JUNTA for Progressive Action
169 Grand Avenue
New Haven CT 06513
Contact Information
Address 169 Grand Avenue
New Haven, CT 06513-
Telephone (203) 787-0191 x16
Fax 203-787-4934
E-mail info@juntainc.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
JUNTA's mission is to provide services, programs and advocacy that improve the social, political and economic conditions of the Latino community in Greater New Haven while nurturing and promoting its cultural traditions as it builds bridges with other communities. JUNTA serves and advocates for all vulnerable populations including low-income, Latino and immigrant communities in Greater New Haven. JUNTA is located in the heart of the Fair Haven neighborhood, New Haven's historic community of immigrants. The ultimate goal of our seven core programs involves improving all aspects of an individual and family's life so that they can experience economic, social, personal and familial success, while working to eliminate barriers that can prevent people from experiencing success despite all of their best efforts. 
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1969
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Sandra Trevino
Board Chair Ms. Alicia Schmidt-Camacho
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale University
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $605,590.00
Projected Expenses $605,590.00
Statements
Mission JUNTA's mission is to provide services, programs and advocacy that improve the social, political and economic conditions of the Latino community in Greater New Haven while nurturing and promoting its cultural traditions as it builds bridges with other communities. JUNTA serves and advocates for all vulnerable populations including low-income, Latino and immigrant communities in Greater New Haven. JUNTA is located in the heart of the Fair Haven neighborhood, New Haven's historic community of immigrants. The ultimate goal of our seven core programs involves improving all aspects of an individual and family's life so that they can experience economic, social, personal and familial success, while working to eliminate barriers that can prevent people from experiencing success despite all of their best efforts. 
Background

JUNTA for Progressive Action was founded in 1969 as a response to the increase of families moving to New Haven from Puerto Rico. Although American citizens, Puerto Rican migrants expressed a need for services and programs that would help to transition their families into American life. These services included English as a Second language, scholarship assistance and translation services. As JUNTA has evolved throughout the years, we have expanded as a center of support for immigrant communities who settle in New Haven. Our programs are universal in that we recognize the needs of diverse populations, and administer programs that support low-income, disadvantaged children and families, as well as immigrants in the New Haven area. With seven core programs, we ensure that basic economic needs are met, such as food, housing, diapers for children, and assisting clients with accessing state and local benefits that will prevent them from slipping into poverty. We emphasize the importance of education as a vehicle to family economic success. To that end, we work in partnership with businesses and community-based organizations to provide Adult Education including ESL, GED, Spanish and citizenship courses, financial education, computer literacy skills training, parental workshops on advocating for their children’s education, and informational seminars on labor rights, immigration and health. Coupled with direct support and services are referrals to our resource partners that can provide further assistance and skills training, JUNTA is empowering residents to improve their quality of life. We also focus on the impact of immigration on New Haven’s cultural and social life. As the leading Latino advocacy organization in New Haven we worked collectively with the City of New Haven on a series of policies designed to integrate immigrants into the fabric of the city. For example, New Haven was a pioneer in its implementation of the Elm City Resident Card - a municipal ID card that provides identification to all city residents, regardless of legal status, and facilitates access to city services and financial institutions. The ID card initiative has been replicated in half a dozen cities, including San Francisco. The New Haven Police Department issued a Police General Order prohibiting police from enquiring about an individual's immigration status in the course of a criminal investigation. All of these policy initiatives were generated by JUNTA. The organization also took the lead in developing the political and community-based strategies to ensure their successful adoption and implementation by the City. We continue integrating immigrants into the life of the city through access to education, local resources and a Worker Center that organizes for equal labor rights for low-wage immigrant workers in Connecticut. We aim to help immigrants put down roots, build a better life, and become contributing members of society.

Impact
Accomplishments

1. Expanded beyond our mission to become an agency that  advises on Latino-specific issues, and collaborates with institutions, organizations and businesses to increase the capacity to address the Latino community and better understand cultural differences and potential barriers.

