Creative Arts Workshop
80 Audubon St
New Haven CT 06510
Contact Information
Address 80 Audubon St
New Haven, CT 06510-
Telephone (203) 562-4927 x
Fax 203-562-2329
E-mail daniel@creativeartsworkshop.org
Web and Social Media
Adult Drawing Class
Four to six year olds in Adventures in Art Summer Program
Young People's Painting Class
Book Arts Gallery Talk

    

 

Mission
Creative Arts Workshop (CAW) is an educational and cultural resource center, devoted to fostering creativity through participation in, appreciation of and leadership in the visual arts in the Greater New Haven area. Creative Arts Workshop affirms its commitment to making its programs available to a broad and diverse population.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1961
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Daniel Fitzmaurice
Board Chair Mr. Ben Bruce
Board Chair Company Affiliation Marketing Professional
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $907,650.00
Projected Expenses $955,650.00
Statements
Mission Creative Arts Workshop (CAW) is an educational and cultural resource center, devoted to fostering creativity through participation in, appreciation of and leadership in the visual arts in the Greater New Haven area. Creative Arts Workshop affirms its commitment to making its programs available to a broad and diverse population.
Background Creative Arts Workshop was founded in 1961 as a learning center for emerging and professional artists alike. From the outset, CAW had a dual commitment to excellence in visual arts education and service to the greater New Haven community. In the late 60s the City of New Haven designated one block of Audubon Street for arts redevelopment, only arts groups could purchase land. Creative Arts Workshop took advantage of this, and by 1972 had its own building. In 1976, thanks to the efforts of an incredible group of people, the mortgage for the entire facility was paid off. Having a facility designed as an art school offering a full range of fine art and craft classes with fully equipped studios has given the Workshop an edge over the similar organizations in the state. The Workshop is now an integral part of New Haven's award-winning Audubon Arts District. Yearly enrollment is about 1500 adults and 600 young people for approximately 320 classes and workshops, which employs 55 artists. CAW has an active schedule of free exhibitions in its two-story gallery, attracting thousands of people each year. These exhibitions present diverse aspects of the arts and crafts industry that relate to the school's education programs. To be responsive to the needs of the CAW community, the curriculum and other programs are evaluated and adjusted periodically. Over 8% of our students have self-identified themselves as having special needs. CAW serves people with emotional and mental problems by integrating them into our regular classes as well as providing one-on-one instruction, often through referrals from therapists and agencies. CAW's classes are open to students of all ages and levels of experience, and both adults and young people come from all over the region to learn new visual arts skills. For advanced students, the Workshop provides an opportunity to pursue independent studies and interact with other artists in critique sessions. Classes are kept small to ensure individual attention. The Workshop is committed to keeping tuition fees as low as possible, and provides tuition assistance valued at approximately $25,000 a year to those in financial need. CAW is supported by tuition fees, grants, generous donors, and fundraising events. Many exhibitions are sponsored by local businesses. Special projects and programs have received grants from the state government, private foundations, local corporations and individual donors.
Impact
  • We hired a new Executive Director, Daniel Fitzmaurice, in January 2105 and are in the thick of our transition.  He is meeting with all stakeholders to learn how best to redirect our resources and energies to strengthen our organization.
  • We ran 315 courses for 2,115 students.
  • We received a grant through the Department of Elderly Services, enabling us to give classes at the three New Haven Senior Centers, serving 220 seniors.  
  • We received a grant from the Institute of Museums and Library Services for the PACK initiative. In collaboration with Yale Center for British Art, Eli Whitney Museum, and the CT Children’s Museum, we provided programs to families and served 150 individuals.
  • Our annual Celebration of American Crafts is a national, juried and invitational exhibition/sale of fine contemporary crafts during the holiday season. It attracted nearly 4,300 visitors. 240 artists from across America were featured.
 
This coming year will be full of challenges as we continue our transition, but they are nonetheless highly welcome.
  • We hired a financial turnaround consultant to give us a clearer picture of our financial situation. Much has been done already: standardized contracts for our faculty with an improved payroll schedule, elimination of unnecessary expenses, and the employment of standard accounting practices. This and more will put us on solid ground to design a realistic budget and fundraising goals. 
  • We are increasing efforts to identify donors from the student body.  Our Board is actively engaged in our fundraising. We are also migrating to a more useful donor management system.
  • We are opening our gallery space for new uses such as live demonstrations, events, and for other organizations' needs.
  • We will rebuild our IT system which is in need of upgrading, bring it into alignment with best practices, and make it more effective for staff and students alike.
  • We are reviewing our programs to insure they are cost effective, eliminating or revamping those that are not.

