The Salvation Army (New Haven Corps)
The Salvation Army
450 George Street
New Haven CT 06511-5411
Contact Information
Address The Salvation Army
450 George Street
New Haven, CT 06511-5411
Telephone (203) 624-9891 x
Fax 203-777-2307
E-mail Dean.Satterlee@use.salvationarmy.org
Mission
The Salvation Army's mission is to meet basic human needs without discrimination and its ministry is motivated by the love of God. The Salvation Army's goal is to help individuals and families deal with the many challenges they face in their daily lives through social, educational, emotional and spiritual development. Every program and service is designed to support and develop self-sufficiency and hope.

The programs and services in greatest need benefit the communities the New Haven Corps serves year-round, such as its Food Pantry, Diaper Bank, and the utility assistance component of its Emergency Assistance Program. Holiday assistance has also been met with a positive response and support through volunteerism, recognition and donations. In the event additional funding is secured, the New Haven Corps will offer rental assistance once again, which had previously been discontinued due to funding constraints, as numerous requests for such assistance continue.

In addition to the emergency assistance that it provides, the New Haven Corps also offers other kinds of assistance to meet a variety of needs, such as its voucher program, providing vouchers redeemable for clothes and furniture. Nursing home and veteran visits are also conducted to provide fellowship to those who may otherwise be overlooked, depressed, or lonely. An opportunity for local children to attend an overnight camp is another need that the New Haven Corps meets. The children of the low-income families who benefit would not be able to attend such a camp experience otherwise. Each year, the New Haven Corps strives to offer at least 50 children from the Greater New Haven area with a minimum cost, week-long camp opportunity through The Salvation Army's Camp CONNRI in Ashford, CT. With such a positive response from those served, the New Haven Corps strives to find ways to reduce the cost of attending camp even further and to offer this experience to even more families.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1899
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Commissioner David Jeffrey
Board Chair Mr. Ray Andrewsen
Board Chair Company Affiliation AM1220 WQUN
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $539,715.00
Projected Expenses $606,808.00
Statements
Mission The Salvation Army's mission is to meet basic human needs without discrimination and its ministry is motivated by the love of God. The Salvation Army's goal is to help individuals and families deal with the many challenges they face in their daily lives through social, educational, emotional and spiritual development. Every program and service is designed to support and develop self-sufficiency and hope.

The programs and services in greatest need benefit the communities the New Haven Corps serves year-round, such as its Food Pantry, Diaper Bank, and the utility assistance component of its Emergency Assistance Program. Holiday assistance has also been met with a positive response and support through volunteerism, recognition and donations. In the event additional funding is secured, the New Haven Corps will offer rental assistance once again, which had previously been discontinued due to funding constraints, as numerous requests for such assistance continue.

In addition to the emergency assistance that it provides, the New Haven Corps also offers other kinds of assistance to meet a variety of needs, such as its voucher program, providing vouchers redeemable for clothes and furniture. Nursing home and veteran visits are also conducted to provide fellowship to those who may otherwise be overlooked, depressed, or lonely. An opportunity for local children to attend an overnight camp is another need that the New Haven Corps meets. The children of the low-income families who benefit would not be able to attend such a camp experience otherwise. Each year, the New Haven Corps strives to offer at least 50 children from the Greater New Haven area with a minimum cost, week-long camp opportunity through The Salvation Army's Camp CONNRI in Ashford, CT. With such a positive response from those served, the New Haven Corps strives to find ways to reduce the cost of attending camp even further and to offer this experience to even more families.
Background William Booth founded The Salvation Army in 1865. Booth, a Methodist minister, began a crusade of helping the hungry and homeless who wandered the streets of London, England. Booth recognized that people could not consider or address their spiritual well being if their basic needs of food, clothing and shelter were not met. Today, one hundred and forty five years later, Booth's mission lives on through the work of The Salvation Army.

Today, The Salvation Army serves people in need from over 124 countries throughout the world.  Booth had instituted a welfare program that continues today as a practical expression of the dominating spiritual motivation of The Salvation Army. Aid is given wherever and whenever the need is apparent, without distinction to race or creed, and without mandatory adherence to the Army’s principles.

A misconception that many have is that The Salvation Army is simply a red kettle and a bell-ringer during the holiday season, but the organization is much more than that. The organization offers a myriad of programs and social services that are much broader in scope and include, but are not limited to: providing food and shelter for the homeless; emergency food pantry assistance; utilities assistance; after school programs; seniors programs; life enhancement skills; employment skills and placement; emergency disaster relief; and counseling, to name a few. 

