Connecticut Fund for the Environment (Save the Sound)
900 Chapel Street
Upper Mezzanine, Suite 2202
New Haven CT 06510
Contact Information
Address 900 Chapel Street
Upper Mezzanine, Suite 2202
New Haven, CT 06510-
Telephone (203) 787-0646 x106
Fax 203-787-0246
E-mail info@ctenvironment.org
Web and Social Media
CFE is working to protect Plum Island, a critical wildlife habitat, which the federal government plans to sell off to the highest bidder. Credit: Robert Lorenz
Mission

The mission of Connecticut Fund for the Environment and its program, Save the Sound, is to protect and improve the land, air and water of Connecticut and Long Island Sound.  We use legal and scientific expertise and bring people together to achieve results that benefit our environment for current and future generations.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1978
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Curt Johnson Esq.
Board Chair Leslie Lee
Board Chair Company Affiliation Greenwich Land Trust, Garden Club of America
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

The mission of Connecticut Fund for the Environment and its program, Save the Sound, is to protect and improve the land, air and water of Connecticut and Long Island Sound.  We use legal and scientific expertise and bring people together to achieve results that benefit our environment for current and future generations.

Background

Founded in 1978 by Fred Krupp, current President of Environmental Defense, CFE merged in 2004 with Save the Sound, a respected voice for the protection of Long Island Sound’s shoreline and marine habitats. Save the Sound is now a distinct program within CFE. The merger enhanced both programs, bringing together Save the Sound’s proven stewardship, restoration, and community outreach capability with CFE’s legal, scientific and policy expertise. Our strategies include advocacy, litigation, stewardship and habitat restoration, based on careful research and analysis. Our work is carried out with thousands of partners and stakeholders, including elected officials, community leaders and citizen volunteers. CFE has a dedicated staff of 28. Key to our success is building and mobilizing coalitions. We have 11,800 active members and constituents, and carry out projects with the help of 2,500 volunteers; we also partner with other environmental organizations, community groups, businesses and non-profits. Currently, we are actively working to protect Plum Island and Oswegatchie Hills, expand clean energy programs in Connecticut, advocate for shared solar facilities and electric vehicles, undertake a suite of habitat restoration and green infrastructure projects, remove trash from Connecticut's beaches, and pursue legal advocacy to reduce pollution from aging and insufficient stormwater / sewage management systems in the western Sound.

Impact

At CFE, we have a vision for transforming neighborhoods into greener, cooler places to live – places where stormwater pollution is filtered before it reaches our coastal waterways and Long Island Sound; where aging, leaking sewers are identified and repaired, keeping bacterial pollution out of the Sound and making beach closings a thing of the past; and where sewage treatment plants are held accountable for excess nitrogen discharges into the Sound that cause oxygen-deprived “dead zones.”

Corporations and government interests cannot always be relied upon to put public health before private gain. Our region needs someone who can fight for the public’s environmental rights in court. Without the legal component of CFE and Save the Sound, Connecticut and western Long Island Sound would be a very different place to live.

Connecticut Fund for the Environment and its bi-state Save the Sound program take on broad, significant and widespread environmental issues with the potential to bring about systemic change. We are uniquely qualified to do so. Our core strengths include policy development and advocacy, coalition-building, and, when necessary, litigation. We collaborate with stakeholders and work with communities, inspiring action to protect our area’s land, air, and water. We have 40+ years of experience in conducting public education and outreach, and building diverse coalitions to lay the groundwork for our legal and legislative advocacy to produce results. We see to it that environmental laws currently on the books are enforced, and advocate for environmental policies and regulations needed to protect the safety and well-being of all.

Needs

We could not accomplish all that we do without the help and involvement of many people. All our effortsfrom legislative advocacy to planting rain gardens—are more successful with the participation of concerned individuals who care about protecting the environment and public health. There are many ways to help. When thousands speak with one voice, thought leaders and policymakers listen. Sign up to receive action alerts on the issues that most concern you, stay informed about key environmental issues in Connecticut and coastal New York, and make your voice heard. Periodically, we need volunteers to help install native plants as part of habitat restoration projects, and plant rain gardens. Volunteers also participate as part of our citizen-science, water-quality monitoring program. Each summer, teams of trained volunteers around the western Sound test local waters for bacterial contamination and other signs of sewage overflows. Others become “watch dogs” for sewage leaks and other forms of contamination into their local waterways. Each fall, CFE/Save the Sound coordinates 50+ beach cleanup events in communities across Connecticut as part of the International Coastal Cleanup. We need people to join an established shore or watercraft cleanup, as well those who are willing to register as a Cleanup Captain to organize their own beach cleanup team. Visit our website ctenvironment.org to find out more about how you can help.

