Literacy Volunteers of Greater New Haven
Literacy Resource Center
4 Science Park
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address Literacy Resource Center
4 Science Park
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 776-5899 x103
Fax 203-745-4629
E-mail info@lvagnh.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

To empower adults through literacy.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1973
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Donna Violante
Board Chair Janet Ryan
Board Chair Company Affiliation Regional Water Authority, retired
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $379,500.00
Projected Expenses $364,007.00
Statements
Mission

To empower adults through literacy.

Background

Literacy Volunteers was incorporated in 1976. It is an accredited affiliate of ProLiteracy America, the national Literacy organization, with 8 paid staff--4 full time and 4 part-time. The agency has four offices, 4 Science Park in New Haven, 20 Church St. in New Haven (Gateway Community College), 415 Howe Ave. in Shelton (Valley Adult Education) and 14 West Main St. in Meriden.

Literacy Volunteers carries out its' mission with the help of many funding partners,  the Board of Directors, volunteer tutors, tutor trainers and dedicated staff. The office at 4 Science Park is located in space donated by the Science Park Development Corporation.  Three partnering agencies--New Haven Reads, Concepts for Adaptive Learning and the Literacy Coalition for Greater New Haven join us there to deliver a broad range of literacy services. 
Literacy Volunteers has been successfully providing free literacy tutoring for adults for more than 30 years.  More than 11,000 adults have been taught by a Literacy Volunteer tutor over these years.
This is how we carry out the mission of empowering adults through literacy:
1) Recruit Volunteers. New volunteers learn about the opportunity to be a literacy tutor from community flyers, our website, www.lvagnh.org, Facebook,  Board members and word of mouth.
2) Tutor Training--New volunteers are trained 3 times/year by experienced paid trainers. Some tutors are trained to teach in the Basic Reading program, others are trained for the ESL program. An average of 90 new volunteers are trained each year.
3) Student Recruitment. Close partnerships with businesses, funders and other social service agencies result in many student referrals.
4) Tutoring.  We have strong tutoring partnerships with many agencies in the communities we serve.  These include all Adult Education programs, many social service agencies and the libraries. Tutors work in Small Groups with students.  The average ratio of tutor to students is 1 to 4.
5) Tutor Support
Staff provide whatever support is necessary to make sure the tutor is successful. This includes setting up workshops, testing students, providing appropriate curriculum and resource materials and frequent on-site visits to the tutoring site.
6) Testing and Evaluation
We strongly believe in accountability and in the value of data. Pre and post test results are added to the statewide results for all Adult Education students. Last year 61% of the students who worked with a Literacy Volunteer tutor and were pre and post tested made significant gains.
 
 
Impact 2013-2014 Accomplishments
  • STUDENTS:   1,285 adults attended Literacy Volunteer classes. This is a 3% increase from the prior year.
  • TUTORS:  255 volunteer tutors helped the students learn to read and speak English.  97 new tutors were trained
  • IMPACT: 61% of all students tested made significant gains as measured by the CASAS test. This is a slight increase from the prior year.
  • RETENTION: 93 % of Basic Literacy students and 100% of ESL students who had been pre-tested stayed in the program longer than 12 hours, exceeding the State goal of 90%.
  • BUDGET AND STAFF: Grant dollars increased , allowing Literacy Volunteers to purchase more books and resource materials for students, and increase  Program Manager hours to support tutors.

Goals for 13-14:

  1. Increase outreach and visibility in the Valley, in Greater New Haven and in Meriden/Wallingford
  2. Increase Board Development
  3. Maintain student numbers in New Haven and in the Meriden ESL program. Increase student numbers in the Meriden Reading program and in both Valley programs.
  4. Increase pre and post testing and increase student achievement levels.
  5. Continue to recruit and train new tutors.
 
Needs
  • Dollars to support programs
  • Board recruitment and development
  • Outreach
  • Fundraising
  • Marketing
CEO Statement

Literacy Volunteers plays a critical role in this community, where structural issues like adult literacy consistently provide obstacles to personal and community growth. The numbers are staggering—30% of the adults in New Haven county, more than 200,000 people, struggle with literacy.

Funding is always at the center of Literacy Volunteers ability to help more adults. Our 255 volunteer tutors helped 1,285 adults last year, 3% more than the prior year. That’s just the tip of the iceberg, but it reflects the maximum number that a small, underfunded and understaffed agency can effectively serve.  

