteer Phyllis McDowell. In its early years, functioned primarily as a drop-in social club for psychiatric patients discharged from state mental hospitals. Over the last 50 years, we’ve experienced significant growth & success, expanding to a full-service psychosocial rehab center located on a campus setting in New Haven. Now open 365 days a year, including all weekends & holidays, more than 600 a year are served. The majority suffer from schizophrenia, major depression, or bipolar disorder, 30% have a co-occurring substance abuse problem and 50% have been homeless at least once in their lives. Members work with staff advisors to set & achieve goals to enable them to manage their illness, learn new skills, be productive, & participate in the community. Our mission is carried out through 5 core programs:

-LifeSkills ClubHouse: Structured & unstructured activities, including illness management groups, peer-support groups, health & wellness groups, lifeskills & self-advocacy groups, social & recreational activities, daily meals, & monolingual Spanish-speaking support

-Career Development: Services to help develop the skills & confidence required to find and keep a job in the competitive marketplace, including on-site paid internships, and placement in competitive employment. Supported education services are available for those interested in returning to school. GED classes and assistance enrolling in post-secondary education programs are offered on campus.

-Fellowship Inn: Outreach & engagement for those staying in local homeless shelters. Monday-Friday, staff drive to local shelters and offer shelter residents transportation to and from the Inn where they receive counseling, access to support services, laundry & shower facilities, and meals during daytime hours when shelters are normally closed

-Supported Housing: Case management for tenants who reside in four apartment buildings (45 units of affordable housing) owned & operated by the agency

-CREST (Community Reporting Engagement Support and Treatment): Structured day reporting program with case management & counseling for people with mental illness referred from the criminal justice system. Operated in partnership with The Connection, Inc. & the CT Mental Health Center

Impact

  • The Supportive Employment program served 130 clients, up 20% from last year. 33 clients were placed in new competitive jobs. 70% of those employed maintained employment for 90 days or more. In 2013, Fellowship received grant funding to expand the program to include a peer-to-peer Graduate program to provide step down employment services to individuals with mental illness who have been successfully employed in the community and need less intense support services from Dept. Staff. Due to the Employment Program's successes, particularly in ranking 3rd statewide in employment placement rates, when a Dept. of Mental Health & Addiction Services (DMHAS) Vocational Program closed, DMHAS allocated the additional funding to Fellowship’s Supported Employment program, resulting in an increase in the program's capacity. The 2014 program’s service goal was increased to over 100 clients, a goal the agency exceeded halfway through the year. The Supportive Ed program helped 57 people return to school, up 6% from last year.

  • The PsychoSocial Rehab Center experienced a 6% increase in clients served, growing from 444-470. 176 clients used our Computer Learning Center for classes on word processing, to complete online job applications, and check e-mail. 155 participated in one or more of our Expressive Arts programs such as ArtShip, Recovery Through Music, Recovery Through Art, and Writers’ Group. Over 29,300 balanced nutritious meals were served to clients free of charge as part of the agency’s Healthy Meals initiative.

  • Completed architect plans & cost estimates for phase 3 renovations of our campus plan, currently developing a financing plan for the renovations.

    2014-2015 priorities:

  • Continue planning for phase 3 renovations, an expansion of the Fellowship Place Inn, Homeless Engagement Program

  • Fund porch renovations on our 276 Dwight Street Supportive Housing property

Needs

Continue planning for Phase III renovations of our campus plan, an expansion of the Fellowship Place Inn, Homeless Engagement Program. The agency is currently developing a financial plan to fund the project.

Funding of our Meal Program so that we may continue to incorporate healthy choices into the diets of the men & women we serve to address the serious health problems associated with their illness, exacerbated by their poor nutrition and a consequence of their severe poverty.

Funding of porch renovations on our 276 Dwight Street Supportive Housing property. Fellowship Place’s Supported Housing Program provides a permanent affordable home and case management for persons recovering from mental illness who were once homeless, or entered the program from a transitional housing program. Onsite case management & support services provided are designed to help tenants reach a maximum level of self-sufficiency, independence, and quality of life possible, help them be successful in maintaining their housing status, and eliminate the risks of them ending up living on the streets. Tenants reside in 4 apartment buildings owned and operated by the agency. 

