Long Wharf Theatre
222 Sargent Drive
New Haven CT 06511-5919
Contact Information
Address 222 Sargent Drive
New Haven, CT 06511-5919
Telephone (203) 787-4284 x
Fax 203-776-2287
E-mail development@longwharf.org
Web and Social Media
Long Wharf Theatre
Mission

Long Wharf Theatre’s mission is to create theatre of the highest quality that inspires reflection and discourse about each of us and the world in which we live.

 

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1965
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Joshua Borenstein
Board Chair Mr. R. Sanford Stoddard
Board Chair Company Affiliation Realtor, H. Pearce Real Estate Co.
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $5,594,070.00
Projected Expenses $5,594,070.00
Statements
Mission

Long Wharf Theatre’s mission is to create theatre of the highest quality that inspires reflection and discourse about each of us and the world in which we live.

 

Background

Long Wharf Theatre is dedicated to producing plays at the highest artistic level that tell the human story—stories that underscore and reinforce our commonality and reflect what it is like to be alive today. We aim to integrate our work into the fabric of our community, both locally and nationally, in order to stimulate dialogue, become a springboard for discourse, and be an educational resource for students of all ages. Long Wharf annually serves more than 54,000 patrons who come from throughout Connecticut, across the United States, and around the world.

 
One in seven Long Wharf productions has gone on to a future life in New York or at another regional theatre, and more than 30 productions have transferred to Broadway or Off-Broadway. Of our many world premieres, three received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. In 1978, Long Wharf won the Regional Theatre Tony Award, the third such award, and has since earned numerous accolades including Connecticut Critics Circle Awards in multiple categories, including Outstanding Production and awards for directiing, acting, and scenic, costume, lighting, and sound design.
 
We partner with local organizations to integrate themes of our productions into community-wide engagement. This includes our partnership with the New Haven Free Public Library (NHFPL) with which we create Community Conversations, inspired by our plays, in each of the Library’s five city-wide branches. Long Wharf is a micro-branch of NHFPL; books related to our productions’ themes may be borrowed at the Theatre. As well, New Haven residents may also “borrow” tickets from any NHFPL branch for their personal use, which makes the theatre financially accessible to our hometown citizens.

Long Wharf education programs facilitate lifelong learning and encourage individual expression for Greater New Haven residents of all ages. We use themes from our mainstage productions to explore literary, historical, political, and social perspectives of a script through in-school workshops with curricula tied to the Common Core, which culminates in students’ attendance at a Long Wharf play. Our Educators’ Laboratory is a professional development program for educators of all subjects and grade levels that enlivens any curricula through arts-based learning techniques and academic year-long, in-classroom mentorship by a teaching artist. Long Wharf also offers year-long internships and residencies to recent college graduates, as well as group and private acting lessons.

Impact

July 2015 marks the beginning of Long Wharf’s 51th anniversary season. We used our golden anniversary to accomplish four objectives: reaffirm our primacy as a key cultural asset in the region; celebrate our legacy; establish ongoing investments and initiatives in artistic content, education, and community development; and reinforce our connection to the community. Now, as we embark into our second half-century,

Over our 50 year history, Long Wharf has developed a legacy of sustained artistic achievement and a commitment to emerging and established playwrights and the production of their work. During Artistic Director Gordon Edelstein’s thirteen seasons alone, Long Wharf has produced more than thirty world, American, and regional premieres of new work, which keeps the Theatre competitive within the field and brings the best new plays and musicals to New Haven. One in seven Long Wharf productions has gone on to a future life in New York or at another regional theatre, and more than thirty productions have transferred to Broadway or Off-Broadway. Most recently, Long Wharf transferred its productions of SATCHMO AT THE WALDORF and MY NAME IS ASHER LEV to Off-Broadway commercial runs; ASHER LEV received the 2013 Outer Critics Circle Award for Outstanding Off-Broadway Play. SATCHMO received the 2014 Outer Critics Circle and Drama Desk Awards for Outstanding Solo Performance.

Long Wharf elastically applies the themes of each production to conversations with its audiences and the community at large, which allow for meaningful interactions across a wide spectrum of the general public. Long Wharf also works closely with public schools and educators of all subjects and grade levels to create arts-based learning programs that encourage individual expression, facilitate life-long learning and inspiration, and establish the audiences and artists of tomorrow.