Illiteracy is a costly problem. Adults with low literacy skills have difficulty finding jobs with adequate pay. They lose income as well as the opportunity for self improvement. They cannot help their children succeed in the school system because they are unable to read to them and help them with homework. When prescriptions cannot be read, illiteracy can cause costly medical problems. Businesses lose money through accidents and errors.  But, illiteracy is a solvable problem.  Every day I see the positive impact that tutoring has. The volunteer tutors are creative, energetic and supportive.  Classes are small and confidence grows as new skills are learned. Learning is celebrated. Friendships are formed. Curiosity is rediscovered and ideas are discussed. Referrals are made for job training and further study.  The students are motivated to learn and testing confirms that they have made significant improvements.

The cause of literacy is not a fad. The students and their types of need have changed over the years and our tutor training and the resources we use have also evolved. But the goal of Literacy Volunteers remains the same: to improve people’s lives in every way by teaching them to read and speak English. I know that the efforts of this agency and the service delivery model we use are making a difference and that the students are achieving long term changes. 

Donna Violante,  Executive Director

Board Chair Statement

Whether being a part of the board or staff, or a volunteer, all of us at Literacy Volunteers share a common mission - 100% literacy.  We know that literacy empowers adults; adults in the United States who can read and speak English are more productive in their family and community; their children are safer and more successful as they develop.  Our board is a diverse group of professionals and retirees who represent our community and our constituents.  We are passionate about our mission and continue to take steps to improve our programs.

Reaching 100% literacy is a vast challenge from where we are today.  Thirty percent of the adults in the New Haven area are at the lowest level of literacy - that means over 200,000 people in the greater New Haven area can use our services.  In the 2013-14 year, we supported 255 tutors working with 1,285 adult students, but that is not enough.
And so, our agency looks for ways to continually
  • grow our student base,
  • improve our student success rates that are measured with state-based testing programs, 
  • attract and retain volunteer tutors,
  • leverage community partnerships to facilitate access to our programs,
  • leverage business partnerships and attract donors to assist in program funding, and 
  • increase public awareness of issues related to low literacy.

We continue to operate Literacy Volunteers in lean economic times, but insure that we provide an infrastructure that is aligned with our student and tutor needs. We manage an operations budget that is advised by the Finance Committee and reviewed at each Board of Directors meeting.  

As a board we review key success factors that include: 

            1) reduced operations spending (currently only about 13% of total spending goes to administrative costs),
            2) student testing outcomes (currently about 61% of student achieve at least a 4 point gain on the CASAS test), and
            3) tutor to student ratios for  basic literacy and ESL programs (1:3 and 1:6 respectively). 

We continually review our community needs and look for ways to maintain a growing base without significantly increasing funding - students have grown 55% (575 to 1285) in the last four years, but tutors have only increased by 29% (181 to 255). That means we have maintained our programs and our success rates without significantly increasing operational expenses through best in class training programs and tutoring methodologies.  And we continually evaluate ways to reach potential new donors, sponsors and tutors.  All these efforts assure us that our spending is aligned with our commitment to improving literacy in the greater New Haven area and operating the most efficient and effective programs that we can.

I have been affiliated with Literacy Volunteers since 2002, but my love of reading has been a life-long affair.  When I was first asked why I remain committed to Literacy Volunteers, I responded about my love of reading, especially reading novels and wanting that for everyone in our community; but with further contemplation, I realize that I can't imagine a life unable to read a bus schedule, or having concern for reading prescriptions and labels, or wondering if I completed a job application adequately.  And now, as I usher more and more volunteers into the program, I hear them speak of their rewards associated with tutoring; the satisfaction of seeing a student succeed, the reward of hearing a student read their four sentence composition entitled "Things I Want to Learn"; the value of the student embrace that says "thank you for teaching me to read."  Then I realize that while we do work very hard as an agency to be efficient and effective, there are really no tools to measure the value of student or tutor self-satisfaction associated with empowering adults with literacy.
And so, we remain a board and a staff and a group of volunteers who are passionate about our mission to reach 100% literacy and rewarded in measurable and immeasurable ways!  

