The Connection
100 Roscommon Drive
Suite 203
Middletown CT 06457
Contact Information
Address 100 Roscommon Drive
Suite 203
Middletown, CT 06457-
Telephone (860) 343-5500 x
Fax 860-343-5517
E-mail cbien@theconnectioninc.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The Connection's mission is Building Safe, Healthy, Caring Communities and Inspiring People to Reach Their Full Potential as Productive and Valued Citizens.

We carry out our mission by providing programs in three primary service areas: Behavioral Health, Family Support Services, and Community Justice.  Each month 7,000 Connecticut residents are assisted through The Connection.  Our services increase the health and wellness of our clients and our communities, as well as save valuable taxpayer dollars. 

The Connection was one of Connecticut's first agencies to initiate community-based treatment programs.  We have found repeatedly, and research has shown, that services provided in the community are especially effective – helping the person or family in need, as well as contributing to the well-being of the community.  We strive to offer the community a chance to recognize the power and benefits of caring for people and supporting their ability to grow. 

We embrace the “housing first” model of care, based on the concept that a homeless individual or household's first and primary need is to obtain stable housing, and that other issues that may affect the household can and should be addressed once housing is obtained. Our efforts with clients in every program area are focused on securing stable housing and acquiring the entitlements; skills; and educational, vocational, and community supports needed to maintain that housing.

 A central element of the programs and services we provide is securing safe, affordable housing that is of a standard we would expect for anyone in our family. The “bricks and mortar” component of The Connection, The Connection Fund, was incorporated in 1989 by the Board of Directors of The Connection, Inc., to develop affordable housing and community facilities.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1972
Former Names
Cornerstone
Alcohol Services Organization of South Central Connecticut (ALSO)
ALSO-Cornerstone
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Lisa Dematteis-Lepore
Board Chair Professor Gloster Aaron
Board Chair Company Affiliation Faculty, Wesleyan University
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $46,561,390.00
Projected Expenses $46,985,857.00
Statements
Mission

The Connection's mission is Building Safe, Healthy, Caring Communities and Inspiring People to Reach Their Full Potential as Productive and Valued Citizens.

We carry out our mission by providing programs in three primary service areas: Behavioral Health, Family Support Services, and Community Justice.  Each month 7,000 Connecticut residents are assisted through The Connection.  Our services increase the health and wellness of our clients and our communities, as well as save valuable taxpayer dollars. 

The Connection was one of Connecticut's first agencies to initiate community-based treatment programs.  We have found repeatedly, and research has shown, that services provided in the community are especially effective – helping the person or family in need, as well as contributing to the well-being of the community.  We strive to offer the community a chance to recognize the power and benefits of caring for people and supporting their ability to grow. 

We embrace the “housing first” model of care, based on the concept that a homeless individual or household's first and primary need is to obtain stable housing, and that other issues that may affect the household can and should be addressed once housing is obtained. Our efforts with clients in every program area are focused on securing stable housing and acquiring the entitlements; skills; and educational, vocational, and community supports needed to maintain that housing.

 A central element of the programs and services we provide is securing safe, affordable housing that is of a standard we would expect for anyone in our family. The “bricks and mortar” component of The Connection, The Connection Fund, was incorporated in 1989 by the Board of Directors of The Connection, Inc., to develop affordable housing and community facilities.