 2. Expanded our Employment and Economic Development programs to more fully address the unemployment rate among Latinos (20%). 

3.  Built our Advocacy & Community Organizing program through investing in our Youth Action Committee.  The committee engaged Latino youth in social justice action and community organizing.  

Top 3-5 goals for the current year:
 
1. Expand health and wellness initiative into all programs. 
2. Work to close loop holes in the existing TRUST Act. 
3.  Advocate for undocumented students to have access to financial aid.
4. Become an authorized provider of immigration services, certified to provide educational materials and legal services to help immigrants navigate the immigration system.
5. Expand the youth advocacy program. 
 
 
    Needs

    1.  Advocacy & Community Organizing program: Funding needed: $40,000 to hire a full time Community Organizer.

    2.  Economic Development & Employment: Funding needed: $10,000 to replace antiquated computer equipment in Junta's computer lab.

    3.  Volunteers: Need for trained volunteers for one-on-one ESL tutoring, conversational groups, and childcare for evening classes. Volunteers are also needed in the area of fundraising.

    4. Facility: Funding needed for repairs to the building. Cost not known, need assessment done. 
     
    5. Need to continue to diversify funding streams. 
     
    CEO Statement

    There is something inherently unique about Junta. It is the balance of service and advocacy, and the way we address the collective spirit of creating change in our community that is tangible and sustainable. As the only community-based organization in greater New Haven that provides bilingual services, we go beyond the immediate economic and social condition that disenfranchises someone who walks in through our doors. It is the process of being progressive. We do not wait for an individual or an entity to take on the challenges and trends that we identify through the daily work. It is our commitment and obligation to be at the forefront . For example, over the past 12 years we recognized the trend of immigration, its impact on greater New Haven, and the resistance and challenges that would arise. As anti-immigrant sentiment and rampant deportation are more increasingly tearing families apart, Junta responded with policy recommendations, action, and the formation of an advocacy program focused specifically on the impact of immigration on the person, built a statewide coalition to strategically address it, and are placing the organization and the community at the table where decisions are made. This is not by accident. It is through careful consideration, feedback from and discussions with those most affected, that we recognized these issues and address them. As we continue to grow as organization, we are committed to our core values of respect, voice, unity, integrity and excellence as central to a successful and thriving community for all people.

     

    Board Chair Statement

     I joined the Board in 2002 at the invitation of the Executive Director, Kica Matos.  I had lived in New Haven since 1999 and was interested in working closely in the community of Fair Haven, where I found a vibrant community of new migrants and working class residents of New Haven. As a scholar of immigration and labor, I was drawn to Junta's mission of advocacy and service on behalf of Latino populations and new migrants. Alongside my Board service, I attended town meetings that Junta convened to discuss the needs of undocumented migrants, who lacked access to drivers' licenses and were vulnerable to theft and extortion because of their inability to open bank accounts. My first work with Junta centered on the effort to integrate migrants into the city and obtain representation through the Elm City ID Card program. At the same time, I attended meetings to create a state-wide coalition dedicated to the defense of migrants' rights. This was critical during the 2007 ICE Raids, and led the Junta Board to prioritize building advocacy programs related to labor and immigrant rights. During this period I served as Board Secretary and chaired the Program Committee.  Junta has been an integral part of my life and work, providing me with a wonderful community.  I was honored to assume the role of Co-Chair for the Board in 2010, and to observe the continued growth and vitality of the organization over this decade.


