Student Parenting and Family Services
181 Mitchell Dr
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 181 Mitchell Dr
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 497-7455 x
Fax 203-946-2938
E-mail rmooreevans@parentingstudents.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

 Student Parenting and Family Services’ (SPFS) mission is to help teenage parents remain in school and achieve academically and to support the emotional, cognitive, social and physical development of members of adolescent families. SPFS works to accomplish this mission by achieving the following goals:

1)  To facilitate the access of teenage parents to public education;

 
2)  To provide school-based, integrated support services for teenage parents and care for their children, including early childhood and parenting education, and social services;

 
3) To foster the emotional, educational, social and physical development of the children of teenage parents; and

 
4) To improve the academic, social and economic outcomes of teenage parents.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1994
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Robin Moore Evans
Board Chair Bonnie Bayuk
Board Chair Company Affiliation none
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $376,796.00
Projected Expenses $391,232.00
Statements
Mission

 Student Parenting and Family Services’ (SPFS) mission is to help teenage parents remain in school and achieve academically and to support the emotional, cognitive, social and physical development of members of adolescent families. SPFS works to accomplish this mission by achieving the following goals:

1)  To facilitate the access of teenage parents to public education;

 
2)  To provide school-based, integrated support services for teenage parents and care for their children, including early childhood and parenting education, and social services;

 
3) To foster the emotional, educational, social and physical development of the children of teenage parents; and

 
4) To improve the academic, social and economic outcomes of teenage parents.
Background

SPFS was conceived in 1992 by a group of law students, health care providers and educators to respond to the high dropout rate among teen parents in New Haven. After two years of planning and fundraising SPFS was incorporated in 1994 as a nonprofit organization. The New Haven Public Schools donated an unused metal shop classroom at Wilbur Cross High School and in 1995 SPFS finished the renovation of the room and began operating an expanding program of services for teenage parents and their children.

For the past 20 years SPFS has operated the Celotto Child Care Center at Wilbur Cross High, providing child care, parent education, academic advising and family support services to 32 teenage parents who attend high schools in New Haven and their 32 children, annually. 

Five conceptual pillars that underlie SPFS’s programs are:

1. Relationship-based programming. SPFS’s staff take the time to develop trusting relationships with children and youth.

2. Continuity of care. The programs are designed to ensure continuity of care for both the children of teenage parents and the teenage parents. SPFS has very low staff turnover.

3. Cultural competence. All of SPFS’s staff are culturally competent. Staff receive annual training to enhance their cultural competencies.

4. Holistic services. A young family’s every identified need is either addressed within SPFS or by connecting the young family to other community services.

5. High expectations.  SPFS expects that teen parents will finish high school, achieve academically and become self-supporting in the future. 

SPFS’s program has been presented at the national Healthy Teen Network conference, the U.S. Conference of Mayors, and numerous local conferences. The program has also been featured in the New York Times and in journals of the early childhood and health care professions.

Impact

SPFS’s top accomplishments in 2014 were the following:

1. 98% of teenage parents served graduated from or continued in high school (did not drop out). This figure represents incredible accomplishment for the students, as many were struggling with the challenges of poverty, homelessness and family dysfunction, in addition to managing the challenges of raising a child while in high school. Nationwide, only 38% of teen mothers do not drop out of high school. 10 seniors graduated high school in June, 2014. 9 of the 10 had been accepted to college or a vocational program at the time of their graduation.

2. 100% of the young children served were up-to-date with immunizations and well-child visits.

3. 96% of the young children achieved developmental milestones; one child who appeared to need early intervention services to address a developmental delay was referred to Birth to Three.

4. 98% of teenage parents served did not have a second child while they were in high school. Nationwide, studies have found that only 75% of teen mothers do not have a second child within two years of giving birth.

 

In addition to the goal of maintaining high quality services, SPFS’s top goals for the current year are:

1. To secure sufficient funding to maintain the program’s essential services.

2. To develop an effective method of following-up with program graduates to gather information about their successes and challenges after graduation from high school and provide counseling and information to help alumni address post-high school challenges, including completing college coursework, securing college financial aid, locating employment and identifying a quality early childhood or pre-k program.

3. To conduct a Board  recruitment drive to increase the number of people on its Board of Directors.
Needs

1. Funding to fill a gap created by the elimination of a state grant that had funded SPFS’s outreach program.

2. Volunteer Board members with time to actively work on the organization’s marketing and fund raising.

3. A volunteer web designer to update SPFS’s website.

4. A volunteer graphic designer able to assist SPFS in designing its annual report and summer newsletter.

5. Contributions to enable SPFS to finish updating the equipment and supplies in its fourth and final room, with new cribs, chairs, toys and books.