Background
The Connection, Inc. has been serving the Greater New Haven community since 1968, when the Cornerstone Group Home, a halfway house for people discharged from psychiatric hospitals, opened its doors under the auspices of the former ALSO-Cornerstone, Inc. ALSO-Cornerstone merged with The Connection (TCI) in January 2010.TCI was formed in Middletown in 1972 as a response to the devastation being wrought on families by the problems of abuse, neglect, addiction, and crime. Since its beginnings in New Haven and Middletown, TCI has been a leader in creating community-based treatment programs. The agency has grown dramatically over the years, now totaling 36 programs in 50 locations statewide, providing services in the areas of Family Support Services, Behavioral Health and Community Justice. Many of our programs have been the first of their kind in the state. These include Supportive Housing for Families®, a unique child welfare preservation and reunification program that stabilizes families and reunites children with their parents; the Ruoppolo Manor Supportive Housing Program, a partnership with the Housing Authority of New Haven that has become a national model for public/private partnerships; and the Center for the Treatment of Problem Sexual Behavior, a nationally-recognized program that promotes public safety by treating sex offenders. We have a strong history of working in partnership with funding sources, including the Dept. of Children and Families, Court Support Services District, Dept. of Correction, and Dept. of Mental Health and Addiction Services. We partner with many agencies, including Columbus House, Hill Health Corp., Fellowship Place, Conn. Mental Health Center. TCI's diverse programs allow the agency to provide a continuum of care for our clients as they move toward stability, independence and recovery. 
The Connection's New Haven-based programs include Supportive Housing for Families, Elm City Women and Children's Program, Dwight House, Recovery House, Pendleton House, Park Street Residence, Park Street Inn, Norton Court, Ruoppolo Manor, Robert T. Wolfe Apartments, West Village, CREST, SIERRA Center, REACH (Re-Entry Assisted Community Housing), Roger Sherman House and the Outreach & Engagement Project. We also provide two Outpatient Clinics, Community based youth drug and violence prevention programs, and Pretrial Education (Driving While Intoxicated) classes at eight locations including New Haven, Branford, Milford, and Ansonia.
Impact
1. Awarded up to $2.75 million to assist in the rehabilitation and conversion of the historic St. Mary Star of the Sea elementary school  into 20 units of affordable rental housing. Some units will be set aside for chronically homeless individuals, including veterans.
2. Received $908,851 in 2016 funding from the State of Connecticut's Nonprofit Grant Program, to support upgrades to The Connection's 48 Howe Street, New Haven, property and to upgrade telephone and Information Technology systemsthroughout the state.
3. Received $294,680 grant in 2016 from the Federal Bureau of Justice Assistance to implement a peer mentoring program in the REACH (Re-Entry Assisted Community Housing) program. This program seeks to establish the efficacy of peer supports in helping former inmates transition successfully back into the community.
4. Established partnership in 2015 with Bridgeport Neighborhood Trust to provide case management services at the Milestone Apartments, opened doors in 2016 to a 30-unit permanent supportive housing complex that gives priority to veterans.
5. Received re-accreditation from the Council on Accreditation, an independent, not-for-profit organization that partners with human service organizations worldwide to improve service delivery outcomes by developing, applying, and promoting appropriate best practice standards.

Top Goals:

1. To be a major shaper of effective state and national public policy by linking research, practice and advocacy.
2.  To ensure our capacity to choose the direction, depth and character of our organization; securing our ability to flexibly serve our clients and our communities, by strengthening our financial position through the growth of unrestricted income streams and reserves. 
3.  To change the view of what the ideal composition and functions of a great nonprofit community resource should be, by operating as an integrated continuum of practitioners, advocates, researchers and trainers.  
Needs
The Connection's top five most pressing needs include:
 

1. Diversify funding to help maintain the quality of our programs and services in the face of the current economic conditions.


2. Expansion of Entrepreneurial services – Peer, vocational, expanded food services to assist clients with community re-entry

3. Balanced/strategic growth

4. Respond effectively to Health Care Reform by positioning The Connection as the preferred provider for both behavioral and (eventually physical health) care needs for our clients and their families.

5. Increase agency's system infrastructure through the purchase of updated information technology and services.

CEO Statement
The Connection was formed in 1972 as a community response to the devastation being wrought on families by the problems of abuse, neglect, addiction, and crime. Beginning with our flagship program, Connection House, a residential substance abuse treatment program located in Middletown, The Connection has been a leader in creating community-based treatment programs. We have found that services provided in the community are very effective, helping both the person in need and contributing to the well-being of the entire community. While the agency has grown dramatically – now totaling 36 programs in 50 locations across the state, providing services in the areas of Family Support Services, Behavioral Health and Community Justice – each of our programs must pass this simple test: it must cost the taxpayer less than if the government provided the service, or cost society more if the service were not provided at all. We have a strong history of working in partnership with our state and federal funding sources and collaborate with other providers across the state to meet the important needs of individuals in our communities.

We are proud of our long history of innovation. Many of our programs have been the first of their kind in the state. Examples are Liberty Commons, the first supportive housing program in Connecticut, which just celebrated its 20th anniversary; our Center for the Treatment of Problem Sexual Behavior, a nationally-recognized program that promotes public safety by treating sex offenders; and Supportive Housing for Families®, a unique family reunification program. The Connection's Intensive Supportive Housing for Families (ISHF) program, which is modeled on the SHF® program, is a 5-year initiative to develop, implement, and study the effectiveness of a supportive housing program for families who come to the attention of the child welfare system and present with severe housing issues and high service needs. And our Institute for Innovative Practice®, The Connection’s research arm, that works with several universities to conduct research that improves client outcomes and informs best practices.

