Beth-El Center
90 New Haven Avenue
Milford CT 06460-4827
Contact Information
Address 90 New Haven Avenue
Milford, CT 06460-4827
Telephone (203) 876-0747 x101
Fax 203-876-0328
E-mail info@bethelmilford.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

To alleviate homelessness and hunger in the Milford area through shelter, support services, advocacy and community education in partnership with the faith-based community and in collaboration with public and private organizations.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1986
Former Names
Combined Parishes Action Committee, Inc.
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Toni I. Dolan
Board Chair Mr. Ed Davies Board President
Board Chair Company Affiliation CEO, Isaiah 61:1, Inc.
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

To alleviate homelessness and hunger in the Milford area through shelter, support services, advocacy and community education in partnership with the faith-based community and in collaboration with public and private organizations.

Background
Almost 30 years ago, a small group of Milford clergy and lay people came together to discuss how people of faith could respond to the needs of hungry and homeless people in greater New Haven. Homelessness, a rarity outside cities prior to the 1970s, had moved to the suburbs like Milford by 1980. In 1981, an interfaith group founded Combined Parishes Action Committee, and opened a soup kitchen in a local Episcopal church and later a shelter for homeless men, women, and families. The shelter and soup kitchen moved to its current location, called the Beth-El Center, in 1992.  Beth-El is the sole provider of shelter and soup kitchen services in the Milford area and, as of 2010, the area’s only provider of supportive housing. Our mission is to alleviate homelessness and hunger in the Milford area through shelter, support services, advocacy and community education in partnership with the faith-based community and public and private organizations. Our broad goals are to: increase the quality of life for people in crisis by providing shelter and food and in enhancing their ability to achieve personal goals, offering permanent supportive housing and finding solutions to preventing  and ending homelessness and hunger in New Haven County.  Supportive housing is permanent housing with case management services provided on-site. This supportive housing development, known as Liberty Point, was made possible with funding provided by the Connecticut Housing Finance Authority, State of Connecticut Department of Social Services, State of Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, City of Milford Community Development Block Grant, and Corporation for Supportive Housing.
Impact
*Assisted over 200 men, women and children in the Milford area rebuild their lives through stable housing, sustainable employment and education or job training.
 
*Remains successful in all Department of Housing program outcomes.
 
*Reorganized our shelter case manager positions to allow for a full-time position of Housing Specialist to expedite and increase positive exits for individuals and families from the Center.
 
*Continues to work directly with our local mental health authority, BRIDGES Mental Health, Inc. to access mobile crisis services and assessments as needed, reducing the number of mental health crisis events in the shelter.
 
*Outreach out to new community partners who would offer additional meals on site; recruited groups to offer dinners in the evening on eighteen of the thirty/thirty-one days each month.
 
*Established partnership with a nutritionist from local Shop-Rite grocery store, who conducted nutrition, shopping and cooking classes to our residents and others from the community who patronize our soup kitchen.
 
* Program shelter staff works in partnership daily with the Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network (CAN) and other housing-related organizations to ensure that available resources are effectively utilized to address the needs of the Greater New Haven homeless population, allowing clients to have comprehensive services and increases program outcomes overall.
 
Goals: Maintain financial stability; insure high quality program services; continue to meet/exceed contract outcomes; facilitate transition to new Executive Director
 
Needs In the past year we have had several program changes due to our Department of Housing contractual requirements and our participation in the Coordinated Access Network of Greater New Haven.  This has placed additional tasks onto our program staff and case managers, as we make every effort to respond to the 211 referral system and to the needs of the ever increasingly complex population who we serve. One of our more pressing needs is for additional staff to share in the responsibilities of our program staff.   Given the potential in state funding cuts, this is an unrealistic goal at this point in time. We continue to work towards the goals of our Resource Development Plan by focusing on individual donors, major gifts and planned giving as these efforts are vital to the long-term sustainability of our agency without a dedicated staff person. The food programs have seen increasing needs and we are making every attempt to insure that we meet those needs by engaging more church and community groups in the provision of additional meals and donations of food items.
CEO Statement
The Beth-El Center has offered services to the hungry and homeless for over 30 years. Our mission has been enhanced over the years by adding our Meals to Go program and our No Freeze Shelter and by our continuous advocacy efforts and our goal to continue to educate the public about these issues. 

