Columbus House
586 Ella Grasso Blvd
New Haven CT 06519
Contact Information
Address 586 Ella Grasso Blvd
New Haven, CT 06519-
Telephone (203) 401-4400 x138
Fax 203-773-1430
E-mail info@columbushouse.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
“To serve people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, by providing shelter and housing and by fostering their personal growth and independence.”
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1985
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Alison Cunningham
Board Chair Robert McGuire
Board Chair Company Affiliation Southern Connecticut State University
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $10,168,863.00
Projected Expenses $10,117,626.00
Statements
Mission “To serve people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, by providing shelter and housing and by fostering their personal growth and independence.”
Background
Columbus House opened its doors in 1982 to serve people who are homeless by providing "2 hots and a cot" in an emergency shelter with a capacity of 34 single adults.  Throughout its history, Columbus House has been instrumental in developing programs to serve people who are homeless through an array of housing and services. The agency currently supports 2 shelters, 3 transitional programs, a Recovery House, and an array of permanent supportive housing options for people who are homeless. Intensive case management services are available throughout all programs.
Beginning with the Outreach and Engagement Team,  led by Columbus House staff, case management services are provided for people living on the streets, in abandoned buildings, in encampments in and around the City.  Columbus House also has a strong reentry program, in collaboration with area agencies, creating wrap-around services that help people coming out of prison to find employment and housing. Several programs focus solely on the issues facing women who are homeless, including trauma and abuse, with a goal toward independence and recovery. Individual case management is available for all clients in the shelter, and focuses on housing, mental health and substance abuse treatment, medical care, employment and life skills development.
Columbus House is well known for its shelter activity, but the organization provides support services for people living in permanent housing. Cedar Hill, Legion Woods, Whalley Terrace and Sojourner's Place collectively house 76 clients, 1/2 of whom have been chronically homeless. In addition, we have secured subsidies through various programs for over 150 people living in scattered site apartments, for whom we also provide case management services. 
Columbus House relies on volunteers to help us do the work we do.  Each night, a group from the faith community, a civic or school group, or a family will be in the kitchen cooking and serving dinner for 100 clients. Over 1000 volunteers participate in Abraham's Tent, where congregations provide shelter for 12 homeless men for a week at a time during the coldest winter months. These tremendous act of generosity saves the agency countless staff time as well as money. Other volunteers help with fundraising events, general building maintenance, administrative support and board activity.  Over 300 volunteers come through the agency each year.
 
 
Impact

The Columbus House Respite Program opened on Oct. 7, 2013, in the main shelter building. 12 private rooms are used to provide recuperative care for homeless patients at YNHH who need bed rest following hospitalization. Clients receive meals, basic needs, visiting nursing services, case management and patient navigator support.

Columbus House was awarded a $1.7million grant through the VA in the Support Services for Veteran Families (SSVF), serving New Haven, Middlesex and New London Counties. SSVF provides case management & employment support to both singles and families, and can provide short term financial assistance to help Veterans maintain their housing or, if homeless, to obtain housing. We will serve 300 Veterans in FY14.

Columbus House provides case management support to over 200 clients who are housed in permanent housing in the community, almost 50 of whom have been housed in the past year. These clients have come through the shelter or were identified through the street outreach team. Funding for housing is from federal and state programs.

Goals:
Columbus House will work with other agencies in New Haven and the Rapid Results Institute to establish Coordinated Access, a system through which clients are housed more quickly and efficiently by breaking down barriers inherent in the current system. We will focus first on housing chronically homeless single adults, with the goal of ultimately getting to -0-.

We will continue to build internal capacity to manage a diverse funding stream, focusing on creating efficiencies in the Business Department through staff development and new, cutting edge technology to support the needs of the dept.

Columbus House will manage the renovation of a 17-unit supportive housing site on Frank Street, opening by December 2014. Val Macri will house chronically homeless single adults and will provide case management services for all.

Columbus House has committed to doing the work of Trauma Informed and Gender Specific Services through TAG, an initiative of DMHAS and the CT Women’s Consortium. TAG will help transform the culture of the agency through assessments, training and TA so that the values of choice, trustworthiness, empowerment, safety and collaboration become central to all aspects of the organization.

