Kennedy Center
2440 Reservoir Ave
Trumbull CT 06611
Contact Information
Address 2440 Reservoir Ave
Trumbull, CT 06611-
Telephone (203) 365-8522 x
Fax 203-365-8533
E-mail dev@kennedyctr.org
Web and Social Media
Celebrating the Potential of All People
Mission
To promote the empowerment of individuals with diverse abilities, disabilities and experiences toward optimal participation and inclusion in the community.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1951
Former Names
Parents and Friends of Retarded Citizens, Inc.
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Martin D. Schwartz
Board Chair Mr. Stephen A Smith
Board Chair Company Affiliation Smith and Company
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $32,554,812.00
Projected Expenses $32,829,000.00
Statements
Mission To promote the empowerment of individuals with diverse abilities, disabilities and experiences toward optimal participation and inclusion in the community.
Background

Founded in 1951, The Kennedy Center, Inc. is a 501 (c) (3), non-profit community-based rehabilitation organization offering innovative and comprehensive program services to persons with special needs and disabilities, from birth through their senior years. The Kennedy Center is one of the most comprehensive rehabilitation facilities in Connecticut, serving individuals from 99 townships throughout the state. Since 1981, The Kennedy Center has sought and consistently achieved the highest accreditation from CARF International (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities) standards setting organization, which places it among the top 1% of rehabilitation organizations internationally. On an annual basis, nearly 2,400 individuals receive program services through our departments of Rehabilitation Services, Residential Services and Kennedy Industries. Our mission is to promote the empowerment of individuals with diverse abilities, disabilities and experiences toward optimal participation and inclusion in the community.

 

  1. Rehabilitation Services provides: individualized employment planning; career counseling; job development & community placement; working interviews and on-the-job training; recovery oriented employment planning & placement and peer mentoring supports; job club series; school-transition services including vocational exploration/training and community independence training; acquired brain injury support services including prevocational skill redevelopment; independent living skills training; and community reintegration.

     

  2. Residential Services provides: individualized group home placement; independent living skills training; supported living services; a Caring for the Caregiver program; family support and respite services. 

     

  3. Kennedy Industries provides: specialized job training in our consumer staffed businesses such as “Kennedy Document Services”, “Frameworks” picture framing, “Kenn Kleen” cleaning service, “Soups and Such” catering and “Cutting Edge” lawn services. Additionally, Kennedy Industries provides Community Experience Programs, Therapeutic Recreation, Transportation, Supported Employment, Behavioral & Health Services, Strengthening Families projects, Mobility Services, Art Therapy, Senior Options, Children’s Services and Alzheimer’s Supports.

 

 

Impact

Accomplishments:

  1. Opened the Maggie Daly Art’s Cooperative in downtown Bridgeport

  2. Purchased a building at 4021 Main Street Stratford to house Children’s Services and Community Experience programs.

  3. Opened three new Community Experience Programs.

  4. Obtained a contract in New Haven for Mobility Management.

 

Top Goals:

  1. Become certified as a Homemaker Companion Agency

  2. Expand Social Enterprise Community Businesses by developing at least one new business.

  3. Increase the number of individuals with disabilities that obtain community employment by twenty percent.

  


 
Needs

  1. Increase entry level direct care staff salaries by $2.00  per hour.  Total cost…$1.6 million.

  2. Reduce direct care staff turnover from 25% per year to 15% per year by increasing staff salaries as indicated in response #1.

  3. Supplement agency operating budget by $250,000 to cover the reduction in state funding as a result of state budget cuts.

  4. Replace all vehicles in the Kennedy Center transportation fleet with over 150,000 miles.  There are presently thirty vehicles out of one hundred fifty vehicles within the fleet that fall into this category.  Total cost…$1,050,000.

  5. Develop a training institute in partnership with a local university to provide hands on training for future leaders of the non-profit field.  Cost $100,000.

 

 

CEO Statement

It was in February 1951, that Evelyn Kennedy and a dozen other parents with children with disabilities met to establish The Kennedy Center as a pioneering grassroots organization. Our agency was founded through the efforts of loyal, hardworking, dedicated volunteers and continues to thrive largely because of their efforts today. From its humble beginnings, The Kennedy Center has grown from a program serving fifteen children, to a statewide multifaceted organization that serves nearly 2,500 consumers annually. Today, we serve individuals from birth to senior years, with various disabilities and special needs.  As a result, families choose to send their loved ones to The Kennedy Center because of its long-standing reputation in the community for innovative and comprehensive program services. Throughout The Kennedy Center’s history the agency has always gone the extra mile to meet the practical life needs of the individuals we serve.

 

The Kennedy Center is dedicated to preserving the safety and wellbeing of the deserving individuals we serve. Individuals with disabilities are an integral part of our community who deserve the same quality of life as their neighbors. Unfortunately, state funding for nonprofit service providers continue to decrease potentially jeopardizing the quality of our states most vulnerable citizens.  Despite these challenges, we remain committed to advocating on the behalf of individuals with disabilities to address their unmet needs and the needs of our greater community.