Board Chair Statement

It has been an honor and privilege to serve on The Connection Board since 2008. During this time I have watched it grow a single program established for adults struggling to overcome addictions to a $44 million agency that provides programs in three distinct program areas: Family Support Services, Behavioral Health, and Community Justice. From our beginnings, The Connection’s vision has been to be the best possible provider of services to vulnerable populations in each of our service areas. Through the years we have diversified our program areas and funding sources to ensure our ability to meet the complex service needs of our state. Today we are funded by five State agencies: The Department of Children and Families, Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Department of Correction, Court Support Services Division, and the Department of Social Services; three Federal agencies: Housing and Urban Development, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and Administration for Children and Families; and many private funders including the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven and the United Way.


 


This diversity in programming and funding has provided stability and opportunity and has made it possible for us to launch The Connection Institute for Innovative Practice, which offers collaborative research, advocacy and smart public policy for vulnerable populations, along with training in best practices and non-profit development.  The Institute  collaborates with leading universities including Wesleyan University, University of New Haven, Yale Program on Recovery and Community Health, Central Connecticut State University, and the University of Connecticut to implement research practices that guide the quality of our services.


 


Challenges we face include hiring and keeping highly qualified staff and the move toward fee for service funding strategies which not only require more data but also require higher levels of training and expertise among staff. Ensuring that our many facilities are of a standard that we would expect for anyone in our family poses a considerable challenge in the face of rising costs and flat funding.


 


High unemployment rates pose a considerable challenge for many our clients because maintaining stable employment is a critical component of their recovery and community reintegration. When our clients are discharged from our programs without stable employment, their risk for relapse and recidivism skyrockets.  Thus, our agency makes a strong effort to develop relationships with businesses and find jobs for our clients.


 


Moving forward we will continue to seek to broaden our funding base by identifying underserved populations and areas of critical need and seeking to become the best, most innovative provider of services in these identified areas. We will also continue to seek to diversify our funding base through private fundraising from individuals, corporations, and foundations, as well as through state and federal governments and through national grant making organizations.  Going forward with these funds we will, as always, seek to contain costs wherever possible while increasing the breadth and quality of our services.


Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Homeless Services/Centers
Secondary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Substance Abuse Dependency, Prevention & Treatment
Tertiary Organization Category Housing, Shelter / Housing Development, Construction & Management
Areas Served
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
The Connection serves more than 4,000 individuals and families in Greater New Haven each year through 25 residential, supportive housing, and outpatient programs. Corporate offices are located in Middletown and services are in an additional 25 residential and outpatient sites in communities throughout the State, including Bridgeport, Hartford, New London, Middletown, Danbury, Torrington, Waterbury, Groton, Norwich and Willimantic. Statewide we serve more than 7,000 individuals each month.
Programs
Description

Park Street Inn (PSI), is a 15-bed Residential Living Center designed to meet the needs of adult individuals who have histories of multiple or prolonged hospitalizations due to mental illness, and who face complex challenges that complicate their recovery. PSI is operational 7 days a week, 24 hours per day, with a staff to resident ratio of 1 to 8. PSI is an innovative, multidisciplinary collaboration between The Connection, Fellowship Place, Yale Program For Recovery and Community Health, and Hill Health Corporation.  The program provides a therapeutic, homelike atmosphere, where residents can safely address their individual needs.  Through a high-structure, low demand community setting, the PSI program provides residents with a period of transition designed to assist them in gaining the skills they need to live more independently in the community.

