Southwestern AHEC
5520 Park Avenue
Suite 109
Trumbull CT 06611-3465
Contact Information
Address 5520 Park Avenue
Suite 109
Trumbull, CT 06611-3465
Telephone (203) 372-5503 x14
Fax 203-372-5504
E-mail mferraro@swctahec.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

Southwestern AHEC's mission is "Opening doors to better health in underserved populations through education, careers and outreach.” 

We do this by “Connecting Students to Careers, Professionals to Communities, and Communities to Better Health.”  

Our programs focus on:

  • Connecting Communities to Health Insurance -  Southwestern AHEC is the Navigator for Fairfield County as designated by Access Health CT and the Office of Healthcare Advocate. Our key role is to coordinate the community outreach effort in helping educate, engage and enroll consumers in healthcare coverage. We work closely with the Assisters in providing education and resources.
  • Community Health Workers (CHW)– We are overseeing a statewide task force to create the definition, roles, scope of work, training, and business case for CHWs in CT in order to create a sustainable CHW workforce in CT. The CT AHEC Network provides training and education for CHWs.
  • Health Careers Diversity – Building a diverse healthcare workforce by engaging kids K- 16 in learning about health careers and the health care field.
  • Children's Immunizations – Working to achieve a 90% and above level of immunization in children ages 0-2 years in the Bridgeport community,
  • Connecting Oral Health and Medical Health – to identify ways to improve overall health by educating providers, consumers and communities about how the oral health links to general health.

Our success is built on building relationships and working to highlight our strengths and, the strengths of our community partners.  Our impact is stronger when we link our programs to complement others in the community. 

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2003
Former Names
Southwestern AHEC at Sacred Heart University
Southwestern AHEC at Housatonic Community College
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Meredith C Ferraro
Board Chair Mr. Charles Meyrick MBA
Board Chair Company Affiliation Housatonic Community College
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $458,400.00
Projected Expenses $458,400.00
Statements
Mission

Southwestern AHEC's mission is "Opening doors to better health in underserved populations through education, careers and outreach.” 

We do this by “Connecting Students to Careers, Professionals to Communities, and Communities to Better Health.”  

Our programs focus on:

  • Connecting Communities to Health Insurance -  Southwestern AHEC is the Navigator for Fairfield County as designated by Access Health CT and the Office of Healthcare Advocate. Our key role is to coordinate the community outreach effort in helping educate, engage and enroll consumers in healthcare coverage. We work closely with the Assisters in providing education and resources.
  • Community Health Workers (CHW)– We are overseeing a statewide task force to create the definition, roles, scope of work, training, and business case for CHWs in CT in order to create a sustainable CHW workforce in CT. The CT AHEC Network provides training and education for CHWs.
  • Health Careers Diversity – Building a diverse healthcare workforce by engaging kids K- 16 in learning about health careers and the health care field.
  • Children's Immunizations – Working to achieve a 90% and above level of immunization in children ages 0-2 years in the Bridgeport community,
  • Connecting Oral Health and Medical Health – to identify ways to improve overall health by educating providers, consumers and communities about how the oral health links to general health.

Our success is built on building relationships and working to highlight our strengths and, the strengths of our community partners.  Our impact is stronger when we link our programs to complement others in the community. 

Background

The Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) program was developed by Congress in 1971 to inspire, train, recruit and retain a health professions workforce committed to underserved populations. AHECs help bring the resources of academic medicine to bear in addressing local community health needs. By their structure, AHECs respond in a flexible and creative manner for adapting national health initiatives to particular needs of the nation’s most vulnerable communities.  Most AHEC programs receive both state and federal funding. Today, 54 AHEC programs with more than 250 centers operate in almost every state, the District of Columbia, Guam and Micronesia. Approximately 120 medical schools and 600 nursing and allied health schools work collaboratively with AHECs to improve health for underserved and under-represented populations.

An imbalance in the quality of and access to health and health care across racial, ethnic and socioeconomic groups are reflected in racial and ethnic disparities in health status and the under-representation of minority and disadvantaged individuals in the health workforce. AHEC programs play a key role in correcting these inequities and strengthening the nation’s health care safety net. Through community-based training programs, AHECs inspire, train, recruit and retain a diverse and broad range of health care professionals to practice in communities who need them most.   