Beth-El Center Inc. staff works in partnership daily with the Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network (CAN) and other housing-related organizations to ensure that available resources are effectively utilized to address the needs of the Greater New Haven homeless population.  Our Center communicates daily with participation on the daily through coordinated entry conference calls, assisting in diversion and shelter prioritization efforts while streamlining admission procedures for our Center. Our Executive Director serves as Co-Chair of the Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network Task Force.  Additionally, our shelter staff is represented on the following committees, work and task force groups: Duty Service Coordinator meeting, Housing Case Conference meeting, CAN Family Workgroup, Youth Workgroup, Maintaining Zero Workgroup, Balance of State Workgroup and Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network Taskforce. We understand the value of collaboration and communication to share resources and assist clients effectively. This approach allows clients to have comprehensive services and increases program outcomes overall.

 

  We will continue to serve our residents of our 34-bed shelter program, but focus our attention on providing our services to the residents to allow them to exit the shelter quicker but armed with the resources necessary to become active community members once again..  All of our efforts will be focused on the goal of ending homelessness by working with all of the area agencies to access Rapid Rehousing funding and other resources in order to provide our residents with the support services, housing and sustainable employment opportunities that they will need in order to become contributing members of society once again. We continue to improve our food services by engaging outside groups to provide additional dinners held at the center. As noted by the United Way Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed (ALICE) report, there are 474,445 households in Connecticut struggling to support themselves.  These families are those who face food insecurity and rely on food banks and soup kitchens to stretch their food budgets.  The reality is that it only takes one incident, loss of a job, or an injury that leads to loss of job, or a car repair that is too costly, to force a family into homelessness.  There still remains much to be done before we have lifted these households out of poverty and have provided a safe, affordable home for all. Beth-El Center will continue to work towards these goals and to respond to the community's needs and to ultimately play a role in ending homelessness and hunger. 
Board Chair Statement

I became involved with the Beth-El Center when a friend introduced me to Toni Dolan, Executive Director. Since becoming involved more than six years ago,  I have learned that hunger and homelessness are not merely urban problems; they occur within our greater Milford community. Seeing what the dedicated staff at Beth-El is able to do with limited resources made me want to help. I am honored to lead a group of board members who are committed to their responsibilities as stewards of the mission and who are dedicated to making a difference in the lives of those who we serve.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Housing, Shelter / Homeless Shelters
Secondary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Soup Kitchens
Tertiary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Public & Societal Benefit NEC
Areas Served
Milford
New Haven
West Haven
Orange
Hamden
Woodbridge
East Haven
Other
The Beth-El Center serves the Greater New Haven Area and through the Coordinated Access Network serves the region through referrals from the 2-1-1 Info-line system.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
As we continue on our goals of ending homelessness and hunger, we are grateful for the ongoing support of The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven and all of our other community partners. We clearly recognize that, without our community partners, we would not be able to provide the quality of services that we want to maintain. Beth-El Center continues to provide a safe, supportive environment for all of our clients.  This is key to re-building lives and to once again being able to live independently.  Our food services continue to provide healthy meals to those in need in our greater community who might otherwise not have the resources to feed themselves or their family. 
Programs
Description
Provides safe, stable living environment in our 34-bed shelter and case management services to single men, single women, veterans, and mothers with children. Each client develops an individualized action plan with goals established by the client.  During their stay, the client is expected to be working on those goals and progress is monitored weekly through meetings with case managers. 
Population Served Homeless / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Our current goals are to provide the resources necessary for clients to move to self-sufficiency and to assist, on a local level, in the goals of the federal plan to end homelessness.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Our primary goal is to alleviate homelessness in the greater Milford community, but ultimately to work collaboratively with other agencies towards the goal of ending homelessness as defined in the federal plan, "Opening Doors".
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Progress is measured against a variety of state and federally mandated standards, including Department of Social Services, Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Federal Emergency Management Agency, as well as our annual self-assessment that is performed by an outside group.  We also rely heavily on the information provided through client surveys, done periodically throughout their stay.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Program success is reflected in the shelter clients moving on to self-sufficiency provided with the tools necessary for long-term success.
 
One of our former clients is now working for a social service agency that works with veterans.  She is also attending college and works part-time for our shelter as a residential counselor.  As a former female veteran, this person holds a unique perspective on the behaviors of our residents, but, at the same time, she understands the necessity of a structured program in order for them to succeed.
 
