New Haven Family Alliance
230 Ashmun Street
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 230 Ashmun Street
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 786-5970 x305
Fax 203-777-5839
E-mail barbara.tinney@nhfamilyalliance.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
To foster family well-being by strengthening parent's ability to provide healthy nurturing environments for their children and by providing supports for children and youth so that they thrive emotionally, socially, academically and spiritually.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1991
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms Barbara J Tinney MSW
Board Chair Mr. Dan Santos
Board Chair Company Affiliation Crest Lincoln Mercury
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $1,299,418.00
Projected Expenses $1,299,418.00
Statements
Mission To foster family well-being by strengthening parent's ability to provide healthy nurturing environments for their children and by providing supports for children and youth so that they thrive emotionally, socially, academically and spiritually.
Background

Established 25 years ago as a child welfare reform agency.  NHFA’s goal is to improve children’s developmental outcomes. NHFA helps parents increase their capacity to guide and nurture their children; supports family members physical, emotional, social and spiritual well being; and works with families so that they can become financially self-sufficient and economically stable. NHFA carries out the agency mission through individual, group and community based innovative interventions and advocacy. Six core programs anchor the NHFA mission; The Male Involvement Network (MIN) fatherhood program, Move to Work (MTW) employment readiness program, the Street Outreach Workers (SOWP) youth violence intervention program, Intensive Family Preservation (IFP) to strengthen families where abuse/neglect has occurred; Strengthening Schools through Family and Community (SSFC) for academic achievement;  the New Haven Juvenile Review Board (JRB) and the Hamden Juvenile Review Board for diversion from juvenile court to a community model of  balanced and restorative justice; a Clinical Services unit led by a licensed clinician provides trauma-informed outreach and case management training for staff members and mental health screening, assessments and referrals for participants in all NHFA programs. The NHFA holistic intervention model has proved highly effective in meeting the needs of very low income urban mothers, fathers and children by connecting parents to their children and reconnecting parents and families to their communities.

The process of coalition building and systems change is part of the agency’s core mission. NHFA works in collaboration with national, state and local partners to advance our mission and create the better off conditions that sustain positive outcomes for children, youth and families. Partnerships with the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars at Yale and with The Consultation Center support the agency's capacity to conduct quantitative and qualitative research to inform, evaluate and enhance NHFA programs.

Our own history and present experience, along with our research resources are primary sources of information for our activities (guided by the members of the communities we serve) to continuously improve our organizational performance. Our implementation of a Results Based Accountability (RBA) framework is equipping NHFA with the skills to use data and information technology effectively to track, measure and document the impact our services have in the lives of the populations we serve.  

Impact

Accomplishments: 1)

Due to SOWP and other efforts, from 2013-2013 to 2014-2015 program years, in New Haven the instances of youth gun violence have decreased by 25%.  This outcome exceeded the city’s goal to reduce youth gun violence by 20% by 2013.  2) 2014: NHFA provided direct child and family services to 668 high risk children and youth age 13 and older including: 373 JRB participants from New Haven and Hamden;  255 SOWP participants. 3) In 2013: NHFA Male Involvement Network fatherhood program (MIN) developed a new partnership, Fathers’ Education and Leadership Training (F.E.L.T.), with the CT Department of Children and Families. MIN outcomes included: a 67% increase in the amount of child support paid by non-custodial fathers that participated in a child support enforcement pilot program as compared to payments made prior to enrollment in the pilot program and a 72% increase in frequency of child support payments made at program completion as compared to frequency prior to program engagement.

 

Goals: That the NHFA will increase significantly its impact in the community through the development of its capacity to be an organization that:

  • Is a learning organization that uses evaluation tools and collects data and knowledge that is used to improve and refine its programs.
  • Is responsive and adaptive, can monitor, assess and respond to external and internal changes to develop, alter or enhance programs; and can predict and prepare for changes in resources.
  • Is an effective and efficient manager of organizational resources with the technical expertise to implement all of the key organizational functions.
  • Has the appropriate technology infra-structure, data collection is automated and used to inform program design and managerial decisions.
  • Has a resource management plan that will include the development and implementation of the NHFA business model and the building of a capital structure to support it
Needs
  • $50,000 in unrestricted dollars for operational support 
  • $10,400 pay for a two year license for the Career Ready 101, classroom instruction and individualize web-based software to prepare youth and adults to attain the National Career Readiness Certificate.  The certificate is recognized nationally by business and union associations.  Includes preparation in job soft skills, financial literacy, career exploration, job interview skills, resume writing, interest surveys and job searches
  • $12,000 to provide work-learn stipends for 10 youth @ $1,200 (10 weeks x 10 hours per week)
  • $5,000 to re-design NHFA web-site
  • $5,000 to support pro-social activities for youth at risk or gun violence
CEO Statement