The Salvation Army is in the business of meeting needs and changing lives, one life at a time. As a result, The Salvation Army doesn’t just suddenly appear around Christmastime; as you will find its programs and social services are actually available in local communities 365 days a year.
Impact

Despite decreasing revenues as part of the aftershock of the economic downturn, the New Haven Corps has been able to serve approximately 26,200 meals through its Food Pantry in the past year. Additionally, 840children were helped with diapers through its Diaper Bank; and 94 clients were assisted with utility bills. Furthermore, 160 clothing vouchers were given to fire victims, the homeless, and those recently discharged from jail; 222 families were given gift certificates for Thanksgiving food; 380 families were supplied with gift certificates for Christmas food, 654 children were presented with toys and clothing through the Angel Tree; and 9 families were helped via Adopt-a-Family, being provided with packages of toys, clothing, and groceries to give them happier holidays.  1307 residents of local nursing homes/hospitals were visited and given Christmas gifts.  This includes the patients at the VA hospital in West Haven

To demonstrate the continued impact that the New Haven Corps has on the families it serves, what follows is a success story:

Last Christmas season, the mother of one of the families who was supported with holiday assistance through "Adopt a Family" was extremely surprised when she came to pick up her items. She hadn't expected even a half of the items she had received. She had thought that this Christmas wouldn't be exciting and joyful for her children and herself, because she had no job, and no income to celebrate this most joyful season of the year. With unexpected excitement and gratitude, tears fell from her eyes. She had no hope before she walked into The Salvation Army's office, but now, for her, everything had changed - she had found hope. Finding hope where none exists is a miracle in and of itself. With the the support of generous donors, The Salvation Army will continue providing help and hope to those in despair through its emergency assistance programs.

Needs The greatest challenge continues to be the inability to provide long term - ini depth case management to assist our participants in identifying root causes which contribute to financial crisis and need; developing a plan of action to address those causes and following up with the plan.  We are, quite frankly, understaffed and struggle simply to keep up with the volume of requests for assistance.  In addition - we have - especially and the end of each fiscal year, been faced with having to reduce variety of food served through The Salvation Army food bank.The Salvation Army's current financial resources have not been able to meet the growing need for these programs.

