Women's Health Research at Yale University
135 College Street, Suite 220
New Haven CT 06510
Contact Information
Address 135 College Street, Suite 220
New Haven, CT 06510-
Telephone (203) 764-6600 x
Fax 203-764-6609
E-mail carissa.violante@yale.edu
Web and Social Media
Mission
Our health directly affects our employment and earnings, economic security, educational opportunities, and child, family and self-care. Women’s Health Research at Yale (WHRY) provides benefit to the community by addressing the dramatic need for medical research that remedies the health disparities experienced by women, and by uncovering gender differences in health outcomes that benefit both women and men. We do this by initiating never before undertaken research with direct practical implications for the public health, and translating and disseminating our findings for the benefit of the community through our Initiative for Community Wellness.
 
ADVANCING HEALTH EQUITY
Sex and gender are among the most important variables in understanding health yet women have been underrepresented in clinical research. Our studies focus on health concerns specific to or more prevalent in women, and the many conditions in which there are gender differences thus providing new health information for both women and men. Through our strategic initiatives, our center partners with the community to translate our findings into improved health care.
 
CONNECTING WITH THE COMMUNITY
WHRY partners with the community through our Initiative for Community Wellness to provide health information of interest and value to the public and health care providers. Our communication efforts include symposia in the community with active Q&A sessions; consultations to health care facilities in the community; a quarterly newsletter with research updates; active social media outlets (Twitter, Facebook) with new health information; and a user-friendly website providing research results on pressing health needs. In a new initiative, WHRY collaborates with a team of cardiac specialists to answer questions about the latest cardiovascular research news – on topics such as your heart and medications, diet, exercise and hormones. The Heart Health Q&A, plus print and electronic media can be found on our website.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1701
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Carolyn M. Mazure Ph.D.
Board Chair Carol F. Ross
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $800,000.00
Projected Expenses $800,000.00
Statements
Mission
Our health directly affects our employment and earnings, economic security, educational opportunities, and child, family and self-care. Women’s Health Research at Yale (WHRY) provides benefit to the community by addressing the dramatic need for medical research that remedies the health disparities experienced by women, and by uncovering gender differences in health outcomes that benefit both women and men. We do this by initiating never before undertaken research with direct practical implications for the public health, and translating and disseminating our findings for the benefit of the community through our Initiative for Community Wellness.
 
ADVANCING HEALTH EQUITY
Sex and gender are among the most important variables in understanding health yet women have been underrepresented in clinical research. Our studies focus on health concerns specific to or more prevalent in women, and the many conditions in which there are gender differences thus providing new health information for both women and men. Through our strategic initiatives, our center partners with the community to translate our findings into improved health care.
 
CONNECTING WITH THE COMMUNITY
WHRY partners with the community through our Initiative for Community Wellness to provide health information of interest and value to the public and health care providers. Our communication efforts include symposia in the community with active Q&A sessions; consultations to health care facilities in the community; a quarterly newsletter with research updates; active social media outlets (Twitter, Facebook) with new health information; and a user-friendly website providing research results on pressing health needs. In a new initiative, WHRY collaborates with a team of cardiac specialists to answer questions about the latest cardiovascular research news – on topics such as your heart and medications, diet, exercise and hormones. The Heart Health Q&A, plus print and electronic media can be found on our website.
Background
Not until the 1990s did the National Institutes of Health, the largest US funder of biomedical research in the world, begin requiring the inclusion of women as subjects in clinical trials. Because, historically, women were largely excluded as participants in these studies, a highly significant gap in health data on women resulted.
 
Women’s Health Research at Yale was founded in 1998 by Dr. Carolyn Mazure, with initial funding from The Patrick and Catherine Weldon Donaghue Medical Research Foundation, to develop interdisciplinary research that would respond to the dramatic need for scientific information on women’s health and on gender-specific factors determining health and disease.
 
Since its inception, Women’s Health Research at Yale (WHRY) is changing the national landscape of medical science by initiating never before undertaken studies on the health of women and on gender differences in health and disease. Now in its 17th year, WHRY continues to have high impact in research development and outcomes, and delivery of health information to the community.
 
Moreover, despite recent inclusion of women in clinical trials, the generally accepted practice of “pooling” outcomes of women and men only serves to mislead us in administering the appropriate interventions for both women and men. The time is now to ensure that health outcomes are analyzed by gender, and that research is rapidly translated into personal and professional practice that can advantage both women and men. WHRY is leading the way in filling the health “knowledge gap” left by historical approaches to research.
 
