Apt Foundation
1 Long Wharf Drive
Ste 321
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 1 Long Wharf Drive
Ste 321
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 781-4600 x
Fax 203-781-4624
E-mail lmadden@aptfoundation.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

Founded in 1970, the APT Foundation Inc’s mission is to promote health and recovery for those who live with substance use disorders and/or mental illness.


 

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1970
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Lynn M Madden
Board Chair Reverand David Parachini
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $20,491,264.00
Projected Expenses $20,032,199.00
Statements
Mission

Founded in 1970, the APT Foundation Inc’s mission is to promote health and recovery for those who live with substance use disorders and/or mental illness.


 

Background The APT Foundation and its treatment programs play an important role in providing substance use and mental health services to individuals in the Greater New Haven Community. Founded in 1970 with funding and support from various state agencies, the APT Foundation has served individuals regardless of ability to pay ( in FY11 we provided $2.8 million of free-care), providing outpatient and residential substance use disorder treatment, primary healthcare, outpatient mental health treatment services, medication assisted treatment, family counseling services, and adult education & vocational services. The APT Foundation is highly committed to engage and retain individuals in services while employing strategies to assist in understanding and embracing substance use disorder and mental health issues as chronic diseases. Services are non- confrontational and built on establishing a relationship with mutual respect and dignity.

APT has successfully been working with people with substance use and/or mental health disorders for the past 40 years develop long lasting connections to their community's through recovery management. Many of the clients we serve have barriers to their recovery related to homelessness, lack of nutritional supports, lack of transportation, lack of family involvement, criminal histories, unemployment, lack of education and what they perceive as a lack of skills. Through a Recovery Orientated System of Care, we have not only been a resource for individuals but we have become knowledgeable of the full range of community services that can help people to achieve their goals and we deliver services outside the boundaries of traditional treatment settings.

The key to effective recovery management at APT includes effective assessment tools, person -driven recovery plans as well as a comprehensive understanding that recovery is an individualized process. This combined with qualified staff that is involved in civic, religious, volunteer, and business organizations outside of the treatment community have been a major factor in helping people make natural connections to their own communities and feel comfortable identifying their recovery capital when advocating for themselves.
Impact APT Foundation Inc's top five accomplishments from the past year are as follows: 

1.      Strengthened the fund balance

2.      Developed and implemented a long term Facilities Use Plan

3.      Replaced patient medical records and  billing system with SMART electronic medial records system.

4.      Standardized policies, practices and procedures across programs

5.      Engaged and retained individuals in services while employing strategies to assist in understanding and embracing substance use disorder and mental health issues as chronic diseases.

 The APT Foundation Inc's top five goals for the current year include:

1.      Evaluate client and community needs to ensure appropriate clinical programming exists throughout APT

2.      Expand services provided at Central Medical Unit (primary care clinic for adults) with consideration of services such as immunizations, Hep C/HIV identification and treatment.

3.      Evaluate specific programming for young adults (18-25).

4.      Improve co-occurring disorder treatment capacity.

5.      Expand Buprenorphine treatment.

Needs

(1)  Currently, the APT Foundation has seen an increasing number of low-income clients who have barriers to access traditional food supports (food kitchens) in need of food/meal supports. While we have worked to address this need by implementing a snack program comprised of donated food items, it recognizes that to sufficiently meet its clients' food and nutritional needs it must develop a formal meal program. Our clients basic needs must be met, before they can fully benefit from mental health and substance use counseling services. The goals of the client meal program are three-fold: Foster retention of our clients in treatment;  Demonstrate client improvement on Basis-24 (a rating scale for acuity of symptoms); and reduce the number of meals missed per week by our clients

(2) Explore options for other residential programs (i.e. sober housing, transitional living) as a step down for our clients transition from our inpatient residential treatment facility to outpatient level of care

(3)  Improve funder relationships so we can expand the number of non-clinical services we provide to clients

(4)  Strengthen and develop appropriate partnerships with community member sin order to meet client treatment life- goals

(5) Develop and implement a social media/marketing plan

CEO Statement

The APT Foundation continues to grow our programs, increase our census, and stay true to our mission making it possible for more persons in our community affected by substance use disorders and mental illness to enter and grow in recovery while also ensuring that the organization can survive, even during the tough economic times that are challenging us now.  By providing an open access to treatment model, the Foundation has worked hard to eliminate a major barrier to client’s engaging in services by collapsing multiple service entry points. This made it able for APT to treat the greater demand in our community and in increase our census 61%, serving 3,921 unduplicated clients and providing over 140,000 clinical events/encounters. 