CEO Statement

Each year Fellowship Place helps over 600 people who suffer from a serious and persistent mental illness, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. The overwhelming majority of people we serve also face poverty, inadequate housing, unemployment, and poor physical health. Fellowship provides a safe and therapeutic environment where people may find productive ways to structure their day and connect with others who face similar life challenges. We are open seven days a week, three hundred sixty-five days a year for meals, supportive counseling, and a wide array of activities that nurture the mind, body, and spirit.

Visit the Fellowship campus on any given day, and you may see artists and musicians at work, a yoga class, a computer class, a healthy eating group, or a relapse prevention group. Even more important, you will see people talking with each other, offering encouragement and support to face the trials and tribulations of life. Without Fellowship Place, many people would find themselves home alone or wandering the streets with nothing to do, no place to go. Our campus provides a beacon of hope for a better and healthier life.

This past year Fellowship Place experienced an increase in clients served in nearly all programs, and with the tireless efforts of our dedicated staff, kept up with the challenging demands that come with serving this population. We also expanded on our variety of high quality programming and services, including implementing a Cognitive Remediation program (CRT) for our Young Adult program, utilizing our state of the art Computer & Psychosocial Rehab Centers. We also created a new peer-to-peer Graduate Program in our Employment Program to provide step down services to individuals who have been successfully employed in the community and need less intense support services from Department Staff. Our Supported Employment program’s successes resulted in the program ranking 3rd statewide in employment placement rates, and when a DMHAS Voc. Program closed, the additional funding was allocated to our successful Employment Program, increasing its capacity from 70 to 80 clients and its service goal to 100 clients. The program has already exceeded its goals only halfway through the year.

The most tragic thing about mental illness is how little people understand it. At Fellowship Place, we are committed to helping our clients, their families, and the general public realize that with proper treatment and support, people with a mental illness can be successful and contribute to the vibrancy of our community.

Board Chair Statement

Navigating the economic downturn has been a great challenge for all nonprofit organizations in our community. Fellowship is no exception. Between 2007 and 2012, our agency received flat funding from the CT Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services, our primary revenue source. Despite this, the Board of Directors made a commitment several years ago to preserve direct services and to maintain our longstanding tradition of being open to our clients seven days a week, three hundred sixty five days a year. We reorganized our administrative staff, reduced our use of consultants, and actively pursued private funding from foundations and private individuals. Our strategy has paid off. Since 2009, we have added specialty programs for young adults, developed a Drama group and a Music group, collaborated with regional agencies on services to help our clients quit smoking, and expanded supportive housing and outreach services for monolingual Hispanic clients.

Our work is made possible by a committed and engaged Board of Directors, and employees who are not only qualified but who really care about the work they do. Every member of the Board serves on at least one Committee, and more than 94% support the agency financially. Most importantly, Fellowship recognizes the needs of our clients as vast and complex, making it very important to actively pursue partnerships with other community organizations and the business community. Our staff is an active member of the Community Services Network at the CT Mental Health Center, Opening Doors New Haven, the Dwight Central Management Team, and various other community groups committed to improving the quality of life in New Haven. We partner with a number of non-profit organizations on job training and other specialty services for our clients. This year, our agency began a Business Advisory Council to advise the Employment Program and network on its behalf. The council includes representatives from community employers, such as People’s Bank, Yale New Haven Hospital, Town Green Special Services, and Stop & Shop. The employer representatives conduct mock interviews, provide advice on resumes, and identify potential new employers for Fellowship’s Employment program.