The Connecticut AHEC Program was established in 1995 by the Connecticut General Assembly, and received its initial federal funding from Human Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) in 1997. Southwestern AHEC was established in 1998 as a center to serve southern Fairfield and New Haven counties at Housatonic Community College.  In 2002, Southwestern AHEC moved to Sacred Heart University for the purpose of seeking other funding sources, and to become a 501(c)(3), tax-exempt organization.  In January of 2006 Southwestern AHEC, Inc. left Sacred Heart to reconfigure and implement its 501(c)(3) status.   We have been operating successfully for 7 years!

Impact

Local Young Woman Awarded Prestigious National Health Service Corps Scholarship!

Anita Jones, a native of Bridgeport, CT, just began her medical school career at Howard University in Washington, D.C. Like all medical students, Anita will be laboring under the heavy burden of rigorous classes and clinical training. But unlike most medical students, Anita will not be burdened with of the high cost of this training.

In July 2013 Anita learned she had been awarded a full scholarship from the National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program (NHSC SP). The NHSC SP supports students in training to become primary care medical doctors, doctors of osteopathy, dentists, nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives and physician assistants. In return, the students make a commitment to provide health care to communities in need, upon graduation and the completion of their training.

Anita dreamed of becoming a doctor for years.  Leading up to medical school she has participated with CT Area Health Education Center (AHEC) Program.  AHECs encourage young people to pursue careers in health, and to serve in medically underserved urban and rural areas. At Harding High School in Bridgeport, Anita was in the Medical Magnet program, and participated in the after-school Health Occupations Students of America  (HOSA) Club, begun by Southwestern AHEC.  She participated in Harding’s Saturday Academy, where high school students were paired with college undergraduates (engaged by Southwestern AHEC) who were enrolled in health careers programs. Through these programs, Anita was exposed to a wide range of health professionals, and acquired specific skills such as CPR, medical vocabulary, problem solving, leadership and presentation skills.

At the University of CT, Anita joined the Collegiate Health Service Corps (CHSC), another CT AHEC program. She also participated in U Conn’s Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP), Through these programs, Anita provided many hours of community service at migrant farm workers clinics, and soup kitchens.

Her most recent connection with CT AHEC happened while visiting a medical office building in Trumbull, and found Southwestern AHEC’s name on the building directory. She knocked on the door, and offered to volunteer with AHEC. This led to 3 years of mutually-beneficial partnership, in which Anita helped Southwestern AHEC with a Bassick High School service project on premature births, the delivery of AHEC’s Youth Health Service Corps program at New Vision International Ministries, and a summer camp for teens on the personal and environmental hazards of tobacco use. She also volunteered many hours in the office to support AHEC’s many programs in the local schools and communities.  She attributes her many experiences with AHEC as a foundation for entry into Howard Medical School, and for being awarded the prestigious NHSC SP award for the next 4 years.   

 

Our 2013-14 goals are to:  

  1. Obtain statewide policy support for Community Health Workers as a sustainable public health workforce, which impacts improvement in health outcomes and in the efficacy of health care delivery. 
  2. As the Navigator for Fairfield County, provide education and coordination in working with Assisters, CACs and Brokers to engage 3000 residents in discussions about the ACA, and enroll 1000.
  3. Successfully engage 100 high school students in the Youth Health Service Corps, and 40 college students in the Collegiate Health Service Corps, tracking them into health careers. 
  4. Expand and restore our fiscal base by obtaining new funding streams through grants, contracts, fee for service, and overall fund development.
 
Needs

Southwestern AHEC's most pressing needs are to gaining new funding streams to enhance and maintain programs.  This includes:  
1.  Obtain funding to support administrative and/or secretarial support. $20K (Part Time)

2.  Identifying new, expanded space.  $25 – 32K per year.

3.  Update and complete Salesforce data infrastructure by training staff, uploading data and implementing its use for grant tracking and evaluation.  $10K

4.  Develop Community Health Worker state infrastructure and policy recommendations and develop training and credentialing process for implementing the best practices of CHWs.  $50K
5.  Funding of $28K to support personnel to do the Dental Care Coordination for the special needs, elderly, and immune-compromised clients.  

6.  Volunteers with experience for initiating a Development program.  Funds and private donations are needed to build a base of fiscal support so as not to rely so entirely on grants and soft money.  This is a priority, yet time constraints on staff and current Board members have left limited resources to get it done. 

