Covenant to Care for Children
1477 Park Street
Suite 2A
Hartford CT 06106
Contact Information
Address 1477 Park Street
Suite 2A
Hartford, CT 06106-
Telephone (860) 243-1806 x
Fax 860-243-0100
E-mail info@covenanttocare.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
Covenant to Care for Children channels the generosity of caring and faithful people to advocate for, and provide direct assistance to Connecticut’s children who are neglected, abused and/or impoverished.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1987
Former Names
Covenant to Care
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dr. David Santis Ph.D.
Board Chair Susan Lee
Board Chair Company Affiliation Aetna
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $514,390.00
Projected Expenses $514,390.00
Statements
Mission Covenant to Care for Children channels the generosity of caring and faithful people to advocate for, and provide direct assistance to Connecticut’s children who are neglected, abused and/or impoverished.
Background

In 1987, two women dedicated to the mission of addressing the needs of neglected children founded Covenant to Care. One, a social worker at the Department of Children and Families (DCF), and the other an employee of the Christian Conference of Churches saw an opportunity to mobilize the faith community to help children suffering from abuse, neglect and poverty. The co-founders received a grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and began its first program entitled, Adopt a Social Worker. After three years of proven success, the State of Connecticut Department of Children and Families, and private donors funded the ongoing program. Rebranded to Covenant to Care for Children (CCC) in March 2005, this program is now in its 28th year of operation. Though the agency works through the faith communities that provide goods, services, and mentoring support, no youth is required to be a participant or member of any faith tradition or religion.

Our Reach One Youth project originated from an initiative established at First Church of Christ in Simsbury, Connecticut in 1992. In September 1999, Linda Smith-Cohen, LCSW was hired to enhance and expand the initiative into formal mentoring. With Linda's assistance, the program developed a mentor-training manual that received approval by the Connecticut Mentoring Partnership in 2000.

In July 2004, in collaboration with Families in Crisis, CCC secured a three-year grant from the Federal Government, Administration for Children and Families to begin a project mentoring children of female prisoners. Mom, Mentor and Me addressed the critical needs of children from the greater Bridgeport, New Britain, New Haven, and Waterbury areas.

These two mentoring projects were merged into one Mentoring Program serving at-risk youth and teens, and children of incarcerated parents. The Mentoring Program was modeled on BBBS and the Amachi  methodologies. The program is now closed.

In 1992, Asylum Hill Congregational Church was asked to collaborate with CCC to meet the emergency needs of families for food.

The Children's Enrichment Fund has been available for most of the years that CCC has been in operation, but not officially named until 1996. This program provides funding to purchase tangible items and services that cannot be met through any other program or fund.

In 1999, Covenant to Care for Children began a program called Critical Goods that allows social workers to have items, which are critical to the basic needs of children, delivered within a short amount of time. 

Impact

Covenant to Care for Children (CCC) is a 28-year-old statewide agency whose mission is to mobilize and channel the generosity of caring and faithful people. CCC advocates for, and provides direct assistance to Connecticut’s children and youth who are neglected, abused or at-risk.

Last year, in the wealthiest of the fifty states, nearly 10,000 of Connecticut’s children were the subjects of substantiated abuse and/or neglect reports. The large majority of Connecticut’s residents want to help, but it is difficult for an individual to know how to meet each child’s needs effectively, especially given the need to respect the child’s privacy and, in most cases, the great complexity of their needs. CCC supplements state resources available to these kids by bridging the divide between abused/neglected/at-risk children and people of good-will who want to effectively help them.

The adopted values of CCC are that we be: child-centered; responsive to needs; motivated by faith; respectful of human dignity; and caring toward all. Our vision is a future where all Connecticut children have caring families and safe places to live and all caring and faithful people demonstrate their commitment to the welfare of children.

Needs Individuals, corporations, foundations, civic organizations, religious and public sectors, to commit 9 cents/day for as many Connecticut children, for as many days as financially feasible, every year.  Newly implemented prevention measures taken by Connecticut's child welfare system greatly enhance the opportunity for early support and effective outcomes.  But, this opportunity also presents critical need to increase reliable revenue by $200,000 for the basic staffing needed to support a network of 2,000 state-wide volunteers.
CEO Statement

CCC’s programs assure cost-effectiveness by remaining prevention focused, and supplementing, never substituting for, public resources for abused and neglected kids. More often than not, our early intervention programs work to keep at-risk children/adolescents and their families intact. The furnishings and other goods that these children need are requested by social workers for specific kids, with specific needs, at a particularly critical moment.