    Alicia Schmidt Camacho
    Co-Chair, Junta Board of Directors
    Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity, Race, and Migration Associate Master of Ezra Stiles College Yale University

     

    Service Categories
    Primary Organization Category Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy / Minority Rights
    Secondary Organization Category Education / Adult Education
    Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / Family Services
    Areas Served
    New Haven
    Ansonia
    Branford
    East Haven
    Hamden
    Milford
    New Haven
    Orange
    State wide
    Wallingford
    West Haven
    JUNTA advocates and provides services for residents of Greater New Haven, including (but not limited to)New Haven, Hamden, West Haven, Derby, East Haven, Ansonia, Wallingford and North Haven. The majority of our clients reside in New Haven.
    Programs
    Description The Neighborhood Place (TNP) is a nationally recognized program. It is the only free after-school and summer arts program designed specifically for at-risk, disadvantaged youth (ages 5-13) from families living at or below the poverty line in New Haven. TNP is a unique, innovative prevention program in which arts and culture activities are combined with on-site mental health counseling. This approach does more than the traditional after school program model to ensure that youth consider alternatives to violence, peer pressure, and drugs and alcohol. The children have the opportunity to express themselves through the programs’ artistic and musical activities and explore their environment through the program’s many field trips.
    Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / /
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

    Children:70% of students who participate in our program are more likely to receive better grades in school, communicate better with classmates, teachers and parents. They become more confident and offer to participate more in school activities and help more at home

     

    Parents:55% of Parent participants are less confrontational with other adults and their families, tend to ask for help when needed and have higher expectations for their children.

    Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

    Children:  Better citizens and more active in their community: Former program participants return to us as volunteers and are as well involved in school activities supporting younger children who may be struggling with reading or may just need someone to read with. These students also participate in nursing homes activities where they read and talk with the elderly. Academic success: Students will be more likely to graduate from high school and attend college due to the academic support received in our program. High self-esteem: Students will develop a higher self-esteem and sense of competency through different activities such as art, sports and daily acknowledgement.

    Parents: Better parenting skills: parents will develop better parenting skills through workshops such as “How to help your child succeed at school”, “Parental advocacy for a better education”, “Food and health for our children”, “Making reading fun”, “How to listen and talk to our children” among others
    Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

    To measure the program success we utilize:

    The Ohio Scale: a survey which is filled up by parents or guardians in the beginning of the program and at the end of the program. This form allows us to compare children social and academic behaviors before and after program participation.

    Students Report Cards: parents/guardians and students are required to provide copy of the school report card at the end of each marking period.

    Communication with Dept. of Children & Families (DCF) counselors and social workers: there is an active communication between these entities and our program to report the progress of our participants.

    Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

    Parent Participant Realizes her dream: a single mother of two while participating in the different parent workshops in our program was encouraged to complete the GED program. She did not just obtain her high school diploma; she went on to college, obtained her Bachelor’s degree and she is now a social worker who recommends our program to parents.

    Student Participants: a middle school girl living in an unstable home environment and struggling academically and socially in school, entered our program as a child. She excelled, improved her grades, gained confidence and is now a student in the school of education in Albertus Magnus School and works as a counselor for our children as a way of giving back just a bit of what was given to her. She is also becoming an advocate for equal rights for the poor.  She recently spoke at the Women's Equity Forum hosted by Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro.

    Description

    The Family Management program works with families to empower them to move along the continuum from dependence to self sufficiency. From simple guidance and service, referral to family support, JUNTA advocates for families for them to gain the knowledge and skills needed for self advocacy and empowerment. Staff screens clients for access to benefits, provides diapers, food assistance (when available) and referrals to agencies for shelter, clothing and household items.

    Population Served Families / At-Risk Populations / General/Unspecified
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

    85% of clients will be prevented from slipping further into poverty because of our services and referrals.

    Over 90 families are receiving diapers from the diaper bank program will now have healthier babies and better financial stability.

    80% of clients that applied for the furniture program receive furniture for their home and now can really call their house a home.

     

    Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

    90% of families involved in the Family Management Program will have improved their financial condition because of access to services. For example, a client will receive access to childcare services that will help the child in the future with a better education and will give the client opportunity to work. The Clients will be provided with housing assistance that in the future will help the family pay a rent that they can afford based on their income.