Our ongoing vision is to continue to improve access to and retention in treatment, as well as the way we provide treatment services by developing an accessible, less restrictive and non-stigmatizing, environment within a coordinated system of care that successfully cross shares our resources (financial and staff) and encourages a peer-to-peer recovery support system.  

In keeping with the Foundation’s pioneering history, we moved APT into many new and innovative directions. With the opening of the Access Center (the "first of its kind" open access and central admissions point of service facility in the State of CT) we were able to reduce wait time and no shows, and improving access and retention rates allowing us to grow the company by more than a 1/3rd from 2007- present. We developed an Overdose Prevention Initiative; put into place a smoking cessation program; developed a standardized free Hepatitis C screening and A& B vaccination program; instituted Trauma Informed Care; utilized the Basis 24 client self-assessment tool to assess client progress as well as consumer satisfaction; we implemented SMART electronic medical records system; and we automated the client medicating process.

The Foundation remains committed to better meet the substance use and mental health needs of our community. Lack of food and nutritional needs is a major barrier to fostering retention of clients in treatment and client improvement in treatment. We must ensure that client basic needs are met so they can fully benefit from mental health and substance use counseling services. In FY12, for the first time in our history we will begin working to develop, fund, sustain a food /meal program to address the food/nutritional needs of individuals with multiple life issues who show up at our open-access center seeking treatment. These individuals face multiple barriers to traditional food/meal support service in the community because they have not stabilized in their recovery; and they have significant cognitive impairment as well as legal, employment, transportation, housing, and family functioning issues, which make it difficult for them to access the services they need at various community agencies.

I am honored to serve as CEO of the APT Foundation and privileged to have the opportunity to work with committed caregivers, as compassion is a rare and wonderful gift and I am proud to share that there is always an abundance of it at APT.

Yours truly,
Lynn Madden
President, CEO
Board Chair Statement

Since its founding in 1970, the APT Foundation has worked tirelessly to fulfill its mission, “to promote the health and recovery for those who live with substance abuse disorders and/or mental illness”. This mission has brought the Foundation into the lives of thousands of individuals and families in the greater New Haven area who have been struggling to confront these challenges in their lives. While the mission of the Foundation has not changed over the years, the range and complexity of the issues confronting our clients has. APT serves an ever more challenging array of needs brought to us by those who seek our assistance and support in their recovery. We are able to address these needs because of the commitment and competence of our extraordinary staff. In the changing economic times in which we live it seems that as resources are stressed the needs and the numbers of those seeking access to our treatment resources constantly grows. While this changing “playing field” is one of our greatest challenges, one of our greatest joys is to watch our staff and programs offer flexible and compassionate treatment to our clients as we form a partnership for recovery in their lives. 

 I am pleased to serve as the Chair of the Board of the APT Foundation. It is a continuation of my commitment to serving others as a Priest and as a substance use counselor and I have the chance to work with our staff of committed care givers and other Board members as together we seek to respond to the needs of our clients in these challenging times.

 The Rev. David C. Parachini

Chair, APT Board of Directors   

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Substance Abuse Dependency, Prevention & Treatment
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Seymour
Shelton
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The APT Foundation would like to develop, fund, sustain a food /meal program to address the food/nutritional needs of individuals with multiple life issues who show up at our open-access center seeking mental health and/or substance use treatment and who face barriers to traditional food/meal support service in the community. These individuals are unable to access traditional food/meal support services in the community because they have not stabilized in their recovery; and they have significant cognitive impairment as well as legal, employment/ transportation, housing, and family functioning issues, which make it difficult for them to access the services they need at various community agencies.


