Central Connecticut Coast YMCA
1240 Chapel Street
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 1240 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 777-9622 x
Fax 203-773-8950
E-mail info@cccymca.org
Web and Social Media
Your support gives kids so much more confidence.
Mission

The mission of the Central Connecticut Coast YMCA is to put Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build a healthy spirit, mind and body for all. The Y welcomes all - no matter religion, age, gender or socio-economic status and makes accessible the support and opportunities that empower people and communities to learn, grow and thrive. With a focus on youth development, healthy living and social responsibility, the Y nurtures the potential of every youth and teen, improves the nation’s health and well-being, and provides opportunities to give back and support neighbors.

 

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1859
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. David B. Stevenson Ph.D.
Board Chair Mr. Dan O'Donnell
Board Chair Company Affiliation Odonnell Company
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $27,012,035.00
Projected Expenses $27,012,035.00
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Central Connecticut Coast YMCA is to put Judeo-Christian principles into practice through programs that build a healthy spirit, mind and body for all. The Y welcomes all - no matter religion, age, gender or socio-economic status and makes accessible the support and opportunities that empower people and communities to learn, grow and thrive. With a focus on youth development, healthy living and social responsibility, the Y nurtures the potential of every youth and teen, improves the nation’s health and well-being, and provides opportunities to give back and support neighbors.

 

Background

Since 1859 the Central Connecticut Coast Y branches have served as community centers in the heart of the 25 towns we serve. Much of the Central Connecticut Coast Y’s work is supported by membership dues, program fees and grants, but central to our mission is the commitment to make the Y affordable and accessible to all, regardless of ability to pay.

The YMCA reaches an exceptionally diverse group of individuals, providing thousands of deserving families, new immigrants, and at-risk young people with the resources and services they need to lead happy, healthy, and productive lives as citizens of our communities.

The YMCA is known for its quality community programs that provide our neighbors with access to affordable and accessible wellness options. In addition to promoting general health and wellness, YMCA programs teach critical life skills (swimming), promote teamwork and leadership skills (basketball), afford opportunities for intergenerational interaction (Y Family Fun Nights), and provide a safe, nurturing space for area residents.

Our philosophy that no one is turned away due to their inability to pay is something that each and every staff member takes very seriously. We believe that an individual's economic status should not limit their access to a variety of activities. This driving philosophy makes YMCA programs even more critical to the general health and well-being of our community.

The Y is, and always will be, dedicated to building healthy, confident, connected and secure children, adults, families and communities. Every day our impact is felt when an individual makes a healthy choice, when a mentor inspires a child and when a community comes together for the common good.

 

Impact

History, Programs and Services:  Since 1859 the Central Connecticut Coast Y branches have served as community centers in the heart of the 25 towns we serve. Nationally and internationally, the YMCA is known for its quality community programs that provide our neighbors with access to affordable and accessible wellness options. In addition to promoting general health and wellness, YMCA programs work to close the Achievement Gap, to teach critical life skills, promote teamwork and leadership skills, afford opportunities for inter-generational interaction, and provide a safe, nurturing space for area residents.

 

Our philosophy that no one is turned away due to their inability to pay is something that each and every staff member takes very seriously. We believe that an individual’s economic status should not limit their access to a variety of activities. This driving philosophy makes YMCA programs even more critical to the general health and well-being of our community.

 

Our YMCA branches offer a variety of successful programs and services, including child care, fitness programs, sports leagues, swimming, summer day and resident camp, and low-income housing with support services.

 

Our last evaluation of programs for the Central Connecticut Coast YMCA showed:

  • 1,230 low-income children made great strides in closing the education achievement gap through the Y’s 3 school-readiness programs, 38 after-school programs and 10 summer camp programs with a special focus on developing reading and writing skills.
  • 32,006 youth participated in programs including child care, youth sports, summer camping, and Youth in Government, where character was built and positive values were reinforced.
  • 7,441 children participated in Y swimming lessons and water safety education programs
  • 5,500 children built new relationships and enjoyed learning new skills through our camps
  • 46,304 youth and adults participated in health, wellness, education, physical activity and diabetes prevention programs and services.
  • 1,685 people were served when our Y reached out and helped them through affordable housing services, including more than 300 children who benefited from our family emergency shelter.
  • 1,293 Y friends gave 31,985 hours of volunteer service to our community.
  • We served a total of 88,000 individuals across our entire association.

