Women's Health Research at Yale University
135 College Street, Suite 220
New Haven CT 06510
Contact Information
Address 135 College Street, Suite 220
New Haven, CT 06510-
Telephone (203) 764-6600 x
Fax 203-764-6609
E-mail carissa.violante@yale.edu
Web and Social Media
Mission
WHRY aims to improve the health of all individuals through scientific knowledge by initiating and supporting research focusing on women's health and on gender differences in health and disease.
 
 
Advancing Health Equity for Women
Sex and gender are among the most important variables in understanding health but, until recent decades, women were underrepresented in clinical research. Our center is helping to close the knowledge gap created by this historical non-inclusion of women. Our studies focus on health concerns specific to or more prevalent in women, and the many conditions in which there are gender differences. Through our strategic initiatives, our center funds pilot studies, develops our own collaborative research projects, trains the next generation of women researchers, and provides educational outreach to the community.
 
Connecting with the Community
Among our major communications efforts, WHRY produces a quarterly newsletter that provides updates on all our research, advances in women’s health, and center activities. You can access the newsletter on our website. In one of our newest communications initiatives, WHRY is collaborating with a team of specialists to provide relevant answers to timely questions drawn from the latest cardiovascular research news – answers on topics including your heart and medications, diet, exercise and hormones. You can access our new Heart Health Q&A feature on our website.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1701
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Carolyn M. Mazure Ph.D.
Board Chair Carol F. Ross
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $800,000.00
Projected Expenses $800,000.00
Statements
Mission
WHRY aims to improve the health of all individuals through scientific knowledge by initiating and supporting research focusing on women's health and on gender differences in health and disease.
 
 
Advancing Health Equity for Women
Sex and gender are among the most important variables in understanding health but, until recent decades, women were underrepresented in clinical research. Our center is helping to close the knowledge gap created by this historical non-inclusion of women. Our studies focus on health concerns specific to or more prevalent in women, and the many conditions in which there are gender differences. Through our strategic initiatives, our center funds pilot studies, develops our own collaborative research projects, trains the next generation of women researchers, and provides educational outreach to the community.
 
Connecting with the Community
Among our major communications efforts, WHRY produces a quarterly newsletter that provides updates on all our research, advances in women’s health, and center activities. You can access the newsletter on our website. In one of our newest communications initiatives, WHRY is collaborating with a team of specialists to provide relevant answers to timely questions drawn from the latest cardiovascular research news – answers on topics including your heart and medications, diet, exercise and hormones. You can access our new Heart Health Q&A feature on our website.
Background
Women’s Health Research at Yale was founded by Dr. Carolyn Mazure in 1998 with initial funding from The Patrick and Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation to address historic gender disparities in medical research by initiating and nurturing innovative studies on the health of women and gender-specific aspects of health and disease. 
 
Research supported by Women's Health Research at Yale broadens the scope of women’s health studies well beyond reproductive health and addresses some of the most pressing health concerns of women today. These include studies on various forms of cancer that especially afflict women; cardiovascular disease; osteoporosis; autoimmune disease; obesity in special populations; the effects of hormones on memory and mood; gastrointestinal disease; gender differences in infection and immunity; prevention of intimate partner violence; depression; prevention strategies for young smokers; and the effects of stress on our health.
 
The center has since grown into one of the largest interdisciplinary research centers of its kind in the country – and has become a national model with broad influence.
Impact
Women’s Health Research at Yale  
  • Generates innovative interdisciplinary research findings on gender differences in health and disease through our Pilot Project Program. 
  • Has awarded more than $4.6 million in “seed” money to fund more than 70 pilot studies in areas of women’s health that had previously received little attention, and the results of these projects have generated more than $56 million in new external grants for further research - an enormous “return on investment” and a testament to the strength of our research findings.
  • An outstanding 54 percent of the investigators who received pilot funds used their pilot data to obtain new external funding to pursue important new areas of research on women’s health.
  • Four/fifths of the funded researchers have been junior or mid-level faculty who needed initial funding to launch their innovative research.
Needs
Supported in part by Yale, Women’s Health Research at Yale is self-supporting and we raise our own funds to initiate and nurture innovative studies on women’s health and gender differences that affect health and disease. Our center's continued operation depends on contributions from individuals, foundations, and corporations.
 
