New Haven Family Alliance
230 Ashmun Street
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 230 Ashmun Street
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 786-5970 x305
Fax 203-777-5839
E-mail barbara.tinney@nhfamilyalliance.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
To foster family well-being by strengthening parents' ability to provide healthy nurturing environments for their children and by providing supports for children and youth so that they thrive emotionally, socially, academically and spiritually.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1991
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Barbara J Tinney MSW
Board Chair Mr. Dan Santos
Board Chair Company Affiliation Crest Lincoln Mercury
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $1,040,948.00
Projected Expenses $1,040,948.00
Statements
Mission To foster family well-being by strengthening parents' ability to provide healthy nurturing environments for their children and by providing supports for children and youth so that they thrive emotionally, socially, academically and spiritually.
Background

 Established over 25 years ago as a child welfare reform agency, the NHFA employs multiple approaches to reach its goal of improving children's developmental outcomes.   NHFA helps families become financially self-reliant, strengthen parents’ attachment to their children and connection to their communities, and as a result, increase their capacity to guide and nurture their children to promote their physical, emotional, social and spiritual well-being. This intervention model has proven to be highly effective in meeting the needs of very low income urban children.

 

Five core programs anchor the NHFA to its mission: 1) the New Haven Street Outreach Program (SOWP), a violence prevention program that provides interventions and deterrents to youth violence; 2) the Juvenile Review Board (JRB), a program to divert juvenile offender from the formal juvenile justice system; 3) the Male Involvement Network (MIN), a coalition of providers and institutional partners with a comprehensive approach to working with non-custodial fathers to achieve positive outcomes for their children; 4) the Intensive Family Preservation Program (IFP), a partnership with Yale Child Study Center, that responses to findings of parental abuse or neglect by the Department of Children and Families, by improving parents’ capacity to care for their children. 5) Strengthening Schools through Family and Community Program (SSFC) provides students and their families with case management, promote academic success, prevent and reduces truancy, and provide alternatives to suspension and expulsion when students do not comply with school rules.

The process of coalition building and systems change is part of the agency’s core mission. NHFA works in collaboration with national, state and local partners to advance our mission and create the better off conditions that sustain positive outcomes for children, youth and families. Partnerships with the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars at Yale and with The Consultation Center support the agency's capacity to conduct quantitative and qualitative research to inform, evaluate and enhance NHFA programs.

To continuously improve our organizational performance, the NHFA relies on its own history and experience, participant and community input, along with its research resources to inform the design of new programs and the enhancement of current programs. NHFA implementation of a Results Based Accountability (RBA) framework is equipping the agency with the skills to use data and information technology effectively to track, measure and document the impact our services have in the lives of the populations we serve.

Impact

Impact (2015 -2016)

1) Juvenile Review Board (JRB): served 230 youth from New Haven and Hamden. 93% successfully completed the program and improved school attendance and achievement.

2) Male Involvement Network (MIN) served 150 parents, 143 non-custodial fathers & 7 non-custodial mothers received services to meet basic needs, health & mental health needs. 110 parents met their service plan goals by increasing their parenting knowledge and skills through parenting education classes and increased parenting time with their children. 77 parents increased taxable income with new employment or salary increases. 34 parents who were in arrears, improved compliance with child support orders.

3) Street Outreach Worker Program (SOWP) provided youth gun violence prevention services to 168 youth at high risk for gun violence in 2015-16. In collaboration with law enforcement and other city efforts, threw a significant, 34%, reduction in non-fatal shooting in New Haven 2012 to 2016

4) Intensive Family Preservation provided home-based clinical services and case management that enabled parents in 50 families involved in DCF because of child abuse or neglect to improve their capacity to provide responsible nurture and guidance for their children so that the children were able to remain at home with their families.

5) Strengthening Schools: served 120 students at high risk of delinquency, truancy and defiance of school rules. 100 students completed the academic year; 80 students advanced to next grade; 5 of 7 seniors graduated from high school. 20 students were suspended; 5 were expelled, 20 were arrested.