In the gray areas of change and crisis, with determination and a sense of urgency, the NHFA reaches toward new levels of thinking to shape effective action and promote the wellbeing of our city’s children. Our sense of organizational purpose makes it possible for us to tackle the significant problems of our time: the affects of chronic, persistent poverty, fatherless households, economic and educational exclusion, the disproportionate representation of youth of color in the juvenile justice system, youth gun violence, and racial disparity in the rate of incarceration of African American and Latino adult males. When a society fails to include all its people in its social and economic development, it fosters despair, hopelessness and violence in those excluded. NHFA helps stakeholders unite to include all of our city’s children and families, and the city  and everyone in greater New Haven benefits. NHFA ventures into New Haven’s impoverished neighborhoods with a message of inclusion, hope, justice and peace.    

 We are poised to be an impact organization and we are fully engaged in the Results Based Accountability process of defining in measurable terms better off conditions that will result in increased well-being for our city’s most vulnerable residents. 

 

The NHFA envisions a New Haven in which all members of our communities—elders, adults, teenagers, and children alike feel nurtured, secure, beautiful, smart and capable; a city where vibrant, successful, economically stable families are the hallmark. A New Haven community in which all children love and believe in themselves, are surrounded by loving parents and caring adults, hold the highest aspirations, and are ably prepared to soar, to reach their fullest potential, are able to compete in the global labor market and can become leaders in their community, the nation and the world. We believe that collectively we can turn this vision into reality for all of our children and families.

We are a resilient organization and our strength is built on the leadership that comes from the resilient populations we serve.

Board Chair Statement

Welcome to New Haven Family Alliance. 

On behalf of the Officers and Board of Directors, I extend greetings. Thank you for partnering with us in our mission to strengthen the lives of children, families and ultimately, our community. 

 

I am a lifelong native of New Haven and the well-being of this city and its residents has always been a priority for me.

 

Healthy families are the strength of any city. Many families today face significant challenges and obstacles to leading healthy, productive lives. It is our desire and privilege to stand beside the families we serve, providing support, exposure, and opportunities for growth and empowerment through a myriad of support services provided by New Haven Family Alliance.

 

Since its inception in 2000, the Male Involvement Network has provided support services for 200 enrolled participant fathers annually. Established  in October of 2007, the NHFA New Haven Juvenile Review Board has diverted 200 youth from Juvenile Court annually and, since 2012, the NHFA Hamden Juvenile Review Board has diverted 70 youth from Juvenile Court annually and reducing recidivism and promoting youth development. Just as noteworthy is our Street Outreach Worker program serves over 200 high risk youth to prevent youth gun- involved violence. Every year, the NHFA Intensive Family Preservation and Reunification Program (IFP) serves 50 families with children who have been abused or neglected by improving the parents’ capacity to nurture their children in a safe environment.

 

These are simply numbers. Upon entering our site, you will find detailed descriptions of all NHFA programming and the work we do with these populations.

 

As an organization, we believe it is our responsibility to be accountable to the public we serve to produce measurable outcomes; to work collaboratively so that our families and communities are better off as a result of our collective work in the not-for-profit sector..

 

We believe that the City as a whole and teh residents of greater New Haven will reap the rewards of the time, energy, financial commitment, and support we have provided to so many at-risk children and families. It is our belief that  your support for the New Haven Family Alliance will improve the quality of  the life of many for generations to come.

 

It is our passion to see children and families realize their fullest potential.

We welcome your support.

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Youth Development / Alliances & Advocacy
Secondary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Community Coalitions
Tertiary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Areas Served
New Haven
The NHFA serves the greater New Haven community with 90% of individuals and families served residing  in New Haven's low income neighborhoods.The remaining 10% of families served reside in the towns surrounding New Haven.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
The Alliance recognized the devastating consequences of absent fathers in the lives of children who are poor and established the Male involvement Network (MIN) fatherhood support services over a decade ago. In response to the epidemic of youth gun violence, the agency operates the Street Outreach Worker (SOWP) youth gun violence prevention and intervention initiative, designed to provide engagement, support and guidance for young people making extradinarily unhealthy decisions for themselves and their communities.  The Balanced and Restorative Justice approach that frames our Citywide Juvenile Review Board (JRB) offers juveniles with misdemeanor offenses an avenue to address the harm they do themselves, their victims and their community and avoid the stigma of the juvenile justice system . We entered a unique relationship with the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars at the Yale School of Medicine and in partnership engaged young people impacted by community violence in a community based participatory research project that lifted their voices in the dialogue about youth gun violence.  In partnership with the New Haven Public Schools we are implementing a school based JRB to serve as an additional tool for school personnel to manage students behaviors that interrupt the learning process without removing the student from school. We are poised to be an impact organization that is driven by producing measurable better off conditions for our families and communities.  As we have matured as an organization, we have become more proficient in our ability to maximize the benefits of our range of services. 
Programs
Description