CEO Statement
Our organization is indebted to the efforts of citizens like you.

With your help, we've been able to stem multiple threats to our state's land, air and water. We've achieved tangible results through legal and legislative advocacy and through citizen engagement. These results include helping to win passage of the Global Warming Solutions Act, which put Connecticut among a handful of states (California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, and New Jersey) that have committed to concrete carbon reductions in a specific time frame. As of this year, we have completed 42 habitat restoration projects with a broad spectrum of partners, including federal and state agencies, municipalities, other nonprofit groups and local volunteers. Our restoration statistics are impressive: 80 river miles opened up to fish passage, 509 acres of lake habitat restored for fish passage through installation of fishways and other improvements, 322 acres of degraded tidal marsh restored, and 25 acres of native vegetation installed. We also completed 7,761 square feet of green infrastructure installations, such as rain gardens and bioswales, that will divert more than 1 million gallons of untreated stormwater runoff from the Sound from approximately 2 acres of impervious surfaces. 
 
Practical solutions to safeguarding Connecticut's land, air and water require many levels of expertise. Our staff of lawyers, scientists and outreach experts does the tough work of finding solutions that work. We then bring those solutions to our state legislature, state agencies and the courts.
 
Our successes also require teamwork. We form alliances with citizens, scientists, advocates, community groups, engineers, unions, businesses and other diverse groups. For example, we know there's a long way to go if we want to clean up sewage overflows and restore the low oxygen "dead zone" in Long Island Sound. So we've joined forces with towns, engineers and the construction industry to convince the state to invest in the Clean Water Fund to finance major sewage projects designed to clean up our rivers and the Sound and to create jobs at the same time.

Most importantly, though, Connecticut would be a very different place without your contributions and support. We cannot clean up beaches, win legislative battles or restore a river without you. Your continued moral and financial support for our work to confront the threats to our land, water and air and to Long Island Sound make all the difference.  Please join your fellow citizens who take the time to make a key phone call to an elected official, or help out along with the more than 2,500 volunteers each year who join one of our beach cleanups or habitat restoration plantings. Thank you!

Board Chair Statement For more than 40 years, CFE has been a respected and impressive force for protecting the land, air and water of Connecticut and Long Island Sound through innovative solutions, collaborative achievements, solid science, committed advocacy and, when necessary, strategic litigation. Environmental issues take many years to resolve. Someone has to push back to defend the wider interests of the community -- someone who is in the fight for the long haul. Thanks to your support, Connecticut Fund for the Environment and its program Save the Sound have fought and won on critical issues to protect public health and preserve our environment like:
 
•    Blocking Broadwater -- a massive 20-story natural gas plant that would have dominated the skyscape of Long Island Sound for decades to come;
•    Persuading the State of Connecticut to protect all 18,700 acres of the Kelda water company's lands and reservoirs in a $90 million purchase by the State and The Nature Conservancy; and
•    Successfully advocating for Connecticut's adoption of the strictest tailpipe emission standards for cars, and a requirement that new cars offered for sale be labeled with their greenhouse gas emission values.

While we’ve waged these big battles, we’ve also made steady achievements like restoring dozens of  river miles and acres of lake habitat, native vegetation and tidal marsh through our habitat restoration program, and removing nearly thousands of pounds of trash from  Connecticut beaches in a decade of serving as Connecticut coordinator for the International Coastal Cleanup.
 
CFE/Save the Sound more than makes up for its relatively small size by having BIG impacts. We aren't afraid to tackle major environmental issues or large, well-funded corporate interests that disrespect environmental values. Your investment in this organization helps ensure that we are here to use our tremendous legal and scientific expertise year after year. Thank you for your support and your faith in our mission.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Environment / Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Secondary Organization Category Environment / Alliances & Advocacy
Tertiary Organization Category Environment / Water Resource, Wetlands Conservation & Management
Areas Served
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
CFE serves all of Connecticut, and the portions of New York in the Long Island Sound watershed.  
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
Programs
Description
Bacterial pollution from sewage in Long Island Sound poses serious public health risks. Our water quality monitoring program measures bacteria levels at beaches, shorelines, streams, and rivers throughout western Long Island Sound. We use the data that we collect to identify and eliminate sources of fecal contamination, drive investment in wastewater infrastructure repairs, and engage the public and elected officials in combating this persistent and hazardous form of water pollution. The Sound also suffers from nitrogen pollution, which causes hypoxic or low-oxygen conditions in parts of the Sound where marine life cannot survive. In response to this problem, we developed and coordinated an on-going study that measures the impacts of nitrogen pollution on Sound bays and harbors each year—the Unified Water Study (UWS). In addition, the Long Island Soundkeeper came under the CFE/Save the Sound family of programs in 2017.
Population Served General/Unspecified / Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Short-term success:
1) We ensure that there is state and federal support for specific projects that benefit Long Island Sound - annual funding for the Clean Water Fund, and federal re-authorization of the Long Island Restoration and Stewardship Act, for example.
 
