New Haven Land Trust
458 Grand Avenue, Suite 111
New Haven CT 06513-3873
Contact Information
Address 458 Grand Avenue, Suite 111
New Haven, CT 06513-3873
Telephone (203) 562-6655 x
Fax 203-n/a
E-mail info@newhavenlandtrust.org
Web and Social Media
Located on the Quinnipiac River, this 35-acre preserve includes tidal wetlands, coastal forest and coastal grasslands. There are two loop trails on the preserve and a bird blind overlooking the salt marsh and river.
Mission

New Haven Land Trust manages 46 community gardens and 6 land preserves covering approximately 80 acres in the City of New Haven. We also provide environmental education. Our mission is to promote the appreciation and preservation of natural resources in New Haven for the benefit and education of the community.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1982
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Justin Elicker
Board Chair Mr. John Richard Logan
Board Chair Company Affiliation United Way of Greater New Haven
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $239,118.00
Projected Expenses $238,042.00
Statements
Mission

New Haven Land Trust manages 46 community gardens and 6 land preserves covering approximately 80 acres in the City of New Haven. We also provide environmental education. Our mission is to promote the appreciation and preservation of natural resources in New Haven for the benefit and education of the community.

Background
In 1982, a group of dedicated visionary people founded the New Haven Land Trust.  The founding resolution stated that the NHLT was formed to preserve, protect and enhance the quality of life within New Haven.  The organization was to preserve ecologically significant open space in New Haven’s densely populated urban area and to create unique opportunities for neighborhood residents to come into contact with their environment.  Environmental education and community gardens were singled out as innovative activities for the NHLT.  Local neighbors would play an important role in determining the use of the parcels and would be encouraged to participate in Land Trust activities. 
 
Today the New Haven Land Trust continues to honor the vision of the founders.  The NHLT owns preserves in six locations comprising approximately 80 acres and two community gardens. It also manages 44 additional community gardens, many on land leased from the City of New Haven. 
 
 The New Haven Land Trust sees opportunity in the next 25 years to expand the founders’ vision.  Community gardens providing food and neighborhood involvement, expanded educational programs, and continued protection of environmental treasures will enhance New Haven’s quality of life.  Our members, volunteers and staff are dedicated to making a difference in our community.
Impact

In 2014, the Land Trust

  • Stewarded gardening activities in 46 gardens across New Haven, engaging over 1,000 gardeners as primary program participants; Distributed 4,800 seedlings, 600 seed packets, and over 150 cubic yards of compost or garden soil to community gardeners; Installed five new sheds from recycled materials, repaired fencing and built 28 new raised beds;
  • Engaged over 2,000 volunteers, assisting in projects in land preserves and community gardens such as invasive removal, trail maintenance, weeding, distributing soil, and building raised beds;
  • Upgraded the trails and built a bridge in the Long Wharf Nature Preserve; Removed invasive plants from 0.5 acres of Quinnipiac Meadows Nature Preserve and replaced them with native trees and shrubs;
  • Established our Youth Stewardship Corps program, where we hired three young people through Youth@Work, a citywide program that provides jobs to young residents who face challenges to workplace success, and one youth supervisor. During the program, youth led a cooking session with children, built raised beds and compost bins, cleaned up preserves, planted trees, and weeded alongside community gardeners, including residents of senior housing communities;
  • Led a series of 7 successful gardening workshops, plus a beekeeping demonstration which featured 2 new hives; plus a summer series of Environmental Education workshops including a canoe trip on the Quinnipiac River and a live bird show and walk;
  • Bethesda Lutheran Garden donated over 90% of their harvest to Christian Community Action; St. Martin de Porres Garden and the Amistad Catholic Garden gave most of their produce to the Amistad soup kitchen.

In 2015, we will continue with all of the above listed efforts and plan to expand our Youth Stewardship Corps program, our Environmental Educational offerings, and our Community Garden infrastructure projects.