The most difficult dollars to obtain either through philanthropic contributions or federal funding are those to support center infrastructure.  A significant portion of the center must be supported through philanthropy. The Director’s Discretionary Fund provides a stable financial base for our full-time staff, affiliated faculty and our center services that support our investigators and our educational outreach. In particular, although not exclusively, this fund ensures personnel salaries for our staff members who develop and maintain multiple operations within our center.
CEO Statement
Improvements in our health and health care depend on new scientific knowledge that can be translated into practical benefits – in the form of better clinical and personal practices. Yet research to generate this knowledge on women’s health and gender-specific aspects of health has been historically lacking – becoming a focus of attention only in recent years.
 
Our center was founded to address the dramatic need for biomedical research on women’s health. With generous support from friends in the community we have been highly successful in starting to insure that women’s health and gender differences are studied, and that health information of practical benefit is derived from this work and used to enhance our lives and well-being.
 
Since the inception of our center, we have
  • Awarded more than $4.6 million in "seed" grants to initiate more than 70 major studies designed to answer important questions about women's health
  • Leveraged pilot funds into more than $56 million external grants so that researchers could continue and expand the work they have begun
  • Built new collaborations within Yale and in centers across the country
  • Helped launch new investigators into careers dedicated to studying gender-specific aspects of health
  • Established an educational outreach program in collaboration with the community to provide health information that can be translated into clinical and personal practice

Yet we are just beginning to understand what needs to be uncovered and illuminated in women’s health and gender-specific medicine. We welcome and encourage your interest in our center.

 

Board Chair Statement

All areas of health and disease that affect women should be included in “Women’s Health,” and this is the basic philosophy that guides Women’s Health Research at Yale.

Without Women’s Health Research at Yale, there is no guarantee that a broad research focus on women’s health will remain a priority at one of the leading medical schools in the country – Yale School of Medicine.  This, in turn, would have ripple effects across the country as colleagues of Women’s Health Research at Yale investigators will no longer have access to this important center and the leadership of its science.

Did you know that Women’s Health Research at Yale raises its own funds to initiate research on women’s health?

Only with your help will we be able to continue ensuring that practical benefits for all women are drawn from new research on the most pressing health concerns for women today.
 
I am honored to be a part of a center with a passionate commitment to advancing the well-being of women and girls. With sustained support, Women’s Health Research at Yale will continue to generate new scientific information to improve our health.

Carol Ross
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Medical Research / Medical Disciplines Research
Areas Served
New Haven
State wide
National
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge

Women’s Health Research at Yale supports investigations that use a variety of basic science and clinical research approaches to address critical questions in women’s health. We encourage research that examines the effects of socio-demographic factors (socioeconomic status, ethnicity, etc) on health outcome. Our educational outreach serves the Greater New Haven area, Connecticut and the Nation. 

CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

Supported in part by Yale, Women’s Health Research at Yale is self-supporting and we raise our own funds to initiate and nurture innovative studies on women’s health and gender differences that affect health and disease. Our center depends on contributions from individuals, foundations, and corporations.

Programs
Description

Women’s Health Research at Yale from inception has been committed to sharing and distributing information about its scientific research, research findings and its center activities with the public, the community and the media. In our Initiative for Community Wellness, we engage and inform the community through workshops, lectures and conferences, and through various print and electronic media, including a newsletter, website, videos and social media. We provide as much accurate, up-to-date information about women’s health as possible in order for community members and the public at large to have a better understanding of health and wellness.

Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Our center shares its newly generated information continually through a variety of outlets, including recently created social media sites on Facebook and Twitter, a quarterly newsletter, and videos available through YouTube. We continue to garner coverage of our scientific studies and activities in print, broadcast and online media outlets.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. A fundamentally important part of our multi-faceted educational outreach effort is making information about our scientific research user-friendly. To this end, we routinely translate information about the work of our scientists so it is easily digestible and helps make community members more informed consumers of health information. When consumers understand science and health information, they improve communication with their health care providers and increase control over their health care decisions. Ultimately, a more informed community can more effectively advance the cause of improving health.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Our center engages and informs the community through workshops, lectures and conferences, our quarterly newsletter, electronic media (including our regularly updated website and social media sites), information pamphlets, press releases, and various external media outlets. We consider these educational outreach efforts vitally important to the cause of advancing women’s health and gender-equity in health care, and to an even larger, national mission. We regularly monitor – through metrics and by constantly listening for feedback from supporters and community members – our achievements in connecting with the community.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. One recent example of our success in engaging the community is the launch of a new series of videos about our scientific investigations and the mission of our center. Our video gallery has drawn thousands of viewers. In addition, the number of interested followers on our social media sites (Facebook and Twitter) continues to grow on a daily and weekly basis. Moreover, our center website was recently revamped to ensure that all information is as easy to digest as possible. Our website now includes a new collaborative effort between our Center and cardiovascular health specialists that answer questions about heart health drawn from the latest news on cardiovascular research. Each installment highlights a particularly relevant heart health concern and provides links to useful information on each topic. 
Description

Women’s Health Research at Yale supports innovative research through our Pilot Project Program which provides “seed” money to promising investigations in important content areas such as cardiovascular disease - the greatest killer of women and men; lung and breast cancers - the leading causes of cancer deaths among women; osteoporosis - a major source of morbidity and mortality for women; depression - the leading cause of disability for women in the world; and smoking cessation – as smoking is the leading preventable cause of death yet rates of cessation have for years demonstrated worse outcomes for women compared to men. Thanks to a recent endowment gift expanding our Pilot Project Program, a Pioneer Award will support studies that are either highly inventive or close to a major breakthrough in advancing women’s health. External grants from major funding agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health, cannot be obtained without the feasibility data generated by these projects.

Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Importantly, four-fifths of our funded researchers have been junior or mid-level faculty who needed initial funding to launch their research on women's health, and more than half obtained external grants - more than five times the success rate for National Institutes of Health grant applications.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Our program is changing the medical research landscape to benefit all women in our lives and to foster the growth of gender-specific medicine. Our research agenda serves as a model for wider application of innovative interdisciplinary research on women's health. The research findings derived from our pilot studies have influenced health practice by developing new approaches and therapies to improving the health of women. Our research findings increasingly show that:
• Women and men have different risk factors for diseases.
• Response to a given treatment can differ by gender.
• Prevention strategies often need to be gender-specific.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Our unique “Pilot Project” grant program provides funding to Yale researchers to generate feasibility data previously unavailable in women’s health that are necessary to obtain external grants. Our program has awarded more than $4.5 million in “seed” grants to Yale investigators, and the results of the funded Pilot Projects have generated more than $52 million in new external grants for further research – an enormous “return on investment."
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Our heart disease research, for example, showed in separate findings that women fared significantly worse than men following heart bypass surgey, and women need gender-specific approaches to ensure completion of cardiac rehabiliation, which dramatically reduces mortality after heart attack.
Description

Women’s Health Research at Yale is deeply committed to forging alliances across disciplines, institutions and research approaches, including basic science, clinical, prevention, and health services research.

We have fostered Research Cores in women’s health to facilitate the interactions and research of individual scientists, while also promoting the development of inter-institutional research initiatives and interdisciplinary team science – research that draws investigators from multiple disciplines with a depth and breadth of knowledge and expertise to collaborate on answering complex, emerging questions.

Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our program is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and a researcher from another university on a nationwide study to determine whether there are gender differences in how female and male military combat veterans readjust to civilian life – one of the first empirical studies of its kind. An unprecedented number of Americans who have served in the military in Afghanistan and Iraq have been women who have been in combat. However, the post-deployment experiences of these women have not been explored in a comprehensive study. This major study grew out of a small pilot grant awarded to our Director by a Connecticut foundation.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Our program goals and priorities are to generate research of practical benefit to women, and to communicate our research findings to health care professionals and the community – all with the intention of enhancing the quality of life for women, men and families. We do so by:

