Creative Arts Workshop
80 Audubon St
New Haven CT 06510
Contact Information
Address 80 Audubon St
New Haven, CT 06510-
Telephone (203) 562-4927 x
Fax 203-562-2329
E-mail daniel@cawmail.org
Web and Social Media
Adult Drawing Class
Four to six year olds in Adventures in Art Summer Program
Young People's Painting Class
Book Arts Gallery Talk

    

 

Mission
Creative Arts Workshop (CAW) is an educational and cultural resource center, devoted to fostering creativity through participation in, appreciation of and leadership in the visual arts in the Greater New Haven area. Creative Arts Workshop affirms its commitment to making its programs available to a broad and diverse population.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1961
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Daniel Fitzmaurice
Board Chair Antoinette Brim
Board Chair Company Affiliation College Professor
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $712,261.00
Projected Expenses $712,261.00
Statements
Mission Creative Arts Workshop (CAW) is an educational and cultural resource center, devoted to fostering creativity through participation in, appreciation of and leadership in the visual arts in the Greater New Haven area. Creative Arts Workshop affirms its commitment to making its programs available to a broad and diverse population.
Background Creative Arts Workshop was founded in 1961 as a learning center for emerging and professional artists alike. From the outset, CAW had a dual commitment to excellence in visual arts education and service to the greater New Haven community. In the late 60s the City of New Haven designated one block of Audubon Street for arts redevelopment, only arts groups could purchase land. Creative Arts Workshop took advantage of this, and by 1972 had its own building. In 1976, thanks to the efforts of an incredible group of people, the mortgage for the entire facility was paid off. Having a facility designed as an art school offering a full range of fine art and craft classes with fully equipped studios has given the Workshop an edge over the similar organizations in the state. The Workshop is now an integral part of New Haven's award-winning Audubon Arts District. Yearly enrollment is about 1500 adults and 600 young people for approximately 320 classes and workshops, which employs 55 artists. CAW has an active schedule of free exhibitions in its two-story gallery, attracting thousands of people each year. These exhibitions present diverse aspects of the arts and crafts industry that relate to the school's education programs. To be responsive to the needs of the CAW community, the curriculum and other programs are evaluated and adjusted periodically. Over 8% of our students have self-identified themselves as having special needs. CAW serves people with emotional and mental problems by integrating them into our regular classes as well as providing one-on-one instruction, often through referrals from therapists and agencies. CAW's classes are open to students of all ages and levels of experience, and both adults and young people come from all over the region to learn new visual arts skills. For advanced students, the Workshop provides an opportunity to pursue independent studies and interact with other artists in critique sessions. Classes are kept small to ensure individual attention. The Workshop is committed to keeping tuition fees as low as possible, and provides tuition assistance valued at approximately $25,000 a year to those in financial need. CAW is supported by tuition fees, grants, generous donors, and fundraising events. Many exhibitions are sponsored by local businesses. Special projects and programs have received grants from the state government, private foundations, local corporations and individual donors.
Impact
This past year was full of bold changes:
  • The Board developed, implemented, and completed the transition strategy for the new Executive Director, and approved a new five-year strategic plan.
  • We completed the Financial Turnaround and are standing on firm fiscal ground. We are now employing best practices in our accounting and have a firm grasp of our finances.
  • We made sweeping changes to our administrative systems including an overhaul of our registration system to make it more user friendly for students and more useful for our financial and data tracking, and a new donor management system that is simpler, less expensive, and more effective.
  • We successfully completed a capital recovery campaign raising over $250,000 in seven months.
  • We've implemented new strategies to encourage more and earlier enrollments. Thanks to these efforts we see 30% of our students are new to the Workshop.
 This coming year will be full of exciting changes as we implement plans laid out this past year.
  • We will hire a diversity consultant to help us become more culturally aware, inclusive, and relevant.
  • We will be collaborating with more organizations to bring the power of the arts to more lives.
  • We will launch our new financial strategy to prepare for both short- and long-term expenses. This will include enhancing our membership program, starting a long-term capitalization fund, seeking revenues through space rental, and revising and enhancing our financial aid program  to insure more students and artists can participate in our courses.
  • We will continue reviewing our programs to insure they are cost effective, eliminating or revamping those that are not. And we will
    expand core programs and create innovative new ones.