 

Janet Ryan

Literacy Volunteers - President of the Board of Directors

March, 2014

 



Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Education / Adult Education
Secondary Organization Category Education / Remedial Reading & Encouragement
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Derby
East Haven
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
New Haven
North Haven
Orange
Seymour
Shelton
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
Literacy Volunteers serves Greater New Haven, the Valley and Meriden/Wallingford.
Programs
Description
321 adults received FREE help with reading skills from Literacy Volunteer tutors in 2013-2014. Although they speak English, they cannot read or write well enough to do the things that matter most to them--getting a better job, helping their children with homework or getting involved with a community project. These adults work in small, leveled groups with 1-2 volunteer tutors.  Their two hour tutoring session consists of work with a specific curriculum workbook, such as Laubach or Voyager, computer work using the Lexia phonics program and writing help. Students meet with tutors twice/week for a total of four hours/week. All students are pre and post tested with the CASAS test. Program staff share the results with tutors and make suggestions for resources to improve trouble areas. This combination of effective curriculum, well-trained and well supported tutors, the Lexia computer program and the pre and post testing system is an effective way to teach adults to read at higher levels.
 
 
Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Student retention is a critical element of success and 79% of Basic Literacy students were retained in the 2013-2014 instructional program.
51% of the students in Literacy Volunteer reading classes in 2013-2014 moved up by at least 4 points on the CASAS reading test--many improved by much more than that. .
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The ultimate goal is to achieve 100% literacy in New Haven!
Basic Literacy students will be re-introduced to life as a reader. Parents will read to their children and help them achieve the level of success needed to participate in the NH Promise program. 

A student wrote: "I want to communicate why I came to the literacy program in New Haven. I had problem writing and spelling at an early age. And school it was emotionally, especially painful and feeling very ashamed in the class room.  But I was gifted in sports and auto mechanics. I was able to get by. My plans were to go in and get help but things came up in you put it off. At the age of 57, I walked in to the literacy program for help.

I wanted to learn to read better, write more clearly and spell better. Learning these skills will help build my confidence. With these skills I can go on to college and get a degree in Human Services. Working in Human Services will give me the education I need, like working with the handicapped, working with DCF’s kids and working with elderly will let me give back to the community.

Right now I do after school programs with kids. I teach them the skill of martial arts. People often think martial arts is just punching and kicking. Martial Arts are helping with kid’s confidence and help build the self-esteem. I want to thank the entire Tutors in the literacy volunteers program for their time, dedication and patience."

 
 
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
These are the tools we use to monitor program success:
1) Attendance sheets.  Tutors fill out attendance sheets every week and email them to the Program Manager. Student attendance hours are entered into the CARS (Connecticut Adult Reporting System) each month.  As soon as the CARS system shows a student has 20 hours of class attendance, the student is scheduled for a post test. Students who fail to attend classes are dropped.
2) Pre and post tests
The CASAS (Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System) test is used to assess student progress. This is a standardized test that is mandated by the State Department of Education and is used for all Adult students in Connecticut. Students are tested when they begin and again after at least 20 hours of instruction.
 
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
"I want people who don't know how to read to know they don't have to be afraid to learn.Not knowing how to read is what holds you back, keeps you down and makes you act angry.  I felt stressed out for so long, always hiding that I couldn't read, even from my wife. Now I feel the progress I am making--I know in my gut when I read a word right. I want to be able to read so I can get my driver's license and get a job that means something to me. I want to be able to read to my son.  I feel bad when my wife says "Daddy's tired" instead of my being able to read to him.
Now I am able to use what I am learning. My neighbor and I drove to Stamford recently. He told me, "Don't get lost, look for the Merritt Parkway sign." I saw it and told him where to turn, because when I saw the sign I was able to sound out the letters.
Reading has opened up another world for me.  Now I feel that I can contribute.  I can't explain it because I never had that world before, but to me, it feels like being reborn.  It is the key to everything."
Description
964 adults attended ESOL classes taught by Literacy Volunteer tutors in 2013-2014. Classes are held once or twice a week at sites throughout the community. They last for 1 1/2 to 2 hours and are taught by volunteer tutors who are trained and supported by Literacy Volunteers staff. Both day and evening classes are offered. Classes are divided into Survival, Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced sections. A variety of curriculum materials are used. ESOL students are taught speaking, listening, reading, writing and conversation skills. All students are pre tested when they begin and post tested after at least 20 hours of tutoring.
This is what students say about the ESOL program: "I came to American to better my self and get an education. I came to school to achieve my goals. I love my school. My school is so much fun. We tell stories about life and we read and write. Hopefully school will help me to get a good job."
 