Martin D. Schwartz

President and CEO

Board Chair Statement

The cuts in funding by the State of Connecticut, coupled with a difficult economy that has impacted many current and potential private donors continues to offer significant challenges to The Kennedy Center. In spite of these challenges The Kennedy Center not only continues to provide superior service to its consumers, but regularly introduces new programs to respond to the practical life needs of the community it serves. 

My daughter Alison is a consumer of The Kennedy Center. Ali is 33 years old and was placed in a supported employment position through The Kennedy Center.  As a result she is a housekeeper at Stern Village, an assisted living facility in Trumbull, CT. She has been there for 5 years and enjoys her interactions with the residents. It has taught her the discipline required to hold a job while increasing her tolerance of elderly people who often require assistance and patience. Ali’s job coach picks her up each morning, transports her to work and brings her home at the end of her day. Her coach serves as a mentor and a friend offering valuable advice on how to improve her performance.  Additionally, Ali attends many social events with her friends at The Kennedy Center’s “Drop In” that is held every week. The Kennedy Center has made a huge different in Ali’s life and has positively affected our family in ways we never imagined.

 

Throughout The Kennedy Center’s history, the objective has been to expand services to include all populations with disabilities and create relevant program supports, as each service need has become apparent. Whether it was our establishment of the first group and apartment homes for individuals with intellectual disabilities in the State of Connecticut, or the creation of our Kennedy Employment businesses such as Cutting Edge Lawn Service, and Kenn Kleen Custodial Maintenance service, the agency has always gone the extra mile to meet the practical life needs of the individuals served.

 

It is an honor to be the Chairman of the Board of The Kennedy Center. Our Board of Directors is composed of a diverse mix of individuals who bring various strengths to the table and insure measured and well-thought out decisions. We are also blessed to have such a professional and dedicated management team in place, led by Martin Schwartz our President and CEO. The Board and the staff have a synergistic relationship that anticipates and manages issues as they occur and allows The Kennedy Center to remain strong in difficult times.

 

Stephen A. Smith

Chairman of the Board

The Kennedy Center, Inc.

 



 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Residential Care & Adult Day Programs
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / Centers to Support the Independence of Specific Populations
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
In total, The Kennedy Center provides services to people living in 99 townships throughout the State of Connecticut. The additional towns served by The Kennedy Center are listed below:  
Beacon Falls
Bethel
Bloomfield
Bridgeport
Bristol
Brookfield
Clinton
Cromwell
Danbury
Darien
East. Hartford
Easton
Fairfield
Farmington
Greenwich
Hartford
Huntington
Manchester
Meriden
Middlebury
Middlefield
Middletown
Monroe
Montville
Naugatuck
New Britain
New Canaan
Newington
New London
New Milford
Newtown
Northford
Norwich
Oakville
Plantsville
Portland
Redding
Ridgefield
Sandy Hook
Southbury
Southport
Stamford
Stratford
Torrington
Trumbull
Waterbury
Watertown
Westbrook
West Hartford
Weston
Westport
West Redding
Wethersfield
Willimantic
Wilton
Windsor
Windsor Locks
 
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

The Kennedy Center celebrates the potential in people with disabilities and special needs from birth to senior years. With dignity and respect, our person-centered plans are individually designed from a team approach involving the individual, their family and our staff. A choice of innovative comprehensive program services are selected to create a plan that both meets the specific needs of the individual as well as promotes empowerment towards optimal participation and inclusion in the community.


Our wide array of specialty programs and services address the needs of people with intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, mental illness, acquired brain injury, Alzheimer’s, deaf and hard of hearing, blind and visual impairments, learning disabilities, physical disabilities plus those who are at risk.

The Kennedy Center was established by families with children with disabilities, who wanted nothing more than what was their children’s inevitable right – to be given the same opportunities as other children. We continue to embrace those original hopes and dreams and develop programs that will ensure each individual’s potential now, and into the future.

Programs
Description The Residential Services Division includes: 16 Residential Group Homes, 19 Supported Apartment Living programs, Family Support, Respite, and the Caregiver program.
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities / Adults / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long term outcome: To provide a variety of community-based options to persons with cognitive and other disabilities for the purpose of assisting them in reaching their fullest independent living potential in the most integrated environment.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Kennedy Center has an extensive quality assurance system, which regularly requires feedback from our constituents and consumers. This system, designed to meet CARF accreditation standards, provides a monthly review of program outcomes, as well as a bi-annual management summary.   The Kennedy Center Board of Directors is involved in the Strategic Planning Committee and reviews the outcome of all other facets of our quality assurance system. 

The system comprises the following nine components:
a.      CARF Accreditation Preparation Committee
b.      Strategic Planning Committee which may include community forum
c.      Internal Audits
d.      Case Management Quality Review Committee
e.      Case Record Review Committee
f.        Behavior Review Committee
g.      Outcome Based Program Evaluation System
h.      Consumer Advisory Committees
i.        Consumer Satisfaction Surveys

The Kennedy Center’s quality assurance staff coordinates the program. Evaluation of this program’s progress is incorporated into The Kennedy Center’s overall program evaluation system. The Kennedy Center’s Quality Review Committee oversees individual progress on consumer personal development goals. The bi-annual summary report is a review of all the data collected in each of the committees identified above. These reviews are reported to agency administration, collaborating agencies and consumers as well as the Board of Directors. This process ensures that acceptable standards are established prior to program operation, based on the proposed program’s goals and objectives, and are measured in percentage levels of achievement.
 