 

The cost-effectiveness of early intervention, targeted resources for identified at-risk kids may be captured by considering a bed provided through CCC to a child living in a home without beds. That bed helps prevent that child from ending up in a bed in a homeless shelter or a residential facility for abused/neglected kids waiting for a foster home, or needing a therapeutic setting before they are ready to live in a private home with a family. Public dollars are available for the beds in these institutional settings; but they are generally not available for the child still in her/his own home. The long term health, education, and economic prospects for the child sleeping in her own home are better than for the child removed from home and sleeping in a residential program’s bed. In other words, our beds remain further upstream because our programs usually help prevent the kids from falling into the child welfare/juvenile justice stream.

CCC’s programs are particularly promising for addressing the large majority of child maltreatment cases where poverty plays a primary role in compromising the safety of children--about 90%. “The link between poverty and child maltreatment has been well documented. Child welfare workers have had limited options, other than foster care, to keep children safe.” (See the “Connecticut Department of Children and Families Differential Response System: Executive Report,” Casey Family Services, June, 2010, http://www.ct.gov/dcf/lib/dcf/drs/pdf/cfs_executivereport_drsfinalreprint.pdf). The average per diem Connecticut support for a child in foster care is about $27. Additional costs of medicaid and long-term poverty and health costs, if included, would increase this number substantially. CCC’s average annual cash cost per youth service for the past two years, including administration and fund raising expenses, is $33.76 (9.25 cents/day), 00.34% of the average foster care subsidy cost.

 

CT Public Cost Per Day: $27.00

CCC Prevention Cost Per Day: $00.09

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Programs
Description
The Adopt A Social Worker program  (AASW) is the largest and oldest of our programs.
 
Faith-based or community organizations agree to a covenant in which they partner with a particular social worker to, as far as is possible, provide for the necessary and special items needed for all of the children in that social worker’s caseload. This augments the provisions of the State, often assuring greater stability in the life of a child.
 
The program works with over 200 faith- and community-based organizations and over 2,000 volunteers and donors. On a yearly basis, as many as 24,000 children are provided with beds, dressers, school backpacks and other goods valued at over $500,000.   
 
Other states have successfully copied this distinctive and preventative model, but ours remains the most comprehensive and successful.
Population Served / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Short-term Outcomes, To provide furnishings, tangible goods, and services needed:
To support plans to prevent maltreatment of a child when there are risks to home and school stability.
To support plans to transition an abused/neglected child into a more suitable home.
To facilitate a child reuniting with her/his birth family.
To help a young adult transition from foster care to independent living.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Served 28,000 children by providing beds, food, clothing, school supplies, gifts, mentors, summer camp experiences, tutors and other services.
Most effective for reducing volatility for at-risk kids is preventing a family disruption by reducing risk factors within the family.When that outcome is not available, improving life stability becomes minimizing transitions, or minimizing trauma associated with a transition.The Casey National Alumni Study, “Assessing the Effects of Foster Care,” (2003) reports that having a low number of placements, a short length of stay in care, and no reunification failures reduces estimated negative mental/behavioral health outcomes by 22%, and improves education outcomes for 18% of foster care alumni. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Evaluation:AASW, CEF, and Critical Goods: Social Workers report outcomes of goods received in response to their requests. These are compiled quarterly and entered into a database under the supervision of CCC’s Associate Director. We attribute change, or prevention of loss, to program activities when the requesting Social Worker reports our activities as necessary for the outcome sought.
Measuring changes,Who Is Involved: Associate Director, Program Coordinators, Social Workers

Uses for Evaluation Results:

The combination of output and outcome data give us a picture of how many abused, neglected, and other high stress risk children we are serving in what ways, with what initial results. CCC’s Board and senior staff review these results in light of our strategic plan, the broader and more long-term view of what these clients need to achieve a healthy and fulfilling adulthood, alternative strategies and programs (including prospects for collaboration), and cost-effectiveness.