Particularly as we look ahead to the nation’s and the world’s health challenges, it is critically important to optimize care by infusing gender-specific medicine into our healthcare systems, taking advantage of what we know and can discover to improve the health of everyone.
 
Research initiated by WHRY broadens the scope of women’s health well beyond the important area of reproductive health and addresses some of the most pressing health concerns of women today. It also is committed to studying the clinical impact of gender differences. Some of our areas of study include cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, autoimmune disease, the effects of hormones, gender differences in immunity, depression, smoking cessation, and the effects of stress on our health.
 
 
Impact
Women’s Health Research at Yale’s accomplishments include:
  • “translating and delivering new health information” of interest and value to the community and to health care providers, 
  • “providing a call to action” within medical research to study the health of women and to investigate gender differences in health and disease that will benefit both women and men, 
  • “supporting this call to action” with the structure and resources afforded by an established interdisciplinary research center that advances a new perspective on scientific inquiry, 
  • showing “a track record of success” in determining new health findings, and 
  • “advising local leaders” on the health status of the community and public health policy.
 
Our current goals include:
  • enhancing our track record of developing new health findings that improve the health of the community, 
  • expanding our research portfolio in areas of pressing need, including cancer, heart disease, and mental health, and 
  • developing more opportunities through our Advisory Council for community involvement with our center.
Needs
Women’s Health Research at Yale is a self-supporting Center within Yale University and, as such, must raise its own funds annually in support of our multi-year strategic plan to improve the public health. Our continued operation depends upon contributions from individuals and foundations. Our most pressing needs include:
  1. The financial support of the community to secure: 1.our Initiative for Community Wellness which provides new health information of interest and value to the community, 
  2. the ongoing research that has a direct effect on the health of the community, 
  3. our infrastructure without which new health research cannot be carried out, and 
  4. our training program which ensures the next generation of innovative interdisciplinary researchers. The participation of the community as consumers and health care providers in asking for: 
  5. health information based on studying women and men, and analyzing outcomes by gender.
CEO Statement
Improvements in our health and health care depend on new scientific knowledge that can be translated into practical benefits – in the form of better clinical and personal practices. Yet research to generate this knowledge on women’s health and gender-specific aspects of health has been historically lacking – becoming a focus of attention only in recent years.
 
Our center was founded to address the dramatic need for biomedical research on women’s health. With generous support from friends in the community we have been highly successful in starting to insure that women’s health and gender differences are studied, and that health information of practical benefit is derived from this work and used to enhance our lives and well-being.
 
We are unique in that since the inception of our center, we have:
  • established a health information outreach program in collaboration with the community to provide new findings that can be translated into clinical and personal practice, 
  • funded numerous "seed" grants and initiated more than 75 major studies on women's health and gender-related differences that are designed to answer important health promotion and disease treatment questions that exist within our community, 
  • leveraged pilot funds into external grants so that researchers could continue and expand the work they have begun, and 
  • launched new investigators into careers dedicated to studying gender-specific aspects of health and health policy.
Yet we are just beginning to understand what needs to be uncovered and illuminated in women’s health and gender-specific medicine. We welcome and encourage your interest in our center, and in participating in the call for a change in health research and policy. 
Board Chair Statement
I am honored to be the Chair of the Advisory Council for Women’s Health Research at Yale and a part of a center with a passionate commitment to advancing the well-being of women and girls.
 
From a personal perspective, this organization, literally, saved my life this spring. In May I suffered two massive heart attacks and spent most of the summer at Yale-New Haven Hospital. The doctors attribute my survival to the speed with which I arrived at the hospital. And that is where WHRY played an important part. Just prior to this experience WHRY had published a series of articles on heart attacks in women. It is important to know that the signs of heart attacks in women are not the same as those in men. Thanks to that information, I immediately recognized my symptoms as serious, called my husband Steve and 911 and made it to the hospital in under 15 minutes.
 
Needless to say, I gratefully support WHRY. The information that their research uncovers is important and vital. It saved my life.
 
The great successes of our center include our partnership with the community in raising awareness regarding the need to know about and study women’s health, the enthusiastic interest of our affiliated scientists in pursuing health research focusing on women and gender differences, our education of young people interested in becoming involved in this area of scientific work, and our sound fiscal management of the center along with smart strategic planning for the stability and growth of the center.
 