Population Served Adults / Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.  ESL students had a 58% retention rate, staying with the tutoring program for at least 20 hours with  pre and post testing.  48% of the students in Literacy Volunteer classes in 2013-2014 moved up by at least 4 points on the CASAS reading test--many improved by much more than that. .

"Today, I want to talk about my trip to this country, I am from Ecuador, In my country I am a Pilot, and I was working in a little aero-taxi company for about 3 years. In my country the aviation industry is very small and for this reason few pilots have enough experience in hours. Pilots can apply for a better airline job but its companies require pilots to have experience in hours, pass their exams and English proficiency in technical aviation English. For me it was very difficult to learn this language and there I didn't have someone or some people who I could to speak or learn so I decided to give up my job and I went to this country to try to improve my English, Fortunately I have my parents here so I am staying at their home. I am studying in the morning in ADULT EDUCATION CENTER and in the afternoon I am attending LITERACY VOLUNTEERS in GATEWAY for conversation classes. There I found some people, who I can speak, learn, listen, study and share our stories because all persons there come from different countries, cultures, etc. I have enjoyed each conversation class and I have been trying to feed my mind with new experiences. When I went here I wanted a goal and it is that I want to learn this language or to give the best of me. When I will return to my country I want to find a new job then enjoy it. I love to flight and may be in the near future I wish or hope work here (USA). I would like to fly the biggest aircrafts around the world".

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
100% literacy in our community is the ultimate goal! ESOL students who attend our classes will become proficient enough in English to get a job, help their children succeed in school and participate in meaningful ways in their community.
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
These are the tools we used to monitor program success:
1)  Attendance Sheets. Tutors fill out attendance sheets every week and email them to the Program manager.  Student attendance hours are entered into the CARS (Connecticut Adult Reporting Sysytem) each month.  As soon as the CARS system shows a student has 20 hours of class attendance, the student is scheduled for a post test. 
2) Pre and Post Tests
The CASAS (Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System) test is used to assess student progress. This is a standardized test that is mandated by the State Department of Education and is used for all Adult students in Connecticut. Students are tested when they begin and again after at least 20 hours of instruction.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
"Ever since I could remember, I have wanted to attend college. When I first arrived in the United States, I could not study because I could not speak English. I had many manual jobs to pay for my expenses. They were hard jobs that paid minimum wage. However, without much education, I had no choice. Then one day in September, 2010 I started attending ESL classes at Adult Ed and at Literacy Volunteers. It transformed my life! I started to feel proud of myself and thankful to all the instructors at Literacy Volunteers.  This has opened the door for me to go to college. Since I started attending college, I am learning something new every day.  Hopefully, I will have more opportunities to find a job with a good salary.  Graduating from college will change my life forever. This would never have been possible if I had never started attending classes to learn English.  Because English is so important, I still attend classes at Literacy Volunteers."
 
Description
Training for new volunteers is offered 3 times/year. Most new volunteers contact us through our website, www.lvagnh.org when they send in an application. New tutors are welcomed by email and invited to observe tutoring classes immediately. Orientation sessions are held with all new volunteers, where staff discuss the details of the program.  Volunteers are encouraged to discuss their expectations from this volunteer opportunity to make sure it is a good fit for them. Volunteers attend 12 hours of training, taught by experienced, paid trainers. Two 12 hour training tracks are offered: one for tutors who want to work with Reading students and the other for tutors who want to work with ESL students. New tutors are required to observe several current tutors, then meet again with Staff to discuss their tutoring assignment and review the resource materials they will use. Tutors usually begin tutoring alongside an experienced tutor.
 