 

Needs

Because of our diverse funding stream in federal, state and local government contracts, multiple program & financial reports are required. We have also experienced a shift from grant funding to fee for service funding in some of the government contracts. This puts a substantial strain on program and business office staff, and will require an increase in administrative functions and costs to accurately manage.

In support of those administrative functions, the Business Department will need to enhance its capacity by migrating to a new and robust software system that can support this diverse and complex budget.

Columbus House owns 6 properties in New Haven, and all are aging, presenting us with significant capital needs. For instance, the first floor bathroom in the emergency shelter is in need of a gut rehab after 12 years of intense daily use. 

Because of the growth of the agency, we will be looking for new office space for administrative staff which is currently housed in the main shelter building on Ella Grasso Boulevard. This will have a dramatic impact on the use of that main building, adding new housing options for people who are homeless.

General operating support is essential to sustain the core functions of shelter and services for people who are homeless.

CEO Statement

Columbus House has a reputation across the Greater New Haven area for being a homeless shelter, which is the place also associated with many of our volunteer activities.  But this organization has grown well beyond the front doors of the shelter and now offers a real continuum of services, from emergency shelter to permanent supportive housing.  We now look beyond the immediate crisis of homelessness toward the solutions that will offer our clients a brighter future.

Along with our colleagues in the greater New Haven area, Columbus House has a commitment to ending chronic homelessness and Veteran homelessness in the next few years. We actively participate in regional and state workgroups and committees to design the policies and practices to accomplish these goals. There is strong support from all levels of government that results in new funding for innovative programs and new housing that will bring us closer to achievement.

These are  lofty goals, but ones which keep us motivated and focused.

We know that a major component in the solution to homelessness is the availability of safe, affordable housing,and for some, that housing needs to be accompanied with supportive services. Columbus House has been providing permanent supportive housing since 1998, and we know that it works. With case management support, people stay housed and realize their own goals of maintaining their recovery, returning to work, reuniting with family and becoming independent.

Another key element of solving the crisis of homelessness is employment. For many, unemployment or underemployment led them to the shelter. We have a small but growing employment program within Columbus House and have been successful in opening doors to employment for many clients. However, there is a real lack of entry level jobs in this area, and despite our efforts, many clients are left out of the workplace. Without the development of new and sustained opportunities for employment in the Greater New Haven area, people will continue to fall into poverty and homelessness.

 There is more work to be done and it is work that we cannot do alone. It is our constant desire to work with others both in New Haven and across the State who are working toward the goal of ending homelessness.  

Board Chair Statement
On behalf of the Board of Directors of Columbus House, I am proud of the work of the agency, and excited about the growth it has had in the past few years.  The move from being a shelter provider to now housing close to 100 individuals in permanent housing points to the dedication of the staff to reach for solutions.  We are also pleased to see new and innovative ideas coming from HUD, and the new program, HPRP, or Homeless Prevention and Rapid Rehousing,  is one of those that makes good sense.   The commitment of the new HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan will set a high bar for all of us to end chronic homelessness, but it is a goal that we will seek to achieve.
However, in this economy we also worry about resources. Reports of the upcoming state budget are all grim, and the threat of cuts to Columbus House programs looms large. If state funding is cut, it will almost certainly mean lay-offs and ultimately will mean a decrease in the level of services we can offer.  When the demand for shelter is increasing, it is difficult to imagine doing more with less. We have and will continue to press for continued funding, but our fear is that this year, cuts will be inevitable. 
Our commitment is to continue to serve this community through our housing and case management services.  In order to do so, we rely on donors and volunteers each and every day.  The board is grateful to the broad community of support that comes to us in so many different ways.  It is this support that will carry us through the troubling waters ahead.
The Columbus House Board of Directors is all voluntary, and we all embrace this opportunity to serve for different reasons. But we all join together in the common goals of offering the highest quality of services and housing so that the clients we serve can realize their highest potential.   
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Housing, Shelter / Homeless Shelters
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Homeless Services/Centers
Areas Served
New Haven
Branford
Cheshire
Guilford
Hamden
Madison
Milford
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
West Haven
Woodbridge
East Haven
Other
Shoreline
Columbus House serves people from across the Region, with 70% coming from New Haven and another 30% coming from the suburbs. In 2011 we assumed operations of the Middlesex Family Shelter and related services in the Middletown area and added an office in Waterbury.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments Over the past 32 years, Columbus House has found ways to bring solutions to the issues of homelessness for the City of New Haven and its immediate surrounding towns. First through the shelter, then street outreach, transitional housing and now with an emphasis on permanent supportive housing, this agency has been on the front lines of the battle against this crisis. The staff of this organization are the ones who are there day in and day out, managing the shelter and its myriad challenges, negotiating with landlords to house someone who is homeless and not such a likely tenant, being outside in the freezing cold to look for people who would die if we did not get them inside for the night. Their commitment to helping others in the most direct way is what makes this organization the success that it has become.
Programs
Description Our Boulevard shelter provides shelter for over 80 women and men, 365 nights a year, serving over 78,000 meals annually. We have a 30-bed emergency shelter for both men and women and a six-month length of stay program that can accommodate up to 39 individuals with beds reserved for Veterans and people living with HIV. Case management services include referrals to mental health and substance abuse treatment programs, employment training programs, health services, and housing.