 

Needs
In 2014, donors like you helped us award $3 million in direct financial assistance to over 6,000 children, individuals and families, giving them YMCA opportunities they could not otherwise afford. Our Annual Campaign efforts yielded $1.2 million. There are more families, more children and more individuals who want to participate but need financial support in order to do so. We need to fill the gap, you make that possible.
 

 

Last year, more than 5,000 children attended one of our summer camps. In total, we awarded over $400,000 in financial assistance for day camp and overnight camp scholarships. Kids need summer camp experiences as part of their development. When you send a kid to camp, they unplug from technology, they spend the day physically active, they spend 30-minutes each day reading to prevent summer learning loss, they experience success and become more confident, they develop life-long skills and life-time friendships. You give an experience they remember forever.

 

You provided a home and changed the lives last year of 1,685 people across Connecticut with support to our housing programs. This includes more than 300 children who benefited from our family emergency shelter. There are many more families at risk of homelessness and many already living without shelter, together with our many collaborators across the State, we need to end chronic homelessness; you help provide individuals with the resources and skills they need to rebuild homes when you support the Y.

 
CEO Statement The Central Connecticut Coast YMCA serves more people, in more ways, and in more communities than any other single non-profit organization. With over 88,000 members and program participants in a 25-town area, the Y provides value-based services to thousands of families annually. Y donors have many giving options. They may support a specific Y program that has benefited their family, or direct their gift to their local YMCA and strengthen the lives of families in their neighborhood. Donors can contribute to the physical and financial growth and stability of the organization with a capital campaign gift, or by making an annual cash gift. Forward-thinking donors join the Heritage Society, knowing their planned giving will secure our ability to grow and plan into the future. Donors who give to the Annual Campaign know that every dollar they invest is used to expand Y programs to those in greatest need. Whatever their manner of giving, our donors understand that a gift to the Central Connecticut YMCA is an investment in this community’s most important assets—its children and families.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Recreation & Sports / Community Recreational Centers
Secondary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Centers and Clubs (includes Boys/Girls Clubs)- Multipurpose
Tertiary Organization Category Housing, Shelter / Housing Support
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
West Haven
Woodbridge
The Valley YMCA branch serves the towns of the Lower Naugatuck Valley.
The Woodruff YMCA branch serves the communities of Milford, Orange, Woodbridge and West Haven.
The Hamden/North Haven YMCA branch serves Hamden, North Haven and Bethany.
The Soundview Family YMCA serves the shoreline communities of Branford, North Branford, Guilford, Madison and East Haven.
The New Haven YMCA Youth Center serves the youth of New Haven.
Programs
Description
The best measure of our community’s health is the health of our children. The experts tell us that children who are involved in youth programs are the healthiest of all. At the Y, we know that real strength isn’t only about physical fitness. Truly strong kids not only feel good about themselves, they are also able to develop skills, make decisions, set goals, and learn how to achieve in their own manner.
Children grow strong in spirit, mind and body in our youth sports programs and swim lessons. In each program, such as basketball, baseball, soccer, dance, martial arts, and floor hockey, children learn the fundamentals of the sport. We promote a non-competitive environment in which everybody plays and everybody wins. To us, good sportsmanship, self confidence and teamwork are more important than winning or losing.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.  Youth will learn new skills, feel like they belong, and know that they have a safe place to go that supports positive experiences in their lives and community, regardless of age, ability or finances.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The Y will attract and engage youth in programs and activities that will build character, particularly the values of caring, honesty, respect and responsibility.
We want to give all youth a sense of belonging and a place they can go that offers recreational, leisure and leadership opportunities that is administered by caring adult role models.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. In our camp and youth sports programs every child is given opportunities to grow socially and emotionally with their peers in a safe and friendly environment. We follow up with campers and parents regarding their camp experience using YMCA of the USA camper survey tools. These tools evaluate the overall camp experience and measure the camp’s impact in the areas most associated with key developmental assets. We also track how many children are awarded financial assistance in all programs to assess community need.