97 new volunteer tutors were trained in 2012-2013.
Population Served Adults / Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. 90-100 new volunteers will be trained annually.  50% will remain at least 2 years, 25% will remain for 3 years and 15% will remain for 4 years.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. 90-100 new volunteers will be trained annually.  At the end of four years, 15% of those tutors will still be tutoring with Literacy Volunteers.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Tutor retention is measured by how long the volunteer remains with the tutoring program.  It is closely liked with tutor satisfaction. With the onset of co-tutors, small group tutoring and an expanded workshop and tutor certificate program, we expect that tutors will get more satisfaction from this volunteer activity and remain with the program longer.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
"Throughout my business career with stock brokerage companies, I was the employee who was asked to learn the new product, software application or compliance procedure and then teach it to my co-workers.  This meant I had to translate the information into something that sales, management and support staff could not only learn, but use effectively.  I draw on the same skills in tutoring.  It has been a tremendous learning experience for me.  I believe I now view the world in terms of of creating a class and I'm always thinking "how can I teach this?"
I work with good people. My students are highly motivated, even excited to learn. The lifelong coping skills they have developed are impressive. Yet despite financial and physical  hardships and many responsibilities outside the classroom, they persevere in their dedication to improve their lives. We encourage each other. When I get stuck for ideas, I ask them for help. When I question what I am doing, they thank me for my efforts and urge me to do more. Happily, I can point to the progress of lessons learned.  To support their efforts is so gratifying for me.  I can use what I know to make someone else's life better.  I believe I often get as much out of our classes as they do."
Program Comments
CEO Comments

The following are samples of essays that Literacy Volunteer students wrote for the 2013 edition of "Hear Our Voices."

Things I Want to Learn

"I want to learn how to drive. Part of my goal is to save money for a new car so I can go places, hang out with my friends maybe even go to New York. A G.E.D will help me get into cooking school so I can open up my own business. Cooking in a restaurant in New York would be great I could make more money." 

Learning To Read and Write

"I could not read all the books in the second grade. In the third grade the words go longer and harder. I go frustrated when I could not read the words. I acted out by banging on my desk.

The school decided to have me see a social worker. I meet with him three times a week but that did not help my reading or my acting out. They then decided to have me work with the janitor from 12 noon to 2:00 p.m. every day. I did that for a year.

After my mother spoke with the school officials and many tests I went from the 4th grade to 5th in a matter of days. I felt like I was in the hook on phonics program they called in special education program. The program did not work for me. I still acted out in 5th and 6th grade.

I was home bond due to surgery for most of the 7th grade. I had a teacher only one hour a day.

During high school I did well in classes like art, math and music they did not require to read much. In my other classes my teachers passed me anyway.

After I graduated I could not get a regular job because I could not read well enough. I started selling drugs. I did that for 15 years on and off. As my children got older, I did not want them to follow in my foot steps. I was tired of just sliding through life. I had my music but I wanted to write down the songs on paper not just in my head. That is why I came to the Reading Center which I call my college.

I also would like to attend cooling classes at Gateway Community College. I need to read before I can do this.

This program is working for me. I will keep coming."

 Jobs in America

"My name is Mariola. I was born in Wrzesnia, Poland. Wrzesnia is about the same size as Shelton, CT. My mother came to the United States before we did, as my sisters and I stayed in Poland to finish school. After one year of teaching elementary school in Poland, I came to the United States. I spent many days crying because I could not communicate with people. My first job was in Dunkin’ Donuts in New Jersey. After one year, I went back to Poland to get married, and then my husband and I both came to America. Fortunately, my husband was able to get a steady job in Stratford. I cleaned houses to add to our income. It seemed like all we did was work and work. After a few years and two children, we purchased a condominium in Shelton, and at that time I worked for a short while in Griffin Hospital. We were than able to purchase a store. After 5 years, we had to sell the store, due to personal reasons. At the present time, I work in ShopRite and still clean houses. I am, however, always looking for a better job."

 
 
 
CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Donna Violante
Term Start June 2014
Email DonnaViolante@lvagnh.org
Experience
Director, CT and Western MA Combined Federal Campaign
Director, Consumer Marketing, AT&T
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 265
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 8
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Ms. Doss Venema Aug 2001 - June 2014
Senior Staff
Title Data & Development Director
Title Program Manager, Basic Literacy
Title Program Director, Meriden
Title Program Manager, Meriden
Title ESL Program Manager, New Haven
Title Testing Coordinator, Gateway Community College Office
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
The New Haven office of Literacy Volunteers is located in the Literacy Resource Center at 4 Science Park, in space donated by the Science Park Development Corporation. Three partnering agencies join us there as collaborators; New Haven Reads, Concepts for Adaptive Learning and the Literacy Coalition for Greater New Haven. Together, we deliver a broad range of literacy services to the community--from reading, math, computer and ESL tutoring for adults, reading tutoring for children, free books for everyone and computer training for New Haven parents.
Additional New Haven area collaborators include Junta for Progressive Action, IRIS, all branches of the New Haven Public Library, Liberty Community Services, Job Corps, New Haven Adult Education, Gateway Community College, the Turkish Cultural Center in West Haven, the Albert Schweitzer Institute at Quinnipiac University, the Yale Health Center, the Yale Bridges program, Branford Adult Education,  and libraries in the cities and towns surrounding New Haven.
 