Among the challenges we face is that of raising funds to underwrite this self-supporting interdisciplinary research center based within Yale University. Most potential donors assume that Yale provides all necessary support for this successful and productive center. Moreover, we face this challenge at a time of shrinking federal and state resources for research. In addition, many in the community are unaware that women were largely excluded as participants in clinical research, thus leaving a highly significant knowledge gap on the health of women and on gender differences in health and disease.
 
We address these challenges by ensuring that the public knows that the medical school has a tradition of faculty members building innovative center or programs that then must be self-supporting. In addition, we communicate to the public the history of excluding women as participants in clinical research and, that even as women are included, there is a tradition of “pooling” data from women and men rather than analyzing health outcomes by gender. Importantly, through our Initiative for Community Wellness, we communicate that our research focuses on females, studies gender differences to ensure benefit for both women and men, and we communicate our findings that improve the lives and well-being of everyone.
 
Carol Frost Ross
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Alliances & Advocacy
Secondary Organization Category Diseases Disorders & Medical Disciplines / Research Institutes & Public Policy Analysis
Tertiary Organization Category Medical Research / Biomedicine & Bioengineering Research
Areas Served
New Haven
State wide
National
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Women’s Health Research at Yale serves the greater New Haven community and Connecticut, and affects the public health nationally through its findings that advance the health of women and gender-specific medicine. Our educational outreach focuses on the greater New Haven area and Connecticut but is visited by a national audience.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
Our interest is in building and growing a productive Advisory Council that represents the interests and diversity of the community. Members are sought who possess leadership capabilities, have direct experience living and working in the greater New Haven community, and can offer their perspective and expertise in guiding our center to optimally serve the health needs of the community.
 
WHRY has established Operating Procedures for the Council for Women’s Health Research at Yale in collaboration with Council members. These procedures articulate the mission, size, structure and responsibilities of the Council.
 
The Council also oversees contact with the Society of Friends, a growing number of people from within the community who believe in the vital need for research on women's health and gender-related health differences and want to help ensure the future of the center. Additionally, each member of the Council makes a personal and financial commitment in support of our research and outreach efforts.
Programs
Description Women’s Health Research at Yale from inception has been committed to sharing health information of interest and value to the community. Through our partnership with the community, our Initiative for Community Wellness, we provide the latest health findings via workshops and symposia with active Q&A sessions, as well as print and electronic informational resources, including newsletters, an active website, videos, and social media communication. We provide accurate, up-to-date information about women’s health, and gender-related differences in health that affect outcomes for women and men, in order for community members to obtain new data that improves health and wellness.
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our center shares its newly generated information continually through a variety of outlets, including recently created social media sites on Facebook and Twitter, a quarterly newsletter, and videos available through YouTube. We continue to garner coverage of our scientific studies and activities in print, broadcast and online media outlets. The effectiveness of our live educational/informational presentations are assessed by audience feedback. Electronic media, such as website, are evaluated in terms of visits or “hits” over time. Social media (Facebook + Twitter) communication effectiveness is calculated by total audience growth. In all these measures, we continue to show extremely positive audience satisfaction, as well as high use, interest, and return “visits” in electronic media.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. A fundamentally important part of our multi-faceted educational outreach effort is making information about our scientific research user-friendly. To this end, we routinely translate information about the work of our scientists so it is easily digestible and helps make community members more informed consumers of health information. When consumers understand science and health information, they improve communication with their health care providers and increase control over their health care decisions. Ultimately, a more informed community can more effectively advance the cause of improving health.