Needs
  • We need to get our operating budget in the black. We have been operating at a deficit since 2012. As mentioned above, we are engaged in a financial turnaround.
  • We must replace the money used from our endowment fund, which was needed to support our operations given our revenue shortfalls.  We are beginning a recovery campaign.
  • Our building needs a major overhaul. We have done some of this work already. We also are exploring options to make the building more energy efficient. An architect on the Board is helping us to prioritize our needs and see where we might use our space differently.
  • We are reevaluating our programs to insure they are not only helping our students and visitors grow educationally and culturally, but are run at a meaningful profit. We need to reach out to new students who have different needs by offering them different programs while at the same time keeping veteran students engaged.  The use of digital technologies will be key to this effort.
  • We need to reconnect with lapsed donors and reach out to new ones.  CAW is poised to become a more exciting and relevant arts organization, and we are eager to bring donors into the process in more meaningful ways.
CEO Statement
Creative Arts Workshop is the largest community-based art school in the state, offering the widest range of classes, with strong departments in both the fine arts and fine crafts. This focus is demonstrated not only in the course offerings presented each term but also in the nine exhibitions displayed in our two-story gallery throughout the year. We serve those aged between 2 and 92. Our program for Young People continues to thrive and accounts for a third of our on-site programming. CAW's larger adult program is one that needs to be flexible in order to stay current. We frequently analyze our main activity, presenting lifelong learning opportunities in the visual arts. We have confidence that our core group of students and classes will continue to be the heart of our offerings. However in order to grow and attract new students we have identified the need to expand the variety of classes and vary the length of those classes. It is clear that the potential audience from the general population has less time to commit to this type of learning opportunity, and we are constantly revising our class offerings to accommodate them.
 
In addition to focusing on our core program, we also continue to look for and expand opportunities to partner with other organizations to provide high quality arts programming in the community. Examples of these collaborations are mentioned in the Management Section.
 
With the institution of term-limits, we have a new Board emerging, one that is energizing the organization. They are focusing on the need for fund development and beginning to tap an underutilized resource, our student body. This new Board also realizes the need for upgraded IT systems and has committed funds to accomplish it.
 
2014-2015 will be a key year as the relatively new Board takes ownership of the future strategic direction for the organization, the search for a new executive director, and the transition that entails.
Board Chair Statement
2015 is a time for transition and growth at CAW. The start of 2015 marked the first change in leadership in 27 years for CAW as we welcome Daniel Fitzmaurice to the Executive Director role. At an organizational level, the challenges facing CAW include supporting this executive transition, enhancing our financial position, and creating a sustainable strategic plan for the organization.

CAW conducted a diligent, national search for a new executive director over the second half 2014. The search committee consisted of a diverse group, representing students, faculty and board perspectives. The interview and selection process also solicited input from faculty and staff. Daniel was selected with unanimous support from the Board. As the new Executive Director, Daniel is continuing this engagement both internally with the organization and externally with the wider community through open brown bag lunches and town hall forums.

The Board has formed a Transition Committee to support Daniel over the course of 2015. This group of students, board members and faculty will act as a support group and sounding board for Daniel.

As of 2015, the financial position at CAW remains challenging. We will continue with our bi-annual gala, our most successful fundraiser. “Pop-up” auctions, participation in the Great Give, and additional community events are also planned.

CAW will continue a strategic planning process that started in 2014 in advance of the executive director search. This process includes creating groundwork for a potential capital campaign to address the improvements needed to the building. As the largest community arts organization in the state of Connecticut, we face the broad challenge of staying relevant for an evolving student body.

At the board level the Governance committee created and approved best practice policies and procedures.

After two years on the board, 2015 marks my first year as board president. I have grown to know CAW through my three young children. We started with parent-child classes and now, as they have grown, they attend summer camp and classes on their own. The CAW is a place where I can see my children grow through challenging and engaging art taught by excellent faculty. I chose to be on the board because I want to give back to an organization that has brought such wonderful experiences to my family. I look forward to playing my part in helping steward the organization in this time of transition and opportunity.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Arts Education
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
CAW serves the Greater New Haven region. The target population is CAW's current constituents (ages 2-92) and individuals and groups who want to have a quality experience in the visual arts, at either a reasonable cost or with scholarship assistance. Our target population also includes our special needs students, as well as the children, parents and grandparents from underserved neighborhoods who participate in our community programs.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
During this time of significant transition, personally meeting the students, faculty, and supporters of Creative Arts Workshop is my top priority. I am excited to explore the Workshop from all angles, draft a new strategic plan aimed at becoming a national model for visual arts education, and developing solutions to our short and long term fiscal issues.