     
    Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

    We know the program is working based largely on case follow-up. The Program Director and support staff follow up with clients at three, six and nine months to determine their current status, any additional needs, and assessing next steps. We also utilize Results Based Accountability to determine how well we the program is benefiting the community and the level of services versus the need.

     

    Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

    We recently had a referral from a New Haven alderwoman concerned about a resident that had not received unemployment benefits yet and had no food at home for the family. Now, when she applied for state assistance they still consider her income to be from unemployment even doe she was not receiving the assistance yet. They still processed the application like she was receiving the unemployment because after asking her questions they knew she was going to get it. With the income being from unemployment it meant she could not get the cash assistance she had applied for that was more money than the unemployment benefits. After helping the client with the immediate crisis of being with no food, client had trust in us and worked with us to complete a family service plan that included employment services. Client after a few months was able to find a job.

    Description
    This program offers a combination of English language, GED and one-on-one citizenship tutoring to approximately 1000 students per year. Currently we offer six levels of English as a Second Language (ESL) courses in the mornings and evenings, Basic and Intermediate Spanish GED and one English GED course. Childcare is provided for parents enrolled in evening courses. In addition to that we have a conversation class as an extra day to come and practice speaking English in a variety of topics. Junta recruits volunteers to teach, tutor, or assist in our ESL and GED programs, and has worked with local agencies and individuals from the community to maintain them with us. As part of the ESL curriculum, JUNTA incorporated Health Literacy lessons to ESL classes and established partnerships with some local health facilities to improve this project every year.
    In 2012 we launched "Letras" a Spanish literacy course for students who cannot read or write in their native Spanish language. This has helped students better transition into ESL courses.
    For all evening classes, free childcare is provided. 
    Within Community Outreach, in partnership with other agencies we present local events such as Fiesta Latina and Latino Day at Pilot Pen Tennis, and are beginning to collaborate with partner agencies and communities to promote health literacy and health-related issues within low-income communities.
    Population Served Adults / Hispanic, Latino Heritage / Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
    Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

    Within the Fall 2012( September – December) and end of Spring 20123(January – May) semesters achievements will include:

    GED: 75% of students who have previously struggled with math or reading, can continue learning without a one-on-one tutoring.
    65% of students will be adequately prepared for new GED testing structure

    ESL: 85% of students have the ability to apply English language learning in their everyday situations.

    Letras (ABE Spanish): 45% of students will transition into ESL, GED or any other programs by the end of the first year. 55% will exhibit more motivation to learn to read.

    Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

    The ultimate change involves people changing the course of their lives because of education, making sure they experience an increased quality of life.

    ESL- 75% of students obtain better employment opportunities because of increase language acquisition

    GED- 100% graduation rate; 85% post grad placement in the job market because of obtaining a GED.

    "Letras" ABE Spanish: 80% of students have functional literacy (ability to read signs, take drivers license test in their native language etc.) in order to lead independent lives. 50% transitioned into ESL courses within one year.

    Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

    We assess what is working and not working through a series of tracking tools:

    Pre-Placement testing for each class to assess the level of each student, which level course they should be placed, and if additional tutoring is necessary. Post testing is conducting to assess the progress of each student, and whether they can transition to a higher level or a different course. Students fill out surveys at the end of each class, providing information on their views of the agency, course and teacher performance. As with all of our programs, we have instituted the Results Based Accountability (RBA) model to drive how our students succeed, and the strength of our program model.

    Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

    90% graduation rate for GED students in 2013

    Case scenario: About five years ago, we had a student who had very little English language skills. Coming from Puerto Rico, she came to Junta to learn English. Within two years of the program, she acquired intermediate level English skills. Through her commitment, the support of our instructors and tutors, she successfully learned the language and was able to obtain a job as an Administrative Assistant…at Junta. She also conducts English to Spanish translations. She is truly a success story, and the type of impact we want to have for our community.