Goals:

The NHFA will increase significantly its impact in the community through the development of its capacity to be an organization that:

· Is a learning organization that uses evaluation tools and collects data and knowledge that is used to improve and refine its programs.

· Is responsive and adaptive, can monitor, assess and respond to external and internal changes to develop, alter or enhance programs; and can predict and prepare for changes in resources.

· Is an effective and efficient manager of organizational resources with the technical expertise to implement all of the key organizational functions.

· Has the appropriate technology infra-structure, data collection is automated and used to inform program design and managerial decisions.

· Has a resource management plan that will include the development and implementation of the NHFA business model and the building of a capital structure to support it.

Needs

The NHFA has identified the need to support its program with the following investments:

  • $5,000 to support pro-social activities for youth at risk of gun violence
  • $10,400 to pay for a 2 year license for the Career Ready 101 classroom instruction and individualized web-based software used to prepare youth and adults in obtaining the National Career Readiness Certificate recognized by business and union associations.
  • $50,000 in unrestricted dollars for operational support
CEO Statement

Welcome to the New Haven Family Alliance.

Healthy families and healthy children make a healthy community. NHFA builds family and community strength and resilience. NHFA believes that children are safer and families are stronger when communities work together and parents feel recognized and supported for their efforts to keep children safe, healthy and learning.

The NHFA has three central beliefs:

(1) Empowering families and building on their strengths, nurtures healthy family functioning that keeps families together in their communities.

(2) Integrating natural supports within the community fosters self-reliance.

(3) Strong, healthy families can be their own advocates and can help reform systems to meet family needs.

Board Chair Statement

Welcome to New Haven Family Alliance. 

On behalf of the Officers and Board of Directors, I extend greetings. Thank you for partnering with us in our mission to strengthen the lives of children, families and ultimately, our community.

I am a lifelong native of New Haven and the well-being of this city and its residents has always been a priority for me. Healthy families are the strength of any city. Many families today face significant challenges and obstacles to leading healthy, productive lives. It is our desire and privilege to stand beside the families we serve, providing support, exposure, and opportunities for growth and empowerment through a myriad of support services provided by New Haven Family Alliance.

The NHFA provides these services through its five programs. Since its inception in 2000, the Male Involvement Network has provided support services for 200 enrolled participant fathers annually. Established in October of 2007, the NHFA New Haven Juvenile Review Board has diverted 200 youth from Juvenile Court annually and, since 2012, the NHFA Hamden Juvenile Review Board has diverted 70 youth from Juvenile Court annually and reducing recidivism and promoting youth development. Every year, the NHFA Intensive Family Preservation and Reunification Program (IFP) serves 50 families with children who have been abused or neglected by improving the parents’ capacity to nurture their children in a safe environment. Just as noteworthy is our Street Outreach Worker program serves over 200 high risk youth to prevent youth gun- involved violence.

These are simply numbers. Upon entering our site, you will find detailed descriptions of all NHFA programming and the work we do with these populations.

As an organization, we believe it is our responsibility to be accountable to the public we serve to produce measurable outcomes; to work collaboratively so that our families and communities are better off as a result of our collective work in the not-for-profit sector..

We believe that the City as a whole and the residents of greater New Haven will reap the rewards of the time, energy, financial commitment, and support we have provided to so many at-risk children and families. It is our belief that your support for the New Haven Family Alliance will improve the quality of the life of many for generations to come.

It is our passion to see children and families realize their fullest potential.

We welcome your support.