Needs
With our finances now well in hand we can turn our attention to other needs.
  • Becoming more culturally aware and relevant to the diverse populations in New Haven.  Having a more diverse Board, Faculty, and student body will be the goal.
  • Overhaul and fund a more robust financial aid program so that anyone who wishes to pursue the visual arts can do so.
  • Continue to find ways to maintain and improve our building. This will include repurposing space.
  • Reevaluate our programs to insure they are not only helping our students and visitors grow educationally and culturally, but are run at a meaningful profit. We need to reach out to new students who have different needs by offering them different programs while at the same time keeping veteran students engaged.  The use of digital technologies and reaching underserved youth will be key to this effort.
  • Creating a fund development program which requires a deeper understanding of contributed revenue. This includes planned giving and revised membership programs.
CEO Statement
Creative Arts Workshop is the largest community-based art school in the state, offering the widest range of classes, with strong departments in both the fine arts and fine crafts. This focus is demonstrated not only in the course offerings presented each term but also in the nine exhibitions displayed in our two-story gallery throughout the year. We serve those aged between 2 and 92. Our program for Young People continues to thrive and accounts for a third of our on-site programming. CAW's larger adult program is one that needs to be flexible in order to stay current. We frequently analyze our main activity, presenting lifelong learning opportunities in the visual arts. We have confidence that our core group of students and classes will continue to be the heart of our offerings. However in order to grow and attract new students we have identified the need to expand the variety of classes and vary the length of those classes. It is clear that the potential audience from the general population has less time to commit to this type of learning opportunity, and we are constantly revising our class offerings to accommodate them.
 
In addition to focusing on our core program, we also continue to look for and expand opportunities to partner with other organizations to provide high quality arts programming in the community. Examples of these collaborations are mentioned in the Management Section.
 
With the institution of term-limits, we have a new Board emerging, one that is energizing the organization. They are focusing on the need for fund development and beginning to tap an underutilized resource, our student body. This new Board also realizes the need for shoring up governance, expanding diversity, and overseeing finances more thoroughly.
 
Board Chair Statement
2016 marks a time of growth at Creative Arts Workshop. Our Executive Director is into his second year leading the organization. He has built a strong staff team, developed new financial processes for organizational stability, and developed a strong relationship with the Board. We leave behind years of stagnation in our mission thanks to our new financial and administrative stability. With the turning of another page in its history, CAW’s story now takes on more vibrancy.

At the end of the first half of 2016 we will complete our first benchmark year of our Balanced Scorecard. We use this tool for measuring the performance of the strategic plan we completed in 2015. The first year results will help us shape the tactics and actions needed to further improve. Our priorities remain the same, but we will evolve how we endeavor to best meet them.

Creating a strong, vibrant and engaged Board remains a priority. Many of our long-serving Board members are beginning to term off. We appointed a long standing faculty member to the Board and recently added a Board member as the new head of the Nominating Committee. The charge for this committee is to broaden the diversity of the Board both in terms of skill sets and cultural perspectives.

One of CAW’s mainstay events, the Celebration of American Crafts (CAC), will return in 2016 after a year off in 2015. During the hiatus we created a committee with the charge of creating recommendations for a more focused, engaging, and profitable CAC. The committee interviewed volunteers, patrons, and staff, conducted a financial analysis, and created ideas for engaging the CAC customers with the school side of CAW. We look forward to an exciting fall with the re-launch of CAC.