 


 

Programs
Description

The APT Foundation's outpatient program provides comprehensive treatment for individuals with substance use disorder or mental health issues or co-occurring(mental health and substance abuse issues). A unique open access program is offered to clients meeting criteria to participate in our services. The program recognizes that individuals entering treatment have different needs and varying levels of commitment to treatment. Based on information gathered during the evaluation process clients in collaboration with the admitting clinician discuss and agree upon a recommended level of attendance to the program. Through the use of a motivational-based treatment philosophy clinicians work closely together to continually monitor progress on individual recovery plans and assist clients to obtain their individual treatment goals. Length of stay varies based on clients needs. Groups are process oriented, designed at providing education on a range of topics. These topics include but are not limited to coping skills, relapse prevention, managing emotions, biology of addiction, co-occurring disorders, goal setting, health topics, weekend planning. In addition to the above topics, the program offers both a Men’s Trauma and Women’s Trauma group. In addition to providing a comprehensive group therapy program, which promotes education and discussion, the program provides individual therapy as needed. On-site individual psychiatric services are also available for assessment and medication management. Medication assisted treatment (Buprenorphine, Naltrexone, etc) is available. Clients with psychiatric conditions that may benefit from medications are treated with appropriate pharmacological agents. Medications are prescribed and monitored by the Medical Director as well as the on-site licensed staff psychiatrist.  

 

Population Served Adults / Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

By improving access to treatment and retention in our Programs within the city of New Haven, using the Rapid Cycle Performance Improvement methodology and an approach for improving treatment promoted by NIATx, we increase our census and increase the number outpatient services we provide.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

It has been suggested that the way treatment services are currently delivered is a barrier to both access to and retention in treatment. Although statistics have shown that nineteen million Americans need substance use treatment, only twenty-five percent are able to access treatment and only fifty percent of those in treatment successfully complete it. (SAMHSA) The ultimate changes that will result from this program is increased access,   reducing waiting time and no shows, and improving access and retention rates,  while simultaneously increasing our revenue, while maintaining our commitment to providing services and specific programming that meets the changing needs, improves the quality of care, and provides a positive treatment experience for our clients and the community.



Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
# of client evaluations
# of admissions
# of treatment encounter/events
BASIS - 24 Consumer Self -report (BASIS 24®, an existing outcome measurement tool that is based on client self report, to measure the impact of treatment outcomes and client profiles. For a little over three years, the Foundation has used Basis 24® to measure the impact of individual outcomes and programmatic outcomes on an aggregate basis. Using a client-driven outcome measure allowed us to tailor treatment more closely to customer needs and by correlating treatment outcomes with programmatic change)
DMHAS Client Satisfaction Survey
SMART - clinical notes and treatment plan updates and reviews ( 30-60-90 day cycle)


Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Some samples of data collected from BASIS-24 : Client self report: how responsive has staff been to questions regarding your treatment and medication? (Select Positive (+) and Negative (-) Client Comments) + “Personable staff and they don’t stereotype just because you’re here receiving treatment.”  - “If abiding by rules and completing classes and tasks allow a quicker take home method.” + “I like all the groups provided and that you can pick and chose your days and hours.” - “Call in prescriptions more accurately and in a timely manner.” + “I like the fact that my doctor makes me feel better about life and was with me every step of the way to help me.” - “Be better on timing. Timing is the only issue you hear a lot about in the waiting area.”

Client self-report: since entering treatment, how well do you think you are doing?  (Select Positive (+) and Negative (-) Client Comments)  + “i was a serious addict my normal self for a long time. I’m thankful for this medication because it saved my life.” - “very tired, driving down here everyday is so tough for me, but very scared to detox.” + “i have struggled for years with my opiate addiction and i have finally found the help i need here.” - “i really try hard to stay clean by my mental state needs to be looked at.” + “i do truly try and care. I think its because the staff does.” - “i still need a lot of help with my treatment.”