 

Population Served Homeless / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities / Other Health/Disability
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Remaining within the program and out of the hospital; interacting well with peers and staff, making progress with established goals; progressing in work toward educational/vocational goals; engaging in job search
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The Park Street Inn program is designed to meet the needs of persons who require a high level of support to assist them in developing fundamental skills that will allow them to return to their community of origin or community of choice. Education of the resident is an integral part of helping them learn the skills necessary to maintain independence in the community.  PSI focuses on those skills that a person would use in their daily activities to live and function independently. A number of PSI program graduates, previously institutionalized for decades, have been living independently in the community for several years. Clinical and psychiatric services are provided on-site.   The medical needs are addressed by on-site nursing from the Hill Health Corporation. The Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health (PRCH) provides staff training and consultation as the philosophical commitment to supporting an individualized process of recovery is put into day-to-day practice.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Counselor notes, program/classroom participation; self-report. Consumer satisfaction surveys are given to clients upon graduation or discharge from the program.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Ability to build independence and community supports, finding and keeping a job, successful completion of educational programs and classes,  successful graduation from program and into independent housing.
Description

The Outreach and Engagement Project is an interagency endeavor that includes Columbus House, Inc., Hill Health Corporation, and Marrakech Behavioral Health Services.  This multi-agency team provides a range of community-based services to homeless adults, ages 18 years and older, with serious mental illness and/or chronic substance abuse who are currently not engaged in treatment and other services, or who have a history of being discharged from treatment for non-compliance. The services are provided along a continuum, from case finding and engagement to transition to traditional treatment and services. Outreach/Case Finding is conducted in small teams at regularly scheduled times Monday through Friday.  Outreach sites include designated street and highway bridges, soup kitchens, shelters, and public locations such as the public library, the New Haven Green, and the train station.  Outreach activities serve to identify potential clients and screen for program eligibility.

Population Served Homeless / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities / Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

In the short-term, Outreach & Engagement Team Members focus on procuring basic needs such as food, clothing, shelter, and access to acute medical care. Efforts are made to reduce potential harm to the individual from such causes as  both imminent and chronic exposure; untreated medical conditions; persistent substance abuse; and risky sexual behavior. In the longer-term, referrals and linkages to various needed services, including Entitlements; Behavioral and medical treatment and care; Supportive/supported housing, shelter, sober house or drop-in center; Vocational and educational services; and Specialized services for seniors. Services are also provided to individuals with ABI, developmental disabilities, HIV, or in need of residential or nursing home care. Coordination of services with other providers and transition of services to new providers is is also provided.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

There is a strong emphasis on building a therapeutic rapport, especially with those whose illness, addiction, or prior experiences have left them distrustful of service systems.  The goal is to increase the acceptance of treatment and services, leading to improved quality of life and stability in the community.  Services at Outreach and Engagement are designed and implemented to support recovery, health and well-being; enhance the quality of life; reduce symptoms and hospitalization; increase resilience; restore and/or improve level of functioning and support the integration of the person served back into his/her community of choice. Securing basic needs such as food, clothing, shelter, access to medical care, is the first step, with the ultimate goal of transferring a client to traditional, long-term services and/or natural supports.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Counselor notes, consumer self-report, continued sobriety and independence as measured by drug screens, ability to achieve and maintain independent living.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Successful enrollment in services, finding and keeping an apartment, maintaining sobriety, successful interaction with peers and program staff, building community supports, maintaining independence.
Description

Roger Sherman House (RSH) is a transitional halfway house for men discharged from the correctional system. The program helps clients achieve self-esteem with positive results by providing them the resources to break the cycle of criminal activity, substance abuse, or poverty. The 61-bed facility focuses on life skills and helps clients regain their independence in the community with a strong emphasis on responsibility. All referrals for this program come from the State of Connecticut Dept. of Correction. Program services include: individual, group and family counseling, substance use education, and educational, vocational and life-skills building.

Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders / Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Successful completion of educational programs and classes, continued participation in recovery and therapeutic groups, achieving GED, diploma or other degree or certification, successful graduation from program, successful re-integration into community and ability to maintain independence, finding and keeping a job.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Located in New Haven and named after the famous Connecticut senator, Roger Sherman House provides clients being released from prison employment opportunities as well as educational opportunities. The 61-bed facility focuses on life skills and helps clients regain their independence in the community with a strong emphasis on responsibility. Long-term successes include finding and maintaining housing and employment and maintaining a stable and productive life in the community.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Counselor notes, client self-report, active participation in therapeutic and recovery groups, successful completion of educational programs. TCI also utilizes consumer satisfaction surveys, required by our state funding agencies, that help to evaluate all services and provide information for service planning on an annual basis.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
When Terry W., a 2011 graduate of the Roger Sherman House program was a client, he had a great deal of difficulty finding work. After considerable effort, fhe ound a job as a sandwich maker at a New Haven market. Because he was a such a hard worker, and was part of the organization during an expansion phase, he moved up quickly within the organization. Today he is a manager, taking classes at Gateway Community College, and has set his sights on becoming a railroad engineer. Terry's is just one of many Roger Sherman House success stories.
Description