Needs
THE LAND TRUST'S MOST PRESSING NEEDS THIS YEAR ARE:
    • Financial support to build capacity so we can increase community outreach and engagement in our gardens and land preserves. Critical to our success is our ability to support staff time for community outreach, to offer educational workshops and implement infrastructure improvements on our nature preserves and gardens.
    • Financial support to make improvements in gardens. We plan to continue to build new community gardens to satisfy the interest and need in the community while maintaining our current gardens to have access to healthy food. Investments of personnel time and resources to put new garden beds, import clean soil and purchase tools are necessary to make these new gardens a success.
    • Volunteers who can organize and lead projects in various gardens; for example, someone who could organize others to build new beds or construct storage sheds in gardens.
    • Increased funding for research into potential land acquisition to increase the size of our land preserves.
    • Volunteers to serve on our Gardens and Preserves Committees, which assist the Land Trust to make decisions and priorities concerning our gardens and land preserves
CEO Statement Many New Haveners are still faced with challenges finding stable employment. As a result, low income communities are particularly at risk when it comes to access to healthy food.  Our community gardens provide an important resource for community members to have access to healthy food at little to no cost.  Contributions to the Land Trust enable us to reach more residents and provide additional garden support such as educational workshops, free seeds and seedlings, water, and access to safe productive growing space to empower more people to sustain themselves and live healthier lives.  Residents of New Haven also have limited opportunities to engage in their natural environment, which is why we find it so important to protect areas where they can recreate and enjoy open spaces.
Board Chair Statement We are fortunate that people have become more aware of the environment and the value of our natural resources. Passions for the environment and great programs have enabled us to attract great board and committee volunteers from across the city. The community gardens, preserve and education programs all take the work of many people. We need to challenge ourselves to better recognize outstanding service of our existing volunteers and build on successes in growing our volunteer base. There is much to be done and it is far too easy for us to rely on those loyal volunteer who shoulder so much work. A challenge for our organization is to continually recruit and develop new volunteers by giving them progressive leadership roles in the organization. If we can continue to improve our success at recruiting, retaining and developing volunteers, the New Haven Land Trust will have a even greater impact in the community.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Environment / Garden Clubs
Secondary Organization Category Education /
Areas Served
New Haven
The Land Trust serves every neighborhood in the City of New Haven.
Programs
Description The New Haven Land Trust manages 46 community gardens in the city of New Haven, providing technical assistance and supplies. We work with neighborhood residents, tenant associations, block watches, social service agencies, schools, youth groups, and the elderly. By creating community vegetable gardens, we transform vacant urban lots into productive hubs of activity that benefit the community in many ways.  The gardens clean up the soil, beautify the neighborhoods, and provide an avenue for healthy exercise, stress relief, enhanced emotional well being, and skill development. It also becomes a family opportunity to work together and teach sustainable living while enjoying delicious home grown bounty. Many of the Land Trust gardens are in resource-poor, low-income neighborhoods and provide access to nutritious food that is free or low-cost, thus easing the strain on household budgets. 
Population Served General/Unspecified / Hispanic, Latino Heritage / Blacks, African Heritage
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Immediate impact - in 2014:
  • Stewarded gardening activities in forty-six gardens across New Haven, engaging over 1,000 gardeners as primary program participants; distributed 4,800 seedlings, 600 seed packets, and over 150 cubic yards of compost or garden soil to community gardeners; Installed five new sheds from recycled materials, repaired fencing and built 28 new raised beds at gardens throughout the city.

  • Led a series of seven successful gardening workshops, plus a beekeeping demonstration which featured new hives at Liberty-Springside Garden.

  • St. Martin de Porres Garden served over 200 through donations to the Downtown Evening Soup Kitchen; the Bethesda Lutheran Garden donated over 90% of what they grew to Christian Community Action up to twice a week; and the Amistad Catholic Workers Garden gave produce to the soup kitchen next door.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Gardeners report increased consumption of fresh produce as a result of gardening;
Gardeners report community cohesion, more connections with neighbors;
Gardeners report increased self-sufficiency skills through gardening 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Land Trust conducts a survey at the end of the growing season that each garden manager fills out to report on what's been grown, number of community members involved, activities and events held, challenges and successes.
We recently redesigned our performance measures for the Garden Program to better track impact on behaviors, community conditions, and health and well-being of those involved in the program.   
A Garden Committee comprised of six District Garden Coordinators
 meets every two weeks to report on garden developments and activities, identify key issues and decide on strategies for addressing those issues.
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Reports from various gardens:

"The garden gets people from different ethnicities and immigrant groups working together. Passersby express curiosity and appreciation for its contribution to the neighborhood."

"People are friendlier. It has made the neighborhood nicer. An area for dumping became a garden. The neighborhood has come together, a place to gather around to admire and talk about.""It gives people a chance to experience nature and grow food. It bring neighborhood people together, in a positive way."

"It gives people a chance to experience nature and grow food. It brings neighborhood people together in a positive way."

"The community gardening program is wonderful and has changed the emotion, economic and spirititual life of the community."

"The community gardening program is a wonderful resource and continues to be a bright spot in this portion of the Hill neighborhood. I have many great stories and pictures of fun and produce growing and harvested over the years."