Consumer satisfaction is measured in several ways, in accordance with CARF standards:
1.      Consumer Advisory Meetings
2.      Direct feedback from consumer during the planning process
3.      Consumer Satisfaction Surveys
Consumers are afforded the ongoing opportunity to participate in a monthly Consumer Advisory Committee meeting.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.  

The Residential Department continues to thrive and has had another busy year, full of accomplishments. In 2013 the department served more than 165 people across New Haven and Fairfield Counties. Services included twenty-four hour residential care for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, respite services to families, supported living services to those living in apartments, and independent living skill-building to those residing with family members. During the course of this year we served 2 new individuals within our group homes, 1 additional participant in the independent living program and 19 new consumers in the Family Support programs.

Description Rehabilitation Services Division provides: individualized employment planning, career counseling, job development & community placement, working interviews, and on the job training; recovery oriented employment planning & placement and peer mentoring supports; job club series; school-transition services including vocational exploration/training and community independence training; acquired brain injury support services including prevocational skill redevelopment, independent living skills training, and community reintegration.
Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities / People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Long term outcome: To provide a variety of community-based options to persons with cognitive and other disabilities for the purpose of assisting them in reaching their fullest independent living potential in the most integrated environment.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Kennedy Center has an extensive quality assurance system, which regularly requires feedback from our constituents and consumers. This system, designed to meet CARF accreditation standards, provides a monthly review of program outcomes, as well as a bi-annual management summary.   The Kennedy Center Board of Directors is involved in the Strategic Planning Committee and reviews the outcome of all other facets of our quality assurance system. 

The system comprises the following nine components:
a.      CARF Accreditation Preparation Committee
b.      Strategic Planning Committee which may include community forum
c.      Internal Audits
d.      Case Management Quality Review Committee
e.      Case Record Review Committee
f.        Behavior Review Committee
g.      Outcome Based Program Evaluation System
h.      Consumer Advisory Committees
i.        Consumer Satisfaction Surveys

The Kennedy Center’s quality assurance staff coordinates the program. Evaluation of this program’s progress is incorporated into The Kennedy Center’s overall program evaluation system. The Kennedy Center’s Quality Review Committee oversees individual progress on consumer personal development goals. The bi-annual summary report is a review of all the data collected in each of the committees identified above. These reviews are reported to agency administration, collaborating agencies and consumers as well as the Board of Directors. This process ensures that acceptable standards are established prior to program operation, based on the proposed program’s goals and objectives, and are measured in percentage levels of achievement.
 
Consumer satisfaction is measured in several ways, in accordance with CARF standards:
1.      Consumer Advisory Meetings
2.      Direct feedback from consumer during the planning process
3.      Consumer Satisfaction Surveys
Consumers are afforded the ongoing opportunity to participate in a monthly Consumer Advisory Committee meeting.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

In addition to our competitive employment programs funded by BRS, we also have two grants with the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services to provide employment planning and job placement assistance. These are our Work Services programs which are based in Bridgeport and Waterbury. Staff provides guidance and support around identifying career options, reorganizing resumes to increase marketability, analyzing potential employment options and the labor market demands, and preparing individuals for interviews. The Work Services Team in Bridgeport successfully placed 40 individuals during this fiscal year and the Waterbury program placed 31.  

 

Our group day employment programs funded by the Department of Developmental Services (DDS) also experienced significant change. The Kennedy Center has been responsive to DDS’ Employment Initiative Campaign to reduce sheltered workshops and increase integrated employment options for persons with disabilities. Although this has been an objective for The Kennedy Center for many years, the changes in funding options and the additional supports through DDS are affording greater opportunities for teams to explore alternative employment without the risks that families have been so concerned about.

 
Description Kennedy Industries Division- Employment provides: Stamps and Stuff Mailing Services, Frameworks Framing, Kenn Kleen Cleaning Service, Soups and Such Catering, Cutting Edge Lawn Services, Supported Employment, and specialized job training.
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities / People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long term outcome: To provide a variety of community-based options to persons with cognitive and other disabilities for the purpose of assisting them in reaching their fullest independent living potential in the most integrated environment.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Kennedy Center has an extensive quality assurance system, which regularly requires feedback from our constituents and consumers. This system, designed to meet CARF accreditation standards, provides a monthly review of program outcomes, as well as a bi-annual management summary.   The Kennedy Center Board of Directors is involved in the Strategic Planning Committee and reviews the outcome of all other facets of our quality assurance system. 