Needs

1. Annual Operating Support: General operating contributions directly support all of Long Wharf’s activities, including its mainstage productions, new play development, community engagement initiatives, and educational programs.

2. Artist Development Initiatives: Continued identification of and investment in emerging and established playwrights. Artistic development funding supports commissions of plays and musicals, productions of world and regional premieres, and the education of Long Wharf audiences about the importance of new work.

3. Facility Improvements: While Long Wharf experienced a major renovation of its mainstage in 2012, more investment is needed in its aging facility. In particular, replacement of HVAC system is needed throughout entire facility to improve efficiency and maintenance costs.

4. Endowment: Contributions to Long Wharf’s endowment ensure the long-term financial health of the institution and the Theatre’s continued artistic excellence and investment in the Greater New Haven community.

CEO Statement

Long Wharf Theatre was born fifty years ago because a handful of young and idealistic theatre lovers believed that New Haven deserved a world class theatre company. Over a half-century, Long Wharf has developed, nurtured, and supported a professional theatre that enriches the cultural fabric of our community. Our productions bring the finest actors, directors, designers, and playwrights to the Elm City, and our world premiere plays have continued life on and Off-Broadway and at regional theatres across the country, creating hometown pride for our work.

In a time of diminishing investment in arts education, Long Wharf delivers thousands of students and educators with in-school and at-theatre programming. We provide youth with critical 21st century workplace skills that are sought after in every industry—creative problem solving, working collaboratively in a diverse team, and public speaking and presentation skills—and invest in the skillset of teachers. Furthermore, Long Wharf offers lifelong learning opportunities for community members of all ages, ranging from in-depth discussions of a play’s relevance to Long Wharf to playwriting classes for residents at an assisted living facility.

Your generous support helps to ensure another fifty years of vital and valuable theatre for New Haven. Thank you for your kind consideration of Long Wharf Theatre in your charitable giving plans.

Gordon Edelstein, Artistic Director

Board Chair Statement

Established at the start of the regional theatre movement, Long Wharf is an important cultural asset to both Greater New Haven and the national theatre community. Our institution is led by the dynamic team of Artistic Director Gordon Edelstein and Managing Director Joshua Borenstein. Gordon has been as Artistic Director for 13 seasons, and has developed a critically acclaimed balance between a commitment to the living writer and a fresh approach to the theatrical cannon. In Josh, the Board has found someone who combines wisdom, strength, practical theatre knowhow with strategic savvy. Together, they engage multiple constituencies in our community, have led our theatre into fiscal stability, and ensure our organization remains an important cultural voice in the 21st century.

Long Wharf has historically invested its resources, time, and energy into work on stage and in the community without making comparable investments in its facility. To address this, in November 2012 we completed a $3.9 million investment in our main performance space. In addition to technical upgrades, the renovated The Claire Tow Stage in the C. Newton Schenck III Theatre features new seats with increased legroom; a comfortable temperature from a new (and quiet!) HVAC system; shorter lines for the restrooms; and an expanded lobby. With easy access to highways and abundant free parking, the entire Long Wharf experience is exciting and refreshed—and world-class theatre may now be enjoyed in equally outstanding comfort.

While artistic quality is paramount, Long Wharf recognizes that serving the community through the arts means more than attracting an audience to a show. We have increased our investment in education and community programs that allow for the greatest mission-based impact possible. During our 2012-13 season, we quadrupled in-school residencies and the number of students served has increased by 20%, a service level that we have sustained in the following seasons. These education programs are available to schools across the state, including those in the 20 town and city area that CFGNH serves. We are expanding the reach of theatre through our partnership with the New Haven Free Public Library and through increased productions for families with young children next season.

Long Wharf relies equally upon ticket sales and charitable giving from its audience members, corporations, foundations, government, and individual donors like you. In recognition of our service to the artistic field and the community, I hope you will make a tax-deductible donation in support of Long Wharf’s legacy and its annual season of work.