Collaborators in the Valley include Valley Regional Adult Education, the Valley Community Foundation, Valley Council, Valley United Way and all the Valley libraries. Collaborators in the Meriden/Wallingford area include both Meriden and Wallingford Adult Education, the Meriden Family Zone, Middlesex Community College, all libraries, Head Start, Master's Manna, SCOW, and the Women & Families Center.
 
 
 
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2011
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits2011
Valley United Way2011
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2001
Board Chair
Janet Ryan
Company Affiliation Regional Water Authority, retired
Term June 2013 to June 2015
Email jsryan@snet.net
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Bill Armstrong New Haven Free Public Library
Claudia Bedoya-Rose Gateway Community College
Melissa DeLucia Albertus Magnus
Veronica Douglas-Givan New Haven Adult Education
Paul Flinter Wallingford Adult Education
Joyce Ghiroli Gastroenterology Center
Bernadette Holodak Community Volunteer
Nicholas Iwanec CPABeers Hamerman & Co. P.C.
Reina Marasco Valley Regional Adult Education
Jack O'Connor Yale SOM
Patti Scussel Start Bank
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 8
Risk Management Provisions
Employee Dishonesty
Blanket Personal Property
Commercial General Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Finance
Executive
Board Governance
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Carol Brutza Gateway Community College
Harold Donegan retired Attorney
Robert Fort Workforce Alliance
Nancy Fryer retired ESL teacher
Dave Pare Record-Journal
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $379,500.00
Projected Expenses $364,007.00
Spending Policy N/A
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
AT A GLANCE2013View
Hear Our Voices2013View
At A Gance 2013-20142013View
At A Glance2012View
Hear Our Voices!2012View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$145,183$258,414$239,030
Government Contributions$127,685$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$127,685----
Individual Contributions$23,485----
------
$6,302----
Investment Income, Net of Losses--$80$141
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$34,476$36,226$32,611
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$290,632$245,167$237,369
Administration Expense$30,373$35,714$32,182
Fundraising Expense$2,613$2,234$1,094
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.041.041.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses90%87%88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue1%1%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$139,349$130,609$112,109
Current Assets$139,349$130,609$112,109
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$10,813$15,586$8,691
Total Net Assets$128,536$115,023$103,418
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $30,500CT State DOE - New Haven BOE $67,724CT State DOE - New Haven BOE $56,348
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountWerth Family Foundation $20,000CT State DOE - Meriden BOE $32,859The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $52,500
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountNew Alliance Foundation $12,500The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $30,000CT State DOE - Meriden BOE $35,067
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities12.898.3812.90
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments Literacy Volunteers is in a unique position to maximize the use of private source dollars (not State or Federal dollars) because we are a Cooperating Eligible Entity (CEE) with the New Haven Board of Education through the Adult Education program.  This makes us eligible to receive a 64.23% match from the State Department of Education, meaning that a private source grant of $45,000 would allow us to leverage an additional $28,903 to support adult literacy programs in the communities we serve.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address Literacy Resource Center
4 Science Park
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 776-5899 103
Contact Email info@lvagnh.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Donna Violante
Board Chair Janet Ryan
Board Chair Company Affiliation Regional Water Authority, retired

 

Related Information

Boost Economic Success

A strong economy begins with a community that supports its people. When you support workforce training, financial literacy and public transportation, you enable individuals and families to work where they live, increasing their chances of economic success.

Provide Quality Education

Educate a child and you change a community. For the child, a good education means better career opportunities and higher lifetime earnings. College graduates enjoy better health and are more inclined to volunteer and vote. For the community, supporting our youths’ educational goals results in a stronger society.