Description APT Residential Services Division (RSD) is a 125-bed, licensed residential substance abuse treatment facility that provides treatment to adults through our ADULT SERVICES PROGRAM. The mission of RSD is to provide residential treatment to individuals with substance use and co-occurring mental health problems accompanied by significant impairment in legal, employment/schooling, and housing/family functioning. The RSD residential programs provides a sustained treatment experience with the goal of rehabilitating multiple areas of impairment and enabling clients to become productive workers, students, family members, and law-abiding members of society. The duration, intensity, and components/ elements of this model vary depending on individual need, treatment planning, and referral source coordination processes. Family visitation and Family Support Group are offered to help facilitate open communication and reintegration. Additional psychiatric, psychological, vocational, educational, medical, and family/community-based services are provided as needed.
Population Served Adults / Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers / General/Unspecified
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

All clients admitted to the program will complete an intake process

90% clients residing in the program will agree to a substance use free lifestyle, with subsequent toxicology tests showing a drop in nanogram levels

All clients will develop a discharge plan as part of their treatment plan upon admission.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. A treatment plan has been developed with the active participation of the client.
95% of admitted clients will have a service/treatment plan completed within
15 calendar days of admission.
Client has reduced/eliminated use of illicit substances.
98% of clients will have at least 1 randomdrug screen monthly. 90% of clients will have no positive drug screens.
Client has successfully completed all components of the program.
75% of discharged clients will have completed the program successfully.
Client has participated in development of discharge plan detailing referrals for community-based services.
98% of successfully discharged clients in program longer than 15 days will have discharge plan/summary.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
SMART (clinical notes and treatment plan updates at 30-60-90 days)
BASIS-24 Consumer Self-report (BASIS 24®, an existing outcome measurement tool that is based on client self report, to measure the impact of treatment outcomes and client profiles. For a little over three years, the Foundation has used Basis 24® to measure the impact of individual outcomes and programmatic outcomes on an aggregate basis. Using a client-driven outcome measure allowed us to tailor treatment more closely to customer needs and by correlating treatment outcomes with programmatic change)
Toxicology screens
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

“I thought it was normal”, those are the words of Nigel, at age eight, describing his family members passing drugs (heroin and cocaine) around the living room all day, every day. He said it wasn’t until he visited his friends’ homes that “I knew it wasn’t normal”. He says after that, he didn’t feel like he fit in with the kids his age and by the age of 14 had joined his family members in the living room abusing drugs. For the next thirty years, he bought, sold and used drugs “as much as I could get and as often as I could use”. He spent his mid-twenties to mid-thirties in and out of jail and treatment facilities. He moved from the Bronx to Connecticut with his aunt. “I had hoped to make some changes in my life” with the move. Nigel came to APT newly diagnosed with HIV and “scared to death that I wouldn’t be able to stop using drugs”. For the first few years, he engaged minimally in treatment and then says, “The light bulb went on”. His health was poor and he was not actively involved in his medical treatment. The change became dramatic. He sought help from every agency and social resource he could find and became fully engaged in his treatment at APT. He has since successfully discharged from treatment and still calls monthly to state he is doing well. He reminds staff at APT that I am still on his “A team”. He remains drug free and fully engaged in his community, though his health is deteriorating from the natural progression of AIDS. He often states that he would have been dead by now if the APT program hadn’t been so supportive of him and his time to work through his own process. We have to remind him that we provided the arena but he did all of the work.

Description

The APT Foundation provides primary health care services to adult clients and their families from all APT substance use and mental health treatment clinics and the greater New Haven community.  We offer medical screening, primary and preventive health care, HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis education with counseling and testing, Suboxone (Buprenorphine) maintenance and outpatient detoxification services for alcohol and opiates. Today there are approximately 3800 patients seen per year and sick care is routinely administered along with scheduled physical exams. Typical health care needs for patients involve the usual substance abuse related problems of liver and kidney disease, gynecological infections, cellulitis, and abscesses from infections. In addition, the routine problems of hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity resulting from poor diets, and infections such as bronchitis, pneumonia and strep are treated. Our primary care services fills an important gap in treatment for individuals as private physicians, and many other clinics, avoid treating these patients or are not prepared to address their special service needs. Approximately 75 to 80 percent of the patients treated are insured through Charter Oak, Medicaid, and Medicare. Those with no insurance are treated  for free or on a sliding scale fee basis. Our licensed practitioners are affiliated with Yale New Haven Hospital and the Hospital of St. Raphael. The office is a clinical site for medical, nurse practitioner and phlebotomy students and various medical and substance abuse research protocols. Our setting allows increased access to clients for the treatment of their substance problems and the engagement of substance users for medical care within a non-judgmental atmosphere.