CAW continues to be the “creative home” for my family. My three children will go to camp in the summer and take classes in the spring. I continue to be involved with CAW because I want to give back to an organization that has brought such wonderful experiences to my family. I look forward to playing my part in helping steward the organization in this time of growth.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Arts Education
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
CAW serves the Greater New Haven region. The target population is CAW's current constituents (ages 2-92) and individuals and groups who want to have a quality experience in the visual arts, at either a reasonable cost or with scholarship assistance. Our target population also includes our special needs students, as well as the children, parents and grandparents from underserved neighborhoods who participate in our community programs.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
Creative Arts Workshop is a one-of-a-kind community asset. My first year at the Workshop has focused largely on meeting and learning from our students and faculty, stabilizing our finances and operations, and enacting a comprehensive strategy to accomplish our vision of becoming a national model for effective community arts education. This is a period of change, rejuvenation, growth, and, of course, creativity!
Programs
Description
Classes are open to a broad population of students aged 2-92+, beginners to advanced. Our 55+ teachers are professional artists, many with advanced degrees who teach book arts, drawing/painting, fiber, jewelry, photography, pottery, printmaking, sculpture, and design. Classes are small, offered on a 6- or 12-week basis at a variety of times. We offer intensive weekend workshops by visiting master artists. In addition to after-school programs, youngsters enjoy a popular summer program of week-long classes. We create special programs for the home-schooled and work to meet the needs of those with disabilities. 
 
Additionally our well-equipped studios are available to a wide range of artists for a modest fee. We have open lab studio time for advanced students. These times allow students and professional artists the chance to work on independent projects or simply practice or learn new skills.

Population Served General/Unspecified / Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Our young people's summer program this year will show increased enrollment to due collaborations with other organizations such as Music Haven, IRIS, and underwriting by a regional orthodontist for his young patients. The added benefit of these collaborations is that we are reaching out to underserved populations and will learn a lot from our relationships with them.
 
We recognize that much more needs to be done in programs. And with the successful conclusion of our Capital Recovery Campaign we are now addressing this part of our work for the first time in many years.
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Since 1961 CAW has been offering quality educational experiences to  the region. Our enrollment is steady after a few years of decline; we now are home to over 2000 students a year. So we rely on student evaluations to see where to redirect our attention. Our goal is to increase our numbers by increasing retention of new students, expanding our course menu, reaching out to new artists, offering more financial aid, and developing offsite programs.Then we hope to see expansion of our registrations not just in terms of numbers but in demographics served and relevance. E.g. more students will want to study art for different reasons like career development or to learn about other cultural art forms. But historically surveys show our students greatly benefit from our programs because we provide safe space to learn and experiment through constructive guidance rather than harsh judgment, and we continue to evaluate new ways to keep their creative juices flowing.
 

 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The classes and workshops are monitored by the Executive Director, the Registrar, and the Department Heads. Online course evaluations are used to measure and track success. Department Heads then share them with individual faculty members. We will also depend on feedback from our collaborators to see how effective our programs were for their clients. New leadership on the Board monitors success as well through the lens of fiscal responsibility.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. We are known throughout the area as the largest community visual arts school in the state, offering the broadest range of classes. We have also been named by CFGNH one of eight anchor arts organizations in New Haven. A current pottery student writes, "There are so many opportunities at Creative Arts Workshop if you want to learn. Since I began taking classes here, my life has been changed." Additionally, another student writes, "Many communities provide an adult education program, but the level of the coursework offered is limited and does not have the depth and skill development which many of the CAW students are seeking. CAW provides a resource which is not offered anywhere else in New Haven or the surrounding communities." 
Description
In August 2016 CAW launched its Ambassador program. Twenty-one volunteers ages 17 to 80 work our front desk four hours a week to greet students and visitors, answer phones, help with registrations, and give tours. In exchange they receive a free class and workshop. We are pleased to have an enthusiastic group represent the best of CAW to those new to the Workshop and who readily share their love of the arts with everyone.
 
Our Teaching Assistant Program provides employment opportunities and job skill development for 10-15 high school and college students/year. The summer provides an eight-week full-time position for four of the best candidates to participate in a highly structured professional experience working with our Young People's Department.
 
During our very popular Celebration of American Crafts sale we have had dozens of volunteers who enjoy helping buyers choose a holiday gift and share their love of crafts with visitors. 
 
Our new Gallery Fellow serves one year working with our Gallery Director to help curate and mount seven exhibitions each year. In exchange for this in depth one-of-a-kind opportunity, the Fellow receives a $5,000 stipend.
 
Population Served General/Unspecified / Other Named Groups / Other Named Groups
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
The Ambassadors have greatly lightened the workload of the staff who have taken on more responsibility with the loss of other positions. They call students prior to term to remind the to register and this has boosted our enrollment. They bring problems to our attention that we might not have normally known about. They also deepen the relationship our students have with the Workshop through their own enjoyment and commitment to the role.
 