R. Sanford Stoddard

Chair, Board of Trustees

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Theater
Secondary Organization Category Education / Elementary & Secondary Schools
Areas Served
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
National
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments


Programs
Description

Long Wharf Theatre’s 51st season includes five dynamic plays by living writers and a charming re-envisioning of a Shakespearian classic. Productions include the world premiere of LEWISTON by Samuel D. Hunter, which follows an Idaho family’s struggle with history, the cyclical nature of their past, and their ties to land; Conor McPherson’s drama SHINING CITY, a magnetic tale of how unspoken and hidden secrets impact the world around us; Emily Mann’s HAVING OUR SAY, her adaptation of Delany sisters’ oral history about being the daughters of a former slave and becoming civil rights pioneers; THE LION, a coming-of-age story told through original music and six guitars, written and performed by Benjamin Scheuer; and Ayad Akhtar’s DISGRACED, a compelling tale about the consequences of denying one’s identity. Finally, Long Wharf will present the Fiasco Theater’s production of MEASURE FOR MEASURE, which weaves live music and moxie into one of Shakespeare’s darkest comedies. 

Population Served Adults / Adolescents Only (13-19 years) /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Long Wharf’s 2015-16 productions are brought to life by the finest actors, directors, and designers in the field. Its productions regularly garner feature stories and rave reviews in local and national press, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, The New Haven Register, and Hartford Courant, among other publications.

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Long Wharf Theatre dedicates itself to producing plays at the highest artistic level that tell the human story, stories that underscore and reinforce our commonality and stories that tell us what it’s like to be alive today. Our 51st season includes six productions that tell diverse and compelling stories that inform our 21st century existence and allows us to integrate the performing arts into the community by using its productions as a springboard for discourse for its patrons and Greater New Haven residents. 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Long Wharf utilizes a number of criteria to determine the success of each of its seasons. First and foremost, the Theatre looks to ensure that the creative artists found the development and production process to be nurturing and supportive of their artistry. Second, informal responses are gathered from audience reactions during the production and patron feedback during post-show conversations with Long Wharf staff and through e-mail surveys. Third, the Theatre evaluates the quantity and quality of critical response for each production. Fourth, Long Wharf reviews the number of subscription and single tickets sold and compares it to its own sales goals as well as sales at peer institutions as a quantitative measure of success. Finally, an in-house, post-production review of the entire production process allows staff members to discuss and learn from the accomplishments of, and obstacles in, each play of the season.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

During its 2014-15 season, Long Wharf's production of BAD JEWS extended beyond its original run and became the highest grossing play on Stage II since it opened in the 1977-78 season. Long Wharf’s 2013-14 production of SATCHMO AT THE WALDORF transferred to The Wilma Theatre in Philadelphia and then to a commercial Off-Broadway production, which garnered performer John Douglas Thompson a Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Solo Performance. Long Wharf Theatre productions have received four years of consecutive funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, the federal agency that supports artistic excellence. 

Description

Long Wharf serves as a laboratory for playwrights to craft and refine new work, and fosters the kind of collaboration among writers, directors, dramaturgs, designers, and actors that results in well-developed, thoughtful, and highly engaging productions. Our new play program is intended to develop a writer’s talent through the development of a new work. Long Wharf also produces plays and musicals that have recently premiered, which allows writers to continue exploring and refining their scripts. As part of our 50th anniversary, Long Wharf established The Lord/Kubler Fund for New Work. Named for two of Long Wharf’s most ardent founding trustees, the Fund will support the development of new work and endow the annual Arvin Brown Commission, which named in honor of Long Wharf’s longest serving artistic director. In spring 2015, we established the Contemporary American Voices Festival staged readings by emerging and established writers over a weekend, which will be an annual event.