Population Served Adults / Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

To address the healthcare needs of patients achieving wellness concurrent with recovery. We will measure this using an outcome of 75 % of clients will show improved and or stabilized living situation as result of accessing CMU medical services at 6 months and 12 months. Indicator  will be the number of clients who self -report an improvement or stabilization in living situation on their BASIS 24 at treatment plan review. 80% clients will receive Hepatitis screen and rapid HIV testing 75% of those who test positive for Hepatitis/HIV will receive appropriate medical treatment

 
 

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Every individual seeking treatment to the APT  Foundation receives as part of the standard clinical admissions procedure, a complete physical, laboratory tests. Recognizing the tremendous growth in the number of people we serve and our commitment to better meet their substance use and mental health needs the CMU will better help us to meet this greater demand.CMU will play a vital role in developing a sense of community among clients in all phases of treatment and our ability to provide additional types of substance use treatment services, such as Buprenorphine and Ambulatory Detox for primarily alcohol and opiates.
 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
 We are able to improve the health outcomes of clients tracking the indicators listed below for each client. This information becomes part of the client’s permanent chart/medical records at the Foundation. 
 

Client Name

Urine Toxicology

HIV/HEPb/c.

Meds

APT Clinic

Annual Physical

Case Manager

 

Date of test:

Results (by date):

Date of test:

Results (by date):

Name:

Dosage:

Name:

Date of referral:

Dr:

Date:

Results:

Name:

Date of referral:

# physicals
#sick care encounters/events
 SMART (clinical/doctor notes)
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Patients are wonderfully cooperative, appreciative and very grateful to have the medical care.” Susan Henry, RN, CMU Director. CMU fills an important gap in services. Private physicians, and many other clinics, avoid treating these patients or are not prepared to address their special service needs. Approximately 75 to 80 percent of the patients treated at CMU are insured through State Medicaid and Medicare. Those with no insurance are treated on a sliding scale fee basis.The reality is that, were it not for clinics like CMU, many of the patients would not seek medical care at all. Because of their addictions many have either had poor medical experiences in the past or have encountered doctors unfamiliar with addiction. Frequently, either patients are reluctant to admit their addictions, or physicians have little or no knowledge of the impact of prescribed medications people in treatment. By coming to CMU for primary care, there is no pretense about addictive histories; follow-up treatment is generally more successful, thereby keeping clients out of hospitals and emergency rooms. At CMU, there is always a medical doctor on staff who is aware of necessary restrictions and ready to prescribe medications that are compatible with treatment.


 

Description

Through the generosity of community donors, in 2014 we have been able to expand our pilot program Life Skills Gardening group . We have employed a part-time horticultural instructor with a degree in horticulture and over twenty years of experience in the field to develop projects and assist the clinical staff to develop protocols for a range of horticulture group topics. The project has been and will continue to be funded through organizational funding opportunities and utilizing community relationships connected to the horticulture industry. Although the restorative benefits of gardening have not as of yet been subjected to rigorous scientific studies, our decision to utilize horticulture therapy is based on a vast body of research discussing the benefits of gardening for a broad range of populations including those with mental health and substance use disorders. Over the past several decades horticulture therapy has been recognized as an evidenced based practice. The use of a horticulture instructor paired with a clinical staff member has been well received. To date over 103 individuals have self-selected to participate in the Life Skills Gardening group is conducted several times a week. Groups provide participants with hands-on gardening experience through the use of “grow boxes” to cultivate vegetables and herbs. Clients have harvested over 30 pounds of produce and have also worked to beautify the location with a number of annual, herb, and perennial barrels. Clients have expressed a great deal of satisfaction with the program. Quotes from group participants include: “My husband gardens all the time, after this experience I think I will do this with him.” “This looks so good, look what we did!” “I have a black thumb, but I want to learn, I will be back.” “I so want to do this at home next year.”

Population Served / /
Description

During the past year the APT Foundation has been involved in a major effort to address the growing problem of overdose deaths that has been affecting our Connecticut communities as well much of the rest of the United States. The APT effort has been undertaken by increasing to 12 the number of APT clinical staff who are trained in providing specific overdose prevention and education services. The services these clinicians provide include teaching patients and their families how to recognize overdose, what to do in an overdose situation, how to manage a person(s) who is overdosing, what emergency techniques to perform to increase the survival, and how to administer the overdose prevention drug Narcan (naloxone) to reverse overdose and what to say when making a report to 911 emergency services. This training includes the provision of a “Narcan Kit” to the patient and their significant others to use in the event of an overdose.