There is no other program like Fellowship in New Haven, and I am certain that without Fellowship Place, there would be more homeless mentally ill people wandering the streets of New Haven, without a safe place to come to every day. At Fellowship, we offer practical help like meals, support to find a job or housing, and most importantly, positive ways to structure the day. We all know how important it is to feel useful and productive.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Mental Health Disorders
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Centers to Support the Independence of Specific Populations
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / Personal Social Services
Areas Served
Hamden
New Haven
West Haven
More than 600 people a year are served, primarily from New Haven and the surrounding communities of West Haven and Hamden.
Programs
Description Provides outreach & engagement for individuals with chronic mental illness who are staying in local homeless shelters. Monday-Friday, staff drive to local shelters and offer adult residents transportation to and from the Inn on our campus where they receive counseling and access to a variety of support services, during daytime hours when shelters are normally closed. Open daily from 7:30am to 2:00pm, the Inn provides a low-key, warm, caring environment. Services offered include breakfast & lunch, laundry & shower facilities, a computer learning center, social & recreational outings, educational services, case management services, referral services, information groups, recovery and skill building groups, a clothing bank, educational & vocational counseling and transportation to/from medical appointments.
Population Served Adults / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities / Homeless
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. When a person suffering from mental illness comes to the Inn for the first time, short-term challenges include cognitive deficits, isolation, brushes with the law, substance abuse, and unemployment. In the Inn, they are given a safe, warm, caring and structured environment away from the streets where they are welcomed & accepted. At first arrival the emphasis is placed on meeting their basic needs such as food, laundry & shower, and linking them up with psychiatric and health care in the community. They also receive assessments & services toward building a support system for management of their illness. We will maintain a daily program capacity of 90%. At least 60% of individuals served annually will have increased or maintained their number of social supports in improving their management of their own illness, and at least 80% of respondents to the annual consumer satisfaction survey will rate services positively. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long-term goals include all individuals with a mental illness who are homeless, entering the Fellowship Inn: determined eligible for Social Security Disability, Medicaid, and other entitlement programs, live in permanent housing, and gain full or part time employment. When a person suffering from chronic mental illness comes to the Inn for the first time, they typically do not have support systems in place to manage their illness. They are living in a shelter situation, in a tent, or on the streets and affecting their long-term success rate is the additional assistance in accessing other community services. The Inn provides them with a springboard to those services; a computer-learning center, educational & vocational counseling, social & recreational outings, case management services, referral services, information groups, recovery and skill building groups, and transportation to/from medical appointments.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Every client has a psychosocial assessment completed at intake and every 6 months until discharge. All clients are encouraged to complete a consumer satisfaction survey. Data collected also includes utilization rates and regular assessments by staff and self-assessments by those served, to ensure that each individual’s service plan goals are met. A variety of reports help track and evaluate individuals, program capacities, and agency-wide outcomes. In 2013 the program maintained daily program capacity rates well over our goal of 90% , 69% served maintained or improved their social supports and 42% achieved housing stability. 100% maintained or increased their income from all sources.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
RC, age 61, is diagnosed with Depression and Alcohol Dependency. At the time of his referral to the Fellowship Inn, he was living on the streets with occasional stays at the city shelter. He moved to New Haven to live with a woman, but when the relationship did not work out, he became homeless. When he first arrived at the Inn, RC had little clothing and was sleeping outside on 1 blanket. He had no income, was not taking any medication for his depression, and had only been sober for a few days. The Inn welcomed him and offered him basic needs, clothing and food, and a sleeping bag which he was grateful for. Through daily attendance at the Inn and assistance with keeping all his clinical appointments, RC is now housed in his own apartment. He still attends the Inn daily for structure and balance. The Inn provided support when he needed it most, and today RC continues be sober – having recently achieved 9 months of clean and sober time.
Description
Established in 2002 to respond to the needs of the growing number of mentally ill people without a permanent place to live, the program provides case management for tenants with chronic mental illness who reside in four apartment buildings (45 units of affordable housing) owned and operated by the agency. Rental subsidies provided by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development makes it possible for tenants to pay only 30% of their monthly income for rent. All tenants are eligible for case management and support services to help them be successful in keeping their housing status. Based on an individual needs assessment, services and supports are available to individuals at the level of intensity needed and for as long as required. Services include education about how to be a successful tenant, knowledge of tenant’s rights and responsibilities; and managing payments for housing expenses, including a monthly budget.
Population Served Adults / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities / Homeless
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our housing is at full occupancy; tenants fulfill obligations under their lease, e.g., pay rent, maintain their apartment, etc. tenants attend tenant meetings and participate in building activities. A utilization rate of 90% will be achieved, at least 85% of individuals served annually will improve or maintain their living situation and level of independence and at least 80% will rate services positively on their consumer satisfaction surveys. 83% of tenants will participate in monthly community tenant meetings and 25% will participate in community activities such as yoga and arts & crafts.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long-term goals include tenants living in supportive housing, remaining in their apartments and achieving optimal quality of life and community living. Tenants will not require higher level of care; not evicted for non conformance with lease requirements. Tenants become involved in employment, volunteer work or other community activities.
 