In 1963, an article promoting a demonstration by Ann Lehman, one of CAW’s founders, proclaimed: “Sparks will fly. Masks will be provided for close observers.” This so vividly expresses dynamic passion within the CAW community. I look forward to cultivating this spark, both in celebrating our legacy, exploring the present, and forging a bright future together.
Programs
Description Classes are open to a diverse population of students aged 2-92, beginners to advanced. Our 55+ teachers are professional artists, many with advanced degrees who teach book arts, drawing/painting, fiber, jewelry, photography, pottery, printmaking, sculpture, and design. Classes are small, offered on a 6- or 12-week basis at a variety of times. We offer intensive weekend workshops by visiting master artists. In addition to after-school programs, youngsters enjoy a popular summer program. We create special programs for the home-schooled and work to meet the needs of those with disabilities.  Surveys show our students greatly benefit from our programs, and we continue to evaluate new ways to  meet their needs.
Population Served General/Unspecified / Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. As a result of the knowledge gained a few years ago from the state sponsored Values/Participation Grant, we have added to or modified our format to better attract new students who wouldn't otherwise take classes. We now offer shorter classes and a wider variety of workshops. For example, we now regularly offer workshops in the decorative arts. These courses are for people who have never thought of themselves as doing art, allowing them an opportunity to experience the creative process in new ways. We have also redesigned our print course brochure to be more user-friendly.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. CAW has just celebrated the 53rd Anniversary of offering quality educational experiences to people from throughout the region. Over the past 15 years, we have seen a shift in the adult student body and are now providing opportunities for a growing number of retirees. While our Young People’s classes are very strong, we have added more programs during school vacations to meet the needs of working parents. We look forward to continuing to do this for another 50 years and beyond, growing in both numbers of students and range of programs offered.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The classes and workshops are monitored by the Executive Director, the Program Director, the Department Heads, and the Board of Directors. Surveys and course evaluations are used to measure and track success. We have introduced online surveys for our adult classes and are sharing the results with Department Heads who then share them with individual faculty members. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. We are known throughout the area as the largest community visual arts school in the state, offering the broadest range of classes. A current pottery student writes, "There are so many opportunities at Creative Arts Workshop if you want to learn. Since I began taking classes here, my life has been changed." Additionally, another student writes, "Many communities provide an adult education program, but the level of the coursework offered is limited and does not have the depth and skill development which many of the CAW students are seeking. CAW provides a resource which is not offered anywhere else in New Haven or the surrounding communities." During the current economic downturn, we have had enrollment that is virtually the same on an annual basis.
Description Our well-equipped studios are available to a wide range of artists. We have open lab studio time for advanced students. CAW's Teaching Assistant Program provides employment opportunities and job skill development for 10-15 high school and college students/year. We have a volunteer internship program with two local colleges for 4-6 interns/year. 
Population Served General/Unspecified / Other Named Groups / Other Named Groups
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Artists with increased skills and expertise in their fields; young people with job skills.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Surveys and teaching assistant and intern evaluations.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. A high school aged teaching assistant writes, "At CAW, I have the chance to explore my own interests in teaching the students individually and my own art skills. The most important piece to me is the fun I have with all of the creative minds that come to CAW; working with all the adults and children is a true treasure. Having a creative outlook for all ages is very important to any community. It gives upcoming or just curious artists of all ages that chance they never got to pursue a passion for art."
Description Exhibitions include works by faculty and students; an annual national exhibition juried by an artist or museum curator of national reputation who selects two prize-winners for a joint show the following year; and the annual Celebration of American Crafts, a national, juried and invitational exhibition/sale of fine contemporary crafts during the holiday season. This event has been expanded to include a fashion show, interior decorating show, and a "Crafternoon" bringing local makers together for a session of sharing their ideas.  The Celebration and our national exhibition provide extensive media coverage opportunities and provide our faculty with valuable teaching tools, giving both local and national artists a venue in which to show and sell their work, while also educating the public in high quality fine arts and contemporary crafts. Every spring, we host an exhibition of artwork by students from a group of 21 regional high schools.  Visitor comments are consistently favorable.
Population Served General/Unspecified / Adults / Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Increased visibility of the Workshop in the community; greater number of general population as well as special needs populations visiting our gallery. We were pleased to have juried show winner Thomas Edwards from Lincoln, NE speak at the opening of his exhibition to the delight of visitors.  We plan to do more artist talks.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The quality of exhibitions has increased over the years and the exhibitions have brought in the larger community to the Workshop. The exhibitions have also given us the opportunity to bring in underserved and special needs populations, giving them a free opportunity where they can learn more about fine arts and contemporary crafts.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Number of visitors to our gallery exhibitions; media attention and reviews.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