  • Developing new, innovative projects in clinical and basic research, health services and disease prevention
  • Addressing understudied aspects of women's health
  • "Mainstreaming" women's health research
  • Enhancing collaborations among investigators and across disciplines, areas of expertise and departments and institutions
  • Identifying new treatment options
  • Promoting preventive strategies
  • Encouraging health behaviors
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We measure our program’s success and wider influence in a variety of ways. First and foremost, we monitor our scientific collaborations among scientists and between institutions to track the practical benefits that come from research findings and how these collaborative efforts help “mainstream” the study of women’s health into the wider biomedical research world. In one of our most important measures of success related to our partnerships, our completed collaborative studies and research relationships have very often led to larger projects and longer-term institutional relationships, such as the study of women combat veterans.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. In an example of our program’s success, several of our funded investigators have gone on to prominent positions in health research elsewhere, and continue to collaborate with our program.  However, our program’s most important achievements have come in the form of new scientific findings – whether in breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, infertility or stress related to depression – that have led to new treatments and prevention to improve the well-being of women.
Description
Women's Health Research at Yale is dedicated to training the next generation of researchers to study women's health and gender differences. We mentor and teach post-doctoral trainees through a range of training programs sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

• Junior Faculty Program: The Yale BIRCWH (Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health) Scholar Program provides interdisciplinary research skill development for junior faculty interested in a research career focused on women's health and addictive behaviors.

• Postdoctoral Programs: Postdoctoral training opportunities to study women's health are provided in a number of important areas such as neuroscience, substance abuse prevention, mental health services, and geriatric clinical epidemiology.
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Women’s Health Research at Yale teaches students, fellows and junior faculty who want to pursue research in women’s health and gender differences. For example, we have been awarded a National Institutes of Health faculty training grant to train and mentor junior faculty scholars to conduct interdisciplinary research on addictive behaviors in women. The five-year program will annually supports four junior faculty scholars who have earned an M.D., Ph.D., or equivalent and have completed post-doctoral training.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Ultimately, the purpose of our program is to ensure the development of scientists who make enduring contributions to the prevention and treatment of addictive behaviors which result in direct practical benefit for women and their families.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The executive faculty leaders meet regularly with the Scholars to provide mentoring, coaching and provide a team science experience to begin research careers focused on addictive behaviors in women.  The monitoring of the Scholars' progress ensures that these entry-level faculty will ultimately make significant and enduring contributions to the field of women’s health and addictive behaviors.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Four Scholars are pursuing their research projects this fiscal year.
Program Comments
CEO Comments The most difficult dollars to obtain either through philanthropic contributions or federal funding are those to support center infrastructure. The Yale School of Medicine contributes in part to the infrastructure of the center, yet a significant portion of the center must be supported through philanthropy. The Director’s Discretionary Fund  provides a stable financial base for our center services that support our investigators and our educational outreach. In particular, although not exclusively, this fund ensures personnel salaries for our staff members who develop and maintain multiple operations within our center.
CEO/Executive Director
Carolyn M. Mazure Ph.D.
Term Start Feb 1998
Email carolyn.mazure@yale.edu
Experience

Dr. Carolyn M. Mazure is the Norma Weinberg Spungen and Joan Lebson Bilder Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology. She created and directs Yale's interdisciplinary women’s health research center - Women's Health Research at Yale.

Dr. Mazure came to Yale for her fellowship training after completing graduate school and three years at the National Institutes of Health, where she worked in studies on the genetics of psychiatric disorders. Immediately following her postgraduate training, she was invited to join the Yale faculty. She became an active clinician and Director of Psychiatry’s Adult Inpatient Acute-Treatment Program at Yale-New Haven Hospital, as well as an active researcher.
 
Her research focuses on the interplay of stress, depression, and addictive disorders. She has a particular interest in gender-specific predictors of illness onset and treatment outcome, and issues of importance to women's health. She has been a featured expert on ABC’s “Prime Time Live” and the BBC documentary the Science of Stress.
 
Currently, Dr. Mazure oversees an extensive research portfolio and is the Scientific Director for Yale’s NIH-funded Specialized Center of Research on developing gender-sensitive treatments for quitting smoking, and an Investigator on a U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs-funded study of post-deployment readjustment of women combat veterans to civilian life. In addition, Dr. Mazure is the Principal Investigator for the new NIH-funded Yale Faculty Research Training Program on Women's Health and Addictive Behaviors.
 
In addition, she has provided testimony to the U.S. Congress on the importance of research on women's health.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 6
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 84%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 4
Unspecified 1
Senior Staff
Title Program Manager
Experience/Biography

Ms. Gregg manages the overall business affairs of our diverse and growing interdisciplinary women’s health research center. She provides administrative oversight of program activities, human resources and financial management of the center's budget and research award activities.