2) Bacterial water quality monitoring and the Unified Water Study continue to provide data relevant needed to drive investment in reducing pollution to the Sound.
 
3) The Long Island Soundkeeper continues to drive public engagement and municipal, state and federal investment to preserve the Sound and the marine animals that live there.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long term success: our rivers, lakes and Long Island Sound are clean and restored: Marine wildlife can prosper throughout Long Island Sound because the low oxygen dead zone is healed; all of our rivers and lakes support aquatic life; our beaches, rivers and lakes are safe for swimming.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Specific benchmarks, for example: CFE/Save the Sound will produce the next Long Island Sound Report Card in 2018.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. In 2017, we successfully completed Year One of the Unified Water Study (UWS) Tier I with 12 groups participating in monitoring in 20 Long Island Sound bays and harbors. Results from the UWS will be published in the next Long Island Sound Report Card and disseminated via social media, activist emails, on our blog, and in traditional media.
Description

Through our Climate and Energy Program we work to secure state policies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase investments in clean energy and energy efficiency; promote the authorization of a full-scale shared solar program in Connecticut (similar to that of our neighbor states like New York and Massachusetts); establish policies to significantly accelerate adoption of electric vehicles and the infrastructure to support them, as well as advocating to preserve already established policies that promote energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change.

Population Served General/Unspecified / Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

In 2008, CFE advocated for and helped pass the Global Warming Solutions Act to address climate change in Connecticut. This law put us among only a handful of states at the time that had committed to concrete carbon reductions in a specific time frame. The Global Warming Solutions Act requires the state to reduce its total greenhouse gas emissions to at least 10 percent below 1990 levels by 2020, and to at least 80 percent below 2001 levels by 2050. We continue to work to ensure Connecticut adheres to standards set by the Global Warming Solutions Act and that the state's long-term commitment to those standards is not abandoned in the wake of short-term fiscal challenges.


Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Adoption of policies to encourage the use of electric vehicles, authorization of shared solar facilities and programs similar to those in our neighboring states of New York and Massachusetts,
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Attendance at public hearings, numbers of groups that join our coalition, #s of calls and emails generated to public officials, examples of administrative and/or policies generated that help ensure Connecticut adheres to benchmarks set by the Renewable Portfolio Standard.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Connecticut’s full transition to a clean energy economy has been stifled by resistance to expanding in-state solar development, including establishing a full-scale shared solar program. Only 20 percent of the public is able to site solar panels on their roofs. The remaining 80 percent must wait until shared solar facilities are authorized. While our neighbor states like New York and Massachusetts continue to attract solar investment, Connecticut is instead mired in a tiny shared solar pilot program that is far behind schedule. We launched our Share the Sun grassroots campaign in 2016 to advocate for bringing a full-scale shared solar program to Connecticut. People and groups across Connecticut are learning about shared solar and getting involved.
Description
We restore habitats critical to the Long Island Sound watershed and work to repair damaged and threatened ecosystems. We remove outmoded and often hazardous dams to open traditional fish migration runs and restore tidal flow, and install native plants along the banks. We combine these activities with public engagement and volunteer opportunities to build awareness, generate a sense of ownership and help ensure future stewardship of the areas we restore. We also undertake green infrastructure projects to combat polluted stormwater, including rain gardens, green roofs, permeable pavement. These projects capture, retain, and filter rain where it falls—before it becomes harmful stormwater runoff. Our green infrastructure projects around the state filter millions of gallons of stormwater runoff each year, and reduce the burden on municipal “gray” infrastructure. We also coordinate approximately 60 beach cleanups each year, engaging approximately 1,800 volunteers in removing trash from Connecticut beaches.
Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
To date, we have completed 42 projects that have restored 80 miles of river habitat and 509 acres of lake/estuary habitat to migratory fish passage; we have also restored 322 acres of degraded saltmarsh and planted 25.9 acres of native species.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
We will restore the ecological function and value of rivers and marshes in the Long Island Sound watershed, as a  result doubling the number of migratory fish species returning upstream to their historic spawning grounds.
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
# of river miles, # of acres of lake habitat, # of acres of native vegetation and # of acres of tidal marsh restored.
 