The Supportive Housing for Families® (SHF®) program, established in 1996, provides families served by the Connecticut Department of Children and Families helping parents become reunited with children who have been placed in foster care, or prevents the placement of children in foster care by providing safe, quality, affordable and permanent housing; intensive case management services; referrals; advocacy; crisis intervention; coordination of substance use treatment; provision of children’s services; educational support and parenting training; and counseling services. Our mission is to help families thrive by finding homes in safe, nurturing neighborhoods, achieving economic independence, developing healthy relationships, and providing their children with a stable and caring home environment. SHF® is located throughout the state, with offices in New Haven, Groton, Middletown, Hartford, Waterbury, Torrington, Danbury and Bridgeport. Primary funding comes from the Department of Children and Families. Primary funding is from the Department of Children and Families.


 
Population Served / /
Description

The REACH program is a scattered site supportive housing for individuals re-entering the community from the correctional system who are eligible for parole but unable to locate appropriate housing. The intent of the program is to assist clients in reenter the community by providing the supports necessary for independent living. Participants are provided with intensive case management and stay in the program for approximately four to six months. REACH provides scattered site apartments that are subsidized based on the tenant’s income. Program services include: referrals to mental health and other treatment providers; vocational support; assistance with educational opportunities; and transportation assistance.


Population Served / /
CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Lisa Dematteis-Lepore
Term Start Apr 1991
Email ldematteis@theconnectioninc.org
Experience
Lisa DeMatteis was appointed Interim CEO in July 2016, on former President and CEO Peter Nucci's retirement. Prior to this appointment, Lisa served as Chief of Staff for The Connection since 2013. She joined The Connection in 1991 and was instrumental in developing The Connection’s statewide Women"s and Children's, as well as our innovative Supportive Housing for Families® program. Immediately prior to being appointed Chief of Staff, Lisa oversaw The Connection's operations, agencywide service divisions, and was the Co-Director of The Connection's Institute for Innovative Practice, and served as Director of Advocacy for The Institute. Before joining The Connection staff, Lisa was a Counselor and Senior Counselor at several Connecticut non-profit agencies. She holds a BA in Community/Child Care psychology from Albertus Magnus College, and is a certified pre-school teacher.
Co-CEO
Experience


Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 396
Number of Part Time Staff 117
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 25
Staff Retention Rate 80%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 155
Asian American/Pacific Islander 6
Caucasian 283
Hispanic/Latino 57
Native American/American Indian 1
Other 11 Two or more races
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 180
Female 331
Unspecified 2
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr. Peter Nucci Jan 1976 - July 2016
Dr. Michael Rowe Feb 1974 -
Senior Staff
Title Vice President, Finance
Title Vice President, Human Resources
Title Director of Special Projects
Title Director of Communications
Title Medical Director
Title Senior Director - Supportive Housing and Women and Children's Programs
Title Senior Director for Family Support Services
Title Senior Director for Community Justice
Title Director of Integrated Healthcare, Outpt Counseling Centers
Experience/Biography  
Title Senior Director for Family Support Services
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

 Member, South Central Behavioral Health Network, & Community Services Network
Founding member, Greater New Haven Alliance to End Homelessness 
The Outreach and Engagement project for homeless adults is a collaboration between TCI, Columbus House, Marrakech, and Hill Health Corp.
 Supportive Housing for Families Program collaborates with agencies statewide. In New Haven we collaborate with BH Services. 
Recovery House, a collaboration with Advanced Behavioral Health
Community Reporting Engagement Support and Training (CREST) Center, a community-based day reporting program a partnership between TCI, Fellowship Place, and the Connecticut Mental Health Center.
* Ruoppolo Manor Support Services program and the Robert T. Wolfe Apartments provided in collaboration with the Housing Authority of New Haven.
* West Village Supportive Housing program, to help end chronic homelessness, a collaboration between the TCI, Alpha Community Services and Community Builders.
* The Park Street Inn, a partnership with Fellowship Place, and Hill Health Corporation
* Administration for Children and Families intensive rapid rehousing program, a partnership with UCONN and CT Dept. of Children and families.  