By combining multiple exhibitions as we recently did, we draw a larger group of visitors.  Three very different pottery artists and a watercolor painter exhibited and encouraged cross-over interest.  Comments were very favorable.
Description We work with PACK which benefits underserved neighborhoods as well as the entire community. Thanks to a grant in 2014 we work with 3 New Haven museums to provide family art activities. We've expanded a program with Hope for New Haven which holds onsite after-school programs for underserved children 5-12.  We also provide summer programs for them at CAW.  We participate in Arts on the Edge Celebration with other Audubon St. arts organizations each June.
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The short-term success of our programs for the under-served and special needs populations is for the participants to gain a broader understanding of the availability and variety of out-of-school learning cultural centers in New Haven and to learn how to take advantage of these opportunities. A specific example would be for an underserved family to see CAW as a resource that provides quality out-of-school learning opportunities for their whole family.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The long-term success is the ability to continue to work with and meet the needs of agencies who work with under-served and special needs populations. Our long-term goal is to have these populations with whom we work see and understand that studying the visual arts provides valuable lifelong learning opportunities that enrich family connections and enhance social interactions within the community.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. All of our classes are surveyed and we work closely with the agencies to determine their needs.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. The reputation of our community programs has grown. We are getting many more requests for family-centered community art programs than we can fulfill. We are pleased with the success of our collaboration with Mary Wade Home which will continue through 2013, and hopefully beyond.  For our PACK program, the focus has shifted so that now we are taking PACK out into the community. We have held two family-centered art activity events for the Chatham Square Neighborhood Association and one for the Fair Haven Management Team Community Festival. Also the parents involved with the PACK program have taken the projects we have designed back to their churches, schools and community centers to share them, thereby increasing the impact of the program. In addition, some of the PACK participants have signed up for our regular classes (with support from our scholarship programs) and were featured in our Cultural Passages exhibitions.
Description CAW's Scholarship Committee awards scholarships valued at about $25,000 to approximately 150 students each year on a needs basis, giving them the opportunity for study which might otherwise be denied them. We also serve people with emotional and cognitive challenges by integrating them into our regular classes as well as providing one-on-one instruction, often through referrals from therapists and agencies. Over 8% of our students have self-identified themselves as having special needs. 
Population Served General/Unspecified / Other Health/Disability /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. 90% of scholarship requests filled; 70% of special needs instruction provided.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Number of scholarship requests filled and number of special needs instruction requests provided. We evaluate requests for scholarship by reviewing student's previous application and class attendance with instructors. Occasionally we deny requests for a scholarship because the applicant did not use a past scholarship.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. One of our students, a young man with Asperger's Syndrome, was honored with a national Award of Excellence from VSA - The International Organization on Arts and Disability. His work was on display at the Smithsonian Institution as part of ACCELERATE, a juried exhibition of artists with disabilities and was part of the traveling exhibition at CAW in the fall of 2011. Another student exhibited in INTERSECTIONS. She has studied painting here since 2001 after being hospitalized. She says, "CAW is the backbone of support and acceptance of my illness. CAW has kept me going over the last 10 years and pulled me out of difficult places." She says she took a huge artistic and emotional risk by exhibiting in INTERSECTIONS, because society often censors artistic expressions of mental illness. But she knew that her art would be accepted as CAW supports people who want to speak out about their disabilities. Because of her increased skills she now professionally exhibits and sells her works.
Program Comments
CEO Comments
A few years ago, CAW's staff participated in a pilot program dealing with increasing participation in the arts. It gave us a rare opportunity to examine what we offer, both from the content and the format point of view and look at how our offerings coincide with demand. We were trained to conduct interviews and focus groups. From these methods of reaching potential students we found out some very important information: People unfamiliar with the Workshop were reluctant to sign up for a 12 week course; unsure of their level of interest, people were willing to spend more per hour for shorter courses; and more weekend workshops, at all levels, were desirable. We have seen a decline or stagnant numbers in our enrollment, with the occasional session that has increased over the year before. This is not as problematic as is the drop in average number per class. Given the nature of our funding, we can only allow courses for which the tuition received covers the direct costs, usually the teacher's fee. We try not to cancel classes as this discourages future participation and have been letting them run with as few as 4 people enrolled. The more classes we have with only 4 people the less from tuition is being contributed to indirect costs. As a result we have added a facilities fee to each course, roughly $2 per week. This fee is separate and clearly designated as such.
 