The Overflow Shelter for men is generally filled to its 75-bed capacity and beyond. This seasonal shelter located on Cedar Street serves clients with food, clothing, showers, personal care items, and case management services.

The Middlesex Family Services Emergency Shelter is located in Middletown. We have the capacity to serve seven families at any given time. We provide safe and sable housing, case management services, and assistance in obtaining permanent housing.
Population Served Homeless / At-Risk Populations / Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Our short term goals for the emergency shelters, Overflow Shelter, and Length of Stay (LOS) programs are to provide a safe environment where homeless adults and families will have access to shelter, food and clothing along with other basic necessities. Ultimately we would like to provide and have clients take advantage of a coordinated effort to access vital services through case management.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Our long-term goals for those coming through the shelters are to ensure that they re-establish and/or increase their income, apply for and receive entitlements, receive adequate health care benefits, seek and secure employment, and reunite with family where appropriate. Our ultimate goal is to help secure appropriate housing either in a transitional, supportive or independent setting. Approximately 50% of homeless adults who access one or more of the shelter programs go on to some form of housing.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Every client who walks through the door of any Columbus House program must undergo a thorough intake process, including completion of a detailed intake/admissions form. We utilize the Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) that allows us to collect data from all clients and enables us to analyze program outcomes. Our funders require monthly, quarterly, and annual outcome reports, and many also require an annual on-site audit. Columbus House has an internal quality assurance department that monitors compliance with all contracts. We also conduct annual client satisfaction surveys. The problems that we encounter that impede client progress include lack of income and lack of an adequate supply of affordable housing.

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Kevin is currently in recovery and committed to his sobriety. He was in our Length of Stay Program for 6 weeks and received comprehensive case management services.  He currently maintains a full time job and is saving money for his own housing (apartment).
Description
The primary goal is to facilitate the successful transition of homeless adults into stable and affordable permanent housing while providing them with the services needed to keep them housed and independent.
 
Harkness House provides support to 14 male homeless Veterans. The program’s goals are to provide stable housing for Veterans, increase access and connection to services, and expand social and employment skills..

On the Move provides housing for 19 men for up to a year while they increase life skills to help them to live more independently. This program offers private rooms, meals, and case management.
 
The Recovery House is a short-term program for men in early recovery who are waiting for placement in sober housing, in-patient treatment programs, or permanent housing with out-patient treatment and support. Length of stay is 60 days.

Middlesex Family Services Transitional Living Program provides housing and case management services for six families in apartments located in Middletown.

 

 

Population Served Homeless / Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Our short term goals for Transitional Housing are similar to that of our Shelter programs. We strive to provide a safe environment where homeless adults and families will have access to shelter along with other basic necessities. Transitional programs include those in early stages of alcohol/drug abuse recovery. Transitional housing clients will have access to a comprehensive case management plan that includes access to a wide variety of support services among collaborative agencies throughout the region. Our ultimate goal is to move clients out of Transitional Housing and into a permanent housing arrangement. 75% of Transitional Housing clients are successfully discharged to some form of permanent housing.