 

In our special needs programs we will evaluate how many participants in the adapted programs feel confident to try mainstream programs as well as how many parents would recommend our programs.

 

In our teen programs we will focus on outcomes that measure how safe youth feel, youth personal adjustments, positive adult/youth relationships and positive youth/community connections. Through pre and post participation surveys we will measure how many youth show increased scores.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.  Our Y’s serve 5,000 kids each year at camp, teach 11,000 kids to swim and play with 16,000 kids in youth sports programs.

In the past 2 years we have trained staff to work with children with special needs in sports, after school and camp, created an adapted arts program and expanded our adapted aquatics program.

Nearly 5,000 teens have come to the Y and acquired the skills they need to resist negative influences, finish their education, pursue careers and break the cycle of poverty.

Description Research demonstrates that after school programs keep youth safe and engaged in positive behaviors. Juvenile crime and victimization goes up during after school hours, in particular, youth are most likely to engage in risky behavior from 3-6pm. Given the high rates of violent crimes committed by and against young people, it is critical to get youth off the streets. Additionally, activities promoting self esteem, social competency, and team building are essential to positive youth development and redirecting violent behaviors, especially when our youth are constantly in “survival mode.” Positive social competency steers youth away from negative behaviors. Furthermore, the ongoing presence of significant adults provides a positive social development environment vital to their growth.
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.  Youth will learn new skills, feel like they belong, and know that they have a safe place to go that supports positive experiences in their lives and community, regardless of age, ability or finances.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Our goal is to challenge and nurture the individual, build self-esteem, instill leadership and social skills, strengthen the body, lift the spirit and sharpen the mind.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.  The YMCA bases much of its success on participation. We know that there is a far greater need in the community than we can hope to alleviate but we look very hard at and measure our success by: 1) increasing the number of overall participants; 2) increasing the amount of financial assistance (FA) awarded; and 3) increasing the number of participants who receive FA. All of these are part of the greater metrics that the staff and volunteers are held accountable for each year. There is quarterly reporting due to the corporate office which is then distributed to each department for review and verification. Some of the measures are done by staff at the branch while others, such as the total amount of FA, can be done at the corporate level through membership and registration software.

In addition to participation rates, our staff also evaluates our programs based on participant feedback. Responses are compiled and shared with staff to review and use in the development of an action plan for improvement for the following year. Our staff makes every effort to talk to parents at the start and end of each session to see what areas we can improve upon and what areas are going well. When we discover an opportunity to improve, staff comes together to come up with ways to solve any issue. Positive responses tell us we are doing something right and allow us to build momentum in a positive direction.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Below is a letter we received from the parent of one of our afterschool participants:
 
"Dear Woodruff YMCA,
 
I am writing to express my family's gratitude for the current resources allotted for the afterschool program to provide care for our son. As a third grader with multiple special needs, Johnny is provided a 1:1 paraprofessional during his school day. In order to meet our family's needs, Johnny needs to attend an afterschool program but could only do this with a 1:1 YMCA counselor who was specifically trained to move and support Johnny's needs.
 
Since the YMCA was able to provide this extended service, Johnny has been successfully enjoying his afternoons. His counselor is very comfortable with Johnny's needs and facilitates his involvement with the other children and their activities.
 
I would encourage the YMCA and their extended supporters to continue with the services that are needed by families. By broadening their scope of unique services, the YMCA programs are better able to support their community. Thank you for the support of this programming."
Description
Summer day camp programs offer children a unique experience in day camping, while providing a desperately needed child care service for working parents in the summertime.  Many single-parent families struggle to keep their jobs and be assured that their children are safe and involved in a culturally stimulating environment during the summer.  Knowing that their children are safe at our camps, making friends and having fun, makes going to work that much easier for working families.
 