The supportive housing services they receive in this program, over time, facilitate access to clinical, medical, social, educational, rehabilitative, employment and other services that have proven to be essential to one achieving optimal quality of life and community living.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Tenants receive psychosocial assessments every 6 months. Monthly occupancy reports are reviewed. Answers to overall service questions in the form of a consumer satisfaction survey are recorded & tracked, assessing quality of services. Data collected also includes participation rates, regular assessments by staff and self-assessments to ensure each individual’s service plan goals are met and they are maintaining their housing status. The New Haven Housing Authority, HUD and the CT Dept. of Social Services conduct regular inspections of the housing units and reports on the status of cleanliness and maintenance of each unit. There were zero failed inspections in 2013 and 100% served maintained or increased their level of independent living.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Carlos, 58, has paranoid schizophrenia. He moved to Fellowship Commons from a supervised residence in 2010. Since becoming ill in his early twenties, he lived primarily with relatives or in group homes. During his 1st year in a Fellowship apartment, he experienced serious physical health problems and frequent hospitalizations. Returning to his apartment seemed unrealistic but he wanted to live as independently as possible. Fellowship Case Managers worked closely with him, his doctors & hospital staff to develop a full service plan, including a Visiting Nurse for medication management and a Home Health Aide to help with laundry, personal hygiene & housekeeping. Fellowship also assigned a Peer Specialist to help him find positive things to do daily. Today he is stable both medically & psychiatrically, is more invested in his own medical and psychiatric care, follows doctor’s orders, and takes his medications. He also attends Fellowship’s Social Club where he eats meals and socializes.
Description
Prevocational, vocational & education services. The program addresses the employment barriers associated with mental illness, including poor work/education history, lack of confidence, workplace discrimination & inflexibility, and social stigma. Services include:
 
Supportive Education: Education assessment & planning, GED classes & tutoring, assistance with the college enrollment process as well as on-going support while enrolled in classes
 
Pre-Vocational Training: develop the skills & confidence required to find and keep a job in the competitive marketplace. Campus internships in Food Service, Maintenance, & Clerical are available for those with little or no work history who need a supportive environment to develop & practice skills
 
Job Placement & Support: Help with resume writing, identifying potential employers in the community, completing job applications & preparing for interviews. Help placing people in jobs, advocacy with employers and follow-up support
Population Served Adults / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
A utilization rate of 90% will be achieved. At least 35% of the unduplicated number of unemployed individuals served annually will obtain or increase their competitive employment. At least 60% of the unduplicated number of individuals served annually will maintain their competitive employment for at least 90 calendar days. At least 80% of respondents to the DMHAS consumer satisfaction survey will rate services positively. At least 70% of individuals enrolled in school will remain in their education program until the completion of their term. We will increase the number of employment and educational partnerships in the program.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long-term goals include all individuals with a mental illness participating in the program will achieve increased self-sufficiency & economic independence by gaining full-time employment or returning to school to further their educational goals.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
A consumer satisfaction survey is conducted annually where results are recorded and tracked, assessing quality of services. Data collected also includes participation rates, regular assessments by staff and self-assessments to ensure each individual’s service plan goals are met. Each individual works with a job coach for individualized, intensive supportive services. The job coach teaches, provides support, and gives evaluations and constructive feedback designed to help them reach their short-term goals and move to the next stage of their long-term career development goals. In 2013, 55% of unemployed clients served obtained competitive employment, well above our goal of 35%. 80% of employed clients maintained employment for at least 90 days.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. MD, a 46 yr old male with schizoaffective disorder, worked for 20yrs as a dishwasher until he became symptomatic and was encouraged to retire. At Fellowship, he learned about the Supported Ed Program and that he could go back to school. After applying to Gateway for 2 semesters, earning a 3.56 GPA and making Dean’s List, he learned an Internship was required to complete his degree. His Education Specialist at Fellowship suggested he apply for a Food Service Internship in Fellowship’s Pre-Voc program. MD is now an intern preparing food, serving meals to the homeless and helping with deliveries. He enrolled in more classes and works with his Internship Supervisor to ensure his class work and intern work coincide. Discussing food and asking questions at work gives him confidence and prepares him for class & exams. When his Internship ends, all of his focus will go into school. He says he can see himself working at a dining hall again someday, preparing meals instead of washing dishes.
Description
Offers a variety of structured & unstructured activities daily, designed to help people find meaningful ways to structure their day and connect with others who face similar challenges. The Psycho Social Rehab Club is open 365 days a year, including all holidays and weekends. Activities include but are not limited to the following:
 
-Health & Wellness Programs: peer support, life skills & illness management, dealing with difficult emotions, building self esteem, relapse prevention and smoking cessation