The system comprises the following nine components:
a.      CARF Accreditation Preparation Committee
b.      Strategic Planning Committee which may include community forum
c.      Internal Audits
d.      Case Management Quality Review Committee
e.      Case Record Review Committee
f.        Behavior Review Committee
g.      Outcome Based Program Evaluation System
h.      Consumer Advisory Committees
i.        Consumer Satisfaction Surveys

The Kennedy Center’s quality assurance staff coordinates the program. Evaluation of this program’s progress is incorporated into The Kennedy Center’s overall program evaluation system. The Kennedy Center’s Quality Review Committee oversees individual progress on consumer personal development goals. The bi-annual summary report is a review of all the data collected in each of the committees identified above. These reviews are reported to agency administration, collaborating agencies and consumers as well as the Board of Directors. This process ensures that acceptable standards are established prior to program operation, based on the proposed program’s goals and objectives, and are measured in percentage levels of achievement.
 
Consumer satisfaction is measured in several ways, in accordance with CARF standards:
1.      Consumer Advisory Meetings
2.      Direct feedback from consumer during the planning process
3.      Consumer Satisfaction Surveys
Consumers are afforded the ongoing opportunity to participate in a monthly Consumer Advisory Committee meeting.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Kennedy Industries Employment Services continues to navigate a very difficult economic environment. Still, it has been fortunate to develop 6 temporary worksite including a site through the Youthworks summer employment Program, Unger Tools, Expand International, Unifirst Corporation, PIK Products, People’s united Bank and Anton Bauer.
Description Kennedy Industries Division- Services provides: Mobility Services, Travel Training, Transportation, Art Therapy, 26 Community Experience Programs, Behavioral Health Services, Alzheimer’s program, and Senior Options.
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities / People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long term outcome: To provide a variety of community-based options to persons with cognitive and other disabilities for the purpose of assisting them in reaching their fullest independent living potential in the most integrated environment.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Kennedy Center has an extensive quality assurance system, which regularly requires feedback from our constituents and consumers. This system, designed to meet CARF accreditation standards, provides a monthly review of program outcomes, as well as a bi-annual management summary.   The Kennedy Center Board of Directors is involved in the Strategic Planning Committee and reviews the outcome of all other facets of our quality assurance system. 

The system comprises the following nine components:
a.      CARF Accreditation Preparation Committee
b.      Strategic Planning Committee which may include community forum
c.      Internal Audits
d.      Case Management Quality Review Committee
e.      Case Record Review Committee
f.        Behavior Review Committee
g.      Outcome Based Program Evaluation System
h.      Consumer Advisory Committees
i.        Consumer Satisfaction Surveys

The Kennedy Center’s quality assurance staff coordinates the program. Evaluation of this program’s progress is incorporated into The Kennedy Center’s overall program evaluation system. The Kennedy Center’s Quality Review Committee oversees individual progress on consumer personal development goals. The bi-annual summary report is a review of all the data collected in each of the committees identified above. These reviews are reported to agency administration, collaborating agencies and consumers as well as the Board of Directors. This process ensures that acceptable standards are established prior to program operation, based on the proposed program’s goals and objectives, and are measured in percentage levels of achievement.
 
Consumer satisfaction is measured in several ways, in accordance with CARF standards:
1.      Consumer Advisory Meetings
2.      Direct feedback from consumer during the planning process
3.      Consumer Satisfaction Surveys
Consumers are afforded the ongoing opportunity to participate in a monthly Consumer Advisory Committee meeting.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.


Our quest to be part of the creative place-making efforts in Bridgeport, coming to fruition as a result of the agency being chosen as the 2013 recipient of The Fairfield Christmas Tree Festival. The proceeds generated from the 4-day event will fund the Artist Cooperative, recently named the Maggie Daly Arts Cooperative (MDAC), in honor and in memory of a wonderful supporter of The Kennedy Center. Maggie was very influential in the development of both The Kennedy Center Art Therapy Program and the Unique Perspective calendar. MDAC is designed to provide a creative environment for individuals with intellectual disabilities to participate in and express themselves through all forms of art and is scheduled to open in March 2014.


Description Kennedy Industries Division-  Therapeutic Services provides: The Autism Project, Birth to Three, Therapeutic Recreation, Parent Aide Services, Teen Activity Centers, After School/Summer programs, and Parent/Child Support groups.
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities / People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long term outcome: To provide a variety of community-based options to persons with cognitive and other disabilities for the purpose of assisting them in reaching their fullest independent living potential in the most integrated environment.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Kennedy Center has an extensive quality assurance system, which regularly requires feedback from our constituents and consumers. This system, designed to meet CARF accreditation standards, provides a monthly review of program outcomes, as well as a bi-annual management summary.   The Kennedy Center Board of Directors is involved in the Strategic Planning Committee and reviews the outcome of all other facets of our quality assurance system. 

The system comprises the following nine components:
a.      CARF Accreditation Preparation Committee
b.      Strategic Planning Committee which may include community forum
c.      Internal Audits
d.      Case Management Quality Review Committee
e.      Case Record Review Committee
f.        Behavior Review Committee
g.      Outcome Based Program Evaluation System
h.      Consumer Advisory Committees
i.        Consumer Satisfaction Surveys

The Kennedy Center’s quality assurance staff coordinates the program. Evaluation of this program’s progress is incorporated into The Kennedy Center’s overall program evaluation system. The Kennedy Center’s Quality Review Committee oversees individual progress on consumer personal development goals. The bi-annual summary report is a review of all the data collected in each of the committees identified above. These reviews are reported to agency administration, collaborating agencies and consumers as well as the Board of Directors. This process ensures that acceptable standards are established prior to program operation, based on the proposed program’s goals and objectives, and are measured in percentage levels of achievement.
 