CEO Statement

Since its inception in 1998, Southwestern AHEC has grown to be a leader in providing students about the health careers.  Our Health Occupations and Techology (H.O.T.) Guide has over 80 health careers that are offered by educational programs and institutions in Connecticut.  It is available online at www.healthcareersinct.com.  Working with underserved, first generation potential college students has provided us with insight into ways to assist these students in becoming a future health care worker.  This year will be the 4th year of implementing a Mentoring program utilizing college students in health professions training programs to mentor our high school students who are participating in our health careers and Youth Health Service Corps (YHSC) program.  The college students serve as a peer model, and work together with the high school students in completing service learning projects to benefit the local communities and their health.  

 

In our experience in working with youth, it is apparent that cultural sensitivity and awareness needs to be introduced to students in middle and high school - so, that they will have a better understanding of themselves and appreciate others for their similarities and differences.  This year we are planning to pilot a program to train the CHSC students in cultural diversity, and train them as trainers to train the younger students - middle and high schoolers.  We are hoping to measure a difference in all of the students who receive the cultural sensitivity training.

 

Southwestern AHEC prides itself in being able to broker, and act as a neutral party to bring various parties together about issues that they have in common.  We have been successful in running the ORBIT (Oral Health-Bridgeport) collaborative for 12 years.  This collaborative meets to share knowledge and experiences, and funding, to promote access to oral health care for the residents of Bridgeport and Stratford.  Our success with our oral health programs and partnerships provides us with the ability to participate on state level programs and partnerships.  We are pleased to serve as the Co-Vice Chair of CT’s Coalition for Oral Health.  

 

We look forward to serving as the Navigator for Access Health CT, and look forward to 100K more CT residents having health insurance ext year. We seek, each day, to meet the challenges of enhancing access to quality healthcare in Southwestern CT, via education, workforce development and community collaborations. 

Board Chair Statement

This year Southwestern AHEC is celebrating the expansion of our programs for each of our focus areas: Connecting Students to Careers,
Professionals to Communities,
and Communities to Better
Health
.  Our outreach and educational programs now extend from Bridgeport into each end of our service region: Stamford, Norwalk and New Haven. Southwestern AHEC is making an impact in our communities by building a more diverse future health care workforce, contributing educational programs for healthier communities, and improving access to quality health care.

We are very proud to say that our success is built on strong collaborative partnerships that enhance our commitment to improving the health of our communities.  As our relationships grow and flourish, we look forward to the future knowing that our vision, commitment and concern will continue to impact lives and bring positive change to our underserved
communities in southwestern Connecticut.
 
The Board of Directors and Staff of Southwestern AHEC, Inc. are excited about our future, and thank you for all of your support.