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Youth Development / Alliances & Advocacy
Secondary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Community Coalitions
Tertiary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Areas Served
New Haven
The NHFA serves the greater New Haven community with 90% of individuals and families served residing  in New Haven's low income neighborhoods.The remaining 10% of families served reside in the towns surrounding New Haven.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
The Alliance recognized the devastating consequences of absent fathers in the lives of children who are poor and established the Male involvement Network (MIN) fatherhood support services over a decade ago. In response to the epidemic of youth gun violence, the agency operates the Street Outreach Worker (SOWP) youth gun violence prevention and intervention initiative, designed to provide engagement, support and guidance for young people making extradinarily unhealthy decisions for themselves and their communities.  The Balanced and Restorative Justice approach that frames our Citywide Juvenile Review Board (JRB) offers juveniles with misdemeanor offenses an avenue to address the harm they do themselves, their victims and their community and avoid the stigma of the juvenile justice system . We entered a unique relationship with the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars at the Yale School of Medicine and in partnership engaged young people impacted by community violence in a community based participatory research project that lifted their voices in the dialogue about youth gun violence.  In partnership with the New Haven Public Schools we are implementing a school based JRB to serve as an additional tool for school personnel to manage students behaviors that interrupt the learning process without removing the student from school. We are poised to be an impact organization that is driven by producing measurable better off conditions for our families and communities.  As we have matured as an organization, we have become more proficient in our ability to maximize the benefits of our range of services. 
Programs
Description

 MIN aims is to improve child outcomes and strengthen families by supporting low-income, non-custodial fathers in their efforts to be involved parents and be community assets.   The MIN Program helps prepare fathers to meet the emotional, social and financial needs of the children.  MIN provides participants with case management, job readiness training and job referrals, and parenting and healthy relationships training. pasting

In 2015-16  MIN’s enhanced partnership with New Haven healthy Start to reduce infant mortality in African American and Hispanic communities deepened  MIN’s commitment to holistic understanding of family dynamics, stages of family planning from pre-conception to birth of healthy, full weight babies and success in meeting safe baby and child development needs in families when one parent is non-residential and each parent may have other partners and other children. MIN’s ongoing partnership with NHHS strengthens MIN staff’s capacity to use NHHS training effectively for community change and systems change by bringing an equity lens to collective impact and addressing health and mental health inequities that effect healthy pregnancy, keeping babies safe and helping fathers understand their unique and essential role in promoting their children’s healthy development. 

Population Served Males / Females / Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
110  non-custodial low income fathers completed service plan goals and increased time spent with children
 
The target contractual goal was to help at least 25 fathers referred for services from Problem Solving Child Support Court improved compliance with child support goals. 34 fathers improved compliance with child support orders.
   
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
80% of  fathers receiving MIN services will be healthy economically, socially, emotionally and physically; will have healthy relationships with their children and with their children's mothers and and will provide the support their children need in a safe environment. 
 
MIN establishes a market presence as a leader in the provision of fahterhood/men's services in Connecticut and the place to go to for fatherhood expertise and training.
 
MIN routinely utilizes Results Based metrics and data to drive management decision making and program enhancements
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
State of Connecticut Department of Social Services
Male Involvement Network Membership
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Engaged 30 member organizations as part of Male Involvement Network; more then 50% of have been members for over 5 years;
MIN was re-certified through 2019 as a State of Connecticut fatherhood site, meeting rigorous national standards for fatherhood programs.
 
Description

JRB is a Balanced and Restorative Justice diversion approach designed for juvenile offenders. The JRB provides juvenile first time offenders who take responsibility for their offenses with an opportunity to avoid going to juvenile court by engaging with a panel of volunteer community members where the juvenile confronts the harm done to themselves, their victims, and their community. Parents must be actively involved in the process. The JRB reframes the juvenile offender’s behavior by addressing these behaviors as harm that can be restored. 80% of JRB completers do not re-offend one year after completing the program.

Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Participants increase school attendance, increase school attachment, pass to the next grade level or graduate from high school/promoted into high school. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The participants do not repeat delinquent activity. They  graduate from  from high school or find a living wage job.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We track students success by assessing report cards for grades improvement, teachers comments and attendance, record the number of participants that were promoted to the next grade level, graduated from high school, admitted into a secondary education program, and number of students that were not re-arrested.   
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. In 2015-2016, JRB enrolled 230 youth from New Haven and Hamden.  one hundred and forty-nine or 93 % participants successfully completed the program.  
Description

The SOWP is a collaborative approach to reducing and preventing youth gun violence. It aims at reducing risk factors and supporting resiliency factors in the lives of participating youth. NHPD and other stakeholders identify youth who are at a high risk of becoming perpetrators and/or victims of gun violence Outreach Workers link youth to needed services and engage them in pro-social activities including connecting youth to schools, life skills workshops, employment readiness, health promoting recreation, and conflict resolution training. Conflict resolution and mediation are core SOWP interventions used to stop shootings and retaliations.

Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Females / Males
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
In 2015-2016 , SOWP  provided  168 youth at very high risk of  gun violence with one-to-one and group mediation and conflict resolution,  mentoring school advocacy and pro-social activities. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long term success for SOWP is the continued reduction of non-lethal gun violence encounters, a risk youth will reduce their risk factors by attending school, be promoted to the next grade level, graduating from  high school and attending a secondary education program and find and retain a living wage job.. 
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

The New Haven Police Department maintain records of youth gun violence including number of fatalities and number of non-lethal injuries.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

SOWP collaboration with law enforcement and other city efforts to reduce youth violence from 2012 to 2016, resulted in a 34% reduction in non-fatal shooting in New Haven.

Description IFP provides family preservation services to 50 families involved with the Department of Children and Families child protection system whose children are at risk of removal from their families.  NHFA provides intensive, in home clinical and case management services to children and parents to improve family safety and stability and maintain children within their own families and community networks.  Parents will develop the capacity to understand and meet their children's needs and reduce the likelihood of the children placed outside of their families.
Population Served Families / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Families that go through the 12 week intensive intervention aare are stronger and more resilient.  Children are safer, healthier and do better in school.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is monitored by the Department of Children and Families.  IFP staff assess  level of risk to children in their family environment and strength of protective factors when the family begins services, while they receive services and at the end of the 12  or 16 week intervention.. IFP staff make appropriate referrals for aftercare and recommendations to DCF in regard to ongoing family service needs 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. All  50 families served by NHFA IFP in 20015-16  significantly reduced  risk of child abuse/neglect in their homes and significantly increased the protective factors that promote healthy  child development. Staff observations were documented  by evaluating pre and post parent survey scores that measure risk and protective factors.  
Description SSFC services are aligned with the New Haven Board of Education goals for School Change, the YouthStat city initiative and the Right Response school program.  SSFC services include case management for at risk students and their families at home, in school and the community to strengthen school attachment, promote academic success, prevent and reduce truancy,and provide alternatives to suspension and expulsion when students do not comply with school rules.  
Population Served / At-Risk Populations / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Participants will develop a strong attachment to school, prevent or reduce truancy.  Expulsions and suspension will be reduced.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The positive changes that are expected for children and youth who participate in these program include remaining in school, pass to the next grade until graduating from high school.  Participant will find stable employment or enroll in a post secondary program or college. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The evidence of progress in SSFC are reflected in the attendance records, grades, and successful promotion into the next grade level, as well as, counselors and teachers reports.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. SSFC served 120 students in the 2015-16, 100 (80%) completed the academic year, remain in school, 5 of 7 seniors graduated from High School.  Only 20 were suspended and 20 were arrested during the program year.  
Program Comments
CEO Comments
Preliminary Results Based Acountability measures are defined for all five agency programs.  We contnue to identify key measures that capture who each program serves, what services we offer, how well we performance and who is better off as a result of our work.  Our Board of Directors is engaged in this capacity building work .  The NHFA is faced with the challenge of operating programs with out adequate funding.  While we have been successful in obtaining funds to enhance the MIN and our work with youth at risk of gun violence these and other programs remain underfunded. The NHFA Board of Directors are continuing an aggressive fund development campaign.  We look forward to your support as we continue to embrace this critical work
CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Barbara J Tinney MSW
Term Start June 1996
Email barbara.tinney@nhfamilyalliance.org
Experience
The Executive Director has over 30 years of human development experience.  10 years in the private sector in human resource and project management capacities and 17 years in the public sector, 14 years as executive director of the New Haven Family Alliance.  Ms Tinney is a Masters Level Psychiatric Social Worker.
Co-CEO
Experience N/A
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 27
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 40
Staff Retention Rate 78%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 17
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 6
Native American/American Indian 1
Other 2 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 12
Female 15
Unspecified 2
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr Mustaffa Abdul Salamm June 1991 -
Senior Staff
Title Director of Operations and Fiscal Manager
Title Director of Clinical Services and Case Management
Title Manager, Youth and Education Services
Title Male Involvement Network Manager
Title Street Outreach Worker Manager
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
  • Male Involvement Network
  • Juvenile Review Board Advisory Committee
  • Juvenile Review Board Community Panels
  • New Haven Police Department
  • New Haven Collaborative
  • New Haven Public Schools
  • Robert Woods Johnson Clinical Scholars
  • Community Mediation
  • Health Equity Index Collaborative
  • Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Steering Committee
  • CARE Capacity Building Committee
  • New Haven Healthy Start
  • State of Connecticut Fatherhood Council
  • The New Haven Re-entry Roundtable
  • Local Implementation Service Team
  • New Haven Police Department
  • City of New Haven Youth Services Department