Consumer satisfaction is measured in several ways, in accordance with CARF standards:
1.      Consumer Advisory Meetings
2.      Direct feedback from consumer during the planning process
3.      Consumer Satisfaction Surveys
Consumers are afforded the ongoing opportunity to participate in a monthly Consumer Advisory Committee meeting.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.


Our Children’s Division continues to forge new friendships, social skills and creative outlets through our Autism Social Skill Groups (SAG), Saturday Art Programs, Family Partnership after-school program (FPP), our partnership with the Bridgeport Lighthouse Program and our Triple P Program (Positive Parenting Program). Two one year projects were funded: one in collaboration with Autism Speaks our Mobility Services Department and our Autism Services to produce a Travel Training curriculum for students on the Autism Spectrum; the second was an in-home, short-term behavioral support system, to address the needs of families and their child on the autism spectrum. As well, our Mobility Services area was funded to produce a film and guidebook on the advantages of public transportation. Finally, our Community Experience department added new communal contacts through our volunteer initiatives and local neighborhood friendship.


Program Comments
CEO Comments
The Kennedy Center provides essential rehabilitative, vocational, recreational and residential services to over 2,400 individuals with disabilities and special needs, from birth through senior years. Unfortunately, like so many nonprofit service providers, The Kennedy Center is extremely concerned with state funding reductions that impact our most vulnerable citizens who cannot advocate for themselves. State rescissions to the Department of Developmental Services budget of $30 million in 2012, in addition to $5.5 million in November 2014 and $8.4 in January, equates to more than $43 million in cuts, for a system that is already teetering on the verge of collapse.  

Time and again, year after year, we have beseeched state leadership to increase funding for services that support people with disabilities. Costs for services are escalating, the number of people seeking programs steadily increase, and the state funding continues to diminish. Failure to provide services for our most vulnerable populations should be unconscionable in one of the wealthiest states in our country. Instead, long-term inadequate funding jeopardizes the health and welfare of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and further intensifies the probability of more nonprofits closing their doors.  

In response, The Kennedy Center is pursuing several initiatives to help ensure the long-term financial security of the agency. Our lobbying efforts continue to address the inequities in state funding and we work closely with Connecticut Community Providers Association and the CT Association of Nonprofits to address public policy and advocacy issues. We recently held a legislative breakfast for area legislatures to enlist their support of our cause for equitable state funding. We continue to identify strategies that help to keep our operating costs low, such as implementing green energy efficiencies and streamlining our program services. The Kennedy Center has also begun development of a home health care service to support the elderly and individuals with disabilities, which is intended to generate additional income that will be applied towards overall organizational operations. Furthermore, we are planning an event that will help to expand our endowment and further safeguard our ability to provide support and services for the people with disabilities whom we serve as we move into the future.         

 


 

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Martin D. Schwartz
Term Start Oct 1978
Email mschwartz@kennedyctr.org
Experience EDUCATION:
Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, Bachelor’s Degree, 1969
 
Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York, Master’s Degree, 1971
Columbia University, New York, Post-graduate, 1975

 

HONORARY DEGREE:        

University of Bridgeport, Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, May 2000

 

EMPLOYMENT:                 

The Kennedy Center, Inc., Trumbull, CT
President and CEO, 1978 - Present

 

Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF)National Accreditation Surveyor, 1984 - Present
 
College of New Rochelle, New Rochelle, NY
Adjunct Professor, Graduate School, 1976 - 1979
 
 
ARC Enterprises, Nyack, NY
Director, 1973 - 1978

 
Children’s Village, Dobbs Ferry, NY
Therapist, 1971 - 1972

 

AFFILIATIONS:

Mayor’s Commission on Handicapped, Bridgeport, CT
Commissioner, 1979 - 1987
 
United Way of Eastern Fairfield County, Bridgeport, CT
Chairman, United Way Member Agency Campaign 1982 - 1983
 
College Health Services, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, CT
Member, Advisory Council, 1983 - 1985
 
 
Connecticut Community Providers Association (CCPA)
Vice-President, 1982 - 1983
President, 1984 - 1985
Secretary, 1989 - 1991
Treasurer, 1991 - 1993
 
Chairman, Developmental Disabilities Div., 1993 - 1994
Board of Directors, 2000 – 2003, 2005 – present

 

University of Hartford

Member, Rehab.Training Program Advisory Committee 1985 – 2004
Member, Rehab.Training Program Evaluation Committee 1987 -2004  
                                                                                                                
Probus Club, Bridgeport, CT
Vice President, 1981 – 1982
President, 1997 – 1998
Rotary Club, Bridgeport, CT
Member

 

Trumbull Chamber of Commerce
Board of Directors, 1998 – Present
President, 2000 – 2002            

 