The Gallery Fellowship is popular; we received over 40 applications for the position. Our first Fellow has demonstrated the value of the program by reducing staff responsibilities and creating a more vibrant exhibition space. And he has appreciated the experience as it contributes to his own career vision.
 
TAs can build their resumes with this experience, which is redesigned to have more two-way feedback and higher expectations.  With their help faculty will have more time to focus on individual students, and students will enjoy more personalized attention as they develop creative skills.
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Since our Ambassador and Gallery Fellowship programs are new, we have yet to see long-term effects, but feedback is positive from both Ambassadors and students and faculty is positive. We are committed to seeing these programs grow.
 
TAs can add to their resume as they advance either toward a career in the arts or simply develop better work and interpersonal skills. We will know better what the long term success will be in a few years since we have radically redesigned this program this year to provide more professional development. Most important our young students will be more engaged in the arts through, which would lead to a greater appreciation of the arts as they grow, if not repeat enrollment in our classes.
 
Other volunteers make the Workshop the exciting welcoming place it is. Without them success would not be possible by any standard. Again we are redesigning our Sale event and believe that volunteers would be more engaged than they have in the past when shifts may have been overly long and frequent.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Surveys of Ambassasdors and in depth immediate conversations with the Gallery Fellow, TAs and other volunteers.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. A high school aged teaching assistant writes, "At CAW, I have the chance to explore my own interests in teaching the students individually and my own art skills. The most important piece to me is the fun I have with all of the creative minds that come to CAW; working with all the adults and children is a true treasure. Having a creative outlook for all ages is very important to any community. It gives upcoming or just curious artists of all ages that chance they never got to pursue a passion for art."
Description
More than proficiency in the arts, success for us means engaging a wide range of people through many kinds of art experiences. To that end we provide exhibitions, lectures, craft sales, and interactive events for exploring the arts. 
 
Exhibitions include works by faculty and students and an annual national juried exhibition. Lectures such as Framing New Haven with architect Robert A.M. Stern, the annual Celebration of American Crafts (an invitational sale of fine contemporary crafts during the holiday season), XOXO Sale of Valentines, and small interactive events the like Edible Book Tea bring people together for fun and to learn more about the arts beyond a studio experience.
 