# volunteers engaged in plantings and beach cleanups.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. In 2016, Our Green Projects team removed Pond Lily Dam in New Haven, CT, reconnecting 2.6 miles of migratory fish habitat; we removed Carpenters Dam in Meriden and Clark Brothers Dam in Southington, opening 33 miles of migratory fish access from Long Island Sound. We continued our work on the one-and-a-half-acre marsh creation component of our comprehensive restoration project at Sunken Meadow State Park in Kings Park, New York. Our Green Infrastructure team installed green infrastructure retrofits at Bridgeport, Connecticut’s Beardsley Zoo—including a 960 square foot walkway with porous pavers and a 950 square foot bioretention garden that will capture more than 300,000 gallons of runoff from more than ¼ of an acre of the zoo’s parking lot. We were instrumental in the coordination, completion and official public release of the West River Watershed Management Plan which is available on the CT DEEP website.
Description

 

We are working to protect Plum Island, located in Long Island Sound and owned by the federal government. The island provides habitat for a wide range of species, including migrating birds, seals and other wildlife. The government is in the process of selling the island to the highest bidder. We believe it should be preserved as a protected refuge with the opportunity for passive recreation. We established the Preserve Plum Island Coalition and are using grassroots engagement, and legal and legislative advocacy. We are also working to protect Oswegatchie Hills, a fragile coastal forest in East Lyme that provides habitat for a wide variety of species and public recreation. The proposed high-density development would further degrade water quality in the Niantic River. We are fighting this unwise development using grassroots outreach and legal advocacy. A successful outcome would protect one of the last, large coastal forests in the Long Island Sound watershed.
Population Served General/Unspecified / Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
numbers of grassroots constituents who join the efforts to protect these two remarkable properties for the benefit of the public, numbers of emails and social media communications generated, numbers of legislative allies who partner with us to protect Plum Island.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long term success would result in the permanent protection of Plum Island in Southhold, NY and Oswegatchie Hills in East Lyme, CT.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
We measure our success by the number of constituents engaged via public gatherings, emails and social media communications; the number of communications pieces generated, and the effectiveness of our legal and legislative advocacy. Ultimately, our success will be assessed by securing permanent protection for these two remarkable properties so they may be enjoyed for passive recreation by all.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Land protection battles often take many years to resolve. We expect to be in the fight to protect these two remarkable properties for as long as it takes. Our most recent land protection success was in the effort to protect Old Saybrook's "Preserve," which today is available to the public for hiking, bird watching and other forms of passive recreation.
CEO/Executive Director
Curt Johnson Esq.
Term Start Oct 2017
Email cjohnson@ctenvironment.org
Experience

Curt Johnson received his J.D. from University of Connecticut School of Law and was awarded a Masters in the Study of Law, Summa Cum Laude, focusing on environmental law from Vermont Law School. He was an attorney with the firm of Murtha, Cullina, Richter and Pinney for three-and-a-half years before joining Connecticut Fund for the Environment as an attorney in 1993.

As Program Director of CFE/Save the Sound, Curt led the team to achieve environmental results in protecting our rivers, Long Island Sound, and our air and water by bringing together people, groups, and our elected leaders.

He co-founded the Environmental Law Clinic at the University of Connecticut School of Law, and recently served as the Connecticut Co-Chair of the Citizens Advisory Committee to Long Island Sound's National Estuary Program and as President to the Hamden Land Conservation Trust.


Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 17
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 2700
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 91%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 18
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 12
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director of Development
Experience/Biography

Karen Baar joined Connecticut Fund for the Environment as Director of Grants in January 2008. A former health care activist, educator, and administrator, she has a B.A. from New York University and a Masters in Public Health degree from the Yale University School of Medicine. Before joining CFE, Karen was a freelance writer for more than 15 years. She has written hundreds of articles about women's issues, health, science and medicine, and social policy for magazines, newspapers, and websites.

Title Chief Program Officer
Experience/Biography

Leah manages CFE/Save the Sound's Land, Energy, Green Projects, and Save the Sound programs. Additionally, she leads policy initiatives and major campaigns that protect our land, air and water, and address eminent threats to Connecticut’s environment and Long Island Sound. Leah also serves as an adjunct lecturer at the University of Connecticut School of Law, where she teaches the Environmental Law Clinic. She joined Save the Sound as its staff attorney in 2001, then served as its Director of Legislative and Legal Affairs for 10 years. Leah earned her J.D. and Environmental Law Certificate from Pace University School of Law in 2000, and her undergraduate study in sustainable architecture and design culminated in a bachelor's degree in Industrial Design from the University of Louisiana in 1996.