    Description

    The Economic Development Program empowers clients by helping them to become , employable and employed, and helps increase income through employment skills training, employment placement and free tax return services to low to moderate income individuals and families.  Within employment we prepare people for the workforce through computer literacy training courses, resume preparation, interviewing skills, and job placement assistance through our relationships with area businesses and companies.      

    Population Served Adults / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated /
    Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

    40% of unemployed clients will obtain long-term employment through our program.

    65% of computer literacy students will be competent in basic computer skills by the end of each session.

    80% of VITA tax clients will receive income tax returns that can be used as savings or supplemental income.

    Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

    60% of employment clients will maintain employment beyond one year, and have the ability to obtain essentials for daily life, including housing, transportation and food.

    65% of clients who obtain employable skills training (computer literacy, resume building, interviewing skills) obtain employment within six months.

     
    Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

    Success is monitored through case follow up from the Program Director. The Director conducts follow up with clients at three, six, nine and twelve months, to assess their current situation. She tracks case notes in our client database. This program also utilizes Results Based Accountability frameworks to determine the success of the program. Within computer literacy and  classes, pre and post surveys are conducted by students to determine how well they retained the information and their views on the course.

    Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

    Client Profile:  An ex-offender was literally dropped off by the Department of Corrections in New Haven.  He met someone on the streets who told him to go to Junta for help.  When we met him he was wearing grey sweat pants and an oversized white t-shirt and carrying a brown paper bag with his personal effects inside.  He looked worn out and in great need. Our Economic Development Director took him to a shelter for the night.  Within less than a month, we found him a job as a dishwasher at a restaurant in Milford.  He had very little money for transportation, no family in the area and very few resources.  He got a ride to Milford and accepted the job immediately.  He was determined to work, even if it meant walking or hitching rides.  He’s now sharing an apartment with someone he met at the shelter and continues to commute to Milford to work by bus.  His life has truly turned around due to his determination to change his circumstances.

    Description
    Recognizing the increasing prominence of immigration-related concerns within our community, the organization has developed broad-based advocacy approach to the defense of immigrant and worker rights, and advocacy for issues affecting immigrants and their families. Over the last year, this  new program has been instrumental in building and leading a  new statewide coalition, Connecticut Immigrant Rights Alliance (CIRA), that focuses on ensuring the human rights of immigrants, advocating for immigrant integration as necessary for the growth of the state. At the local level, we are building civic engagement through social justice education and training of local residents to advocate on their own behalf. Current issues include resistance to Secure Communities and racial profiling. Through the coalition and local work, we have built and maintained relationships with national level partners including National Day Labor Organizing Network and Center for Popular Democracy.  In January 2013 we launched the Junta Youth Action Committee to engage local youth in social justice organizing and leadership training.
    Population Served Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees / Minorities / Migrant Workers
    Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

    Establish support for and formalize the Youth Action Committee, a core group of youth devoted to advocacy and organizing around issues that affect our population and their personal lives. 

    Legislative advocacy that addresses human and civil rights issues across ethnicity, citizenship status and socioeconomic lines, including worker's rights, healthcare and discrimination. Currently, the passing of legislation that will unfreeze the wages of tipped workers.



    Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
    Fully integrate immigrants into the economic, social and political life of the community.

    All immigrants are given full human rights and are treated with respect and dignity.

    Residents are engaged in social change through personal involvement and advocacy.

    Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

    Our core measurement tool will include the “Advocacy and Policy change Composite Logic Model” created by the Harvard Family Research Project. This tool tracks communications and community organizing, advocacy capacity, policy and politics. Success will be monitored by how well residents stay engaged and informed in creating social change. We will track individual participation and the progression of issues affecting the community. Within advocacy, we will track how well policy proposals and/or recommendations are communicated on legislative levels. We will measure awareness of issues through tracking contacts with legislators and other leaders.

    Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

    Creation and management of the Connecticut Immigrant Rights Alliance (CIRA), which has 40 organizations and activists from throughout the state involved and advocating for immigrant rights.