Cordially,
Charles Meyrick, MBA, President
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Health Care / Health Support
Secondary Organization Category Education / Secondary & High Schools
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services / Human Services
Areas Served
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
West Haven
Woodbridge
Southwestern AHEC's region extends from Greenwich to Madison, including southern Fairfield and New Haven counties.  The towns and cities outside of greater New Haven include Greenwich, Stamford, Darien, New Canaan, Norwalk, Wilton, Ridgefield, Redding, Weston, Easton, Westport, Fairfield, Bridgeport, Stratford, Trumbull and Monroe.  Although much of the region is affluent, many of Connecticut's neediest residents reside in the urban areas, and are able to have access to our programs.
Programs
Description
The ORBIT Collaborative was created in 1999 with the mission to increase access to quality and affordable dental services for vulnerable populations in Bridgeport and Stratford.  ORBIT’s members are: Optimus Health Care, Southwest Community Health Center, Fones School of Dental Hygiene at the University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport Department of Social Services and WIC Program, Stratford Health Department, Connecticut Dental Health Partnership, The Bridgeport Dental Association (BDA), Action for Bridgeport Community Development (ABCD) Head Start Program.  Southwestern AHEC is the facilitator for ORBIT.  ORBIT was funded by the Connecticut Health Foundation from 2002 - 2010.   The overall program goal is to ensure that children secure primary & specialty dental services, utilizing: care coordination, pro bono services of local dentists in providing care to uninsured children for Give Kids A Smile, providing community-wide oral health promotion programming, and integration of services of the ORBIT members.  Southwestern AHEC also participates on CT's Coalition for Oral Health Planning.  In 2010-11 we implemented the Every Smile Counts basic sceening survey of over 10,000 Kindergarten, 3rd Grade and Head Start Children to get data on the incidence of caries and BMI measurements under contract from the State Department of Public Health.
The ORBIT group is currently working on a Pregnancy and Oral Health grant from the CT Health Foundation to develop a system for low income pregnant women to learn about the importance of oral health for both them an their unborn child.  This project is also working to educate Healthy Start, WIC staff, Community Health Center OB-GYNs and Dentists about the importance of identifying a dental home for mother and baby, and having them obtain a dental home.
At this time, there is no funding for the project, which requires approximately .5 FTE and administrative costs.  This includes grant writing and data collection from partners.
Population Served At-Risk Populations / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The deliverables for the Pregnancy and Oral Health project are currently being defined by the partners, and will be submitted by the middle of November 2011.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Program success is measured by the fact that ORBIT is still meeting and responding to the needs of the community. 
Description
Our Health Careers programs seek to recruit a more diverse future healthcare workforce, for long term improved access to health care, reducing health disparities, and recruit/retain health care professionals serving underserved and vulnerable communities. Programs include:
  • Youth Health Service Corps (high school) - Service Learning
  • Collegiate Health Service Corps (college) - Service Learning
  • Is a Health Career for You?  K-12 hands on activities with guest speakers and health topics; Gear Up, Goodwill
  • Health Profession Student E-Mentoring with High School Medical Careers students. 
  • "Investigations in Health Careers" course instructor at Housatonic Community College.  It is a College Credit Pathway Course for Central HS in Bridgeport.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Students create a service learning project on a health topic for a specific topic.  They complete research, are exposed to health careers professionals who do work related to the health topic, and present to a group of children, peers, adults, senior citizens, etc.  The model for the service learning projects are based on the Five Stages of Service Learning (IPARD/C):
Investigation, Preparation, Action, Reflection, Demonstration and Celebration.  This allows for students to reflect on personal growth as it applies to providing service to the community.   The curriculum and service learning projects also incorporate the National Health Care Skills Standards (NHCSS), and the 21st Century Skills which are reinforced as the students complete the service learning projects.  80% of the students who begin the service learning projects will demonstrate personal growth and achievement, and successful us of the applying the NHCSS and 21st Century Skills in preparation for a future career in the health field.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long term success is monitored by program participants entering a health professions program, and, eventually working in health care.
Description

The goal of the IAP Program is to increase children’s immunization levels, with a focus on 0-2 year olds. Key activities of the IAP Program are:

  • Improve vaccine delivery to participating pediatric offices
  • Track individual children’s vaccination histories, using CIRTS (Connecticut Immunization Registry and Tracking System)
  • Locate children “lost” to tracking, through collaborative efforts with community partners
  • Conduct community outreach to targeted parents and pregnant women
  • Provide education and assessment opportunities to participating pediatric offices
  • Conduct promotional campaigns during national immunization recognition week and month

Significant Achievements:

  • The Bridgeport immunization rate has increased from 65% in 2006 to 78% in 2011.  The efficacy rate of finding children who have not received their vaccinations is 96%.
  • Southwestern AHEC hosts a Bridgeport Immunization Advisory Council to provide vaccine updates and share best practices among pediatric and family practices.
  • Staff created “CIRTS BINGO” for use as a training tool for local parents and community service agency staff.  Since 2008 and 2009, more than 400 parents have learned about the CT vaccine registry through this fun and informative tool.
  • Outreach is conducted each year at numerous community health fairs, schools, social service agencies and faith-based organizations, reaching hundreds of parents with information about preventable disease, immunizations and the CIRTS program.
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / At-Risk Populations / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. All children will receive their immunizations and will receive them in a timely manner.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Pediatric Providers participating in VFC program; Number of children who are up to date with their vaccines, and an improved overall immunization rate for Bridgeport.
Description
The goal of the Community Health Program (CHW) developed by the Southwestern AHEC is provide training, education and support for the development of a CHW network in CT.  This CHW Network will assist CHWs be become recognized as vital workforce for improving access to quality health care for linking vulnerable and at-risk populations to accessing health care resources in Connecticut.
 
The research phase of this project is currently taking place.  Individuals and community agencies are being identified, and contacted regarding their interest.  A needs assessment will be completed for employers and CHWs. Data will be utilized to develop the next steps in moving this project forward.  A public health conference is a possibility to bring other states and CHW networks together to share best practices.  The potential for the CHW field is enormous as research shows they improve the integration of service delivery, and contribute to reducing health disparities.
 