Description Since 1986 the New Haven Land Trust has acquired approximately 80 acres of land which will remain publicly accessible open space. These habitats include tidal wetlands, coastal upland forest and grassland, traprock ridge, riparian forest and fresh water wetlands. Our goals for these preserved lands are to maintain them in a natural state and to restore areas degraded by human impact to high quality biologically diverse environments for the benefit of New Haven residents and the New Haven environment.
Population Served General/Unspecified / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Three-four nature walks are conducted each year on the preserves, involving approximately sixty people. 
We made major improvements in three of our land preserves in 2012 - a dam removal project is underway in one; invasive control project in another; a bird blind and bird habitat education signage constructed in Quinnipiac Meadows Preserve; a 2012-2013 trail renovation, footbridge construction and educational signage project is underway at the Long Wharf Nature Preserve.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
It is difficult to measure the absolute impact of the Preserve program on the broader community in terms of awareness raised, knowledge gained, well-being. 
We don't know exactly how many people visit our preserves, as they're always open to the public, but we estimate that 200-300 people enjoy them each year.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
A sign-in book at the trail heads on three of our Nature Preserves allow us to gather qualitative feedback on visitors' experience of the preserves and their ideas for improvement. 
We keep track of the # of people who attend our nature walks and collect general feedback from attendees to improve future events. 
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. We are currently improving our process for gathering feedback from visitors that will provide qualitative data on how their experience of the preserves impacted their attitudes, behavior, and knowledge of natural habitats.
Description In 1982 the founders of the New Haven Land Trust were motivated to try to preserve the remaining undeveloped natural areas in New Haven. As land was acquired it became apparent that environmental education had to be part of our mission. Offering guided nature walks both introduced the public to our preserves and reinforced the importance of conserving nature in an urban setting. As a supporting partner, the Garden Club of New Haven made a significant contribution to this effort by developing and teaching a curriculum for school children at the Long Wharf Nature Preserve. We are also pursuing a passive approach by installing educational signage at our preserves. We developed three self guided nature walks: one at Long Wharf Nature Preserve and two at Quinnipiac Meadows Nature Preserve. Currently Quinnipiac Meadows is a site for Yale University plant research and on any given school day you may find students from the Sound School using the Long Wharf Preserve in their education.
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. By the end of each workshop, participants will be report increased knowledge in the subject area and, in the case of gardening workshops, report new skills for growing produce. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Participants in our gardening and urban habitat education workshops will have an increased knowledge of the urban natural environment and, depending on the focus of the workshop, new skills for gardens or new knowledge of wildlife habitats in New Haven. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We conduct post-workshop participant evaluation surveys.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Gardening workshops in 2013 - 
In workshop evaluation surveys -  95% of participants reported that the workshop was very useful.  
Description In 2014, we established our Youth Stewardship Corps program, where we hired three young people through Youth@Work, a citywide program that provides jobs to young New Haven residents who face challenges to workplace success, and one youth supervisor. During the program, youth led a cooking session with children, built raised beds and compost bins, cleaned up preserves and planted trees. They also weeded alongside community gardeners, including residents of senior housing communities. In 2015, we hope to expand this program to include up to 6 youth.
Population Served / /
Program Comments
CEO Comments
With the need in New Haven for access to healthy food continuing to grow, the Land Trust's primary challenge is our personnel capacity to conduct outreach, implement projects and provide educational opportunities.  Financial contributions that allow us to increase the amount of time our staff work with community members directly improves our ability to increase the number of community gardens; residents' knowledge on how to garden; environmental education opportunities and volunteer events; and to expand our potential to increase the land that we preserve for the benefit of the New Haven community .
CEO/Executive Director
Justin Elicker
Term Start Feb 2014
Email justin.elicker@newhavenlandtrust.org
Experience

Justin is a seasoned community leader who brings incredible energy, entrepreneurial spirit and passion for the mission of the New Haven Land Trust.

Professionally, Justin has worked with the Yale Office of Sustainability and served as a sustainability consultant to numerous companies. He has a dual master’s degree from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and the Yale School of Management. Elicker’s community and environmental leadership includes the Friends of East Rock Park, which he reinvigorated with Cedar Hill resident Betty Thompson, and New Haven Green Drinks, which he co-founded. He served for four years on the New Haven Board of Aldermen, spearheading environmental initiatives and serving as an informal advisor to the Food Policy Council. Most recently, he completed a city-wide campaign for mayor. As a candidate, he demonstrated his ability to effectively lead a large-scale outreach effort, raise funds and motivate staff and volunteers to engage thousands of people across the city.