Furthermore, staff has experienced a decline in volunteers when it comes to such tasks as toy sorting and distribution during the holiday season. Although the current Advisory Board has also been a strong asset, the Corps would also like to build its capacity through the recruitment of more members from various occupations to develop it even further. As a result, the New Haven Corps is always looking for new volunteers and financial contributors to support and improve the programs and services it provides to those in need.
CEO Statement The Salvation Army is a well-known organization throughout the Greater New Haven area, providing as many programs and services as possible to serve those in need from the Greater New Haven area. For this reason, many other organizations refer those in need to The Salvation Army for assistance. Additionally, not a day goes by without potential clients coming into the Corps or contacting staff in desperate need of assistance. Unfortunately, this need has only continued to grow. However, in the past year especially, the Corps has unfortunately had to turn more and more individuals and families away who have come seeking help due to a decrease in revenues. Due to the economic downturn, coupled with an increase in requests, allocated funds for emergency assistance have been expended earlier and earlier each fiscal year. Therefore, more funding for emergency services will allow more individuals and families to benefit year-round.
Board Chair Statement The New Haven Corps provides opportunities for its board members to serve the community through its programs and services and the members provide the Corps with supports through their personal and business networks as well. The board is also highly involved in the New Haven Corps' finance and property decisions as they arise. At each meeting, board members carefully review ongoing operations, make informed suggestions and approve new projects after careful deliberation. When the New Haven Corps is in need of any additional services or resources for new projects or issues beyond its limited resources, the board directly provides their support if possible or connects staff to service providers through their networks that can meet such needs, either at a discounted service rate or through monetary donation.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Religion- Related / Christianity
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Salvation Army
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / Emergency Assistance (Food, Clothing, Cash)
Areas Served
Hamden
New Haven
North Haven
Orange
West Haven
East Haven
Woodbridge
The Salvation Army's New Haven Corps serves the areas of East Haven, Hamden, New Haven, North Haven, Orange, West Haven, and Woodbridge. Although the majority of its clients in need of social services come from New Haven, staff are fully devoted to all individuals and families in need from each town within their catchment area to provide emergency and holiday assistance.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments Persons of need living/residing within the geographical areas as outlined above
Programs
Description The Corps operates a year-round emergency Food Pantry. The Food Pantry serves clients from the Greater New Haven area. The Corps’ target population is low-income, working poor and numerous community members who are disabled, mentally and/or physically. Many of the program’s clients do work; however, they still do not make enough money to pay rent and consistently put food on the table. Dire situations such as these cause potential clients to look to The Salvation Army for help for that bag of food they desperately need. Overall, the pantry serves primarily single-parent families, consisting of a mother and her children, as well as a number of individuals. All of the clients served live in the Greater New Haven area. Eligible clients are served with bags of food, which include meat, canned goods, grain, bread, juice, snacks, and any other necessities. The pantry is open every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Each client served is assisted by a Case Worker.
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. As individuals and families have their basic need for food met to assist them in meeting their other needs, they will begin the process of increasing their self-sufficiency. The ultimate goal for this program is for families to rely on it less as they are connected to additional resources and are able to meet their other outstanding priorities to stabilize their lives.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. In addition to daily staff observation, monthly statistics regarding Food Pantry usage are reported to the local food bank and reviewed at the time of the annual program audit conducted by The Salvation Army's Southern New England Divisional Headquarters.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. With a big sigh a gentleman first walked into The Salvation Army's New Haven Corps, asking for assistance. He was desperately in need. Due to his unemployment and other hardships in life, his spouse left him and his family. As a result, he had become a single parent, responsible for taking care of two young children and his father, who was sick in bed because of an illness. Staff gave him advice, including information concerning others programs he may be eligible for. The Food Pantry was especially helpful for him in obtaining food to feed his family. When he picked up a bag of groceries most recently, he was very excited to share his good news, which was that he found a job and had started working at a store in New Haven. A couple days later, he donated many cans of food to help out people in the community who were still suffering like he once was.
Description As part of its Emergency Assistance Program, the New Haven Corps offers utility assistance and vouchers for clothing and furniture. Both are offered year-round, with the majority of utility assistance taking place between March and September.

Unless referrals are received from agencies in other towns, utility assistance is only provided to New Haven residents as every other town within the New Haven Corps’ catchment area has an agency that provides a similar service and efforts are made to avoid duplication. Through utility assistance, staff helps those at risk of shut off through paying current-month charges. Not only does this program keep utilities on, but it also grants those impacted enough time to arrange for future payments on their own.

Vouchers are designed for those in need of clothing and furniture. The target population includes: the homeless, jail discharges and disaster and domestic violence victims. Vouchers are redeemable at The Salvation Army’s Thrift Stores.
Population Served Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated / At-Risk Populations / Victims
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Approximately 100 people receive immediate utility assistance each year, preventing shut off. In addition, approximately 100 homeless individuals and jail discharges and 15 victims of disasters and domestic violence are served with vouchers each year. Through clothing and furniture vouchers, those in need are able to receive the provisions necessary as part of their road to recovery and independence.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The Emergency Assistance Program grants those in the need the ability to improve and rebuild their lives. Through providing one-time emergency assistance to those experiencing financial difficulties, these individuals are ultimately given the time they need to plan for the future, having temporarily eliminated their stress and financial burdens. Although these clients may still require additional resources, it is the hope of this program that they slowly rely on The Salvation Army and other financial assistance providers less as they become more self-sufficient.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Utility companies receive confirmation letters for each respective client's payment arrangements with The Salvation Army and current-month payments so that each client will not have their utility services shut off. Statistics regarding those served are maintained to provide to funders and tracked through The Salvation Army’s internal database.

Each Thrift Store of The Salvation Army that receives a client with a voucher returns the voucher to the respective Corps with a list of purchased items so that appropriate staff can track and confirm that clients purchased what they needed.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. What follows is one success story describing lives helped:

A fire victim came to The Salvation Army in need. Due to a disaster, she lost most of her family's possessions, furniture, clothes, kitchen appliances, etc. in the house. A local fireman informed her that The Salvation Army provided vouchers to fire victims. With the vouchers issued by The Salvation Army, she could purchase some essential things that she needed to live suitably and move on with her life from the local thrift store. She thanked The Salvation Army again and again for what it could do, which was a big help for her and her family.
Description The Salvation Army’s New Haven Corps provides various types of help through its Holiday Assistance Program. As part of this program, each Christmas season, the Corps runs Angel Tree and Adopt-A-Family components to serve people who are less fortunate from the community. Those who cannot afford Christmas gifts for their children apply to these programs in October. They are required to bring specific information and documentation (i.e., proof of I.D., income, number in household) to be considered for the programs. Most receive Christmas gifts through Angel Tree, while some who are in desperate need are served not only gifts, but also other items helpful for enjoying a holiday season through Adopt-A-Family.