Title Chief Legal Officer/ General Counsel
Experience/Biography

Roger Reynolds directs all cases and legal matters for CFE/Save the Sound to protect Long Island Sound, inland waters, land, and air. He is also an adjunct professor at University of Connecticut School of Law where he established and teaches the Environmental Law Clinic and teaches Negotiation. Before joining CFE/Save the Sound, Roger was an Assistant Attorney General for the State of Connecticut where he was lead counsel for the state on numerous environmental, consumer protection, and antitrust cases. He clerked for Justices Palmer and Callahan on the Connecticut Supreme Court and received his J.D. from NYU Law School.

Title Director of Communications
Experience/Biography

Laura has worked in outreach and communications at CFE since 2007 and currently directs the organization's strategic communications, media relations, website and social media, and grassroots advocacy communications. She holds a B.A. in English from Wesleyan University and previously worked at Cheney & Company, a design and marketing firm in New Haven, and at the Valley Conservation Council, an open space, river protection, and smart development organization in Virginia.

Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
Collaboration is key to the success of CFE/Save the Sound.  We have approximately 5,000 members and 11,800 constituents. We carry out our hands-on projects with 2,500 volunteers annually. We partner with many other environmental organizations, community groups, businesses, unions, municipalities and other non-profits. Currently, we convene and coordinate the Preserve Plum Island Coalition, the Share the Sun Campaign, and serve as one of only 2 nonprofits on the Governor's Council on Climate Change.
Board Chair
Leslie Lee
Company Affiliation Greenwich Land Trust, Garden Club of America
Term Jan 2007 to Sept 2018
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Elizabeth Connolly Alexander Vice Chairman of the Board, Connolly iHT
Dina Brewster Founder & Owner, The Hickories, Ridgefield, CT
Todd Cort Lecturer in Sustainability, Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
Barbara David Lyme Open Space Committee; Board of the Hartt School at the University of Hartford
Raphe Elkind Teacher, fifth grade, New Canaan Country Day School
E. Donald Elliott Professor, Yale School of Law; Senior of Counsel, Covington & Burling, LLP
Evan Heller Real Estate Advisor; Institute of Urban Research, University of PA
Thomas Holloway CT Advisory Board of the Trust for Public Land; Former CFO, Community Economicy Fund, Hartford
Campbell Hudson IIIPartner, Hudson & Kilby
Katherine Kennedy MDAssistant Clinical Professor, Dept of Psychology, Yale University
Anne Lacouture Penniman ALSAPrincipal, Anne Penniman Associations LLC; Member, CT Board of Lanscape Architects
Barbara Setlow Ph DInstructor, Dept of Molecular Biology & Biophysics, UCONN Health
Diane Stoner Board member, Constance B. Ripley Land Trust
Johan C. Varekamp Ph DProfessor of Earth & Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 15
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Standing Committees
Finance
Audit
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Program / Program Planning
Personnel
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Sept 30 2018
Projected Revenue $5,076,736.00
Projected Expenses $5,076,736.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902015
Form 9902014
Form 9902013
Form 9902012
Form 9902011
Form 9902010
Form 9902009
Form 9902008
Audit Documents
Audit2016
Audit2015
Audit2014
Audit2013
Audit2012
Audit2011
Audit2010
Audit2009
Audit2008
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$3,701,166$1,911,690$1,690,501
Government Contributions$928,173$365,678$687,188
Federal--$145,697--
State--$103,784--
Local------
Unspecified$928,173$116,197$687,188
Individual Contributions------
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses$214,842$142,961$122,727
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$55,470$49,281$23,458
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$2,791,679$1,748,964$1,871,056
Administration Expense$419,705$337,108$277,729
Fundraising Expense$486,835$392,463$350,841
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.321.001.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses75%71%75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue11%17%15%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$7,996,270$6,852,078$6,496,428
Current Assets$1,974,570$752,757$759,127
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$382,559$203,812$116,359
Total Net Assets$7,613,711$6,648,266$6,380,069
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Kresge Foundation $150,000Newman's Own $200,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --CT Dept. of Energy and Envir. Protection $103,784NOAA $196,274
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Zoom Foundation $100,000Restore America's Estuaries $157,214
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities5.163.696.52
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 900 Chapel Street
Upper Mezzanine, Suite 2202
New Haven, CT 06510
Primary Phone 203 787-0646 106
Contact Email info@ctenvironment.org
CEO/Executive Director Curt Johnson Esq.
Board Chair Leslie Lee
Board Chair Company Affiliation Greenwich Land Trust, Garden Club of America

 

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