Population Served Adults / Adolescents Only (13-19 years) /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Recent new plays that were developed and/or produced by Long Wharf include JANUARY JOINER by Laura Jacqmin (World Premiere, 2012-13); RIDE THE TIGER by William Mastrosimone (2nd production, 2012-13); THE CONSULTANT by Heidi Schreck (World Premiere, 2013-14); THE SHADOW OF THE HUMMINGBIRD by Athol Fugard (World Premiere, 2013-14); FOREVER by Dael Orlandersmith (World Premiere, 2014-15); BROWNSVILLE SONG (B-SIDE FOR TRAY) by Kimber Lee (2nd production, 2014-15); THE SECOND MRS. WILSON (World Premiere, 2014-15; November 2015 production at George Street Playhouse, NJ); SERIAL BLACK FACE by Janine Nabers (Workshop/Reading, 2014-15); and AUBERGINE by Julia Cho (Workshop/Reading, 2014-15). Long Wharf is also directly supporting TABLE, a new musical by composer David Shire (BIG, BABY, CLOSER THAN EVER; original music for SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER) and librettist Adam Gopnik, essayist and writer for The New Yorker, which we plan to produce in a future season.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Long Wharf has an established commitment to developing and producing work by living writers, which is supported by a highly sophisticated audience proficient in attending premiere productions. During Artistic Director Gordon Edelstein’s thirteen seasons alone, Long Wharf has produced more than thirty world, American, and regional premieres of new work by emerging and established writers including Julia Cho, Noah Haidle, Laura Jacqmin, Aditi Brennan Kapil, Gabriel Kahane, James Lapine, Craig Lucas, Charles L. Mee, Dael Orlandersmith, Anna Deavere Smith, Paula Vogel, and Tracey Scott Wilson, among others. Prior to full production, Long Wharf first supported many of these new plays with developmental workshops and readings. 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Long Wharf looks to ensure that it provides a supportive, nurturing environment for each artist’s creative process, supporting them through each stage of a play’s development—from commission to workshop to full production.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

One in seven Long Wharf productions has gone on to a future life in New York or at another regional theatre, many of which were world premiere or productions of new work. This has led to a national reputation from artists and peer theatres alike for quality development and production of premiere plays, establishing the careers of emerging writers and furthering the careers of established playwrights. 

Recent examples include the 2012-13 production SATCHMO AT THE WALDORF, which immediately transferred to The Wilma Theatre in Pennsylvania following its close at Long Wharf Theatre and 2014 Off-Broadway run (Winner, Best Solo Show, Outer Critics Circle and Drama Desk Awards); FEBRUARY HOUSE, a 2011-12 co-world premiere with New York’s The Public Theater that allowed the musical to have two back-to-back productions in the same season; and 2014-15 world premiere of Dael Orlandersmith’s FOREVER, which went on to production at New York Theatre Workshop.

Description

Arts education is critical for the development of 21st century workplace skills, especially in the areas of creative problem solving, working collaboratively in a diverse team, public speaking, and presentation skills. Long Wharf has developed a suite of school-based education programs that invest in both teachers and students and augment learning opportunities during times of budgetary stagnation. Programs include the Student Theatre Series, which incorporates age-appropriate productions into the curricula of middle and high school students through printed and video study guides, a three-day residency by a Long Wharf teaching artist, and attendance at a Long Wharf production; Educators’ Laboratory, experiential seminars that provide teachers with exposure to a wide variety of artistic perspectives that may be translated into any course of study; and In-School Residencies by teaching artists that serve as a supplement to or, in some cases, are the sole drama education in these schools.

 

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Adults /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Long Wharf’s school-based education programs help fill the gap left by budgetary constraints of local school districts while providing unique and engaging opportunities for learning to Greater New Haven students and educators. In recognition of its historical success with school-based programming, Long Wharf received an award from the Werth Family Foundation, which allowed the Theatre to significantly expand its investment in both teacher professional development and in-school residencies. Beginning in the 2012-13 season, teachers who sign up for all three Educators’ Laboratory sessions receive year-long, in-school mentorship by a Long Wharf teaching artist to help them make the leap between theory and practice. The Theatre’s capacity to provide in-school residencies has also increased, helping to meet the demand for programming by school administrators and teachers alike.

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Though Long Wharf’s education programs are available to schools and educators statewide, the majority of participants come from the Greater New Haven area. During the 2013-14 season, 100% (21) of Educators’ Laboratory teachers and 65% (2,007) of Student Theatre Series students came from the twenty town/city area that The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven serves.

Over its nine years, Educators’ Laboratory has served ninety-seven teachers in forty-three Connecticut schools. These educators teach English, Reading, History, Social Studies, English as a Second Language (ESL), Science, Career Development, Drama, and Music and have exponentially reached more than 19,000 students. In-school residencies, which may last a week, a month, or an entire academic year, have been held for all grade levels at multiple sites and have fulfilled the programmatic needs of individual schools.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Throughout the academic year, Long Wharf’s Education Department meets with teachers of participating classes to ensure that the Theatre’s school-based education programs meets their goals and enhances already existing curricula. Participating educators also complete surveys that assess the effectiveness of the elements of each program. If appropriate, students complete evaluations, which helps Long Wharf gauge the experience from multiple perspectives. Feedback is considered as our education program curricula is crafted for each season.