-Basic Needs Services: daily meals, emergency food bags and clothing/toiletries distribution

-Social & Recreational Programs: young adult program, Hispanic peer support group, computer center open lab, all-star softball team, holiday celebrations and other social & recreational activities

-Expressive Arts: art groups, music & performances and drama workshops

-Leadership Training: member government, peer support training and legislative advocacy
Population Served Adults / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities / Homeless
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Into each individual’s service plan, access to a variety of activities and community services will be incorporated, expanding the reach of the individual's safety net to help minimize the occurrence or impact of severe crisis situations. At least 60% of individuals served annually will have increased or maintained the number of social supports. At least 80% of respondents the annual consumer satisfaction survey will rate services positively. 400 unduplicated individuals will participate in activities and receive services toward building a support system for management of their illness. We will achieve a daily program capacity of a minimum of 70 people.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long term goals include individuals with mental illness participating in the program will increase their number of social supports and improve the management of their own illness. In addressing their social needs through a variety of activities, they will learn critical skills and behaviors while improving their progress and overall health & wellness. Individuals will achieve or regain the confidence and skills necessary to lead vocationally productive and socially satisfying lives.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

An annual consumer satisfaction survey is conducted where results are recorded and tracked, assessing quality of services. Also, as a member follows his/her service plan, other relevant data is collected; data related to daily attendance and activities; data from critical incidence reports to monitor for increases or decreases in crisis situation; data related to participation rates, assessments by staff and self-assessments. Every 6 months a member's service plan is reviewed, personal progress goals are adjusted and a revised service plan is put in place. Based on this approach, increases in positive treatment outcomes are experienced by both men and women as they continue learning critical skills & behaviors, improving their progress and overall health & wellness, greatly reducing the risk of relapse,
hospitalization, or a setback in their recovery process.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
In 2013, 72% served increased or maintained their number of social supports.
SC, a 41-year-old woman who is a member of Fellowship’s Psychosocial Club has Bipolar Disorder and a history of Poly-substance abuse and homelessness. In 2011, she relapsed and began using drugs heavily. She lost her housing and was staying in a local homeless shelter. Fellowship staff helped her apply for housing assistance and encouraged her to accept a referral for clinical treatment. Staff offered non-judgmental support that eventually helped her get her life back on track. Today, 6 months later, she is doing very well. She attends the social club on a regular basis, sees her clinician regularly, takes her medication, and is very happy in her new apartment.
Program Comments
CEO Comments

Sound management & planning have resulted in a long history of exploring community resources to expand services. Our significant growth over the years, led by our Strategic Planning Committee and guided by research & data on the unmet needs of our target population, has resulted in endeavors into the supportive housing arena, the criminal justice system and young adult services.

In 1996 recognizing the need in our community for outreach & engagement for people with mental illness staying in local homeless shelters, the Fellowship Inn was established.

In 2002 responding to the needs of the growing number of mentally ill without a permanent place to live, our Supportive Housing program was established. With local funding, we purchased & renovated 3 buildings to provide 22 units of supportive housing. Additional funding was secured to provide onsite case management services.

In 2007 we partnered with the Connection & the CT Mental Health Center to establish CREST (Community Reporting Engagement Support & Treatment) to provide a structured day reporting program with case management & counseling services for people with mental illness referred from the criminal justice system.

In 2009 we completed renovations to Fellowship Commons Westville, an 18-unit apartment building purchased & renovated to provide more affordable housing to adults with psychiatric disabilities.

In 2010, with help from a local Foundation, we established a Young Adult Program to meet the specialized needs of a growing number of young adults suffering from mental illness. We also partnered with Communicare to add smoking cessation services to help our clients reduce or quit smoking.

In 2011 we secured private funding to hire a Clinical Coordinator allowing the agency to be more responsive to clients who present significant case management issues in the Clubhouse.

In 2012 we hosted the grand opening of a new state of the art Psychosocial Rehab center with expanded program & meeting spaces to help us better meet the needs of the people who come to our campus for rehabilitation, counseling and a variety of support services. We  implemented Cognitive Remediation services in our Young Adult program, utilizing our state of the art Computer & Psychosocial Rehab Centers.

In 2013 we received grant funding to expand our Supported Employment services to include a peer-to-peer Graduate Program. We also began a Business Advisory Council to advise the Employment Program and network on its behalf.

In 2013, we began planning for Phase III renovations of our campus plan.