There is also nursing home visitation that takes place during the holiday season. Every year, staff and volunteers visit over ten nursing homes, bringing with them Christmas gifts and friendly conversation.
Population Served Families / At-Risk Populations / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Angel Tree provides underprivileged children and seniors with up to two holiday gifts. On average, The Salvation Army’s New Haven Corps serves between 600 and 700 children through Angel Tree each year. Those children receive toys, clothing, shoes and more. For families in even greater need, an inventory of their needs is taken and a wish list is compiled. This list may include toys, clothing, household items, and/or information regarding utilities and heating assistance. The Corps then serves approximately 15 families through Adopt-A-Family. These families are fortunate to receive a full package of holiday items. In addition, more than 1,000 nursing home residents enjoy visitation from The Salvation Army with seasonal greetings and gifts. In the end, through the Holiday Assistance Program, many more people celebrate a holiday season with materials and resources that they could not afford on their own.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The ultimate goal for holiday assistance is to extend and enrich the joy of the holiday season in the community. There are many people who are less fortunate and do not have an opportunity to enjoy the holiday season otherwise. The New Haven Corps’ commitment is to serve those people and help as many people as it can to enjoy and celebrate a very exciting time of the year with their families. Families will also be able to meet other basic needs through money saved, not having to make sacrifices to provide for their families during the holidays.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The New Haven Corps is required to provide a report to The Salvation Army's Southern New England Divisional Headquarters, which is responsible for overseeing all operations through Connecticut and Rhode Island, for review of the program and its success. Included in the report are statistics (i.e., number of beneficiaries, total expenditures, etc.).
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. One woman knocked on the door of The Salvation Army, seeking assistance for the upcoming holiday season. Her granddaughter was expecting a baby in a couple of weeks, which meant she had to support not only her grandchild, but also the baby. To make matters worse, she recently lost her part-time job. Even though she had tried to find another job to make ends meet, it had proved difficult to find a job in this difficult economy. Fortunately, she heard from her neighbor that The Salvation Army had assisted those in need. As a result, she gladly signed up for a Thanksgiving gift certificate and a Christmas application, coming by the office to express her appreciation and how such assistance will ensure that her holidays are memorable ones. She hopes to secure a new job soon.
Program Comments
CEO Comments
The New Haven Corps operates its social services programs Monday through Friday every week. Approximately 600 people come to the Corps to have their needs met each month. Staff believe that their regular/seasonal services are crucial not only for The Salvation Army to reach out to the community and serve those in need, but also for those who are seeking help today. However, in order to carry out its services, The Salvation Army would not be able to meet nearly as many needs were it not for the support and help from its partners, participants, and donors. The more support The Salvation Army's New Haven Corps has for its programs, the more lives that can be helped.
CEO/Executive Director
Commissioner David Jeffrey
Term Start Oct 2013
Email David.Jeffrey@usn.salvationarmy.org
Experience Commissioner Jeffrey functions in a role akin to the CEO for The Salvation Army as a corporate entity. Major Thomas A. Schenk and Mr. Richard D. Allen are both authorized by the Board of Trustees to execute documents on behalf of the Board of Trustees and The Salvation Army.
Co-CEO
Commissioner Barry C Swanson
Term Start Feb 2013
Email Barry.Swanson@use.salvationarmy.org
Experience Commissioner Swanson functions in a role akin to the Co-CEO for The Salvation Army as a corporate entity. Major Thomas A. Schenk and Mr. Richard D. Allen are both authorized by the Board of Trustees to execute documents on behalf of the Board of Trustees and The Salvation Army.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 4
Staff Retention Rate 66%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 3
Unspecified 1
Senior Staff
Title Corps Commanding Officer
Title Corps Commanding Officer
Title Assistant Corps Officer
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