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

During the 2012-13 season, Long Wharf’s number of in-school residencies has quadrupled and the total number of students served has increased by 20%. Long Wharf Theatre sustained this level of service to students during 2013-14 and 2014-15 seasons.

 

Description

To engage the community in its artistic life, Long Wharf elastically applies the themes of each production to conversations with its audiences and the community, which allows for meaningful interactions with Greater New Haven residents. Post-show discussions are hosted by Long Wharf artistic staff after nearly every performance. The Theatre extends this dialogue beyond the stage through strategic partnerships with local institutions, such as the New Haven Free Public Library (NHFPL). Long Wharf’s Elder Play Project engages the senior citizen community in the creation of memoir-based drama. Finally, Long Wharf’s Theatre for Young Audience productions engage residents of all ages. 


pasting
Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

The 2014-15 Elder Play Program is engaging twelve residents at Tower One/Tower East; the dramatic retelling of their oral histories will be presented there and at Long Wharf in August 2015. In collaboration with The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, in April 2015 Long Wharf produced “Violence in Our Community: In Search of Understanding and Empathy,” a convening of public health officials, government representatives, community activists, and concerned residents. Inspired by Long Wharf’s production of BROWNSVILLE SONG (B-SIDE FOR TRAY), these groups came together to discuss urban violence, in particular gun violence, in New Haven and ways that we can combat an issue that deeply affects our city.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

While artistic quality is paramount, Long Wharf recognizes that serving the community through the arts means more than attracting an audience to a show. As a result, Long Wharf continues to increase its investment in strategic community programs that allow for the greatest mission-based impact possible. A significant portion of Long Wharf’s audience is comprised of lifelong learners—those whose lives are enriched by the continual pursuit of education through culture. Through engaging post-show conversations about the productions on stage, community-wide conversations through the Theatre’s partnership with the New Haven Free Public Library, and the Elder Play Project at Tower One/Tower East, Long Wharf creates meaningful arts-based interactions that celebrate and demonstrate the relevance of the performing arts to our daily lives. 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Community program success is monitored by the number of individuals participating in each program and their level of engagement in each conversation or program. Long Wharf also monitors changes in the demographic composition and the geographic footprint of its audiences as a measurement of its effective reach in the community. For its collaboration with the New Haven Free Public Library, Long Wharf will review the quantity of materials borrowed from its micro-lending site, the use of borrowed tickets from the NHFPL’s five branches, and the attendance levels at the community-wide conversations.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Because of their longevity and upstanding service to the community, the collaboration between Long Wharf and NHFPL was established through a highly competitive award from Co-Creating Effective and Inclusive Organizations, a New Haven institution that seeks to effect change through community-serving organizations.

Long Wharf is one of the few regional theatres in the country with a lifelong learning program for senior citizens; the Elder Play Project has provided participants with greater social engagement and an engaging retelling of their oral histories. Because of its success, this Long Wharf program will be featured in a case study commissioned by Theatre Communications Group, the national organization for the American theatre, about best practices for audience engagement.

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Joshua Borenstein
Term Start May 2011
Email joshua.borenstein@longwharf.org
Experience

Joshua Borenstein is in his fifth season as Long Wharf Theatre's Managing Director. In this capacity, Borenstein co-produces the season with Artistic Director Gordon Edelstein by leading the theatre’s administrative and financial operations. During his tenure, Long Wharf celebrated its 50th anniversary season; led an Off-Broadway transfer of Satchmo at the Waldorf to New York; completed a $4 million, award-winning renovation of the Claire Tow Stage at the C. Newton Schenck III Theatre; and doubled the size of its education department. Borenstein also worked at Long Wharf from 2003 to 2007 in various general management capacities. Prior to Long Wharf, Borenstein served in various roles at AMS Planning & Research, Yale Repertory Theatre, and Trinity Repertory Company. Borenstein was also at the Huntington Theatre Company in Boston through Theatre Communication Group's "New Generations" program.