CEO Statement

Student Parenting and Family Services is the only program in the state that provides teen parents with support, parenting education and quality child care in an accredited child care program inside a high school. 

Without our Celotto Child Care Center, the infants and toddlers we care for might left with rotating babysitters who provide minimal stimulation and opportunities for development.  At the Celotto Center, the children are nurtured all day by caring teachers. One of the things that is unusual about our program is our grouping of children across age groups. While many child care programs have an infant room and a separate toddler room, we group our children in “family groupings” which allow older toddlers to “help” nurture younger children, and enable younger children to learn from older children. We believe this grouping encourages the development of language, social and emotional skills, and empathy. This grouping also allows children to remain in the same group with the same teachers during all the years of their enrollment in the program. All children need consistent caregivers, and for our high risk children, continuity of care is especially important.  The “family grouping” structure requires teachers who are skilled and flexible, and we have worked hard to attract and retain high quality teachers. National estimates of turnover in child care settings are between 25% and 40% annually. Our annual teacher turnover rate over the past five years is 8%.

Another special aspect of our program is the way our small office, which serves as an administration/counseling/tutoring office, is full of constant, hopeful activity.  I see our therapist connecting with a teen parent for the start of a therapy session; a teacher helping a teen parent learn about introducing nutritious foods to her toddler; our education specialist meeting with a teen parent about college applications; and a teen and her aunt working out family disagreements to create a more peaceful home. Our staff are willing to do whatever it takes to help launch our teen parents and their babies and toddlers, and their dedication shows in the achievements of our young families.

Board Chair Statement

I have had the good fortune to be working with Student Parenting and Family Services’ program since its inception close to 20 years ago.  I have watched, over these many years, the amazing work that our director, teachers and  staff have done for the care and well being of not only the children involved in our child care center but for the teen parents and their extended families as well. Our Board members support the college attendance of our teen parent program graduates by raising scholarship money; during our scholarship interviews with teen parents preparing to graduate from the program, the teens talk about how important the program is in allowing them to further their own educations and how they have higher hopes for their children than they would have imagined when they first became pregnant.  As a Board member, I can give support to the program to help it maintain its mission and remain a viable option for teen parents and their children. 

 We are challenged, in these difficult economic times, to secure enough funding to maintain our programs. Our budget is lean, and there is little to cut; the vast majority of our expenses are people: our therapist, early childhood teachers and education specialist and outreach worker who are so critical to the educational and social successes of the teen parents in our program. Our Board and staff are working to better publicize our fantastic outcomes and increase giving to the program. Many studies have shown that it makes good economic sense to improve teenage parents’ parenting skills and high school graduation rates, but I also find it personally gratifying to watch young parents, whom were at such high risk of dropping out of school, get their diplomas and celebrate with their children. 

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Secondary Organization Category Education / Secondary & High Schools
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / Child Day Care
Areas Served
New Haven
SPFS serves teenage parents from across New Haven, who attend a public regular, magnet or charter middle school or high school in New Haven.

 

Programs
Description SPFS’s Elizabeth Celotto Child Care Center is located inside Wilbur Cross High and provides child care and parent education to 32 teen parents attending school in New Haven and their 32 children. The NAEYC-accredited Center provides quality early childhood education to the teens’ children every school day and during times when teen parents attend tutoring, enrichment activities or vocational training. Teen parents receive “hands-on” parenting education. A nurse consultant provides episodic care. Five mini-buses provide daily transportation for the young families to and from the child care center.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. 95% of teenage parents will remain in or graduate from school.
100% of the children of teenage parents will achieve developmental milestones or will be referred to special services if necessary.

100% of children will be up-to-date with immunizations and well-child visits.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
75% of teenage parents will become financially self sufficient.
 
75% of the children of teenage parents will enter kindergarten ready to learn.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
High school attendance and graduation records.
Ages and Stages Developmental Screening.
Client files reviewed by nurse consultant.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. In past years, researchers from the Yale School of Nursing have conducted studies of Student Parenting and Family Services’ (SPFS) program. Those studies and SPFS’ own internal program evaluations show the following outcomes:

§ Over a five year period, 99% of teenage parents using the Center continued in or graduated from high school, compared with less than 50% of teenage parents who do not have access to special interventions;

§ Teenage parents enrolled in the Center had parent-child interactions that were significantly better than those of teenage parents nationwide;

§ Teenage parents experienced lower levels of parenting stress; and

§ Over a five year period, 99% of infants and toddlers in the Center were up-to-date with immunizations and well child visits, compared to 75% of two year-olds nationwide.