Population Served At-Risk Populations / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Community Health Workers will be recognized as having a vital role in health delivery by every type of health and human service setting, including hospitals, health departments, clinics, human service organizations, church-based organizations, ethnic organizations, and groups which promote the interests of special populations such as pregnant women and children, or those at risk for HIV/AIDS.  CHW's and employers will recognize the importance of training and mastering outreach competencies.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Community Health Workers will have a statewide Network that serves as their professional organization.  CHW's will be recognized and paid for their services in the health insurance/delivery system. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Benchmarks such as agencies and CHW's signing on to work groups, participating in the needs assessment, identifying their own best practices.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. CHW's will be recognized under the one name of "Community Health Workers".
Program Comments
CEO Comments Southwestern AHEC's programs are tailored to meet our mission by "Connecting Students to Careers, Professionals to Communities, and Communities to Better Health."  Every program includes each of the three areas of the mission.
CEO/Executive Director
Mrs. Meredith C Ferraro
Term Start Sept 1998
Email mferraro@swctahec.org
Experience
2006 ~ Present          Executive Director, Southwestern Area Health Education Center (AHEC), Inc.
 
2002 ~ 2005             Executive Director, Southwestern Area Health Education Center (AHEC), Sacred Heart University

1998 ~ 2002             Executive Director, Southwestern Area Health Education Center (AHEC), Housatonic Community College

1994 ~ 1998             Assistant Professor and ACCE, Physical Therapist Assistant Program, Housatonic Community College

1992 ~ 1997             Hand Therapist, per diem, Riverview Sports Medicine and Physical Therapy, HealthSouth, Advantage Health Hand and Arthritis Therapy Center, Stewart Hand Therapy, Greenwich Hand Therapy

1994 ~ 1995             Physical Therapist, per diem. United Home Care

1989 ~ 1992             Private Practice. Meredith C. Ferraro, MS, PT. Upper Extremity and Hand Rehabilitation, Stony Brook, NY                               

1989 ~ 1991             Adjunct Assistant Professor. Touro College, Physical Therapy Program

1987 ~ 1988             Acting Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education, Touro College, Physical                                            Therapy Program

1985 ~ 1987             Clinical Assistant Professor, SUNY Stony Brook, SUNY Buffalo, P.T. Program.

1979 ~ 1987             Senior Physical Therapist, University Hospital, SUNY, Stony Brook, NY   11794. Established Hand Therapy services; developed Clinical Education program for PT students in the Hand Therapy specialty.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 3
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director of Programs
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
Southwestern AHEC's many collaborative partners:
Access Health CT
Aging With Grace Program
Alpha Community Services
AmeriChoice
Bassick High School, Bridgeport
Beat the Street
Bridgeport Child Advocacy Coalition
Bridgeport Dental Association
Bunnell High School, Stratford
Center for Women & Families of Eastern Fairfield County
Central CT Coast YMCA
Central High School, Bridgeport
City of Bridgeport Health & Social Services
Community Health Network
Connecticut Oral Health Initiative
CT Dental Health Partnership
CT State Department of Public Health
CT State Department of Social Services
Fairfield County Environmental Justice Network
Fairfield County Medical Association
Fairfield University
Flood Middle School
Fones School of Dental Hygiene, University of Bridgeport
Gear Up
GlaxoSmithKline
Greater Bridgeport Latino Network
Greater Bridgeport Medical Association
Hall Neighborhood House
Harding High School, Bridgeport
Health Neighbors Program
Hill Regional Career High School
Housatonic Community College
Lukemia/Lymphoma Society
Martha’s Place
MedImmune
Merck Vaccines
Muhammad Islamic Center
Multicultural Health Partnership
New Haven Home Recovery
Office of Healthcare Advocate
Pfizer Vaccines
Public Allies
Quinnipiac University
Sacred Heart University
sanofi pasteur
Sickle Cell Association of Southern CT
Southern Connecticut State University Wellness Center
St. Anne’s Soup Kitchen
St. Vincent’s Medical Center
Stratford Garbage Museum
Stratford Health Department
Stratford High School, Stratford
Stepping Stone Transitional Housing Program, Christian Community Action
The Connection Inc.
The Mentoring Institute of Coastal Fairfield County
The Workplace
Town of Stratford Beautification Committee
United Way of Coastal Fairfield County
University of Bridgeport
Upward Bound
Vitas Hospice
West Haven VA Hospital
WiMentor
Women Infants & Children Program
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits2006
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Outstanding Leadership AwardConnecticut's Coalition for Oral Health Plan2007
Most Improved Immunization ProgramState of Connecticut Dept. of Public Health Immunization Program2010
Community Partner AwardCoonecticut State Dental Association2011
Courageous Community Leadership ProgramWm. Caspar Graustein Foundation2013
Comments
CEO Comments The last three years have been challenging with finances, yet we have been able to downsize and become more efficient.  With strong, committed staff, we are able to continue to work hard, and achieve good outcomes.  We have been able to pursue our dreams with Community Health Worker programming, which has provided the agency with more visabibility.  We are also dedicated to health reform and serving as the Navigator for Fairfield county.  We look forward to future opportunities and growth.
Board Chair
Mr. Charles Meyrick MBA
Company Affiliation Housatonic Community College
Term Jan 2012 to Jan 2014
Email meyrick@optonline.net
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Dr. Jennifer Brett ND, LAcUniversity of Bridgeport
Dr. Marilyn Camacho Bassick High School
Diane Christiano Stratfod Public Schools
Michael Mandel MBAHousatonic Community College
Erin McDermott Habitat for Humanity
John McNab MHS, PA-CHartford Hospital
Michael Simko Esq.V. Michael Simko Law, LLC
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 4
Board Co-Chair
Mr. Mike Simko Esq.
Company Affiliation Mike Simko Law
Term Jan 2012 to Jan 2014
Email VeeMike@MikeSimkoLaw.com
Standing Committees
Audit
By-laws
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Nominating
CEO Comments
Southwestern AHEC's Board of Directors completed the Executive Retreat on November 20, 2011.   A substantial amount of work was accomplished, resulting in a Board Action Plan with specific goals and strategies, focusing on Board development and function.  In the last year, 2012-13, the Board has develop and updated the agency's mission, and is beginning to update the strategic plan.   
 