Borenstein has been a guest lecturer at Yale University, Southern Connecticut State University, and Boston University. He has served as a grant panelist for the NEA, the Greater Hartford Arts Council, and the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. Borenstein currently serves on the boards of National Corporate Theatre Fund, Connecticut Arts Alliance, and New Haven’s Arts Industry Coalition. He was recognized in Connecticut Magazine’s “40 Under 40: Class of 2014.” Borenstein is a graduate of Wesleyan University and the Yale School of Drama.

Co-CEO
Mr. Gordon Edelstein
Term Start June 2002
Email gordon.edelstein@longwharf.org
Experience

Gordon Edelstein is in his thirteenth season as Long Wharf Theatre’s Artistic Director. In addition to his recent work on the world premiere of Athol Fugard’s Have You Seen Us? and his own adaptation of A Doll’s House, Edelstein directed Coming Home at Berkeley Rep and Long Wharf’s production of The Glass Menagerie starring Judith Ivey at the Roundabout TheatreAs a director, he has garnered three Connecticut Critics Circle Awards and, during his Long Wharf tenure, the Theatre has produced world premieres by Athol Fugard, Paula Vogel, Craig Lucas, Julia Cho, Noah Haidle, Dael Orlandersmith, and Anna Deavere Smith. Over the course of his career, Edelstein has also directed and/or produced premieres by Philip Glass, Arthur Miller, Donald Margulies, James Lapine, Charles Mee, Mac Wellman, and Martin McDonagh, among many others, and has directed an extremely diverse body of work from Sophocles to Pinter, from Shakespeare to Beckett.       

Under Edelstein’s artistic leadership, Long Wharf has received fourteen additional Connecticut Critics Circle Awards, including six best actor or actress awards in plays that he directed. He was also given the organization’s Tom Killen Award, awarded annually to an individual who has made an indelible impact on the Connecticut theatrical landscape. Edelstein has directed countless plays and workshops for Long Wharf including the world premieres of BFE (transfer to Playwrights Horizons), The Day the Bronx Died (transfer to New York and London), A Dance Lesson, and The Times, as well as We Won’t Pay! We Won’t Pay!, A New War, A Moon for the Misbegotten, Anna Christie, The Front Page, and Mourning Becomes Electra, starring Jane Alexander. Prior to assuming artistic leadership of Long Wharf Theatre, Edelstein helmed Seattle’s ACT Theatre for five years. He received a B.A. with honors in History and Religious Studies from Grinnell College in 1976 and was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Grinnell College in 2003.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 53
Number of Part Time Staff 21
Number of Volunteers 235
Number of Contract Staff 98
Staff Retention Rate 65%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 62
Hispanic/Latino 5
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 37
Female 37
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director of Marketing and Communications
Title Director of Education
Title Director of Production
Title Director of Finance & Administration
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

Through its strategic education and community programs, Long Wharf has a myriad of Greater New Haven partners who help the Theatre achieve the greatest mission-based impact possible. This includes Connecticut elementary, middle, and high schools who participate in the Student Theatre Series, Educators’ Laboratory, in-school residencies, and the Theatre for Young Audiences program; Long Wharf’s collaboration with the New Haven Free Public Library; and New Haven’s Tower One/Tower East where the Elder Play Project is currently in residence.

To maximize its fundraising potential, Long Wharf collaborates with the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven on planned giving and participates in CFGNH’s “GiveGreater” initiative. Long Wharf is a member of the National Corporate Theatre Fund, which collectively raises national corporate support for ten major nonprofit theatres across the country.