Since last summer APT Foundation has given almost 600 Narcan Kits to patients and families. We also recently participated in International Overdose Awareness/Prevention activities with a week long series of events including breakfast and lunch at all locations, “Got Narcan” T-shirts, increased treatment groups focusing on overdose prevention and kit provision, and information packets regarding the issues surrounding overdose and how to prevent it.

Population Served / /
Program Comments
CEO Comments

Despite difficult financial challenges we face we continue to grow services to all clients, regardless of payment status,in the belief that persons in recovery become more responsible over time and theorizing that an open door will position APT as the “go-to” provider in the community.

This year we continued stay true to our mission of treating all who seek care regardless of their ability to pay making it possible for persons in our community to enter treatment and grow in recovery. We provided 217,026 direct service encounters. We served 7,037 unique individuals. We completed 3,184 walk in evaluations. We provided $1,565,541 in reduced rate/ free-care.

By systematically eliciting and analyzing the preferences of consumers we created a more accessible and effective treatment system that encourages improved efficiencies and financial performance. Agency management strategies drawn from business world are valid not for a profit motive per se; but rather in that all successful business models are customer-driven and product improvement focused.

CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Lynn M Madden
Term Start Apr 2006
Email lmadden@aptfoundation.org
Experience B. A  University of Maine, 1995                                
M.S    Public Administration, Univ. of Maine, 1997                               
Career/Academic Appointments:

1997-2006              

Instructor, Dept. of Public Administration, University of Maine, Orono, Maine

Administrative Positions:

1985-1986             
Media/Program Coordinator, US Navy Recreation, US Naval Station, Rota, Spain

1986-1991             

Director of Community Relations & Volunteer Services, Eastern Maine           Medical Center, Bangor Maine

1991- 2006            

Vice President, Operations, Acadia Hospital Corp, Bangor Maine

Chief Operating Officer, Acadia Healthcare, Inc, Bangor, Maine

2003-2006                            

Executive Sponsor, Paths to Recovery,  Acadia Hospital, Bangor Maine

2004-Present         

Process Improvement Coach/Consultant, Robert Wood Johnson        Foundation/ Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

2006 – Present      

Chief Executive Officer,  APT Foundation, Inc, New Haven, CT
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 211
Number of Part Time Staff 55
Number of Volunteers 12
Number of Contract Staff 8
Staff Retention Rate 75%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 113
Asian American/Pacific Islander 5
Caucasian 124
Hispanic/Latino 24
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 83
Female 183
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr. Allen Brown Jan 1999 - Apr 2005
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
 The APT Foundation works closely with a number of community organizations (such as Columbus House, Women's Consortium, Hill Health Center, SATU, Work Force Alliance, STRIVE, Hispanic Clinic, CT Food Bank, CMHC, Easter Seals, etc) to ensure that client’s treatment needs are met. Referrals sources include but are not limited to other service providers, faith based supports, recovery based organizations, and other healthcare providers.
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Consumer SatisfactionDMHAS2010
Comments
CEO Comments

Since its founding in 1970, the APT Foundation has worked tirelessly to fulfill its mission, “to promote the health and recovery for those who live with substance abuse disorders and/or mental illness”. This mission has brought the Foundation into the lives of thousands of individuals and families in the greater New Haven area who have been struggling to confront these challenges in their lives. While the mission of the Foundation has not changed over the years, the range and complexity of the issues confronting our clients has. APT serves an ever more challenging array of needs brought to us by those who seek our assistance and support in their recovery. We are able to address these needs because of the commitment and competence of our extraordinary staff. In the changing economic times in which we live it seems that as resources are stressed the needs and the numbers of those seeking access to our treatment resources constantly grows. While this changing “playing field” is one of our greatest challenges, one of our greatest joys is to watch our staff and programs offer flexible and compassionate treatment to our clients as we form a partnership for recovery in their lives. 

 

I am pleased to serve as the Chair of the Board of the APT Foundation. It is a continuation of my commitment to serving others as a Priest and as a substance use counselor and I have the chance to work with our staff of committed care givers and other Board members as together we seek to respond to the needs of our clients in these challenging times.