We are focusing on the evaluation of our programs and have begun using
an online survey tool. Promotion of all of our activities is also of importance to us. We have limited funds for marketing and promotion and need to make sure that we are using them most efficiently.
 
Our scholarship program has limited funds; we are only able to offer 1/2 of tuition assistance for all who seek it. This means we have seen a drop in the number of scholarship requests.
 
We have seen an increase in the number of people requesting professional internships (usually recent college graduates unable to find work) and have been able to accommodate them on a limited basis. 
CEO/Executive Director
Daniel Fitzmaurice
Term Start Jan 2015
Email daniel@creativeartsworkshop.org
Experience
  • Managing Director - Elm Shakespeare, New Haven, CT from August 2013 to December 2014
  • Assistant Director Audubon Arts - Neighborhood Music School, New Haven, CT from May 2014 to August 2014
  • Founder/Director - Music Studio on Harrison Hill, Portland, OR from January 2010 to May 2013
  • Curator for Community and Music - Saint David of Wales Church, Portland, OR from September 2009 to May 2013
  • Office Manager - Metropolitan Youth Symphony, Portland, OR from October 2012 to April 2013
  • Accompanist - Portland Peace Choir, Portland, OR from October 2009 to March 2012
  • Middle School Music Specialist - Cathedral School, from October 2010 to June 2011
  • Music Educator - Holy Trinity Catholic School from August 2010 to June 2011
  • Senior Counselor - Audubon Arts, New Haven CT from June 2006 to August 2008
Co-CEO
Experience
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 75
Number of Contract Staff 55
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 4
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Ms. Susan Smith Sept 1987 - Jan 2015
Senior Staff
Title Program Director
Title Public Relations Manager
Title Development Associate
Title Drawing and Painting Department Head
Title Sculpture/Jewelry Department Head
Title Photography Department Head
Title Printmaking Department Head
Title Book Arts Co-Department Head
Title Book Arts Co-Department Head
Title Fiber Department Head
Title Pottery Department Head
Title Young People's Co-Department Head
Title Young People's Co-Department Head
Title Registrar
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
AUDUBON ARTS ON THE EDGE, an annual collaboration of Audubon Street arts organizations, is a free family-friendly event in June. In 2014 CAW will participated in Parents and Communities for Kids (PACK)--along with The British Arts Center, The Children’s Museum, and The Eli Whitney Museum--to provide family-centered art activities both in CAW studios and in the community. We offer a summer program for the children of Hope for New Haven. We present the Southern Connecticut Conference High School Art Show annually. Other limited or one-time collaborations include exhibitions of city organizations' art projects, hosting master printmakers for week-long classes of high school students, and providing classes for Girl Scouts and other groups. We are also on the list of United Way's Boost! program providers.