CEO/Executive Director
Mary A. Guerrera LCSW
Term Start June 2007
Email mguerrera@fellowshipplace.org
Experience

Executive Director Mary A. Guerrera, LCSW was appointed Executive Director in April 2007, following the retirement of the former Executive Director. She has more than 30 years experience in the human service field, having held direct service and management positions in child welfare, elder services and mental health. She earned a Master of Social Work degree from the University of Connecticut in 1981 and is a licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of Connecticut. In her tenure as Executive Director she has significantly expanded the agency's programming, restructured operations for better efficiency, and
increased the agency's fiscal status.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 38
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 98
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 70%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 28
Hispanic/Latino 3
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 9
Female 29
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Development Director
Experience/Biography
Since 2009, when hired as Development Director, Melissa Holroyd has consistently increased the agency’s revenue from foundations, private individuals, and special events. She has 20 years experience in development in various roles. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Communications from Northeastern University.
Title Business Director
Experience/Biography
LuAnn joined Fellowship in March, 2005 as an Accounting Manager and was appointed Business Director in July, 2006. Ms. Buono has a BS in Accounting and a Masters Degree with a concentration in Finance. She has more than 25 years experience in the accounting field. She is responsible for budgeting, financial reporting and policies, cash management, and accounting controls.
Title Director of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services
Title Director of Career Development Services
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

We are a Community Service Network of New Haven partner, a collaborative of 18 agencies that provide an array of coordinated behavioral health services to people throughout the community. Clinical partners include CT Mental Health Center, Continuum of Care, Yale Behavioral Health Services, Yale-New Haven Psychiatric Hospital and the CT VA. Hill Health Center has provided a Physician's assistant free of charge to provide health screenings, blood pressure checks & group health discussions on our campus. We are a partner in a Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Admin. Transformation Grant, to place a peer specialist in our supportive housing program, who provides a variety of on-site activities to enhance our supportive housing services. We formed a Business Advisory Council to advise our Employment Program and network on its behalf; representatives from employers such as People’s Bank, Yale New Haven Hospital and Stop & Shop conduct mock interviews, provide advice on resumes and identify potential new employers for the program. Employment & education collaborations with local employers, colleges, and universities help provide opportunities in our Employment & Supported Education program. The New Haven Board of Ed hosts GED classes on campus twice weekly. 

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits2012
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2012
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Founder Phyllis McDowell awarded Citizens Service Before Self Awardthe Congressional Medal of Honor Foundation2011
Greater New Haven 2010 Health Care HeroBusiness New Haven2010
Comments
CEO Comments

In 2011, the Dept. of Mental Health & Addiction Services (DMHAS) announced the forthcoming of new reporting requirements for all DMHAS contract agencies. As a DMHAS contract agency, Fellowship realized that a more sophisticated system of data collection, tracking & reporting was necessary. We began the planning of a new system that would not only allow us to meet the newly announced requirements, but would grow with us as future requirements were announced and one that had the capacity to keep up with our growth as we followed through with our multi-phase Campus Master Plan. There were numerous challenges faced with the development of a new system, including the education & training of staff on new data collection methods & reporting procedures, and the unexpected financial burden of hiring an outside consulting firm for the development of a database that would meet the new requirements while maintaining the capacity to expand. After months of development & planning, the transition to the new system was successful and performed without interruption or down time in data collection or member services.

All member-related information is stored in the database in member-specific case management file format. Each member file has all demographic information as well as utilization (attendance) and detailed progress notes recording changes in skills, attitudes and behaviors. Staff enters/updates data daily, so that data is current at any point in time. Individualized service plans are utilized to evaluate progress and develop service plan goals, and ongoing relationships with our member's clinicians and other service providers allow us to be pro-active in addressing potential problem behaviors. By providing regular assessments by staff and requiring self-assessments of members, we have successfully been able to monitor their changes. A variety of reports help track & evaluate individual members, program capacities, and agency-wide outcomes.

Fellowship Place also conducts a consumer satisfaction survey annually. This past Fiscal Year, the agency scored an overall satisfaction rate of 97%.