Population Served General/Unspecified / Adults / Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. We expect to see increased visibility of the Workshop in the community and a greater number of general population visiting our gallery. For example, we were pleased to have Robert A.M. Stern speak about the architecture of New Haven in conjunction with an art sale featuring works by and about New Haven buildings and places. It was the first time we had featured architecture as an art form. As a result many new visitors attended.  We plan to do more artist talks.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The quality of exhibitions will be more reflective of the region. While there is always opportunity for national talent to exhibit, we seek to be more inclusive in showing works that may be more relevant to the New Haven region. This would mean tapping artists whose work reflects different cultural values. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Number of visitors to our gallery exhibitions; revenue generated, media attention and reviews.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
By combining multiple exhibitions as we recently did, we draw a larger group of visitors.  Besides the combination of Robert Stern and the art sale, we also presented "People and Paper" by painter/paper maker Shirley Binin in conjunction with the traveling exhibition by the New England Guild of Book Workers, "Geographies." There were several tour talks associated with the latter. Comments were very favorable for both.
Description CAW looks forward to some new community collaborations this year with a real commitment to creating unique experiences. This is also a major focus of our strategic plan. Thanks to the generosity of one of our donors, students from Music Haven will enjoy tuition-free visual arts classes this summer to round out their experience. A regional professional is underwriting summer classes for children of his patients for the second time. We presented a holiday craftsmaking program at Achievement First in 2015 to 60 students. W provided "KidSpace" interactive family activities at ArtSpace's City Wide Open Studios. And we continue to meet with other area organizations to discuss ways in which we can contribute to the development of their clients through the visual arts.
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The short-term success of our programs for the under-served and special needs populations is for the participants to gain a broader understanding of the availability and variety of out-of-school learning cultural centers in New Haven and to learn how to take advantage of these opportunities. A specific example would be for an underserved family to see CAW as a resource that provides quality out-of-school learning opportunities for their whole family.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The long-term success is the ability to continue to work with and meet the needs of agencies who work with under-served and special needs populations. Our long-term goal is to have these populations with whom we work see and understand that studying the visual arts provides valuable lifelong learning opportunities that enrich family connections and enhance social interactions within the community.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. All of our collaborations are evaluated to insure that they are meeting our strategic goals and meeting our vision. And of course we work closely with the agencies to determine their needs.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. The reputation of our community programs has grown. We are getting many more requests for collaborations than we have in the past. These can be grant funded opportunities, but they are also donor sponsored, which demonstrate the significance our programs in their eyes; they really are putting their money where their mouths are, and we are honored that they support us so enthusiastically.
Description CAW's Scholarship Committee awards financial aid valued at about $25,000 to approximately 150 students each year based on needs or merit. This program is central to fulfilling our mission of making the arts available to everyone. 
Population Served General/Unspecified / Other Health/Disability /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. This is a draw for those for whom the cost of tuition is the primary barrier to creativity. Recently, the number of applications has decreased proportionately to the decrease in our overall student body. We are developing initiatives to increase awareness of financial aid to current and future students.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. 90% of financial aid requests are filled and permit students to continue their lifelong exploration of the arts. However, this program is supported primarily from endowed scholarship funds. Our long-term success is based on radically increasing the amount of funds available, thus, increasing the number of students served.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Success is clear in the number of financial aid requests, percentage of requests filled, and funds generated for the program from our endowment and annual contributions. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. One of our students, a young man with Asperger's Syndrome, was honored with a national Award of Excellence from VSA - The International Organization on Arts and Disability. His work was on display at the Smithsonian Institution as part of ACCELERATE, a juried exhibition of artists with disabilities and was part of the traveling exhibition at CAW in the fall of 2011. Another student exhibited in INTERSECTIONS. She has studied painting here since 2001 after being hospitalized. She says, "CAW is the backbone of support and acceptance of my illness. CAW has kept me going over the last 10 years and pulled me out of difficult places." She says she took a huge artistic and emotional risk by exhibiting in INTERSECTIONS, because society often censors artistic expressions of mental illness. But she knew that her art would be accepted as CAW supports people who want to speak out about their disabilities. Because of her increased skills she now professionally exhibits and sells her works.
CEO/Executive Director
Daniel Fitzmaurice
Term Start Jan 2015
Email daniel@cawmail.org
Experience
  • Managing Director - Elm Shakespeare, New Haven, CT from August 2013 to December 2014
  • Assistant Director Audubon Arts - Neighborhood Music School, New Haven, CT from May 2014 to August 2014
  • Founder/Director - Music Studio on Harrison Hill, Portland, OR from January 2010 to May 2013
  • Curator for Community and Music - Saint David of Wales Church, Portland, OR from September 2009 to May 2013
  • Office Manager - Metropolitan Youth Symphony, Portland, OR from October 2012 to April 2013
  • Accompanist - Portland Peace Choir, Portland, OR from October 2009 to March 2012
  • Middle School Music Specialist - Cathedral School, from October 2010 to June 2011
  • Music Educator - Holy Trinity Catholic School from August 2010 to June 2011
  • Senior Counselor - Audubon Arts, New Haven CT from June 2006 to August 2008
Co-CEO
Experience
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 40
Number of Contract Staff 55
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Ms. Susan Smith Sept 1987 - Jan 2015
Senior Staff
Title Development Manager
Title Drawing and Painting Department Head
Title Sculpture/Jewelry Department Head
Title Photography Department Head
Title Printmaking Department Head
Title Book Arts Co-Department Head
Title Fiber Department Head
Title Weaving Department Head
Title Young People's Co-Department Head
Title Registrar
Title Finance Manager
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
For a while we have been offering a summer program for the children of Hope for New Haven. In 2016 thanks to donor support we will also sponsor children from Music Haven to take courses at CAW to round out their arts experience.  Our Hilles Gallery is hosting two of the New Haven Paint & Clay Club's exhibitions in 2015-2016. In December 2015 we presented a holiday crafts program at Achievement First to 60 students. We offer course discounts to members of the New Haven Arts Council. And in September 2015 CAW, Neighborhood Music School, and NHAC participated in the Park of the Arts Clean Up.