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2010
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Outstanding Regional TheatreTony Awards1978
Tom Killen Award given to Artistic Director Gordon EdelsteinConnecticut Critics Circle2008
Outstanding Actress in a Play, Nilaja Sun, "No Child..."Connecticut Critics Circle2010
Outstanding Actor in a Play, Coleman Domingo, "Coming Home"Connecticut Critics Circle2009
Outstanding Actress in a Musical, Jessie Mueller, "Carousel"Connecticut Critics Circle2008
Outstanding Director of a Play, Gordon Edelstein, "Uncle Vanya"Connecticut Critics Circle2007
Outstanding Production of a Play, "Under the Lintel"Connecticut Critics Circle2006
Outstanding Lighting Design, Jennifer Tipton, "A Moon for the Misbegotten"Connecticut Critics Circle2005
Outstanding Actor in a Play or Musical, Erick Lochtefeld, "February House"Connecticut Critics Circle2012
Outstanding Actor in a Play or Musical, Stanley Bahorek, "February House"Connecticut Critics Circle2012
Outstanding Actor in a Play or Musical, Ken Barnett, "February House"Connecticut Critics Circle2012
Outstanding Actor in a Play, Francesca Choy-Kee, "Agnes Under the Big Top"Connecticut Critics Circle2011
Oustanding Debut, Eshan Bay, "Agnes Under the Big Top"Connecticut Critics Circle2011
Outstanding Leading Actress in a Musical, Katie Rose Clarke, "The Last Five Years"Connecticut Critics Circle2014
Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play, Steve Routman, "The Underpants"Connecticut Critics Circle2014
Outstanding Actor in a Play, J.D. Thompson, "Satchmo at the Waldorf"Connecticut Critics Circle2013
Outstanding Sound Design, Leah Gelpe, "January Joiner"Connecticut Critics Circle2013
Outstanding New Off-Broadway Play, "My Name is Asher Lev"Outer Critics Circle Award (New York)2013
Outstanding Actress in a Play, Keilly McQuail, "Bad Jews"Connecticut Critics Circle2015
Outstanding Ensemble, Cast of "Picasso at the Lapin Agile" (Tie)Connecticut Critics Circle2015
Major Award for Outstanding Contributions to New England TheatreNew England Theatre Conference2014
Regional Award for Outstanding Contributions to New England TheatreNew England Theatre Conference2000
50 Years of Achievement in Theatre AwardNational Corporate Theatre Fund2015
Best Professional TheatreCTNow.org's Best of New Haven Readers' Poll2014
Best Professional Theatre CompanyCTNow.org's Best of New Haven Readers' Poll2015
Outstanding Solo Performance, John Douglas Thompson, "Satchmo at the Waldorf" (Long Wharf Theatre, Producer)The Drama Desk Awards2014
Board Chair
Mr. R. Sanford Stoddard
Company Affiliation Realtor, H. Pearce Real Estate Co.
Term July 2015 to June 2017
Email cndstod@comcast.net
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Ms. Nancy Alexander Facilitator and Consultant, Ideas for Action
Ms. Susannah Bailin Community Volunteer
Mr. Joshua Borenstein Managing Director, Long Wharf Theatre
Ms. Gail Brekke Retired Vice President, LIN Television
Ms. Linda Calarco Community Volunteer
Mr. Vic Cassella President, American Polyfilm
Mr. Gordon Edelstein Artistic Director, Long Wharf Theatre (Ex Officio)
Ms. Ruth Gitlin Managing Director, Angelo, Gordon, & Co.
Ms. Sally Glick Vice President and CFO, Coordinated Financial Resources; Administrator and Co-Founder, Chamber Insurance Trust
Mr. Marc Greenberg Managing Director, Point72 Asset Management
Ms. Beverly J. Hodgson Arbitrator & Mediator
Ms. Natalie Holder Founder & Executive Director, QUEST Diversity, Inc.
Mr. James D. Horwitz Managing Attorney, Koskoff, Koskoff and Bieder, PC
Ms. Jacqueline R. Koral
Ms. Ruby Melton Deputy General Counsel (Retired), Louis Dreyfus Highbridge Energy
Ms. Ginger More Retired, Oak Investment Partners
Mr. David I. Newton President, Elm Advisors, LLC
Ms. Laura Pappano Community Volunteer
Ms. Mary L. Pepe Director of Human Resources, Town of Greenwich, CT
Ms. Pietrina L. Saxton Retired Associate Director, Pfizer, Inc.; Community Volunteer
Mr. Michael Schaffer Manager, C.A. White
Mrs. Anne Schenck Community Volunteer
Mr. Mark Simon Partner, Centerbrook Architects & Planners LLC
Mr. Leonardo H. Suzio President, York Hill Trap Rock Quarry Company
Mr. Fred E. Walker Retired Broadcast Executive/Consultant; Trustee Emeritus
Ms. Patricia Doukas Zandy Associate Secretary (Retired), Yale University
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 26
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 16
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Blanket Personal Property
Boiler and Machinery
Business Income
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Computer Equipment and Software
Crime Coverage
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Extra Expense Insurance