     Organized an immigration awareness project entitled "Inside Out" that photographed immigrants and immigrant rights advocates and were displayed throughout greater New Haven in October 2013.  Over 400 local residents participated.

    Passed legislation in the first year of the program, The Connecticut Trust Act.

    Program Comments
    CEO Comments
    Our Legal Advocacy and Services program works in collaboration with Yale Law School and Quinnipiac Law to provide free legal services to low-income residents.  Legal services are based on the current needs and trends within the community including employment/worker's rights, divorce, immigration and domestic violence.
     
    We have a unique opportunity to combine direct service with advocacy and community organizing.  As an organization, we have been in a long discussion and planning as to how we begin to change behaviors and conditions of our community.  As a Board, staff and community, we acknowledge that civic engagement has to be a part of direct service.  People must seek change individually and collectively.  Through our new Advocacy & Community Organizing program, and strengthening our direct service model,  we aim to create true social change.
    CEO/Executive Director
    Ms. Sandra Trevino
    Term Start Oct 2007
    Email Sandra.Trevino@juntainc.org
    Experience

    Sandra Trevino is originally from Texas and is a graduate of the University of Texas-Brownsville with a B.A. in Psychology. She received her Masters in Social Work from the University of Texas-Pan American. Sandra is a Board Certified Clinical Social Worker specializing in childhood mental disorders. She was also a clinical instructor for two years at the Yale Child Study Center. In 2010 Sandra was awarded the Elm Ivy Award by the City of New Haven and Yale University for partnerships with Yale Law School, Dwight Hall and the President’s Public Service Fellowship. Prior to becoming JUNTA’s Executive Director, Sandra served as the Licensed Program Coordinator for The Neighborhood Place, JUNTA’s therapeutic arts, after-school and summer program. 

    Staff
    Number of Full Time Staff 6
    Number of Part Time Staff 8
    Number of Volunteers 15
    Number of Contract Staff 3
    Staff Retention Rate 85%
    Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
    African American/Black 0
    Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
    Caucasian 1
    Hispanic/Latino 13
    Native American/American Indian 0
    Other 0 0
    Staff Demographics - Gender
    Male 3
    Female 11
    Unspecified 0
    Former CEOs and Terms
    NameTerm
    Ms. Sarahi Almonte May 2007 - Sept 2007
    Ms. Kica Matos Feb 2001 - Dec 2006
    Senior Staff
    Title Deputy Director
    Experience/Biography

    Latrina was born and raised in New Haven. She began her career as an editor for a custom publishing company in Norwalk, CT after graduating from Southern Connecticut State University in 2001 with a B.A. in English Literature. Latrina’s experience in non-profits includes work as a development associate at the New Haven Symphony Orchestra, and volunteering with Integrated Refugee & Immigration Services, Hill Development Corporation and Hill Neighborhood Forum. She is on the Advisory Board for the Coordinating Council of Children in Crisis, and is a former commissioner of the Civil Service Board for the City of New Haven. 