 

As part of the Results Based Analysis (RBA) service delivery network, we work with the State of Connecticut and our sister child focused community service providers to collaboratively build statistical results.

 

Our annual evaluation results go to the Board of Directors, all staff, and to supporters. A summary form is posted on CCC’s website. It is also available in hard copy for those who need an Annual Report—usually financial supporters. Annual results are available by the end of August each year for the prior fiscal year, ending on June 30th. Board and staff receive quarterly reports of key indicators, during the month after the end of each fiscal quarter.
Description
Critical Goods is our response to the needs of families who are at-risk of losing their children or who are being reunified with their children and must have certain material goods before that can happen: beds, appliances, cribs, and household items.
 
We assist children and youth in their development and growth by helping them overcome the challenges of poverty and emotional distress. Donations of emergency and nonemergency goods are collected and delivered to families in an effort to foster safe and nurturing home environments for the children.
 
During any given fiscal year, we deliver an average of $115,000 worth of usable goods to families in need. On a yearly basis, around 500 children are provided with beds, dressers, a table to eat at or do homework on and other goods that they too often go without.
Population Served / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. To provide furnishings, tangible goods, and services needed:
To support plans to prevent maltreatment of a child when there are risks to home and school stability.
To support plans to transition an abused/neglected child into a more suitable home.
To facilitate a child reuniting with her/his birth family.
To help a young adult transition from foster care to independent living.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Most effective for reducing volatility for at-risk kids is preventing a family disruption by reducing risk factors within the family.When that outcome is not available, improving life stability becomes minimizing transitions, or minimizing trauma associated with a transition.The Casey National Alumni Study, “Assessing the Effects of Foster Care,” (2003) reports that having a low number of placements, a short length of stay in care, and no reunification failures reduces estimated negative mental/behavioral health outcomes by 22%, and improves education outcomes for 18% of foster care alumni.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Social Workers report outcomes of goods received in response to their requests. These are compiled quarterly and entered into a database under the supervision of CCC’s Associate Director. We attribute change, or prevention of loss, to program activities when the requesting Social Worker reports our activities as necessary for the outcome sought.
Measuring changes,Who Is Involved: Associate Director, Program Coordinators, Social Workers

Uses for Evaluation Results:

The combination of output and outcome data give us a picture of how many abused, neglected, and other high stress risk children we are serving in what ways, with what initial results. CCC’s Board and senior staff review these results in light of our strategic plan, the broader and more long-term view of what these clients need to achieve a healthy and fulfilling adulthood, alternative strategies and programs (including prospects for collaboration), and cost-effectiveness.

 

As part of the Results Based Analysis (RBA) service delivery network, we work with the State of Connecticut and our sister child focused community service providers to collaboratively build statistical results.

 

Our annual evaluation results go to the Board of Directors, all staff, and to supporters. A summary form is posted on CCC’s website. It is also available in hard copy for those who need an Annual Report—usually financial supporters. Annual results are available by the end of August each year for the prior fiscal year, ending on June 30th. Board and staff receive quarterly reports of key indicators, during the month after the end of each fiscal quarter.
Description
CCC manages two food pantries, one in collaboration with Asylum Hill Congregational Church (AHCC) which serves Hartford; a second in collaboration with Kensington Congregational Church serving clients in the New Britain area. The program assists Department of Children and Families clients through home delivery of a two week supply of non-perishable foods as well as client selected foods purchased from local grocers.
 
Through these collaborations, every year, an average of 600 children and 250 adults receive emergency food assistance alleviating the serious problem of hunger.
Population Served / /
Description
The Children's Enrichment Fund is a program responding to unusual requests that enhance our efforts to care and nurture children and youth.
 