Title Financial Accountant
Experience/Biography

Mr. Mutonji oversees the financial portfolio for Women’s Health Research at Yale. He manages all regulatory grant requirements both for our Pilot Project Program and for Women’s Health Research at Yale’s research and educational grants.

Title Communications Associate
Experience/Biography

Ms. Violante manages our Center’s social media, website, and newsletter in order to communicate important scientific and health information to the community.

Title Senior Administrative Assistant
Experience/Biography

Ms. Otto provides overall administrative support for the Center, including daily oversight of the Center’s scientific and community outreach.

Collaborations
A large number of faculty is affiliated with the center, including researchers involved in studies of various topics on gender differences in health and women’s health. In addition, the affiliated faculty includes directors of interdisciplinary research cores on cardiovascular health, addictive behaviors, and women and trauma.
 
Women's Health Research at Yale also collaborates with the cardiology team at OhioHealth Healthcare System to deliver monthly installments of Heart Health Q&A providing answers your questions on timely topics in cardiac care, including questions on your heart and medications, exercise, diet and hormones.
 
 
Board Chair
Carol F. Ross
Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Term Sept 2011 to Dec 2015
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Diane F. Ariker Community Volunteer
Susannah Rabb Bailin Community Volunteer
Elisa Spungen Bildner J.D.Community Volunteer
Kim A. Healey Community Volunteer
Sharon Wolfsohn Karp M.D.
Susan Lustman Katz J.D.Community Volunteer
Bobbi Mark M.B.A.Community Volunteer
Kevin McCann J.D.Community Volunteer
Ellen Gibson McGinnis J.D.Community Volunteer
Roslyn Milstein Meyer Ph.D.Community Volunteer
Marta E. Moret MPHCommunity Volunteer
Wendy Underwood Naratil Community Volunteer
Eve Hart Rice M.D.
Patricia Russo Community Volunteer
Lynne Schpero Community Volunteer
Diane Young Turner Community Volunteer
Dinny Seton Wakerley Community Volunteer
Patricia Doukas Zandy J.D.Community Volunteer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 16
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 17
Unspecified 1
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Constituent Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Congresswoman Rosa L. DeLauro Community Volunteer
Rosemary Hudson Community Volunteer
Eileen S. Kraus Community Volunteer
Joann Woodward Community Volunteer
Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman Community Volunteer
Standing Committees
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Kitty Northrop Friedman J.D.Community Volunteer
Kimberly Goff-Crews Community Volunteer
Linda Koch Lorimer J.D.Community Volunteer
CEO Comments

A critical avenue through which Women’s Health Research at Yale engages the community is through the center’s volunteer advisory group, the Council for Women’s Health Research at Yale. The Council comprises women and men in the community who are committed to women’s health and who impart their professional and personal advice, guidance and active participation for the benefit of the center.

The Council oversees the Society of Friends, a growing number of people from within and outside of the Yale community who believe in the vital need for research on women's health and want to help ensure the future of the center. They have made a personal and financial commitment in support of the work of our investigators and our research efforts.

The mission of the Council is to generate funds to sustain Women’s Health Research at Yale and to raise public awareness about the importance of its mission.

 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $800,000.00
Projected Expenses $800,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 5%
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
WHRY: Advancing Health Equity for Women2012View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$356,187$455,559$394,087
Government Contributions$183,653$144,284$147,548
Federal$183,653$144,284$147,548
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$158,042$85,561$120,717
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses$124,592$111,882$112,579
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$662,350$554,721$472,926
Administration Expense$162,382$166,635$147,703
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.001.121.25
Program Expense/Total Expenses80%78%76%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets------
Current Assets------
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets------
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets------
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments
The financial documents (990s and audits) are for Yale University.  The previous three years of financial information listed in the profile (and the graphs) are those of the Women’s Health Research, a program of Yale University.

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

 

 

Address 135 College Street, Suite 220
New Haven, CT 06510
Primary Phone 203 764-6600
CEO/Executive Director Carolyn M. Mazure Ph.D.
Board Chair Carol F. Ross
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer

 

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