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce1995
United Way of Greater New Haven1998
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits1990
Connecticut Council on Philanthropy2005
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Affordable Housing Committee AwardConnecticut Mortgage Bankers Association2011
"Model Program" designation for Supportive Housing for Families programChild Welfare League of America2010
Maxwell Award of ExcellenceFannie Mae Foundation2008
Outstanding Criminal Justice Award - Northeast RepresentativeNational Criminal Justice Association2016
Board Chair
Professor Gloster Aaron
Company Affiliation Faculty, Wesleyan University
Term Apr 2016 to Apr 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Ms. Margaret Jordan Addo Esq.Attorney
Mr. Joseph Bibisi Deputy Mayor, City of Middletown
Mr. Grady Faulkner CUNO Inc., a 3M Company
Ms. Judith Felton Middlesex Community College
Mr. John Ivimey Esq.Reid & Riege, P.C.
Reverend Mary Klaaren City of Middletown (Retired)
Mr. John LaRosa Retired
Mr. Andrew Lasko Regional Manager, Northeast Utilities (Retired)
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 3
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Disability Insurance
General Property Coverage
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Professional Liability
Risk Management Provisions
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Board Co-Chair
John Ivimey Esq.
Company Affiliation Reid & Riege, PC
Term Apr 2016 to Apr 2019
Email jivimey@rrlawpc.com
Standing Committees
Finance
Executive
Human Resources / Personnel
Program / Program Planning
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Professor Stephen Angle Wesleyan University
Attorney Robert Cohn Zangari-Cohn-Cuthbertson
Professor Richard Kagan Retired Professor of History
Mr. George Kennedy Retired
Mr. Tom Nolan Author
Ms. Judith Normandin Pearce Company Realtors
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $46,561,390.00
Projected Expenses $46,985,857.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Driving Hope Home brochure2016View
21st Annual Pizza Fest Poster2016View
The Connection Agency Conference Brochure2016View
Cornerstone Society Brochure2015View
The Connection Constituent Brochure2014View
The Connection Agency Brochure2014View
The Connection 2014 Gala Promotional Flyer2014View
The Connection Annual Report2014View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Revenue$45,462,465$44,696,863$44,177,594
Total Expenses$45,395,496$45,416,465$44,232,301
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$58,781$71,840$23,787
Government Contributions$41,284,528$40,061,676$39,754,260
Federal------
State$36,181,114$38,372,341--
Local------
Unspecified$5,103,414$1,689,335$39,754,260
Individual Contributions$72,832$73,928$72,207
------
$4,026,448$4,475,000$4,300,225
Investment Income, Net of Losses$19,876$14,419$27,115
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$40,324,622$40,189,317$39,342,444
Administration Expense$5,070,874$5,227,148$4,889,857
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.000.981.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses89%88%89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$7,768,654$6,394,776$6,418,031
Current Assets$4,205,186$3,107,986$3,248,018
Long-Term Liabilities$817,591$568,275$487,907
Current Liabilities$4,431,848$3,374,251$2,758,272
Total Net Assets$2,519,215$2,452,250$3,171,852
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDCF $15,594,211DCF $16,083,977DCF $15,733,720
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDOC $9,393,712CT Dept. of Corrections $9,146,354CT Dept. of Corrections $9,448,821
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDMHAS $7,189,160CT Dept. of Mental Health & Add. Services $9,004,218CT Dept. of Mental Health & Add. Services $8,851,438
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities0.950.921.18
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets11%9%8%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 100 Roscommon Drive
Suite 203
Middletown, CT 06457
Primary Phone 860 343-5500
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Lisa Dematteis-Lepore
Board Chair Professor Gloster Aaron
Board Chair Company Affiliation Faculty, Wesleyan University

 

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Meet Basic Needs

A strong community not only meets its members’ basic needs but also works to create long-term solutions to their problems. Provide people with affordable housing, enough to eat and access to affordable health care and you enable them to envision a better future for themselves.

Promote Civic Vitality

Greater New Haven’s vibrancy is linked to its communities’ support of its neighborhoods, public gardens and sports, as well as its commitment to the protection of its people and pets.

Ensure Health & Wellness

A healthy community is a rich community. When we enjoy good health, when we engage in wellness activities – and when we support people living with disease or disabilities -- there are profound physical and psychological benefits. Simply put, we are all stronger and happier. To support the health and wellness initiatives in your community is to put good health within reach of all.