 

Comments
CEO Comments

1) NHFA’s fiscal, administrative and programmatic infrastructure has not kept pace with its development and implementation of innovative programs and interventions. This is in part a result of limited non-restrictive, flexible funds. In response to this challenge, the agency is implementing the recommendations proposed in the FMA assessment report

2) NHFA needs to reduce administrative cost in order to stabilize its financial situation in 2015 and beyond. As part of this effort by the end of December, NHFA is moving its office to a less expensive, community based location in the Dixwell neighborhood.

Board Chair
Mr. Dan Santos
Company Affiliation Crest Lincoln Mercury
Term Sept 1999 to Sept 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Dr. Diana Ariza Quinnipiac University
Mr Michael Brooks mbrksconsulting
Mr Darrell L. Brooks Beulah Land Development
Carol Brutza Gateway Community College
Patricia Dewitt Yale New Haven Hospital
Mr Curtis Hill Concept for Adaptive Learning
Dr Gloria Holmes Ph.D.Quinnipiac University
Atty. Michael Iacurci J.D.Law Office of Michae Iacurci
Mr Robert MacAlpine retired
Vice Chairman Donald Nelson Mr.Retired Pfizer Senior Vice President
Ms Barbara J Tinney MSWNew Haven Family Alliance, Inc.
Ms Larcina C Wynn New Haven Family Alliance, Inc.
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 4
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Board Co-Chair
Mr Donald Nelson
Company Affiliation Retired
Term Sept 2006 to Sept 2017
Email nelsondr512@yahoo.com
Standing Committees
Finance
Nominating
Personnel
Executive
CEO Comments
The Board of Directors has added 3 new members. The Board of Directors and the Executive Director are currently establishing both an emergency succession plan and  a succession plan
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $1,040,948.00
Projected Expenses $1,040,948.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
Documents
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$147$353,166$122,310
Government Contributions$1,310,056$1,349,180$1,338,532
Federal------
State$327,125$327,125$300,292
Local------
Unspecified$982,931$1,022,055$1,038,240
Individual Contributions------
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses------
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other--$5,159$11,897
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$1,031,302$1,205,573$1,190,064
Administration Expense$316,734$455,727$400,061
Fundraising Expense--$185--
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.971.030.93
Program Expense/Total Expenses77%73%75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$252,181$119,407$98,494
Current Assets$231,452$98,678$78,240
Long-Term Liabilities$219,630$56,213$118,213
Current Liabilities$243,075$233,043$201,051
Total Net Assets($210,524)($169,849)($220,770)
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountYale Child Study $246,227Yale Child Study $246,227Yale Child Study $246,227
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDCF $227,125DCF $227,125DCF $226,125
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Labor $100,000CT Dept. of Labor $100,000DSS $74,167
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.950.420.39
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets87%47%120%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments NHFA Board of Directors will be working with the Yale School of Management to develop a five year strategic planning that includes a fund development plan.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 230 Ashmun Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 786-5970 305
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Barbara J Tinney MSW
Board Chair Mr. Dan Santos
Board Chair Company Affiliation Crest Lincoln Mercury

 

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