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Ideally, Transitional Housing acts as a stepping stone to permanent housing. Our case managers help clients reunite with family members, regain custody of children in State custody, re-establish income and entitlements, help with employment, and coordination of appropriate medical care. It also provides a safe, sober place to stay while in early stages of recovery.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
We utilize the Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) that allows us to collect data from all clients and enables us to analyze program outcomes. Our funders require monthly, quarterly and annual outcome reports and many also require an annual on-site audit. Columbus House has an internal quality assurance department that monitors compliance with all contracts. We also conduct annual client satisfaction surveys. The problems that we encounter that impede client progress include lack of income and lack of an adequate supply of affordable housing.

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Because of our coordinated efforts with the Veterans Administration (VA), more people are off of the streets and out of the shelters. They are utilizing transitional housing while waiting for permanent supportive housing (affordable housing with supports.)
Description
The primary goal of Permanent Supportive Housing is to provide safe, secure rental units, offering independent living and a permanent residence. It provides flexible and accessible support through on-site and community case management services.

Supportive Housing:
Cedar Hill Apartments has 25 efficiency apartments for single adults. HOME Inc. owns and manages the property.

Legion Woods has 20 1-bedroom apartments for single adults. Partners include The Connection, the Veterans Administration and the CT Mental Health Center.

Whalley Terrace has 22 units for elderly adults, ten of whom have experienced chronic homelessness. HOME Inc. also owns and manages the property.

Sojourner’s Place houses nine women who are diagnosed with both mental health and addiction disorders. It is part of the Supportive Housing Project.

Columbus House also provides case management support to over 100 individuals and families who live independently throughout CT. They hold their own lease with subsidized rents.

Population Served Homeless / At-Risk Populations / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Formerly homeless adults are able to live in and afford their own apartment. They have access to case management services with a goal of stability, independence and increased community integration.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Stable housing leads to an increased quality of life while decreasing the number of adults who return to homeless shelters. Some are able to eventually live without support services. They remain in their apartment, but the support services can then be utilized by others in need.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Our success is measured by the number of permanent supportive clients who remain in their apartments and don’t go back to homelessness. Of the 170 clients living in our supportive housing programs, over 90% have remained housed.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
A combination of bad luck and bad choices led Bruce to homelessness. He tried heroin and cocaine when he was 22 and struggled with drugs ever since. He was in and out of prison.

Bruce had reached a turning point in his life. He realized he couldn’t go on living like this. He entered a recovery program for six months and was then referred to Columbus House.

“Columbus House staff told me what I would have to do and where I would have to go in order to start the process of getting my life back together,” he said.

Bruce stayed in shelters for nearly a year as he worked to put his life back together. He was referred to Cedar Hill, one of our permanent supportive housing facilities, where he has lived in his own apartment for three years.

Because of his leadership and dedication to his community, Bruce was awarded the 2010 Janice Elliot Supportive Housing Award by Reaching Home, a campaign to end long-term homelessness through supportive housing.

Description
Outreach Services:
Pathways to Independence project works to ensure that people who are chronically homeless have access to mainstream services and recovery support that will assist them in their ability to secure and maintain permanent housing.

The Outreach & Engagement team of case managers goes out into the community to engage men and women with severe mental illness and substance abuse issues who are living unsheltered. The program serves over 200 clients annually.

Our Peer Support Educators and Specialists are individuals who are in recovery themselves, and serve as a valuable resource to our clients who are working toward recovery and independence.

Our Road to Recovery program provides transportation to eligible clients to and from approved treatment appointments throughout the state.

The Starting Over program supports 80 men and women who are connected to the New Haven parole system by providing case management, peer support, and employment services.

 

Population Served Homeless / At-Risk Populations / Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our short term success in the outreach service would be to literally have someone on the street be trusting enough to engage in a conversation with one of our case managers. Accepting a cup of coffee, a bus token or a ride to a doctor’s appointment is a major accomplishment in engaging people living on the street; especially those with undiagnosed and/or untreated mental illness or those with a substance abuse disorder.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Our long term success is measured by our client’s access to and utilization of shelter, support services, housing, medical and behavioral health services.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
We utilize the Homeless management information systems (HMIS) that allows us to collect data from all clients and enables us to analyze program outcomes. Our funders require monthly, quarterly and annual outcome reports and many also require an annual on-site audit. Columbus House has an internal quality assurance department that monitors compliance with all contracts.. We also conduct annual client satisfaction surveys. The problems that we encounter that impede client progress include lack of income and lack of an adequate supply of affordable housing.