As executive director, Justin manages the organization’s administration and programs. He also is charged with organizing and strengthening the Land Trust’s already robust network of volunteers in running programs, raising funds and increasing the visibility of the organization.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 2000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 0%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 2
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Catherine Bradshaw Apr 2013 - Mar
Chris Randall Mar 2010 - Jan 2013
Senior Staff
Title Operations Manager
Experience/Biography Laura has worked in the nonprofit community for the past 11 years with experience in events planning, program coordination and management. Laura received an MA in Public Service with a specialization in nonprofit leadership in 2012 and a Bachelor of Fine Art in 2003. From 2007-2009, Laura served as a small business developer for the Peace Corps in a rural village in the mountains of Morocco.
Title Community Garden Manager
Experience/Biography Emily recently relocated to Connecticut from Durham, North Carolina where she founded and managed the Duke Campus Farm, an experiential education tool for students, staff and the surrounding community. Emily also received a degree in Public Policy from Duke University in 2010. She oversees the Land Trust's nearly 50 community gardens throughout New Haven. 
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Collaborations
The Land Trust’s long history has enabled us to develop strong relationships with many regional partners in environmental and urban agricultural issues. We have worked closely with our partners on joint projects that span from jointly run garden and preserve educational programs, to an "incubator garden" program which brings families that have graduated from New Haven Farms' nutrition education program into community gardening, to a large-scale dam removal project to improve fish migration. Partners are critical to our day to day success and important to the long-term success of our organization.
Board Chair
Mr. John Richard Logan
Company Affiliation United Way of Greater New Haven
Term Jan 2012 to Apr 2016
Email jrlogan@newhavenlandtrust.org
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Ms. Liz Acas Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects
Dr. Paula Armbruster Retired
Mr. Brad Armstrong New Haven Farms
Mr. Jason Bischof-Wurstle New Haven Museum
Mr. Leonard Grauer
Ms. C. Walker Holmes Trust for Public Land
Mr. Dan Kops Quinnipiac River Group, Make Haven
Ms. Allie Perry Community Volunteer
Mr. Errol Saunders
Ms. Anne Schenck Retired
Ms. Maria Tupper Community Volunteer
Ms Betsy Yagla New Haven Promise
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 6
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Risk Management Provisions
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Medical Health Insurance
Board Co-Chair
Mr. Jason Bischoff-Wurstle
Company Affiliation Yale University
Term Jan 2012 to Apr 2015
Email jasonbischoffwurstle@newhavenlandtrust.org
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Education
Nominating
CEO Comments
We are fortunate that people have become more aware of the environment and the value of our natural resources. Passions for the environment and great programs have enabled us to attract great board and committee volunteers from across the city. The community gardens, preserve and education programs all take the work of many people. We need to challenge ourselves to better recognize outstanding service of our existing volunteers and build on successes in growing our volunteer base. There is much to be done and it is far too easy for us to rely on those loyal volunteer who shoulder so much work. A challenge for our organization is to continually recruit and develop new volunteers by giving them progressive leadership roles in the organization. If we can continue to improve our success at recruiting, retaining and developing volunteers, the New Haven Land Trust will have a even greater impact in the community.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2015
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2015
Projected Revenue $239,118.00
Projected Expenses $238,042.00
Spending Policy N/A
Documents
Form 990s
9902013
9902012
9902011
9902010
9902009
9902008
9902007
9902006
IRS Letter of Exemption
Tax Exempt Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$97,359$18,174$49,142
Government Contributions$36,059$68,200$68,000
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$36,059$68,200$68,000
Individual Contributions------
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses$9$358$22
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$7,503$10,216($3,702)
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$87,595$96,735$100,394
Administration Expense$19,382$20,177$12,019
Fundraising Expense$12,414$9,686$4,787
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.180.770.97
Program Expense/Total Expenses73%76%86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue9%11%4%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$1,667,758$1,659,438$1,672,326
Current Assets$171,683$139,931$156,923
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$7,861$21,080$4,318
Total Net Assets$1,659,897$1,638,358$1,668,008
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $71,115The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $45,400 --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCity of New Haven $25,000City of New Haven $25,000 --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Energy & Environmental Protection $11,059Greater New Haven Green Fund $10,000 --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities21.846.6436.34
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 458 Grand Avenue, Suite 111
New Haven, CT 065133873
Primary Phone 203 562-6655
CEO/Executive Director Justin Elicker
Board Chair Mr. John Richard Logan
Board Chair Company Affiliation United Way of Greater New Haven

 

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