This program provides a small fund designed to accept donor designated funds for the special needs of children. Social workers can request these funds for the needs of children that are not met by the State Government departments, other agencies, or our AASW Program. Examples are camp experiences, haircuts, lessons, tutoring, special books, or other aids.
Population Served / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Most effective for reducing volatility for at-risk kids is preventing a family disruption by reducing risk factors within the family.When that outcome is not available, improving life stability becomes minimizing transitions, or minimizing trauma associated with a transition.The Casey National Alumni Study, “Assessing the Effects of Foster Care,” (2003) reports that having a low number of placements, a short length of stay in care, and no reunification failures reduces estimated negative mental/behavioral health outcomes by 22%, and improves education outcomes for 18% of foster care alumni.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Social Workers report outcomes of goods received in response to their requests. These are compiled quarterly and entered into a database under the supervision of CCC’s Associate Director. We attribute change, or prevention of loss, to program activities when the requesting Social Worker reports our activities as necessary for the outcome sought.
Measuring changes,Who Is Involved: Associate Director, Program Coordinators, Social Workers

Uses for Evaluation Results:

The combination of output and outcome data give us a picture of how many abused, neglected, and other high stress risk children we are serving in what ways, with what initial results. CCC’s Board and senior staff review these results in light of our strategic plan, the broader and more long-term view of what these clients need to achieve a healthy and fulfilling adulthood, alternative strategies and programs (including prospects for collaboration), and cost-effectiveness.

 

As part of the Results Based Analysis (RBA) service delivery network, we work with the State of Connecticut and our sister child focused community service providers to collaboratively build statistical results.

 

Our annual evaluation results go to the Board of Directors, all staff, and to supporters. A summary form is posted on CCC’s website. It is also available in hard copy for those who need an Annual Report—usually financial supporters. Annual results are available by the end of August each year for the prior fiscal year, ending on June 30th. Board and staff receive quarterly reports of key indicators, during the month after the end of each fiscal quarter.
CEO/Executive Director
Dr. David Santis Ph.D.
Term Start June 2006
Email dsantis@covenanttocare.org
Experience

CCC’s Executive Director has 10 years of non-profit management experience. This experience has included: legislative advocacy, community outreach, and volunteer coordination.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 2500
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 4
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Associate Director
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Quarterly
Collaborations
Bells of Hope
Families in Crisis
Connecticut Department of Corrections
Asylum Hill Congregational Church (Food Pantry)
Waterbury Prevention Board
Governor's Prevention Partnership
National Alliance on Mental Illness
Wheeler Clinic
Connecticut Retired & Senior Volunteer Programs (RSVP)
Faith & Community Organizations that participate in our Adopt A Social Worker Program
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits1987
Board Chair
Susan Lee
Company Affiliation Aetna
Term Aug 2015 to July 2016
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Carol Guardo Retired, College President
Mr. Leigh King Ameriprise
Heidi LaPenta Aetna
Latoya A. Lowery DCF
Marina Luri-Clark Marina Luri Clark Events
Susan Roman Children's Medical Center
Rosalie Simichak DCF
Adam Joshua Tarr
Monica Torpey Aetna
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 8
Board Co-Chair
Latoya Lowery
Company Affiliation DCF
Term Aug 2015 to July 2016
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2015
Fiscal Year End June 30 2016
Projected Revenue $514,390.00
Projected Expenses $514,390.00
Documents
IRS Letter of Exemption
CCC Incorporation
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$716,896$746,158$577,058
Government Contributions$265,089$268,905$268,041
Federal------
State$265,089----
Local------
Unspecified--$268,905$268,041
Individual Contributions$1,519$3,677$3,814
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses$264$332$464
Membership Dues------
Special Events$10,658$7,452$30,337
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$1,011,418$994,307$838,330
Administration Expense$20,090$19,058$28,460
Fundraising Expense$44,186$52,985$51,577
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.920.960.96
Program Expense/Total Expenses94%93%91%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue4%5%6%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$179,365$264,550$236,528
Current Assets$124,988$224,675$205,409
Long-Term Liabilities$63,514$75,000--
Current Liabilities$20,851$13,282$20,434
Total Net Assets$95,000$176,268$216,094
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDCF $265,089DCF $268,905 --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Ameriprise (as fiduciary) $65,691 --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities5.9916.9210.05
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets35%28%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments
This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 1477 Park Street
Suite 2A
Hartford, CT 06106
Primary Phone 860 243-1806
Contact Email info@covenanttocare.org
CEO/Executive Director Dr. David Santis Ph.D.
Board Chair Susan Lee
Board Chair Company Affiliation Aetna

 

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