The New Haven Corps works most often with The Salvation Army's New Haven Adult Rehabilitation Center, Liberty Community Services and the Community Action Agency of New Haven Inc. Many of these organizations continue to refer clients to the New Haven Corps for rental assistance. The Salvation Army's New Haven Adult Rehabilitation Center and the Liberty Shelter of Liberty Community Services typically refer their residents to the New Haven Corps for clothing and furniture vouchers, while Christian Community Action Agency refers clients for food, diapers and utility assistance. Similarly, if the New Haven Corps identifies clients who are in need of shelter or a rehabilitation program, they are referred to the Adult Rehabilitation Center or Liberty Shelter. If no funding is available for a given type of emergency assistance at the time of request, staff refers him/her to the Christian Community Action Agency. Such collaboration prevents duplication in services and allows for potential clients to be served as quickly as possible.
Board Chair
Mr. Ray Andrewsen
Company Affiliation AM1220 WQUN
Term Sept 2012 to Aug 2015
Email ray.andrewsen@quinnipiac.edu
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Khalfani Ajamu Community Volunteer
Mr. Glenn Archer IT Communications
Mr. Fabian Durango Durango Insurance
Mrs Giulia Gouge Social Media Marketing
Mr. John Karavas Mortgage
Mr. Hugh Keenan Funeral Director
Ms. Victoria Navin Retired
Mr. James E. Traester CPA
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 2
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 50%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Commercial General Insurance
Disability Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
General Property Coverage
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Colonel William Bamford Internal - Vice President, Trustee/Self-employed Minister
Major Glenn C. Bloomfield Internal - First Assistant Treasurer, Trustee/Self-employed Minister
Major David Champlin Internal - Trustee/Self-employed Minister
Colonel Steven Howard Internal - Trustee/Self-employed Minister
Commissioner David Jeffrey Internal - Chairman of the Board, Trustee/Self-employed Minister
Lt. Colonel Kenneth W. Maynor Internal - Trustee/Self-employed Minister
Lt. Colonel James W. Reynolds Internal - Treasurer, Trustee/Self-employed Minister
Major Thomas A. Schenk Internal - Secretary, Trustee/Self-employed Minister
Commissioner Barry C Swanson Internal - President, Trustee/Self-employed Minister
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01 2014
Fiscal Year End Sept 30 2015
Projected Revenue $539,715.00
Projected Expenses $606,808.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Documents
Audit Documents
Fiscal Year Statement2013
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Letter of Determination
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Document Destruction Policy2002View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201220112010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$9,988$16,739$15,162
Federal$9,988$16,739$15,162
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$102,145$29,139$37,254
--$8,750--
$47,431$35,680$33,912
Investment Income, Net of Losses------
Membership Dues$1,162$852$516
Special Events$165$36$1,046
Revenue In-Kind$116,134$81,658$101,280
Other$309,257$318,558$309,679
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Program Expense$263,156$123,445$133,021
Administration Expense$217,645$247,815$226,767
Fundraising Expense$81,672$74,782$70,198
Payments to Affiliates$43,025$39,106$38,847
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.971.011.06
Program Expense/Total Expenses43%25%28%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue73%137%131%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Total Assets$21,418$22,872$42,072
Current Assets------
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$4,922$3,486$4,197
Total Net Assets$16,496$19,386$37,874
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201220112010
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountChristmas Kettle $158,877Mail Appeal $165,400Mail Appeal $179,509
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountMail Appeal $131,987Kettle Appeal $136,348Kettle Appeal $115,209
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountGift in Kind $116,134Gift-In-Kind $81,658Gift-In-Kind $101,280
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.000.000.00
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments
Due to not exceeding required financial thresholds, The Salvation Army’s New Haven Corps does not have an independent audited financial statement conducted.
 
We asked for an appropriation grant to cover the difference of $67,093.  
Foundation Staff Comments This organization is exempt from completing the Form 990. 
 
This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address The Salvation Army
450 George Street
New Haven, CT 065115411
Primary Phone 203 624-9891
CEO/Executive Director Commissioner David Jeffrey
Board Chair Mr. Ray Andrewsen
Board Chair Company Affiliation AM1220 WQUN

 

Related Information

Meet Basic Needs

A strong community not only meets its members’ basic needs but also works to create long-term solutions to their problems. Provide people with affordable housing, enough to eat and access to affordable health care and you enable them to envision a better future for themselves.