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Our center engages and informs the community through workshops, lectures and conferences, our quarterly newsletter, electronic media (including our regularly updated website and social media sites), information pamphlets, press releases, and various external media outlets. We regularly monitor – through metrics and by constant feedback from community members – our achievements in connecting with the community. The effectiveness of our live educational/informational presentations are assessed by audience feedback. Electronic media, such as website, are evaluated in terms of visits or “hits” over time. Social media (Facebook + Twitter) communication effectiveness is calculated by total audience growth.Additionally, we use Facebook and Twitter analytics that calculate the average audience interaction with our content, as well as Klout’s metrics to track our social media reliability. These indicate that the more reliable we are, the more likely our audience is to share our content in their own networks. Klout refers to this as “influence” and describes it as “the ability to drive action.” By being responsive to the topics of interest expressed by the community, we continue to have community presentations with high attendance and evaluations. Similarly, by being responsive to the format that we use in electronic communication (e.g. video clips vs data snapshot vs quotes) that results in higher use, our audience has grown by 8% since September 2014.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. One recent example of our success in engaging the community is the launch of a new series of videos about our scientific investigations and the mission of our center. Our video gallery has drawn thousands of viewers. In addition, the number of interested followers on our social media sites (Facebook and Twitter) continues to grow on a daily and weekly basis. Moreover, our center website was recently revamped to ensure that all information is easy to digest. Our website now includes a collaborative effort between our Center and cardiovascular health specialists that answer questions about heart health drawn from the latest news on cardiovascular research. Each installment highlights a particularly relevant heart health concern and provides links to useful information on each topic.
Description Women’s Health Research at Yale supports innovative research through our Pilot Project Program which provides “seed” money to promising investigations in important content areas such as cardiovascular disease - the greatest killer of women and men; lung and breast cancers - the leading causes of cancer deaths among women; osteoporosis - a major source of morbidity and mortality for women; depression - the leading cause of disability for women in the world; and smoking cessation – as smoking is the leading preventable cause of death yet rates of cessation have for years demonstrated worse outcomes for women compared to men. Thanks to a recent endowment gift expanding our Pilot Project Program, a Pioneer Award will support studies that are either highly inventive or close to a major breakthrough in advancing women’s health. External grants from major funding agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health, cannot be obtained without the feasibility data generated by these projects.
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Importantly, four-fifths of our funded researchers have been junior or mid-level faculty who needed initial funding to launch their research on women's health, and more than half obtain external grants - more than six times the success rate for investigator-initiated National Institutes of Health grant applications.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Our program is changing the medical research landscape to benefit all women in our lives and to foster the growth of gender-specific medicine. Our research agenda serves as a model for wider application of innovative interdisciplinary research on women's health. The research findings derived from our pilot studies have influenced health practice by developing new approaches and therapies to improving the health of women. Our research findings increasingly show that:
  • Women and men have different risk factors for diseases. 
  • Response to a given treatment can differ by gender. 
  • Prevention strategies often need to be gender-specific.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Our unique “Pilot Project” grant program provides funding to Yale researchers to generate feasibility data previously unavailable in women’s health that are necessary to obtain external grants. Our program has awarded more than $4.5 million in “seed” grants to Yale investigators, and the results of the funded Pilot Projects have generated more than $56 million in new external grants for further research – an enormous “return on investment."
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Our heart disease research, for example, showed in separate findings that women fared significantly worse than men following heart bypass surgery, and women need gender-specific approaches to ensure completion of cardiac rehabilitation, which dramatically reduces mortality after heart attack.
 