Similarly, an overnight camp experience provides kids with opportunities to develop lifelong friendships, establish relationships with counselors from all over the world, be exposed to new activities in which they might not ever have the chance to participate elsewhere and strengthen their self-esteem as they build new skills. It is a time where youth can learn about themselves in a safe, structured and purposeful environment away from home.
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) / Infants to Preschool (under age 5) /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

We have found our camp to be a great societal equalizer in dealing with youth and families. Wherever you come from or whatever your circumstances, a camp experience almost inevitably broadens your perspective of the world and teaches you how to live and thrive within it. Every year, we provide this opportunity to children and families who cannot afford to attend.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Our goal is to help boys and girls grow as individuals, building their self esteem while instilling leadership social and life skills - all while they have fun in our beautiful camp environment. Campers have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of activities that are made possible by our  natural settings while led by enthusiastic staff. 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
We measure our program efficacy in two fundamental ways:
1) We measure the percentage of total camper population funded through financial assistance.
2) We follow up with campers and parents regarding their camp experience using YMCA of the USA
camper survey tools. These tools evaluate the overall camp experience and measure camp's impact in the areas most associated with key developmental assets including the extent to which camp helps children make new friends, get to know and live communally with children who are different from themselves, develop strong, trusting relationships with adults who are positive role models, gain self-confidence and learn to make decisions and choices independently.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

In 2010, 184 children were able to participate in YMCA Camp Hi-Rock programs and services who would not otherwise have been unable to do so. We anticipate approximately 204 children will be helped through our Strong Kids Financial Assistance program in 2011. In 2010, 94% of camper survey respondents reported that camp helped them make new friends. 89% of camper survey respondents reported that camp helped them get to know kids who are different from themselves (an increase over 2009 when 79% of campers responded in this manner). 87% of campers reported that camp made them feel good about themselves. Lives were positively changed, critical child care was provided to low-income families during the summer time period, character traits such as honesty, caring, respect and responsibility were learned. There was a tremendously positive impact for all of Camp Hi-Rock to continue to have and serve a fully diverse population of campers. This made our camp experience stronger for everyone.

Description

To be without a home is often to be without hope. Yet the Central Connecticut Coast YMCA is committed to helping individuals and families move from homelessness to hopefulness. 

The Valley YMCA provides housing services to many individuals. Its residence programs give men not only a safe place to live, but also a comfortable environment.  We were also able to help those that were struggling to stay current on their rent due to reduction in their work hours or unemployment. Knowing that the Y staff are willing to work with them so they don’t have to worry about a roof over their head has given many of the residents peace of mind and the ability to continue to provide for other necessities, including food and medication.

While many of our residents may not have any other support networks, the Y’s housing gave 50 individuals, a sense of community, hope and a place to belong last year.

Population Served Adults / Males /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The YMCA is proud of its role in providing a continuum of care to individuals and families who have become homeless. We work hard to utilize our resources to efficiently help those who find themselves in need - many from circumstances outside of their own control.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The program goals are to provide a safe, healthy environment for homeless families, where their basic needs can be met and to create housing stability for families who are at risk of becoming homeless.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The evaluation process is based on an exit interview conducted at the time a family is due to move into permanent affordable housing or into another type of housing suitable to meet the clients’ needs. The tool used at the exit interview is a written survey.  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.  Jose and Suheily came from Puerto Rico in 2011 looking for better opportunities for themselves and their children. With limited familial support in the area, they found themselves homeless. They came to Alpha Community Services YMCA looking for shelter and were immediately housed along with their three children at the Emergency Family Shelter. Jose and Suheily were very diligent in applying for jobs, submitting housing applications, and attending trainings. Soon enough, both of them found work within local factories. They were able to find an affordable apartment and move out of the shelter.

Since their departure from the shelter, Jose and Suheily received a Section 8 voucher from the Bridgeport Housing Authority. Jose, Suheily, and their children are doing very well and have expressed much gratitude for the help and guidance they received from Alpha Community Services YMCA.