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Greater New Haven Visitors Bureau2010
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Best Artisans GalleryNew Haven Advocate Readers Poll2007
Best Artisans GalleryNew Haven Advocate Readers Poll2008
Community Partner of the YearAlbertus Magnus College2010
Arts AwardArts Council of Greater New Haven1982
Best Arts CenterThe Advocate2014
Second Place for Best Art OrganizationThe Advocate2014
Comments
CEO Comments The Workshop is relieved to have put to rest our financial crisis. Thanks to the leadership of our Board we successfully completed a $250,000 Recovery Campaign. We can now look to growing our funds and programs, which have been stagnating for many years. Other issues that need to be addressed include the serious condition of the building. While we are fortunate to be in a facility that was built to be an art school, with special consideration for the studios, the building lacks any insulation and the deterioration of the mortar leads to frequent leaks.We are exploring the possibility of solving this problem and making the building more energy efficient. The other area of concern is that while tuition covered up to 70% of the costs in the past, this is no longer the case with the figure being closer to 45%. This means that there is a need for more fundraising. Again, our Board is taking an active role in reaching out to former and new donors as well as considering additional revenue sources such as rental income. While challenging, these are very exciting times for the Workshop as we transform ourselves into a model for community arts schools across the country.
Board Chair
Antoinette Brim
Company Affiliation College Professor
Term Sept 2016 to Sept 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Peter Billings Billings & Barrett New Haven Attorneys
Joy Ford Urban Planner
Danielle Ginnetti Business Owner
Barbara Harder Artist/Faculty
Charles Jones Utility Manager
Ann P. Lehman Artist
Ingi-Mai Loorand Attorney
Georgia Newcomb Real Estate Agent
Mark Odyniec People's United Bank
Ruth Sack Artist, Faculty CAW
Harold Spitzer Architect
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Medical Health Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Standing Committees
Finance
Board Governance
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
CEO Comments
The next few years will be very important for the organization and offer a unique opportunity to consider its strategic direction.  Term limits were instituted for our Board members after 40 years without them. This means that over the course of the next 2 years we will have essentially a new Board. Beginning in 2010 a new Board President immediately changed how the Board operates, bringing it into a new era with focus on Fund Development, Finance, Strategic Goals, and Governance. The current President emphasize the distinction between Board roles and those of the staff. As an organization which was founded by volunteers and that has had Board members chair all its operating committees, this is a huge change in how we are structured. This means an increased responsibility for staff.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $712,261.00
Projected Expenses $712,261.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 5%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$338,428$295,442$323,337
Government Contributions$0$23,061$23,803
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified--$23,061$23,803
Individual Contributions------
------
$385,261$494,463$533,229
Investment Income, Net of Losses$6,195$12,553$20,373
Membership Dues$5,927$20,187$23,005
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$40,027$15,745$55,909
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$873,345$870,395$908,702
Administration Expense$129,469$183,398$161,610
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.770.820.92
Program Expense/Total Expenses87%83%85%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$713,829$859,898$988,546
Current Assets$83,087$62,914$39,370
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$111,150$32,731$21,678
Total Net Assets$602,679$827,167$966,868
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $6,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $15,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $15,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --New Alliance Foundation $10,000New Alliance Foundation $10,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.751.921.82
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments The Board of Directors at Creative Arts Workshop has revised its budget creation process for FY16 thanks to the help of a Financial Consultant whose work helped us align our financial management with standard accounting practices. We show an operating deficit again for FY16, but this will no longer be the norm. This budget reflects significant organizational changes, leading to an 86% improvement over FY15 and a 49% improvement over our 5 year average. CAW will utilize Board Designated funds and an increase in contributed revenue to support the budgeted deficit and is projecting a balanced budget in FY17.


Foundation Staff Comments  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon.
Address 80 Audubon St
New Haven, CT 06510
Primary Phone 203 562-4927
Contact Email daniel@cawmail.org
CEO/Executive Director Daniel Fitzmaurice
Board Chair Antoinette Brim
Board Chair Company Affiliation College Professor

 

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