    Formal Evaluations
    CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
    CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
    Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
    Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
    Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
    Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
    Collaborations
    Center for Popular Democracy, New Haven Adult Education, Greater New Haven Literacy Coalition, The Diaper Bank, New Haven Home Recovery, Yale Law School, Center for Community Change, National Day Labor Organizing Network, Unidad Latina en Accion,  Jewish Community Relations Council, Yale Peabody Museum, Yale Child Study Center, Fair Haven School, Planned Parenthood of Southern New England, Bank on Connecticut Initiative Committee, United Way of Greater New Haven, STRIVE New Haven, Quinnipiac Law School, New Haven Farms, Fair Haven School, New Haven Public Library, Helping Hands, Center for Popular Democracy, National Day Labor Organizing Network, Yale Center for Clinical Investigation, Connecticut Women's Education and Legal Fund, Fair Immigration Reform Movement
    Awards
    Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
    Literacy AwardNew Haven Public Library2011
    Elm Ivy AwardYale University2010
    Hi5 High Impact Literacy AwardNewAlliance Foundation2012
    Board Chair
    Ms. Alicia Schmidt-Camacho
    Company Affiliation Yale University
    Term Jan 2013 to Dec 2015
    Email Alicia.Camacho@yale.edu
    Board of Directors
    NameAffiliation
    Ms. Adriana Arreola New Haven Promise
    Mr. Kimball Cartwright Planned Parenthood of Southern New England
    Ms. Jilan Crowley Community Volunteer
    Mr. Henry Fernandez Fernandez Advisors
    Ms. Norma Franceschi -Community Volunteer
    Ms. Sandra Hernandez Branch Manager, Fair Haven Library
    Ms. Letamarie Highsmith
    Ms. Sara Lulo Yale Law School
    Ms. Hope Metcalf Yale Law School
    Mr. Rafael Ramos City of New Haven
    Mr. Matthew Short Chelsea Realty
    Mr. Dominic Woolfrey Higher One
    Board Demographics - Ethnicity
    African American/Black 1
    Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
    Caucasian 5
    Hispanic/Latino 7
    Native American/American Indian 0
    Other 0 0
    Board Demographics - Gender
    Male 5
    Female 8
    Risk Management Provisions
    Accident and Injury Coverage
    Directors and Officers Policy
    Disability Insurance
    Life Insurance
    Medical Health Insurance
    Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
    Board Co-Chair
    Mr. Rafael Ramos
    Company Affiliation City of New Haven
    Term Jan 2014 to Dec 2016
    Email rramrfl@aol.com
    Standing Committees
    Board Governance
    Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
    Executive
    Finance
    Nominating
    Program / Program Planning
    CEO Comments
    MMs.Our Nominating Committee has worked diligently over the last year to identify and recruit new Board members.  We have added three new members that have been volunteers to the organization, and who have a vested interest in the mission of Junta.  They are bringing new ideas and true commitment to service. 
     
     
    Financials
    Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2015
    Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2015
    Projected Revenue $605,590.00
    Projected Expenses $605,590.00
    Spending Policy N/A
    Detailed Financials
    Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
    Fiscal Year201320122011
    Foundation and
    Corporation Contributions
    $200,088$195,973$145,434
    Government Contributions$333,087$330,497$350,636
    Federal------
    State------
    Local------
    Unspecified$333,087$330,497$350,636
    Individual Contributions------
    ------
    ----$15,556
    Investment Income, Net of Losses($16)--$15
    Membership Dues------
    Special Events$15,440$1,200--
    Revenue In-Kind------
    Other$7,879$2,624$16,652
    Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
    Fiscal Year201320122011
    Program Expense$427,514$397,714$393,066
    Administration Expense$89,615$74,502$67,260
    Fundraising Expense$54,614$59,214$55,728
    Payments to Affiliates------
    Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.971.001.02
    Program Expense/Total Expenses75%75%76%
    Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue10%11%11%
    Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
    Fiscal Year201320122011
    Total Assets$474,176$487,961$658,425
    Current Assets$234,552$242,887$409,880
    Long-Term Liabilities------
    Current Liabilities$8,114$6,634$175,962
    Total Net Assets$466,062$481,327$482,463
    Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
    Fiscal Year201320122011
    Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDSS $212,802DSS $212,588 --
    Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountYALE - DCF $119,136YALE-DCF $108,014 --
    Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $45,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $46,965 --
    Solvency
    Short Term Solvency
    Fiscal Year201320122011
    Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities28.9136.612.33
    Long Term Solvency
    Fiscal Year201320122011
    Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
    Capitial Campaign
    Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
    Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
    Comments
    Foundation Staff Comments

    This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

     

    Address 169 Grand Avenue
    New Haven, CT 06513
    Primary Phone 203 787-0191 16
    Contact Email info@juntainc.org
    CEO/Executive Director Ms. Sandra Trevino
    Board Chair Ms. Alicia Schmidt-Camacho
    Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale University

     

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