The Male Involvement Network (MIN) is a coalition of 25 service providers, institutional partners and participant fathers who have joined together to collaborate in functional working partnerships. MIN'S purpose is to ensure that coordinated services are provided to men and fathers to develop, enhance and strengthen relationships with their children, families and communities. MIN is a unique collaborative model, designed to equip existing service providers with the knowledge and skills needed to serve fathers. The program goals are to prepare men to meet the emotional, social and financial responsibilities for their children. MIN employs case management, psycho-educational workshops (fatherhood education and healthy relationship education), workforce development, peer support group(s) and mentoring approaches to engage men in this knowledge development and skill building work. MIN helps fathers develop their capacity to engage positively in their children’s lives.  

Population Served Males / Females / Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
85% of enrolled  non-custodial low income fathers complete service plan goals and increase time spent with children
 
80% of fathers refered for services by judicial problem solving court will be compliant with child support orders
 
80% of enrolled fathers will demonstrate increased time spent with children  
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
80% of  fathers receiving MIN services will be healthy economically, socially, emotionally and physically; will have healthy relationships with their children and with their children's mothers and and will provide the support their children need in a safe environment. 
 
Increase the capacity of the MIN to offer comprehensive fatherhood services incrementally from 200 to 400 low income fathers annually over 3 years.
 
MIN establishes a market presence as a leader in the provision of fahterhood/men's services in Connecticut and the place to go to for fatherhood expertise and training.
 
MIN routinely utilizes Results Based metrics and data to drive management decision making and program enhancements
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
State of Connecticut Department of Social Services
Male Involvement Network Membership
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Engaged 30 member organizations as part of Male Involvement Network; more then 50% of have been members for over 5 years;
 
MIN awarded 300,000 two year department of justice second chance mentoring grant.  Only DOJ mentoring grant awarded in CT
 
MIN recertified as a State of Connecticut fatherhood site meeting rigorous national standards for fatherhood programs
 
Description

The Juvenile Review Board (JRB) is a Balanced and Restorative Justice diversion approach designed for juvenile offenders. The JRB provides juvenile first time offenders who take responsibility for their offenses with an opportunity to avoid going to juvenile court by engaging with a panel of volunteer community members where the juvenile confronts the harm done to themselves, their victims,and their community. Parents must be actively involved in the process.  The JRB is a strength based, youth development intervention  which reframes the juvenile offender’s behavior by addressing these behaviors as harm that can be restored. Juveniles enter into a restorative contract that both holds them accountable for their actions and focuses on their strengths and interest through youth development and youth leadership activities. 80% of JRB completers do not re-offenders one year after completing the program.

Population Served At-Risk Populations / K-12 (5-19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
% of youth not re-arrested for 6 and 12 months post program involvement
% of former parent customers that become volunteer panel member
% of youth participants trained and serving as mentors, tutors or peer mediators during enrollment and at 6 and 12 months post program involvement
% parents that increased their involvment with their child's school by attending parent teacher meetings and important school events
% youth that improve
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
60% Reduction in the number of first time offenders on the Superior Court for Juvenile Offenders docket within the next 3 years;
% of youth completing JRB who graduate from high school
% of youth completing JRB who enter post-secondary education
 
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Successful completion of diversion contract
Monitoring and Tracking of school attendance and performance
Youth input in program continuous improvement process
Participation rates
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
K a 15 y/o female referred to the JRB in 2007 for fighting had been suspended several times at time of enrollment.  K is 18 y/o graduating this year from New Haven Academy and is enrolled in Gateway Community College.
 
B was 16 y/o at enrollment referred to the JRB after being expelled for 180 days in 2009.  The JRb was able to enroll her in the STEP alternative school program where she was able to accumulate credits so that she is graduating  this year from Wilbur Cross and is applying to colleges.
 