Another former client, came to us as a young mother with a three month old baby. As soon as she was able to find day care for her child, she enrolled in the Certified Nursing Program. She succeeded in passing the CNA program and her certification. While going to school and caring for her infant, she also applied for housing and benefits through the Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP).  Once she was able to obtain employment, she was given some assistance through HPRP and was able to move into an apartment. 
Description
Provides hot, nutritious meals on site, five days per week, from 11:30 a.m. 1 p.m. and a bag meal distributed from 5 to 6 p.m. to community members in need. In 2016, the soup kitchen provided over 26,000 meals. Several community groups and our faith communities also provide meals in the evenings and on weekends.
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated / Homeless
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Our goal is to provide a hot, nutritious meal five days a week and two alternate days of the weekend to help to sustain those in need within the greater community.  We believe that providing sustenance, we build trust with our patrons in that they are invited in to a safe, clean environment without question as to means or background, and will be provided a good, healthy meal.  This program was originally intended to feed the hungry, and that continues today; however, we have recognized that we need to broaden that goal to helping those who do not have a permanent housing situation and/or support services.  We recognize that we have served thousands of meals over 30 years of service, which has prevented some health issues for our clients that could have resulted from malnutrition.  We served 26,000 meals in 2016 through our luncheon and meals to go programs. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Our primary goal is to provide meals and ultimately training in nutrition, food preparation, and food service so that our clients can lead productive lives and further our mission to alleviate hunger. Our staff works collaboratively with the local mental health agency, Bridges, to offer mental health and mobile crisis services to our soup kitchen clients.  We have implemented an outreach program to patrons of our meal programs to begin to establish some initial contact in the hopes of building relationships and educating them as to the resources that might be available to them such as mental health, employment counseling,  applications for housing vouchers, etc. The staff of the VA of West Haven, through the Errera Community Center, also works closely with us to provide those veterans who are not residents of the shelter with access to services that the VA provides to those patrons who are veterans and who might not be accessing the services for which they would be eligible.  The long-term success of this outreach is aligned with the goals of our Strategic Plan and the goals of the federal plan to end homelessness in that those who are assisted with these services can ultimately be housed safely with the resources necessary to continue to be successful long-term.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Food preparation and service are carefully monitored by the local health department.  As part of our new pilot outreach program, we will be monitoring those who seek assistance.  We provide surveys to the clients on a periodic basis to determine their level of satisfaction with the meals and the nutritional benefit. The CT Food Bank does an annual inspection of our facilities and monitors compliance with the standards as determined nationally.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
The Soup Kitchen served 26,000 meals in 2016 and the need has increased since that time. We are serving an average of 70-80meals per day for lunch, with an additional 25 meals to go, as well as the evening meals provided by outside groups.
Description
Distributes bagged meals to low income and homeless community members from 5:00 - 6:00 p.m. five evenings per week. 
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated / Homeless
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Now that we have been able to determine the need within the community for an evening meal, we are evaluating whether to make this a permanent program. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. To provide temporary assistance to those in need of an evening meal in the community.  Long-term, this program might become a permanent program to provide a hot dinner meal, in addition to the lunch that is currently provided-perhaps prepared and served by our client trainees
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

We will be doing an analysis of the number of people served to make a determination as to whether this program should continue in its present format, or should be expanded into an evening meal that is served in the soup kitchen.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Our Meals to Go program has now served 7,575 meals since its inception.  This meal program provides an evening meal for those in need in the community, but does not open on the nights when the local churches offer an evening meal. 
Description
This program provides emergency shelter services to homeless individuals/families for an overnight stay during the winter months to those in need. This service is weather-based and operates during the evenings from 9:00 p.m. to 7a.m.  Initially implemented during the 2009 winter season, the intent was to open during the months of January through March; however, the past two seasons have produced colder temperatures earlier in the season, so we have opened the shelter in December. 
Population Served Homeless / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
The original goal of this program was to provide shelter for those homeless people who might otherwise be exposed to the elements.  Through this effort, however, our short-term success will be measured by the relationships that have been established with a population that is generally not trusting.  Once we have been able to open that door, we can find a way to assist them with the resources necessary for them to once again become self-sufficient.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Through the relationships and trust built with this chronically homeless population, it is the ultimate goal to work with them to find and access the social services necessary for them to find and sustain permanent housing and sustainable income.  The Beth-El Center is currently a member of the newly formed New Haven Regional Alliance to End Homelessness.  The goal of this alliance is to align itself with the goals of the federal plan to end homelessness, Opening Doors.  The goals of this plan include ending homelessness for individuals and veterans in five years and for families in ten year.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
We require all clients to complete a survey each night upon arrival.  This survey has demographic information and can be used to locate some of these chronically homeless.  We have begun initial conversations with the local mental health facility, Bridges, and the VA of West Haven to discuss a plan for outreach to this population.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
As of this date, we have provided shelter for 947 people who would otherwise have been forced to seek shelter outside during the winter.  We also provided food and drink for them in the evening and then again in the morning to sustain them during the day. 
Program Comments
CEO Comments