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Scott was living on the streets for 4 years. Because of his substance abuse issues, he refused any assistance and would not come to the shelter. One of our Outreach Case Managers was ultimately able to convince Scott to come in. They spoke and over time a bond was established. Because of this engagement, he received help in applying for benefits and healthcare which allowed him to receive the appropriate addictions support. He took part in Abraham’s Tent and is now living in his own apartment.
Program Comments
CEO Comments Growth brings both opportunities and challenges, and balancing those to ensure that the agency survives is the work of the senior directors. We regularly seek new opportunities that will offer the clients access to services and housing so that they can move on toward independence and recovery. Even as we do that, we are mindful of the burden that each new program places on the infrastructure of Columbus House, and are seeking ways to ensure that growth does not overwhelm our capacity to continue to provide appropriate administrative support. New programs are exciting only if we can manage them well.

Capacity building to keep up with expanding programs is not always immediate, especially with limited access to funding for administrative support.

CEO/Executive Director
Alison Cunningham
Term Start July 1998
Email acunningham@columbushouse.org
Experience
Alison Cunningham has been with Columbus House in 2 roles. In the mid-1980’s, she was the Program Director when the entire program of the agency was the emergency shelter. After a few years in that role, she left for other opportunities but stayed engaged with the agency and was appointed to the Board for a few years in the early 90s.
 
In 1998, Alison returned to the agency as its Executive Director. She has managed the growth of this organization from a $1.5 million budget to now close to $10million budget, with over 150 staff and shelter/housing for over 400 people each night and services for hundreds more.
 
Alison has served on various boards and committees, both local and statewide: CT Coalition to End Homelessness – current member and past Board Chair; Reaching Home Steering Committee of the Partnership for Strong Communities, current member; Opening Doors Greater New Haven, past co-chair; South Central Behavioral Health Network, former board member. She is a relentless advocate for ending homelessness.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 120
Number of Part Time Staff 30
Number of Volunteers 1000
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 75%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 82
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 58
Hispanic/Latino 8
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 69
Female 81
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Development Director
Title Business Director
Title Director of Real Estate Development & Facilities Management
Title Director of Human Resources
Title Director of Programs & Services
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
Columbus House has formal collaborations for several current programs, in which multiple organizations are funded:
lead agency on the Outreach and Engagement Team with local partners; ( The Connection, Hill Health Center, Marrakech).
Starting Over - Reentry Program with APT and Easter Seals/Goodwill Industries;
Pathways to Independence- 3 year SAMSHA funded program with CMHC, Hill Health Center;
Respite Program- 12 bed recuperative care program with Yale New Haven Hospital and Hill Health Center;
Employment funded program with The Workplace.
 
 
Comments
CEO Comments
There are 5 senior level directors of Columbus House who provide leadership and inspiration for this organization, who work long and hard hours to keep it functioning at its best. It is this group that makes it possible for us to reach beyond what we thought we could do, to stretch to the next step, to grab that new opportunity, always aware of the mission statement that was written in 1982 and holds true today. It is a team that can face the challenges of program growth, personnel demands and changes, funding cuts and leaking roofs with a resolve to find a way to improve.
Our opportunity today is to examine the infrastructure to determine if we have the appropriate model in place to manage Columbus House and to weather the changes always in front of us. We are being pushed constantly to consider mergers, strategic alliances, and shared services. Perhaps in any one of those models is a better way of doing business. We have explored mergers in the past with a leading organization in New Haven, and in the end, we both turned down the opportunity. We have absorbed smaller agencies, expanding our reach into new services in new communities. We are open to doing business the best possible way to get the most out of our funding and the opportunities that lie ahead.
Board Chair
Robert McGuire
Company Affiliation Southern Connecticut State University
Term Jan 2014 to Dec 2015
Email robertwmcguire@sbcglobal.net
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Jim Barra Ironwood Capital
Kellie Byrd Danso Gateway Community College
Greg DeStefano Konowitz, Kahn & Co., PC
Prof. Mohammad Elahee Quinnipiac University
Amy Eppler-Epstein New Haven Legal Aid
Charisse E. Hutton State of CT - Judicial Branch
Kia Levy Community Foundation for Greater New Haven
Althea Marshall Brooks Career Resources, Inc.
Margaret Middleton The CT Veterans Legal Center
Dr. Jeanne Steiner CT Mental Health Center
Catherine Velez Webster Bank
Marley A. Williams US Trust Bank of America
Rudy A. Zimmerman Retired, Bayer Pharmaceutical
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 8
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 2 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 9
Unspecified 1
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Special Event Liability
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Blanket Personal Property
Business Income
Commercial General Insurance
Computer Equipment and Software
Crime Coverage
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Extra Expense Insurance
Fiduciary Liability
Flood
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Internet Liability Insurance
Property in Transit and Off Premises
Workplace Violence
Board Co-Chair
Email robertwmcguire@sbcglobal.net
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Investment
Board Governance
Housing and Community Development
CEO Comments