 

The Rev. David C. Parachini

Chair,

Board of Directors   

Board Chair
Reverand David Parachini
Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Term July 2014 to June 2015
Email eakp@aol.com
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr Jay Broderick Beers, Hamerman & Co, PC
Mr Fred Erskine The Atlantic Group
Ms Betty Levy EsqLevy & Schaffer, LLC
Mr. David Margolis CICPresident, Greenberg Rhein Margolis, Inc.
Michelle Michaud Treasurer, CFO
Ms. Lucille Patrone RNCommunity Volunteer
Ms. Janet Ryan Community Volunteer
Dr Richard Schottenfeld MDYale University School of Medicine
Dr. Michael Sernyak MDCT Mental Health Center (CMHC)
Mr. Mark Sherman Community Volunteer
Rabbi Hesch Sommer D.MinJewish Family Services
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 10
Female 2
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Risk Management Provisions
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Directors and Officers Policy
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Professional Liability
Board Co-Chair
Ms Janet Ryan
Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Term July 2014 to June 2015
Email jsryan@snet.net
CEO Comments

APT serves an ever more challenging array of needs brought to us by those who seek our assistance and support in their recovery. We are able to address these needs because of the commitment and competence of our extraordinary staff. In the changing economic times in which we live it seems that as resources are stressed the needs and the numbers of those seeking access to our treatment resources constantly grows. While this changing “playing field” is one of our greatest challenges, one of our greatest joys is to watch our staff and programs offer flexible and compassionate treatment to our clients as we form a partnership for recovery in their lives. 

 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $20,491,264.00
Projected Expenses $20,032,199.00
Spending Policy N/A
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902013
Form 9902012
Form 9902011
From 9902010
Form 9902009
Form 9902008
Audit Documents
audit2013
audit2012
audit2011
Audit2010
AUdit2009
Audit2008
IRS Letter of Exemption
501 C 3
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
DMHAS Consumer Satisfaction Survey2009View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Revenue$20,491,264$19,393,420$19,116,885
Total Expenses$20,032,199$19,669,229$18,831,430
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$503,508$234,817$163,083
Government Contributions$7,413,917$7,691,299$7,832,833
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$7,413,917$7,691,299$7,832,833
Individual Contributions------
------
$12,571,342$11,463,711$11,116,217
Investment Income, Net of Losses$2,497$3,593$4,752
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$16,770,669$16,542,952$15,870,295
Administration Expense$3,261,530$3,126,277$2,961,135
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.020.991.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses84%84%84%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$5,505,645$3,782,226$4,109,866
Current Assets$1,272,185$1,780,975$1,846,858
Long-Term Liabilities$1,243,051--$57,375
Current Liabilities$1,566,487$1,576,691$1,571,147
Total Net Assets$2,696,107$2,205,535$2,481,344
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDMHAS $5,450,142 --DMHAS $5,433,364
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountYale School of Med. $719,381 --Yale School of Med. $919,724
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDOC $579,178 --DOC $576,242
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.811.131.18
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets23%0%1%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments

Despite difficult financial challenges we face we continue to grow services to all clients, regardless of payment status,in the belief that persons in recovery become more responsible over time and theorizing that an open door will position APT as the “go-to” provider in the community.

This year we continued stay true to our mission of treating all who seek care regardless of their ability to pay making it possible for persons in our community to enter treatment and grow in recovery. We provided 217,026 direct service encounters. We served 7,037 unique individuals. We completed 3,184 walk in evaluations. We provided $1,565,541 in reduced rate/ free-care.

By systematically eliciting and analyzing the preferences of consumers we created a more accessible and effective treatment system that encourages improved efficiencies and financial performance. Agency management strategies drawn from business world are valid not for a profit motive per se; but rather in that all successful business models are customer-driven and product improvement focused.

Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 1 Long Wharf Drive
Ste 321
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 781-4600
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Lynn M Madden
Board Chair Reverand David Parachini
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer

 

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A healthy community is a rich community. When we enjoy good health, when we engage in wellness activities – and when we support people living with disease or disabilities -- there are profound physical and psychological benefits. Simply put, we are all stronger and happier. To support the health and wellness initiatives in your community is to put good health within reach of all.