Description The Parenting Students Support Program (PSSP) is staffed by an outreach worker and therapist, who work together to provide teen parents with a range of services. Available services include 1) short-term therapy; 2) monthly support groups; 3) assistance accessing services from outside agencies; 4) individual life skills development; and 5) mediation of family conflicts.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / At-Risk Populations / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
95% of teenage parents will remain in or graduate from high school.
95% of teenage parents will not have a second pregnancy while in high school.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
High school attendance and graduation records maintained by New Haven Public Schools.
Client files maintained by outreach worker and case manager.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. 17 year-old Juan had custody of his son due to his son’s mother’s mental health issues. Juan lived with his parents and had dropped out of high school. SPFS helped Juan enroll in adult education and provided child care for Juan while he attended adult education. Juan spoke frequently with SPFS staff about his feeling that his parents were not supporting his efforts to raise his son. SPFS’s staff helped Juan explore both his childhood and his current relationship with his father, and helped Juan express his feelings about growing up without a father and improve his communication with his parents. Juan’s mother and father responded to Juan by becoming more supportive of his education and parenting, and agreed to care for Juan’s son in the evenings so he could work. Juan’s father is spending more time with Juan and Juan’s son. SPFS’ work with this family helped Juan and his dad, increase their involvement in the life of their young child.
Description

SPFS’s Academic Advising program provides teenage parents with academic supports, including class selection, credit tracking and homework help. The program also provides intensive support for seniors including career exploration, planning for employment and postsecondary education, college visits, and college and financial aid applications. The program provides students with volunteer opportunities that allow students to fulfill their community service requirement for graduation and New Haven Promise, and encourages school attendance through an Attendance Club, where students who attend school a designated number of days each month are rewarded with breakfast and a small gift.

Population Served / /
CEO/Executive Director
Robin Moore Evans
Term Start Feb 2014
Email rmooreevans@parentingstudents.org
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 7
Number of Part Time Staff 4
Number of Volunteers 1
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 92%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 11
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

SPFS has a strong partnership with New Haven Public Schools, which provides the program’s participants with transportation to and from the program every day. Administrators and teachers from New Haven middle and high schools work with the Project to identify teen parents in need of services and to respond to academic needs. 

SPFS also works closely with other community organizations providing services to teens and families with low incomes:
- The Fair Haven Community Health Center provides health consultation to Student Parenting staff and health care to students who attend Wilbur Cross High School. The Health Center also engages in collaborative case management with Student Parenting’s case manager when students consent to the sharing of information.

- The Department of Children and Families (DCF) refers teen parents to Student Parenting’s programs; Student Parenting collaborates with DCF to serve teenage parents who have open DCF cases, providing services, helping teen parents access community services and advising DCF about the specific needs of teen parents who are DCF-involved.

- SPFS has developed a strong partnership with Gateway Community College, where a designated contact person has been a tremendous help with the teenage parents’ transition to college. 

Board Chair
Bonnie Bayuk
Company Affiliation none
Term July 2014 to June 2016
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Nancy Blackwell-Todd New Haven Public Schools
Dawn Gilliams Connecticut Juvenile Probation
Linda Hannans New Haven Public Schools
Russell Outler Webster Bank
Catherine Rees Middlesex Hospital
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 5
Unspecified 0
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $376,796.00
Projected Expenses $391,232.00
Spending Policy N/A
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902013
Form 9902012
Form 9902011
Form 9902010
Form 9902009
IRS Letter of Exemption
SPFS IRS Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$41,000$61,365$49,908
Government Contributions$304,817$407,189$403,345
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$304,817$407,189$403,345
Individual Contributions------
------
$43,499$37,405$69,521
Investment Income, Net of Losses$60$97$353
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$419,986$469,932$491,846
Administration Expense$58,084$59,295$61,536
Fundraising Expense$1,535$1,735$1,856
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.810.950.94
Program Expense/Total Expenses88%89%89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$348,055$359,870$367,668
Current Assets$341,716$354,238$363,580
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$130,158$51,744$34,636
Total Net Assets$217,897$308,126$333,032
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Ed. $168,717CT DSS $207,217CT DSS $210,084
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT DPH $80,556CT DPH $108,396CT DPH $118,340
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCity of New Haven $55,544City of New Haven $67,730City of New Haven $72,674
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.636.8510.50
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 181 Mitchell Dr
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 497-7455
CEO/Executive Director Robin Moore Evans
Board Chair Bonnie Bayuk
Board Chair Company Affiliation none

 

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