98% of referred youth enrolled in program (voluntary participation)
75% reduction in suspensions compared to pre-program
75% of participating youth successfully complete program requirements
75% demonstrate improve behavior in school
Description

The Street Outreach Worker (SOWP) program, a collaborative, multi-faceted approach to reducing and preventing youth gun violence., has contributed to a 37%  reduction in non fatal shootings in its age cohort.  Homicides in this age cohort rose for several years, but have decreased by 71% between 2011 and 2012,  The SOWP employs a model aimed at reducing risk factors and supporting resiliency factors in the lives of participating youth. NHPD, school personnel, parents and other stakeholders identify youth who are at a high risk of becoming perpetrators and/or victims of gun violence with the goal of preventing shootings and killings. Outreach Workers link youth to needed services and engage them in pro-social activities including connecting youth to schools, life skills workshops, employment readiness, health promoting recreation, and conflict resolution training. Conflict resolution and mediation are core SOWP interventions used to stop shootings and retaliations.  

Population Served At-Risk Populations / Families / Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
204 unduplicated youth at high risk for gun violence engaged through the SOWP
70% of youth referred, self-referred and recruted enroll in program
60% of enrolled youth completing productivity plan
50% of youth age 16 and older engaged by Street Outreach workers participate in conflict mediation, life skills, employment readiness and/or vocational skills development activities.
60% of court involved youth receive positive court, probation and/or parole considerations through advocacy efforts
 
 

Third party evaluation (Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar) of project effectiveness was completed in 2009

There has been a 10% decrease in youth-related (15 yrs. – 21 yrs.) shootings since July 2007.               

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
50% Reduction in youth involved (10 - 21) gun violence by 2014 in  the City of  New Haven
70% of participating youth without arrest at 6 and 12 months post program
50% Reduction in youth-involved gun violence by neighborhood by 2014
50% of high school participants graduate
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success is monitored by the City of New Haven Community Administrative Services department
Description

Strengthening Schools Through Family And Community (SSFC) is a program designed to support the academic achievement of children in grades k-8 with attendance issues and who exhibit behavioral problems. The program goal is to improve student academic performance and mastery. This is accomplished by assisting students ain their efforts to address behavioral concerns and thelping parents establish effective parent-school relationships; supporting students and teachers in the school setting; assisting in meeting families basic needs when necessary; advocating for both students and parents in school , juvenile court, and at suspension and expulsion hearings and in other setting as needed. Approximately 95% of students currently served by SSFC meet criteria for free lunch and reside in single female headed households. 

Population Served At-Risk Populations / Families / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Student supportive services provided in 10 schools, 6 K-8 schools and 4 high school
76 students were served during this period and 63% demonstrated improved attendance and/or improved in-school behavior
A school based Juvenile Review Board has been implemented in one middle shcool to serve as an additional tool for managing student behaviors that disrupt the learning process;
 
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Schools, Communities and Families will work in unison to support the academic achievement of students in the New Haven Public School system who are challenged to meet their grade level academic demands, manage in-school behavior and attend school on a regular basis.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
SSFC success is monitored by the New Haven Public Schools central office.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Piloted and implemented a school based Juvenile Review Board
Of the 14.5% of students engaged by SSFC who were not attending school, 100% were either re-connected with NHPS or enrolled in the adult education program.
The SSFC staff have successfully partnered with 10 schools in the NHPS system.  These include k-8 and high schools.
Description

Move to Work (MTW) is a 5 day a week job readiness & vocational training program that prepares participants receiving cash assistance from the Department of Social Services for the labor force. The program is designed to meet the needs of both mothers and fathers. Program services include life skills and pre-employment skill development, customer service skill development leading to a customer service credential and job development and placement. Participants receive case management to support employment plan goal attainment and address their barriers to employment.  Many of the parents referred to MTW are challenged with the need to change behaviors that have grown out of multi-generational dependency on public assistance for their economic well-being.   With help and opportunity many of these parents face this challenge with resolve and a desire to become economically self-sufficient.  

Population Served Adults / At-Risk Populations / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
70% of all Mothers and Fathers enrolled in the Move To Work classes will obtain employment and successfully transition off of public assistance
70% of employed participants will retain employment and become economically self sufficient
Employed participants will advance into living wage jobs 
 
 
 