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. David B. Stevenson Ph.D.
Term Start Nov 2010
Email dstevenson@cccymca.org
Experience

David Stevenson began his YMCA career in 1979 as the Physical Director at the Sidney-Shelby County YMCA in western Ohio. In 1983, Dave returned to Washington D.C. to attend graduate school at American University and to work as the Assistant Director for the National Center for Health/Fitness. His deep commitment to the Y mission brought him back to the National Capital YMCA in 1987 where he served as the Associate Executive Director for Programs. In 1991, Dave accepted the position as Branch Executive for the YMCA of Central Maryland, and in 1998, he joined the staff of the Sewickley Valley YMCA as its Chief Executive Officer. In November 2010, Dr. Stevenson became the President & CEO of the Central Connecticut Coast YMCA.

As a twenty-five year professional in the YMCA movement, Dr. Stevenson states, “With roots dating back to the 1850’s, the YMCA continues to serve as a vital and thriving force to build spirit, mind, and body for all. And as a cause-driven movement, the YMCA is welcoming to all and well positioned to address the challenges of today’s society.”

Dr. Stevenson holds a B.S. degree in Recreation Management from Ithaca College, an M.S. degree in Health/Fitness Management from American University, and a Ph.D. degree in Educational Administration from AmericanUniversity.

Dave and his wife, Maura, are the proud parents of Patrick (24) and Maggie (21), and live in the Central Connecticut Coast YMCA service area.

 