Columbus House has historically had a very active board, with members who are committed to addressing the issues of homelessness. They have grown just as the agency has grown to a more sophisticated level of governance that examines the big picture of the agency and the progress toward ending homelessness. Committees include the executive committee, finance and audit committees, housing committee, development committee and governance committee.

 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $10,168,863.00
Projected Expenses $10,117,626.00
Spending Policy N/A
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,043,929$1,593,084$765,683
Government Contributions$5,897,437$6,052,239$5,048,315
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$5,897,437$6,052,239$5,048,315
Individual Contributions------
------
$637,877$588,149$567,401
Investment Income, Net of Losses$6,456$3,211$2,681
Membership Dues------
Special Events$45,833$22,340$23,517
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$7,344$65,365$12,696
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$6,206,970$6,227,555$5,347,165
Administration Expense$1,201,467$1,123,413$910,829
Fundraising Expense$340,488$261,732$273,763
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.991.090.98
Program Expense/Total Expenses80%82%82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue5%3%5%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$8,104,970$8,144,440$7,738,125
Current Assets$1,004,955$1,253,207$929,400
Long-Term Liabilities$895,996$864,553$966,190
Current Liabilities$693,078$653,942$857,681
Total Net Assets$6,515,896$6,625,945$5,914,254
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDMHAS $2,568,167DMHAS $2,575,622DMHAS $2,219,452
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDSS $1,030,823DSS $1,771,311DOC $740,960
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDOC $756,744DOC $762,308DSS $423,463
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.451.921.08
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets11%11%12%
Comments
CEO Comments Every year we worry that local, state and federal budget cuts will have deleterious effects on the bottom line of the financials of Columbus House. We have been relatively lucky in that we have suffered minimally from such cuts, losing only a few staff positions along the way. However, each lost staff is a lost opportunity to serve the clients under our roof. What is most problematic with government funding is the fact that we receive no cost of living increases through any one of these contracts. We have had flat funding in all HUD contracts, and save for a few years when we did receive a COLA in state contracts, we have been flat funded for most of our history with DSS, DMHAS and the City of New Haven. Obviously the cost of doing business has not remained stagnant, and we are committed to raising salaries to help our staff keep up with the cost of living. This has been our single most difficult issue when being dependent on public funding.

Private fundraising has to make up the gap, and in these difficult economic times, there is no certainty that our efforts to increase those fundraising dollars will be successful. We have a strong track record, but balancing our budget from year to year is getting increasingly difficult. Today, even though unemployment is at an all time high, we are faced with raising salary levels to attract the appropriate level of staff to work with a difficult population and respond to the myriad and complex reporting requirements. Salaries alone are over $3million in this year’s budget and the cost of benefits continues to skyrocket.

Columbus House must constantly seek to provide superior financial management through staff and board oversight to deal with these challenges.
 
The agency manages its fiscal results to a net revenue (expense) before depreciation method.  This produces a positive cash basis result, but oftentimes negative total result once depreciation expense is factored in.
Foundation Staff Comments
This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 586 Ella Grasso Blvd
New Haven, CT 06519
Primary Phone 203 401-4400 138
Contact Email info@columbushouse.org
CEO/Executive Director Alison Cunningham
Board Chair Robert McGuire
Board Chair Company Affiliation Southern Connecticut State University

 

Related Information

Meet Basic Needs

A strong community not only meets its members’ basic needs but also works to create long-term solutions to their problems. Provide people with affordable housing, enough to eat and access to affordable health care and you enable them to envision a better future for themselves.