Funding in this climate continues to be a challenge that Southwestern AHEC.  
  The fund support for our oral health programming ended at the beginning of the year.  Despite major efforts to replace the funding with grant applications, and our first fund-raising event, the necessary funds to keep the program functioning at a high level requires staffing.   This funding loss has affected our operating costs, with a significant decrease in the 2011-12 fiscal year budget.  The organization has downsized to three full time staff members.  Administrative/office work now takes a significant portion of the Executive Director's time.  Yet, this provides the opportunity for basic operational review and restructuring.  For example, dollars can be saved by bringing the bookkeeping function in-house, when is it currently fully outsourced.  We are also reorganizing the office, and the staff's job responsibilities are more streamlined and efficient.  This downsizing has afforded us the opportunity to review, reflect, rebuild and reinforce our strategic direction. 
 
This funding challenge fits directly into the Board's Action Plan from the retreat with the work focusing on:  Fund Development and Organizational Sustainability, continual Board Development, and overall Organizational Development.  Opportunity knocks!

 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01 2013
Fiscal Year End Sept 30 2014
Projected Revenue $458,400.00
Projected Expenses $458,400.00
Spending Policy N/A
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201220112010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$7,300$20,099$33,475
Government Contributions$380,961$508,557$614,127
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$380,961$508,557$614,127
Individual Contributions------
------
$25,328$14,106$35,340
Investment Income, Net of Losses------
Membership Dues------
Special Events----$3,635
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$91$507$913
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Program Expense$262,901$399,064$499,481
Administration Expense$108,385$142,791$91,277
Fundraising Expense$25,932$25,731$46,523
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.040.961.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses66%70%78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue7%5%7%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Total Assets$438,429$422,889$463,147
Current Assets$416,477$393,107$421,518
Long-Term Liabilities$283,628$280,779$274,637
Current Liabilities$44,982$48,753$70,836
Total Net Assets$109,819$93,357$117,674
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201220112010
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountAHEC UCHC State of CT $195,846AHEC UCHC State of CT $190,846AHEC UCHC State of CT $198,233
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDPH $80,800DPH $80,800DPH $80,800
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountAHEC UCHC Federal $79,414AHEC UCHC Federal $79,212AHEC UCHC Federal $76,825
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities9.268.065.95
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets65%66%59%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
The last few years have been challenging with downsizing, yet have been rewarding as well.  We have been forced to be more targeted and efficient in our work, and achievements have continued with being able to balance the budget.  We look forward to slow expansion and continued fiscal success.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 5520 Park Avenue
Suite 109
Trumbull, CT 066113465
Primary Phone 203 372-5503 14
Contact Email mferraro@swctahec.org
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Meredith C Ferraro
Board Chair Mr. Charles Meyrick MBA
Board Chair Company Affiliation Housatonic Community College

 

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