Member of State Legislative Blue Ribbon Task Force 1991

studying comparisons of services provided by private and
public rehabilitation agencies

 

Member of the Trumbull Commission on Accessibility

Handicap Compliance Board

Vice-President, 1996 – Present

 

Member of the Board of Directors

Bridgeport Regional Business Council

2000 - 2002
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 419
Number of Part Time Staff 343
Number of Volunteers 252
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 70%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 289
Asian American/Pacific Islander 11
Caucasian 371
Hispanic/Latino 65
Native American/American Indian 1
Other 25 Two or More Races
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 225
Female 537
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Vice President of Finance
Title Vice President of Residential Programs
Experience/Biography EDUCATION

Master's in Social Work, May 1973; Major, Social Group Work

University of Connecticut, School of Social Work, West Hartford, Connecticut

Bachelor of Arts, May 1971; Major, Sociology

Stonehill College, North Easton, Massachusetts

EMPLOYMENT               

6/79 - present    Vice President of Community Facilities

THE KENNEDY CENTER, INC., Trumbull, Connecticut

Responsibilities: Administrator of 12 community residence programs which are licensed by the Department of Mental Retardation, as well as a Supportive Living Apartment Program. Prepare residential budget plans in accordance with the Department of Mental Retardation guidelines, foster maximization of government funding resources for residents, work with Residential Management Team to provide supervisory oversight to each program area, coordinate the Local and State licensing inspection process to assure compliance with the applicable regulations, develop and update Residential Policies and Procedures Manuals as needed, develop additional alternative community residences, staff of 180 residential employees.

3/76-6/79            Licensing and Certification Section

DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL RETARDATION, Hartford, Connecticut

Responsibilities: License and certification administrator for on-going operation of DMR licensed residential facilities and ICF/MR distinct units within the Bridgeport, Lower Fairfield, Southbury and Danbury regions. Performed periodical on-site surveys of private facilities to determine eligibility for licensure and certification based upon State and Federal regulatory requirements.

6/73 - 3/76            Social Service Department

NEW HAVEN REGIONAL CENTER, New Haven, Connecticut

Responsibilities: Primary case coordination and social work services for mentally retarded individuals who reside in two of the residential units at the NHRC. Participant on an inter-disciplinary team which met regularly to formulate long/short range case plans for the residents.               

9/72 - 5/73            WEST HAVEN COMMUNITY HOUSE, West Haven, Connecticut

Responsibilities: Group worker for Senior Citizen Friendship Group.

OTHER

Field Work Supervisor for Southern Connecticut State University School of Social Work, and Fordham University School of Social Work, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1993, 1995, 1996.

Title Vice President of Rehabilitative Services
Experience/Biography THE KENNEDY CENTER, INC., Trumbull , CT

October 2004 to Present -- Vice President of Rehabilitation Services

Oversee the Rehabilitation Division which includes Competitive Placement Programs, Acquired Brain Injury Program, Case Management Services, Mental Health Services: work services supported education, peer-mentoring services, Intake, Marketing Services and School-to-Career Transition Services. Supervise a team consisting of over 75 employees, which include 7 managers and 5 program coordinators. Ensure integrity of grants, contracts, and overall quality of services delivered. Lead Quality Assurance of case management systems for the entire agency. Liaison with various funding sources: BRS, BESB, DSS, DMHAS, DDS etc. to secure and maintain contract funding. Oversee a divisional budget of approximately 2.5 million.

August 2001 to September 2004 -- Supervisor of Employment Services

Oversee all Competitive Placement Programs, Acquired Brain Injury Program, Department of Worker's Rehab Services, and School-to-Career Transition Services. Supervised a team consisting of more than 20 individuals. Directly oversee two team coordinators, six job developers, and 12 employment specialist staff. Re-organized School-to-Career Transition Program to target identified constituent needs. Developed marketing strategy for expanding all employment services, including school-to-careers transition program. Member of the Business Advisory Council and Chair monthly Case Record Review Committee.

August 1999 to August 2001 -- Clinical Services & Marketing Manager
 
Oversee Acquired Brain Injury Program, Department of Worker's Rehab Services, and Veteran's Administration Services. Direct and supervise inter-departmental teams consisting of more than 15 individuals. Provide individual career and crisis intervention counseling. Developed new Person Centered Individual Program Planning system. Develop marketing strategy for expanding clinical services.Develop integrated transitional living program.

January 1996 to August 1999 -- Acquired Brain Injury Services Coordinator

Assist in creation and development of new comprehensive program and position. Perform any necessary testing needed to determine community cohesiveness. Direct and supervise inter-departmental teams consisting of more than 10 individuals. Developed new Person Centered Individual Program Planning system

Education:

Marist College, Poughkeepsie, NY

Master of Arts Degree in Counseling/Community Psychology May 1994

Bachelors of Arts in Psychology May 1993

Associations:

State of Connecticut School Transition Taskforce, 2000 to present

Trumbull Business-Education Initiative 2000 to present

Business-Education, Inc. of Trumbull

Board Member, 2000 to present

Foundation President, 2003 to 2007 and 2009 to 2010

Association of Persons in Supported Employment (APSE) Connecticut Chapter

Vice-President, 2009 to present

American Counseling Association

 

 

 

 

Title Vice President of Kennedy Industries
Experience/Biography

1988 - Present: The Kennedy Center, Inc.