In 2014, the state of Connecticut initiated a process to improve the delivery of housing and crisis response and assistance to single adults and families who are homeless or at imminent risk of homelessness by redesigning the community’s process for access, assessment, and referrals within its homeless assistance program. The Coordinated Access Network (CAN) was developed to ensure consistent and uniform access, assessment, prioritization, and referral processes to determine the most appropriate response to each individual’s and family’s immediate housing needs.  This new system of coordinated access is mandated by HUD and the state of Connecticut Department of Housing and is recognized nationally as a best practice to improve efficiency within systems, to provide clarity for individuals and families experiencing homelessness and can help serve more people more quickly and efficiently with targeted assistance. The challenge for the Beth-El Center and other shelters is that this process has been ever evolving since 2014 and has required great flexibility and adaptability on the part of our staff requiring a great deal of our focus on the goals of the CAN, while constantly having to learn and familiarize ourselves to the latest modifications and amendments to the processes and procedures. We are required to focus our exit plans on a goal of 30-days, rather than the 90-day program that has previously been our goal. This has been increasingly difficult to achieve due to shrinking resources,lack of affordable housing,impact of state budget uncertainty,increasingly complicated clients and the focus on the goal to end chronic homelessness by 2016; many of previous resources were eliminated which required us to be very creative and to search for other options.

 

CEO/Executive Director
Mrs. Toni I. Dolan
Term Start Nov 2006
Email tdolan@bethelmilford.org
Experience

Toni Dolan has been the Executive Director of the Beth-El Center of Milford since November 2006. Toni has over thirty years experience in the non-profit sector, having served on nonprofit boards as well as holding several positions in nonprofit agencies, including Interim Executive Director and then permanent Executive Director of Beth-El Center, Inc., interim Executive Director of Interfaith Refugee Ministry of New Haven, Ct. She was also the Administrative Director for the Trinity College Community Child Care Center.

She also has many years of experience in her community, having served as a member of the Glastonbury Town Council, Vice Chair of the Glastonbury Town Plan and Zoning Commission, a member of the Sewer Commission and a member of the Youth and Family Services Commission. Toni also served as Co-Chair of the Regional Advisory Council of Manchester Community College for 25 years.
 
Toni is also active in the Milford community, serving on the United Way Campaign Cabinet for four years, on the Chamber of Commerce Legislative Action Committee.  Toni recently assumed the Chairmanship of the United Way Council of Executives, a group of Executive Directors from the United Way of Milford's agencies, that meets once a month to discuss strategic issues that are facing each agency and how we, as a group, can address them .                                                                                      
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 7
Number of Part Time Staff 11
Number of Volunteers 85
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 80%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 3
Female 15
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director of Programs and Facilities
Title Soup Kitchen Manager
Title Administrative Assistant
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Collaborations
City of Milford, Human Services Department
City of Milford, Community Development Block Grant
Family Resource Center/Kids Count
Rape Crisis Center of Milford
United Way of Milford
United Way of Greater New Haven 
BH Care
Milford Young Parents Program
Calvary Alliance Church
Christ the Redeemer Church
Cornerstone Christian Center
First Baptist Church
First United Church of Christ 
First & Wesley United Methodist Church
Holy Infant Church
Kingdom Life Christian Church
Mary Taylor Memorial Methodist Church
St. Agnes RC Church
St. Andrew's RC Church
St. Ann RC Church
St. Gabriel RC Church
St. Mary RC Church
St. Peter's Episcopal Church
Trinity Lutheran Church
United Church of Christ, Devon
United Presbyterian Church
Woodmont United Church of Christ
 Veterans Administration of West Haven
 Errera Center of West Haven
Liberty Community Services
Bridges Community Mental Health
Greater New Haven Opening Doors Steering Committee
Coordinated Access Network System for Singles and Families (CAN) 
 
 
 