Board Chair
Mr. Ronald A Netter
Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Term July 2010 to June 2015
Email nettpapa@gmail.com
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Ms. Sue Cohen Retired-Community Volunteer
Ms. Anne Demchak Manager, Stop & Shop
Mr. Kevin Dougherty People's Bank
Mr. Eugene Frost Business Life Lines/Northwestern Mutual
Mr. Lawrence Grab Anthem - Director Of Behavioral Health Services
Mr. Fred Grave PressoCuzzo
Mr. Lewis Lagervall Retired, Community Volunteer
Dr. Herbert Lewis - Honorary Board Member
Mr. Patrick Luddy Retired, Community Volunteer
Ms. Phyllis M. McDowell - Honorary Board Member Founder
Mr. Andrew McLaren Community Volunteer
Mr. John Mooney CPA, CFEBailey, Moore, Glazer, Schaefer & Proto LLP
Mr. Jim Rascati LCSWBehavioral Health Consultants, Partner
Ms. Renee Redman Esq.Attorney, Private Practice
Dr. William H. Sledge - Honorary Board Member Yale Psychiatric Hospital
Ms. Estelle Thorpe Retired, Community Volunteer
Mr. Andrew Ullman EsqUllman & Perlmutter
Ms. Lisa Weeks Consumer Representative
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 18
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 13
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Standing Committees
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Nominating
Program / Program Planning
Building
By-laws
Human Resources / Personnel
CEO Comments

Navigating the economic downturn has been a great challenge for all nonprofits in our community; increases in health insurance costs, utility costs and food costs have risen significantly over the past 5 years and continue to rise. Combined with flat funding from the State for 4 out of the same 5 years, it is no surprise that non-profits in our community serving the poorest of the poor are most affected; struggling to provide quality services with less resources. An analysis of our anticipated operational cost increases for FY15 & FY16 indicate $263,000 in private funding must be raised each year to help bridge the gap between government funding and our true cost of doing business, and offset our annual operational cost increases. 

Sound management and well-established systems & practices in fiscal control have helped us address these challenges in the past and maintain the superior quality of services we have been known for, for over 50 years. Our fiscal responsibility & resiliency is best demonstrated by the 4-year period of 2009-2012 when consecutive years of significant operational cost increases & flat funding from the state were endured. During this difficult economic period, the Board of Directors held on to a commitment made years ago to reserve direct services and maintain our longstanding tradition of being open to our clients 7 days a week, 365 days a year. To absorb the years of significant operational cost increases & flat funding, without negatively impacting program services or hours of operations, the agency took a number of measures. We increased employee premiums & co-pays on our health plan, reduced the employer's contribution to the retirement plan, postponed budgeted new hires, delayed giving merit increases to employees, held off on non-essential repairs & purchases and reorganized our admin staff. The agency actively pursued and increased our diversification of private funding. Such measures helped Fellowship internally absorb 4 years of operational cost increases & flat funding from the state, maintain all programs & services, continue all hours of operation and sustain all direct service positions. Funding diversification efforts led to grant funds in support of our campus meal program, and funds to create a new Supported Employment Graduate Program to provide step down employment services to individuals with mental illness. We added specialty programs for young adults and expanded supportive housing & outreach services for monolingual Hispanic clients.

 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $2,540,024.00
Projected Expenses $2,540,024.00
Spending Policy N/A
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$226,984$291,242$203,640
Government Contributions$1,826,466$2,873,408$1,822,158
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$1,826,466$2,873,408$1,822,158
Individual Contributions------
------
$343,839$385,906$383,253
Investment Income, Net of Losses$9,364$3,568$26,862
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$19,332$24,195$235,120
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$2,162,909$2,329,420$2,086,821
Administration Expense$323,682$307,530$281,114
Fundraising Expense$58,869$55,198$52,420
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.951.331.10
Program Expense/Total Expenses85%87%86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue3%2%3%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$6,129,300$6,425,982$5,608,199
Current Assets$1,822,078$2,041,068$2,244,335
Long-Term Liabilities$288,136$301,782$502,078
Current Liabilities$148,741$324,926$193,018
Total Net Assets$5,692,423$5,799,274$4,913,103
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDept. of Mental Health & Add. $1,528,970Smart Family Foundation $87,100Dept. of Mental Health & Add. $1,521,860
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Connection, Inc. $269,798The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $56,000The Connection, Inc. $259,798
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $115,000The Seedlings Foundation $20,000Smart Family Foundation $87,100
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities12.256.2811.63
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets5%5%9%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 441 Elm St.
New Haven, CT 065114523
Primary Phone 203 401-4227
CEO/Executive Director Mary A. Guerrera LCSW
Board Chair Mr. Ronald A Netter
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer

 

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