Vice President of Kennedy Industries

 Coordinate person-centered employment options for 200 individuals.
 
Support non-work needs and improved quality of life through a Life Skills Department, Senior Option Program, Community Inclusion Supports, Behavioral Services Department and Children’s Services for 500.

Support children, youth and families with diverse economic, social cultural and community linkage needs to successfully reach personal goals.

Crisis Intervention and behavioral support training to area school systems.

Develop new funding mechanisms and innovative strategies.

Extensive grant writing and coordination with all major funding sources.

Both oversight and direct responsibility for behavioral supports and plans for children and adults with disabilities.

Manage five business concepts.

Effectively maximize community inclusion for all citizens with disabilities.

Manage diverse professional staff of 275.

 1984 - 1988:                The Kennedy Center, Inc.

Special Services Director

 1979 - 1984:                The Kennedy Center, Inc.

Art Therapist

 1978 - 1979:                Fuller Memorial Hospital, South Attleboro, MA

Art Therapist / Occupational Therapy Aide

Education

Newtown College, Newtown Massachusetts, B.A. in Fine, Graduated Cum Laude

 Lesley College, Cambridge, Massachusetts, M.A. in Education, concentration Expressive Therapy

 Business Leadership Program, 1992 Graduate, Bridgeport, Connecticut

Professional Certifications

Registered Art Therapist, American Art Therapy Association

CPI Instructor, Master Level, International Association of Nonviolent Crisis Intervention

CARF (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities) Surveyor
Title Vice President of Human Resources
Experience/Biography Twenty-nine years in Rehabilitation field, providing services to children and adults with disabilities. Recipient of an Exemplary Award from The Rehabilitation Network of New England and a National Exemplary Award from the U.S Department of Education. Awarded “Best Practice” status by the CT Hospital Association for risk management coordination.

Responsible for CARF International Accreditation Process in which the agency received two “perfect” surveys, placing the agency in the top 1% of all rehabilitation programs. Provide technical assistance to area agencies for CARF preparation.

Speaker and trainer at local, state and national conferences.

Work Experience: The Kennedy Center, Inc., Trumbull, CT 06611

1985 – 86  Placement Counselor

1986 – 87 Counseling Coordinator

1987 – 93 Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

1993 – 97 Administrator of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

Duties expanded to include supervision of vocational rehabilitation department and community based services; coordination of services to community day programs and supported employment consumers; monitoring compliance with CARF (Commission and Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities) and ICF (Intermediate Care Facility) standards. Development and supervision of comprehensive case management system.

1997 – 01 Administrator of Quality Assurance

Assure quality of programming through several accountability systems including program evaluation, case management and CARF. Responsible for coordination of agency’s Strategic Planning process.   Coordinator of agency’s volunteer and internship programs.

2001      Vice President of Human Resources and Administrative Services

Expanded responsibilities include administration of agency’s human resource functions, including recruitment, hiring, orientation and training. Promote positive employee relations through staff appreciation activities and diversity exercises. Serve as trainer in the areas of conflict resolution and employment practices. Established Kennedy Institute of Leadership and Mentorship Program. Ensure agency policies and procedures are in compliance with state and federal statutes.

Education:           
University of Connecticut, BA in Rehabilitation Services, 1981
 
Southern Ct State University, MS in Counseling, Marriage and Family Therapy Program 1983
Title Vice President of Development
Experience/Biography Experience

Associate Vice President of Development, 2004 – Present

The Kennedy Center, Inc.    Trumbull, CT

Not-for-Profit Rehabilitation Agency for People with Disabilities & Special Needs.

Supervised all fundraising efforts for agency including fundraising events, grants, annual giving campaigns, endowment and capital campaigns. Developed and designed all marketing materials including brochures, invitations, banners, program books, giving letters, videos, PowerPoint presentations and most recently website. Increased annual giving dollars in five years by 125%; event dollars by 49% and grant dollars by 81%. Facilitated capital campaign raising over $1 million in a one year period.

President / Merchandising Director

JAM Productions, LLC      Norwalk, CT, 1998-2004

Trading Company representing overseas clothing factories to the U.S. Market

Merchandised product for nationally known brand and designer companies. Collaborated with clients on strategic marketing plans and design developments. Supervised production management for multi-million dollar orders with overseas factories.

Project Manager

Praxis Media            Norwalk,    CT, 1996-1999

Communication Consulting Firm to Fortune 500 Companies.

Supervised and Coordinated “Top 100 Moments of Sports” awards dinner in Madison Square Garden. Produced and edited short promotional videos. Planned and executed special projects for major corporate management retreats (American Express and UPS) that achieved results. Sourced vendors, prepared and administered budgets. Arranged all meeting agendas, on-site logistics and travel arrangements.

Director of Retail / Merchandising Manager

Big Enough            Stamford,   CT, 1993-1996

Children’s Clothing Company.