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Greater New Haven Visitors Bureau2010
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Best Artisans GalleryNew Haven Advocate Readers Poll2007
Best Artisans GalleryNew Haven Advocate Readers Poll2008
Community Partner of the YearAlbertus Magnus College2010
Arts AwardArts Council of Greater New Haven1982
Best Arts CenterThe Advocate2014
Second Place for Best Art OrganizationThe Advocate2014
Comments
CEO Comments The Workshop continues to do relatively well weathering the economic downturn. However FY 2012 was the first year in the last 25 years there was a deficit, about 3% of the total budget. We needed to borrow $30,000 from the portion of the endowment that is Board designated. We were unable to pay it back, and in fact incurred a second year deficit in the 5% range. We are now in a budget deficit for a third year, but are making long-verdue changes in our accounting and management systems. Other issues that need to be addressed include the serious condition of the building. While we are fortunate to be in a facility that was built to be an art school, with special consideration for the studios, the building lacks any insulation and the deterioration of the mortar leads to frequent leaks.We are exploring the possibility of solving this problem and making the building more energy efficient. The other area of concern is that while tuition covered up to 70% of the costs in the past, this is no longer the case with the figure being closer to 45%. This means that there is a need for more fundraising, an activity in which the original Board of Directors was not accustomed to participating, and finding other ways of recooping indirect costs.
Board Chair
Mr. Ben Bruce
Company Affiliation Marketing Professional
Term Sept 2014 to Sept 2018
Email bwalkerbruce@gmail.com
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Phillip Alexander Fashion Designer
Judy Birke Art Consultant
Frances Clark Non-profit director
Robert Dannies Retired
Joy Ford Urban Planner
Susan Froshauer Bio-Tech Entrepreneur
Anna Garsten Lawyer
Danielle Ginnetti Business Owner
John Gordon Yale University Art Gallery Assistant Curator
Joyce Greenfield Artist
Thomas Griggs Jr.Hospital Administrator
Charles Jones Utility Manager
Kurt D. Koehler Wealth Manager
Ann P. Lehman Artist
Ingi-Mai Loorand Lawyer
Georgia Newcomb Real Estate Agent
Mark Odyniec People's United Bank
Tom Peterson Photographer
Harold Spitzer Architect
Cheryl Szczarba Real Estate Agent
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 20
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 10
Female 11
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Medical Health Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Standing Committees
Finance
Board Governance
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
CEO Comments
The next few years will be very important for the organization and offer a unique opportunity to consider its strategic direction.  Term limits were instituted for our Board members after 40 years without them. This means that over the course of the next 2 years we will have essentially a new Board. Beginning in 2010 a new Board President immediately changed how the Board operates, bringing it into a new era with focus on Fund Development, Finance, Strategic Goals, and Governance. The current President emphasize the distinction between Board roles and those of the staff. As an organization which was founded by volunteers and that has had Board members chair all its operating committees, this is a huge change in how we are structured. This means an increased responsibility for staff.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $907,650.00
Projected Expenses $955,650.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 5%
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$295,442$323,337$321,210
Government Contributions$23,061$23,803$19,496
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$23,061$23,803$19,496
Individual Contributions------
------
$494,463$533,229$544,487
Investment Income, Net of Losses$12,553$20,373$12,562
Membership Dues$20,187$23,005$23,730
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$15,745$55,909$24,981
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$870,395$908,702$899,058
Administration Expense$183,398$161,610$161,772
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.820.920.89
Program Expense/Total Expenses83%85%85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$859,898$988,546$1,044,909
Current Assets$62,914$39,370$74,515
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$32,731$21,678$14,448
Total Net Assets$827,167$966,868$1,030,461
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $15,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $15,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $20,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountNew Alliance Foundation $10,000New Alliance Foundation $10,000New Alliance Foundation $15,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Seedlings Foundation $5,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.921.825.16
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments After 25 years of not having a deficit, in FY 2012 and 2013 the Workshop experienced shortfalls. Due to the build up of a surplus fund, the impact of the recession didn’t hit CAW until these years. Contributing factors include rising expenses and diminishing enrollment.
Also the organization recognizes that it will need to engage in a substantial capital campaign, probably in the range of $3 to $4 million, to meet growing capital needs, most obviously the condition of the building itself. We have received a recommendation of one solution with a price tag of $500,000. Other options need to be explored. In the meantime we are taking care of only the immediate repairs with a reserve fund set up with surplus dollars.
 
There is a need for a larger endowment, from which we could draw down the interest in an amount that would impact the operating budget significantly. One of the difficulties of the budgeting process is that there is a swing of $60,000 between one year and the next due to the tradition of holding biennial fundraising events. The perception is that the success of the biennial events is due to the fact that we don't tax either the people asked to contribute or the attendees by staging the event every year. In the alternate years we have tried to find events that will raise a more modest $25,000. This year we are holding our gala, but will also be holding more fundraising events (like our pop-up online auction).  Additionally we will be more aggressive in finding more grant opportunities.


Foundation Staff Comments  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon.
Address 80 Audubon St
New Haven, CT 06510
Primary Phone 203 562-4927
CEO/Executive Director Daniel Fitzmaurice
Board Chair Mr. Ben Bruce
Board Chair Company Affiliation Marketing Professional

 

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