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success is monitored by the Workforce Alliance of South Central Connecticut
Program Comments
CEO Comments
Preliminary Results Based Acountability measures are defined for all five agency programs.  We contnue to identify key measures that capture who each program serves, what services we offer, how well we performance and who is better off as a result of our work.  Our Board of Directors is engaged in this capacity building work .  The NHFA is faced with the challenge of operating programs with out adequate funding.  While we have been successful in obtaining funds to enhance the MIN and our work with youth at risk of gun violence these and other programs remain underfunded. The NHFA Board of Directors are launching an aggressive fund development campaign.  We look forward to your support as we continue to embrace this critical work
CEO/Executive Director
Ms Barbara J Tinney MSW
Term Start June 1996
Email barbara.tinney@nhfamilyalliance.org
Experience
The Executive Director has over 30 years of human development experience.  10 years in the private sector in human resource and project management capacities and 17 years in the public sector, 14 years as executive director of the New Haven Family Alliance.  Ms Tinney is a Masters Level Psychiatric Social Worker
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 27
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 40
Staff Retention Rate 78%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 17
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 6
Native American/American Indian 1
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 12
Female 15
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr Mustaffa Abdul Salamm June 1991 -
Senior Staff
Title Director of Operations and Fiscal Manager
Title Director of Clinical Services and Case Management
Title Manager, Youth and Education Services
Title Juvenile Review Board Coordinator
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
  • Male Involvement Network
  • Juvenile Review Board Advisory Committee
  • Juvenile Review Board Community Panels
  • New Haven Police Department
  • New Haven Collaborative
  • New Haven Public Schools
  • Robert Woods Johnson Clinical Scholars
  • Community Mediation
  • Health Equity Index Collaborative
  • Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Steering Committee
  • CARE Capacity Building Committee
  • New Haven Healthy Start
  • State of Connecticut Fatherhood Council
  • The New Haven Re-entry Roundtable
  • Local Implementation Service Team
  • New Haven Police Department
  • City of New Haven Youth Services Department

 

Comments
CEO Comments

1) NHFA’s fiscal, administrative and programmatic infrastructure has not kept pace with its development and implementation of innovative programs and interventions. This is in part a result of limited non-restrictive, flexible funds. In response to this challenge, the agency is implementing the recommendations proposed in the FMA assessment report

2) NHFA needs to reduce administrative cost in order to stabilize its financial situation in 2015 and beyond. As part of this effort by the end of December, NHFA is moving its office to a less expensive, community based location in the Dixwell neighborhood.

Board Chair
Mr. Dan Santos
Company Affiliation Crest Lincoln Mercury
Term Sept 1999 to Sept 2015
Email dsantos46@comcast.net
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Dr. Diana Ariza Quinnipiac University
Mr Michael Brooks mbrksconsulting
Mr Darrell L. Brooks Beulah Land Development
Carol Brutza Gateway Community College
Patricia Dewitt Yale New Haven Hospital
Mr Curtis Hill Concept for Adaptive Learning
Dr Gloria Holmes Ph.D.Quinnipiac University
Atty. Michael Iacurci J.D.Law Office of Michae Iacurci
Mr Robert MacAlpine retired
Vice Chairman Donald Nelson Mr.Retired Pfizer Senior Vice President
Ms Barbara J Tinney MSWNew Haven Family Alliance, Inc.
Ms Larcina C Wynn New Haven Family Alliance, Inc.
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 4
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Board Co-Chair
Mr Donald Nelson
Company Affiliation Retired
Term Sept 2006 to Sept 2015
Email nelsondr512@yahoo.com
Standing Committees
Finance
Nominating
Personnel
Executive
CEO Comments
The Board of Directors has added 3 new members. The Board of Directors and the Executive Director are currently establishing both an emergency succession plan and  a succession plan
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2015
Fiscal Year End June 30 2016
Projected Revenue $1,299,418.00
Projected Expenses $1,299,418.00
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201220112010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$112,676$238,397$159,698
Government Contributions$1,424,528$1,417,280$1,311,791
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$1,424,528$1,417,280$1,311,791
Individual Contributions------
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses----$2
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$8,769$22$2,166
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Program Expense$1,240,533$1,174,092$804,597
Administration Expense$430,651$444,294$653,790
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.931.021.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses74%73%55%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Total Assets$118,437$250,594$148,285
Current Assets$92,299$218,577$110,644
Long-Term Liabilities$119,182$64,203$78,554
Current Liabilities$102,639$164,564$122,863
Total Net Assets($103,384)$21,827($53,132)
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201220112010
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGraustein Memorial Fund $75,000Graustein Memorial Fund $225,000 --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.901.330.90
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets101%26%53%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments NHFA Board of Directors will be working with the Yale School of Management to develop a five year strategic planning that includes a fund development plan.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 230 Ashmun Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 786-5970 305
CEO/Executive Director Ms Barbara J Tinney MSW
Board Chair Mr. Dan Santos
Board Chair Company Affiliation Crest Lincoln Mercury

 

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