Reorganized and Managed retail outlet stores. Created business plan for home show sales organization. Increased Sales Projections by 50%. Developed all promotional, visual and direct mail campaigns.

Corporate Retail Director

Las Colinas Corporation            Dallas, TX, 1980-1983

Real Estate / Management Corporation

Created and Merchandised 5 retail stores specifically targeted for Community. Supervised all operations and staff. Created and directed all aspects of advertising and promotions. Compiled and Managed business plans and open-to-buy programs, maximizing sales volume and profitability. Developed each store’s identity through visual merchandising, packaging and logo design

Education

BA, Advertising / School of Journalism, University of Kansas    Lawrence, KS      

Computer Skills

Microsoft Word, Outlook, Excel, PowerPoint, Raiser’s Edge, Quark, Photoshop, Adobe Acrobat, Windows Movie Maker

 

 

Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

The Kennedy Center, Inc. has an extensive network of collaborative partnerships with both state and community entities to include: The Board of Education and Service’s for the Blind, The Department of
Children and Families, The Department of Developmental Services, The Department of Social Services, local school districts as well as a myriad of community human service organizations that are too numerous to be listed here.

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Christina Lewis AwardDepartment of Social Services2005
Article March/April PeriodicalAging Today2006
CT Quality Improvment Innovation Silver AwardCT Quality Improvement Award Partnership, Inc.2006
Honorable Mention AwardNational Family Caregiving Awards Program2009
Impact ArticleInstitute on Community Intergration & Research and Training Center on Community Living2010
National Family Caregiving AwardNational Family Caregiving Awards Program2010
Above and Beyond TPSLD AwardTrumbull Parents of Students with Learning Differences2014
IPS Supported Employment Fidelity ReportDepartment of Mental Health and Addiction Services2014
Board Chair
Mr. Stephen A Smith
Company Affiliation Smith and Company
Term Apr 2014 to Mar 2015
Email steve@smithandcompanyonline.com
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Dr. Pietro Andres M.D.Gastroentrology Associates
Dr. Robert D. Chessin M.D.Retired
Mr. Brian Csizmadia Aquarion Water
Mr. Mark A. DeCruccio US Trust Bank Of America Private Wealth Mgmt.
Ms Lisa Ann Ellis consumer/client
Mrs. Alice C. Ferreira United Healthcare
Mrs. Ann C. Foley Mother of Consumer/client
Mr. Peter J. Gavey Goodnow Invest. Group, LLC
Mrs. Barbara F. Green Esq.Green and Gross, PC
Mrs. Dottie Kellersman Auxillary Presdent
Mrs. Dorthy B. Larson Lifetime Director
Mr. Michael N. LaVelle Esq.Pullman & Comley, LLC
Mr. Daniel Long Newtown Savings Bank
Mr. Michael Lynch Barnum Financial Group
Ms. Michele Macauda Retired
Mr. Jack McCullough Vallassis
Mr. Leonard Miller Retired
Mr. Ronald B. Noren Esq.Brody Wilkinson P.C.
Mr. Vincent Santilli People’s United Bank
Mr. Robert A. Scinto R. D. Scinto, Inc.
Mrs. Diane Thompson Wolfman Productions, Inc.
Mr. Kevin Walsh GE Corp
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 23
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 15
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Risk Management Provisions
Automobile Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Standing Committees
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Finance
Personnel
Program / Program Planning
Investment
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $32,554,812.00
Projected Expenses $32,829,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 4%
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Revenue$30,782,912$30,417,052$28,750,597
Total Expenses$31,242,495$30,382,942$28,685,637
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$608,857$874,212$849,561
Government Contributions$20,914,858$19,678,295$17,072,832
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$20,914,858$19,678,295$17,072,832
Individual Contributions------
------
$8,687,938$9,093,419$10,154,304
Investment Income, Net of Losses$221,726$174,905$298,566
Membership Dues------
Special Events$231,580$208,263$244,232
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$117,953$387,958$131,102
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$27,451,743$26,752,472$26,427,068
Administration Expense$3,166,355$3,024,095$1,694,242
Fundraising Expense$624,397$606,375$564,327
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.991.001.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses88%88%92%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue3%3%3%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$16,387,475$16,481,441$16,962,721
Current Assets$2,341,785$2,641,232$3,241,289
Long-Term Liabilities$4,510,116$4,427,359$4,943,930
Current Liabilities$4,293,021$4,409,565$4,260,264
Total Net Assets$7,584,338$7,644,517$7,758,527
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountState of Connecticut $20,726,475State of Connecticut $19,276,348State of Connecticut $16,806,914
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.550.600.76
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets28%27%29%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments

The Kennedy Center creates its annual projected expense budget by including the total cost for full staffing.  As a result of typical staff vacancies throughout the year The Kennedy Center is able to bridge the difference between projected revenues and expenditures at the end of the fiscal year.

Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 2440 Reservoir Ave
Trumbull, CT 06611
Primary Phone 203 365-8522
Contact Email dev@kennedyctr.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Martin D. Schwartz
Board Chair Mr. Stephen A Smith
Board Chair Company Affiliation Smith and Company

 

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