Fine Arts and Collectibles
General Property Coverage
Inland Marine and Mobile Equipment
Life Insurance
Liquor Liability
Medical Health Insurance
Property in Transit and Off Premises
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Board Co-Chair
Ms. Beverly J. Hodgson
Company Affiliation Arbitrator & Mediator
Term July 2014 to June 2016
Email beverly.j.hodgson@gmail.com
Standing Committees
Audit
Human Resources / Personnel
Board Governance
Building
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Finance
Executive
Finance
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Mr. Robert Alvine Chairman, Premier Subaru
Mr. Arvin Brown
Ms. Anne Calabresi
Mr. William E. Curran
Mr. Elwood B. Davis
Ms. Barbara DeBaptiste
Mr. Charles D. Ellis
Ms. Louise Endel
Mr. Richard A. Ferguson
Mr. D. Terence Jones Partner, Wiggin & Dana
Mr. Charles C. Kingsley
Mr. Nicholas S. Lamont
Mr. John S. Lapides
Ms. Curly Lieber
Ms. Phyllis McGrath Founder & President, Philanthropy Management LLC
Dr. Jerome H. Meyer
Dr. Jerome H. Meyer Past Chair, Long Wharf Theatre; Artist
Ms. Sandy Milles
Mr. George O'Brien Jr.
Ms. Barbara L. Pierce
Ms. Robin Sauerteig
Ms. Carol Schreiber Organizational Psychologist/Consultant
Ms. Pamela Tatge
Ms. Karen Pritzker Vlock
Mr. A. Tappan Wilder
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2015
Fiscal Year End June 30 2016
Projected Revenue $5,594,070.00
Projected Expenses $5,594,070.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 5.75%
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Long Wharf - State Charitable Solicitations Permit2016View
Long Wharf - State Charitable Solicitations Permit2015View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$2,213,306$1,873,513$5,412,011
Government Contributions$99,728$125,836$64,145
Federal------
State$99,728----
Local------
Unspecified--$125,836$64,145
Individual Contributions------
------
$2,475,794$2,654,573$2,914,567
Investment Income, Net of Losses$827,855$695,530$4,168
Membership Dues------
Special Events$218,378$305,069$293,150
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$46,580$45,278$81,842
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$4,570,471$4,564,020$4,782,630
Administration Expense$927,757$855,117$895,298
Fundraising Expense$685,283$660,891$677,626
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.950.941.38
Program Expense/Total Expenses74%75%75%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue27%29%12%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$19,023,035$17,772,839$16,212,777
Current Assets$1,697,318$1,890,720$4,130,927
Long-Term Liabilities$1,377,812$1,394,306--
Current Liabilities$1,234,695$1,156,764$1,492,389
Total Net Assets$16,410,528$15,221,769$14,720,338
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Seedlings Foundation $540,000The Shubert Foundation $190,000Seedlings Foundation $4,779,323
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Shubert Foundation $190,000CT Dept. of Economic & Community Dev. $115,836The Tow Foundation $1,425,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Economic & Community Dev. $99,728Eucalyptus Foundation $95,000The Shubert Foundation $890,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.371.632.77
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets7%8%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments

Like most nonprofit organizations in this country, Long Wharf was significantly affected by the 2008 economic downturn. With decreased individual and corporate support and an underperforming summer presentation, Long Wharf ended its 2009 fiscal year with a $1.2 million deficit. This significant shortfall made the Theatre rethink its financial model. For example, Long Wharf budgets a significant contingency each season (approximately 5% of total expenses), which is used to cover unforeseen costs. If any contingency remains at the end of the year, the surplus is applied to the organization’s accumulated deficit. Using this model, Long Wharf has paid down 28.6% of its deficit. Once Long Wharf retires the deficit, it will continue this financial model to establish a working capital reserve to support artistic initiatives, keep the institution on solid financial footing, and help manage cash flow. 

Joshua Borenstein

Managing Director
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 222 Sargent Drive
New Haven, CT 065115919
Primary Phone 203 787-4284
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Joshua Borenstein
Board Chair Mr. R. Sanford Stoddard
Board Chair Company Affiliation Realtor, H. Pearce Real Estate Co.

 

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