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 177
Number of Part Time Staff 1388
Number of Volunteers 1605
Staff Retention Rate 61%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 182
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 996
Hispanic/Latino 110
Native American/American Indian 7
Other 268 multi-racial/unknown
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 416
Female 905
Unspecified 244
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Philip J Dwyer July 1990 - Nov 2010
Senior Staff
Title Senior Vice President/COO
Title Vice President of Finance/CFO
Title Vice President of Human Resources
Title Director of Marketing & Communications
Title Controller
Title Vice President of Financial Development
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Board Chair
Mr. Dan O'Donnell
Company Affiliation Odonnell Company
Term Jan 2014 to Dec 2016
Email dan@odonnellco.com
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Nicolas Ancel Attorney
Ms. Lissette Andino Northeast Utilities
Mr. David Bjorklund The SB Group
Mrs. Diane Chiota Community Volunteer
Leo Connors Merrill Lynch
Mr. Mario Coppola Berchem, Moses and Devlin
Mr. Jason Corsi GE Capital Markets, Inc.
Ms. Martha Dulla Grassy Hill Lodge
Mr. Christopher Gallo BlumShapiro
Dr. Mario Garcia New Haven Department of Public Health
Mr. Stephen Geckeler AquaLawn
Mr. Michael Horton Titan Energy New England
Michael Horton Titan Energy
Dr. Jeannette Ickovics Yale School of Public Health
Jacqueline James City of New Haven
Mr. William Jennings Bridgeport Hospital
Ms. Blanca Kazmierczak People's United Bank
Ms. Dorsey Kendrick Gateway Community College
Jon Leckerling Leckerling Ladwig & Leamon LLC
Mr. Ron Lesko Beardsley, Brown & Bassett
Mr. George Logan Aquarion Water Company
Ms. Althea Marshall Brooks City of New Haven
Mr. Kevin McGrath The Original Toy Company
Mr. Jatin Mehta Retired
Mr. Michael Morand Yale University
Mr. Robert Morton Morton's Mortuary
Mr. Dave Pantalone Community Volunteer
Mr. Preston Tisdale Esq.Koskoff, Koskoff & Bieder, PC
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 4
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 7 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 14
Female 8
Unspecified 7
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Blanket Personal Property
Boiler and Machinery
Builders Risk
Business Income
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Commercial General Liability and Medical Malpractice
Computer Equipment and Software
Crime Coverage
Day Care Center/Nursery School
Directors and Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
Educators Errors and Omission Liability
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
Fiduciary Liability
Flood
General Property Coverage
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Inland Marine and Mobile Equipment
Internet Liability Insurance
Life Insurance
Renter's Insurance
Risk Management Provisions
See Management and Governance Comments
Special Event Liability
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Water Craft and Aircraft
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Workplace Violence
Medical Health Insurance
Professional Liability
Standing Committees
Audit
Endowment
Executive
Finance
Board Development / Board Orientation
Investment
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Ms. Sandra Brown Retired
Mr. John J. Crawford Strategem, LLC
Mr. Walter Esdaile Retired
Mr. Robert L Fiscus Retired
Mr. Richard Hoyt Chapin & Bangs
Mr. Jeff Jones Retired
Mr. Michael Leone Retired
Mr. Robert Lyons Bilco
Mr. William Maley Trans-Lite, Inc.
Mr. Ronald Noren Brody and Wilkinson, PC
Mr. Jerry Stagg Retired
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2015
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2015
Projected Revenue $27,012,035.00
Projected Expenses $27,012,035.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 5%
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
2012 Annual Report2012View
2011 Annual Report2011View
2010 Annual Report2010View
2009 Annual Report2009View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,914,419--$1,623,622
Government Contributions$5,771,362$0$5,730,629
Federal----
State----
Local----
Unspecified$5,771,362$5,730,629
Individual Contributions$98,983--$105,559
------
$18,443,000--$18,140,516
Investment Income, Net of Losses$462,530--$377,991
Membership Dues------
Special Events$65,449--$31,458
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$79,426--$502,725
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$21,841,642--$21,628,354
Administration Expense$3,160,378--$3,209,343
Fundraising Expense$225,039--$226,024
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.06--1.06
Program Expense/Total Expenses87%--86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue3%--3%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$37,675,253--$38,162,954
Current Assets$5,006,214--$5,097,679
Long-Term Liabilities$7,808,932--$10,331,982
Current Liabilities$3,560,992--$3,826,076
Total Net Assets$26,305,329--$24,004,896
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount ---- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount ---- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount ---- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.41--1.33
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets21%--27%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Capital Campaign PurposeHelpCapital Campaigns are defined as a fundraising efforts over-and-above an organization's annual operating budget. Campaigns might include the purchase of land or a building, major renovations, and major equipment purchases. Endowment campaigns may also be included if the funds are legally restricted. The Campaign for YMCA Camp Hi-Rock aims to ensure that Hi-Rock has the infrastructure necessary to complement our extraordinary setting and to facilitate the vital work being accomplished by the members of the Hi-Rock community at camp. This spring we will celebrate the opening of the new Parker Seeley Lodge. The Campaign for the Woodruff Y's priority is to complete the second floor and reallocate space to expand services. The Campaign for the Soundview Family Y is to complete Phase 2 of our project and expand services.
Goal $9,200,000.00
Dates May 2011 to Sept 2015
Amount Raised To Date 2465891 as of Feb 2015
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

Address 1240 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 777-9622
Contact Email info@cccymca.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. David B. Stevenson Ph.D.
Board Chair Mr. Dan O'Donnell
Board Chair Company Affiliation Odonnell Company

 

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A healthy community is a rich community. When we enjoy good health, when we engage in wellness activities – and when we support people living with disease or disabilities -- there are profound physical and psychological benefits. Simply put, we are all stronger and happier. To support the health and wellness initiatives in your community is to put good health within reach of all.

Nurture Children & Youth

When families, schools and communities take the view that children and youth are valued and respected assets to society, they necessarily support environments that nurture youth development. Children raised to embrace positive social values, to seek self-understanding, and to value their self-worth grow to become community-minded young adults with a sense of belonging and a belief in their resiliency. See how you can help our community's children grow into tomorrow's leaders.

Meet Basic Needs

A strong community not only meets its members’ basic needs but also works to create long-term solutions to their problems. Provide people with affordable housing, enough to eat and access to affordable health care and you enable them to envision a better future for themselves.