 
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
United Way of Greater New Haven2010
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
CEO Human Service AwardMilford Chamber of Commerce2009
Community Partnership AwardVisting Nurse Association2010
Community Investment AwardUnited Way of Milford2017
Comments
CEO Comments
Over the past few years, as we have worked on the Strategic Plan goals, our Board of Directors has evolved to a group of professional people who want to be involved in strategic decision making and who want to support our fundraising efforts The board consists of a variety of backgrounds, expertise and relevant experience each recruited for those skills and talents that are needed to supplement the existing board's skills and talents. This board is especially engaged in furthering the Strategic Plan initiatives and focusing on them at each board meetings.  They are each committed to all of our fundraising efforts and they support our fundraising events generously. The Board of Directors performs an annual performance evaluation for the Executive Director and establishes annual goals that include provisions for staff development, insuring annual performance evaluations for all staff, and reviewing all revisions and/or updates to the Employee Handbook, Internal Financial Policies and Procedures, and any other governance documents.
Board Chair
Mr. Ed Davies Board President
Company Affiliation CEO, Isaiah 61:1, Inc.
Term Jan 2015 to Dec 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mrs. Sindy Berkowitz The Milford Bank
Mr. Dennis Brown Self-employed
Mr. Max S. Case EsqJacobi & Case, P.C.
Mr. Justin Colby Onward Publishing
Ms. Marilyn Cormack Retired
Mr. Richard Goulart Wakefern Inc.
Ms. Shaileen Landsberg Orange Health Care
Mrs. Suzanne Lyngaas Retired
Mr. Louis Massari Clifford W. Beers Guidance Clinic, Inc.
Ms. Shawn Onukwugha Bridgeport Hospital
Ms. Monique Osborn Retired
Dr. Alex Quintner Sensitive Care Associates
Mr. Greg Raucci Bismarck Construction Managers/General Contractors
Ms. Eileen Schuman retired
Emily McDonough Souza Esq.Neubert, Pepe & Monteith, P. C.
James Winkel Esq.Harlow, Adams & Friedman
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 16
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 9
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Automobile Insurance
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
General Property Coverage
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Special Event Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Board Co-Chair
Ms. Susan Lapine Vice President
Company Affiliation Educator, Post University
Term Jan 2015 to Dec 2017
Email slapine75@gmail.com
Standing Committees
Board Governance
Finance
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Program / Program Planning
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Executive
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Joanne Byrne Retired
Teresa Cavaliero Director of Adult Education
Harry Garafalo Shop-Rite
Nick Genovese St. Agnes' Church
John Hoffman St. Mary's Church
Celeste Lohrenz The Milford Bank
Richard Meisenheimer Spectrum, Inc.
Dr. Hank Sprouse Retired
Maria Tomasetti Ahlzeimer's Association
Gail Utitus Hardy Printing
CEO Comments
As we continue to align our programs with the national and state goals of ending homelessness, we will be asked to rapidly-rehouse clients.  Although there are some limited funds available for this purpose, there is a scarcity of safe, decent and affordable housing in the area. We see this as an opportunity and continue to pursue the feasibility of housing development within the Milford community along with creative solutions such as shared housing situations. 
 
Beth-El is participating in a local housing committee that is currently seeking properties in Milford that could be acquired and renovated into affordable and/or supportive housing developments.  Beth-El is also considering a partnership with a non-profit developer to investigate the feasibility of housing for veterans and families.  This partnership would be funded through a grant through the Veterans Trust Fund and would allow for predevelopment costs.
 
Beth-El is participating in the New Haven Regional Alliance to End Homelessness-a group that seeks to coordinate all of the area agencies involved in housing and homelessness towards the goal of ending homelessness.  The Executive Director has been actively participating in the Coordinated Access Network planning committees as well as a member of the Greater New Haven Opening Doors Steering Committee.
 
We continue to be challenged by the lack of jobs, affordable housing, as well as the increased demand on our shelter and food services, while resources are shrinking.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2018
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2018
Projected Revenue $739,084.00
Projected Expenses $757,368.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$999,488$1,044,805$1,073,940
Current Assets$501,527$493,059$471,545
Long-Term Liabilities$12,206$10,500$88,851
Current Liabilities$33,825$29,660$25,757
Total Net Assets$953,457$1,004,645$959,332
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Housing $188,500CT Dept. of Housing $191,961Norma F. Pfriem Foundation $140,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountNorma F. Pfriem $150,000Norma F. Pfriem Foundation $150,000City of Milford $126,481
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountTJX Corp. $5,000City of Milford $84,526US Dept. of Veteran Affairs $59,312
Comments
CEO Comments
Our Board is fully committed to all of our fundraising events to meet the goals and mission of our agency, which is to alleviate hunger and homelessness in the greater Milford region. As access to safe affordable housing shrinks and the growing need for food increases, and the shift from shelter-based to housing-based services is a targeted focus of our programs, it is especially challenging to meet those needs given the current staffing capacity, increased costs, and level or possibly decreased funding. Despite this, we have been able to improve revenues without accruing additional debt and have been able to increase revenues with approximately the same amount of fixed assets; thus assets are being used more efficiently. 
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 90 New Haven Avenue
Milford, CT 064604827
Primary Phone 203 876-0747 101
Contact Email info@bethelmilford.org
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Toni I. Dolan
Board Chair Mr. Ed Davies Board President
Board Chair Company Affiliation CEO, Isaiah 61:1, Inc.

 

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