Using a unique data set allowing a 15 year follow-up of women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations, our research on breast cancer risk demonstrated these women compared to women without the mutations were significantly more likely to develop additional tumors in either breast following treatment for an initial occurrence, thus dramatically affecting treatment decisions for these women. 
 
Description
Women’s Health Research at Yale is deeply committed to forging alliances across disciplines, institutions and research approaches, including basic science, clinical, prevention, and health services research.
 
We have fostered Research Cores in women’s health to facilitate the interactions and research of individual scientists, while also promoting the development of inter-institutional research initiatives and interdisciplinary team science – research that draws investigators from multiple disciplines with a depth and breadth of knowledge and expertise to collaborate on answering complex, emerging questions.
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our program is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs on a nationwide study to determine whether there are gender differences in how female and male military combat veterans readjust to civilian life – one of the first empirical studies of its kind. An unprecedented number of Americans who have served in the military in Afghanistan and Iraq have been women who have been in combat. However, the post-deployment experiences of these women have not been explored in a comprehensive study. This major study grew out of a pilot grant awarded to our Director by a Connecticut foundation.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Our program goals and priorities are to generate research of practical benefit to women, and to communicate our research findings to health care professionals and the community – all with the intention of enhancing the quality of life for women, men and families. We do so by:
  • developing new, innovative projects in clinical and basic research, health services and disease prevention,
  • addressing understudied aspects of women's health,
  • "mainstreaming" women's health research,
  • enhancing collaborations among investigators and across disciplines, areas of expertise and departments and institutions,
  • identifying new treatment options,
  • promoting preventive strategies, and
  • encouraging health behaviors.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We measure our program’s success and wider influence in a variety of ways. First and foremost, we monitor our scientific collaborations among scientists and between institutions to track the practical benefits that come from research findings and how these collaborative efforts help “mainstream” the study of women’s health into the wider biomedical research world. In one of our most important measures of success related to our partnerships, our completed collaborative studies and research relationships have very often led to larger projects and longer-term institutional relationships, such as the study of women combat veterans, which show direct practical benefit for the population being studied.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. In an example of our program’s success, several of our funded investigators have gone on to prominent positions in health research elsewhere, and continue to collaborate with our center. However, our center’s most important achievements have come in the form of new scientific findings – whether in breast cancer, cardiovascular disease, infertility or stress related to depression – that have led to new treatments and prevention to improve the well-being of women.
Description Women's Health Research at Yale is dedicated to training the next generation of researchers to study women's health and gender differences. For example, we mentor and teach post-doctoral trainees through a range of training programs sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Women’s Health Research at Yale teaches students, fellows and junior faculty who want to pursue research in women’s health and gender differences. For example, we have been awarded a National Institutes of Health faculty training grant to train and mentor junior faculty scholars to conduct interdisciplinary research on addictive behaviors in women. The Scholar training program has a highly successful track record in which our first four recently graduated Scholars all have attained outstanding research positions with grant funding, and each is pursuing interdisciplinary research on women’s health in either major academic institutions or health policy organizations.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Ultimately, the purpose of our program is to ensure the development of scientists who make enduring contributions to the promotion of health and treatment of disorders which result in direct practical benefit for women and their families.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The executive faculty leaders meet regularly with the Scholars to provide mentoring, coaching and provide a team science experience to begin research careers focused on addictive behaviors in women. The monitoring of the Scholars' progress ensures that these entry-level faculty will ultimately make significant and enduring contributions to the field of women’s health and addictive behaviors.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. WHRY’s Scholar training program has a highly successful track record in which our first four recently graduated Scholars all have attained outstanding research positions with grant funding, and each is pursuing interdisciplinary research on women’s health in either major academic institutions or health policy organizations.
Program Comments
CEO Comments
Among the challenges we face is the fact that many in the community are unaware that women were largely excluded as participants in clinical research, thus leaving a highly significant knowledge gap on the health of women and on gender differences in health and disease. In addition, we face the challenge of raising funds to underwrite our self-supporting interdisciplinary research center based within Yale University. Most potential donors assume that Yale provides all necessary support for this successful and productive center. Moreover, we face this challenge at a time of shrinking federal and state resources for research.
 
We address these challenges by ensuring that the public knows that the medical school has a tradition of faculty members building innovative center or programs that then must be self-supporting. In addition, we communicate to the public the history of excluding women as participants in clinical research and, that even as women are included, there is a tradition of “pooling” data from women and men rather than analyzing health outcomes by gender. Importantly, through our Initiative for Community Wellness, we communicate that our research focuses on females, studies gender differences to ensure benefit for both women and men, and we communicate our findings that improve the lives and well-being of everyone.
CEO/Executive Director
Carolyn M. Mazure Ph.D.
Term Start Feb 1998
Email carolyn.mazure@yale.edu
Experience
Carolyn M. Mazure is the Norma Weinberg Spungen and Joan Lebson Bildner Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology. She created and directs Yale's interdisciplinary women’s health research center - Women's Health Research at Yale.
 
Dr. Mazure did her fellowship training at Yale after completing graduate school and three years at the National Institutes of Health, where she worked on the genetics of psychiatric disorders. Immediately following her postgraduate studies, she was invited to join the Yale faculty. She became an active clinician and Director of Psychiatry’s Adult Inpatient Acute-Treatment Program at Yale-New Haven Hospital, as well as an active researcher.
 
Her research focuses on the interplay of stress, depression, and addictive disorders. She has a particular interest in gender-specific predictors of illness onset and treatment outcome, and issues of importance to women's health. She has been a featured expert on ABC’s Prime Time Live and the BBC documentary the Science of Stress. Currently, Dr. Mazure is the Principal Investigator for the NIH-funded Yale Junior Faculty Research Training Program on Women's Health, and the Scientific Director for Yale’s NIH-funded Specialized Center of Research on developing gender-sensitive treatments for smoking cessation.
 
Dr. Mazure has provided testimony to the U.S. Congress multiple times, and was a public health fellow for the Government Reform Committee. She served on the planning committee for the First White House Conference on Mental Health and chaired the American Psychological Association’s Summit on Women and Depression. Currently, she is appointed to the Advisory Committee for the Office for Research on Women’s Health of the National Institutes of Health. She is the recipient of numerous national awards and, in her home state, she was inducted into the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame as the visionary creator of Women’s Health Research at Yale, and elected into the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering. 
 
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 6
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 84%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 5
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 5
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Deputy Director
Experience/Biography

Sherry A. McKee is the Deputy Director of Women's Health Research at Yale, and a nationally recognized clinical researcher and mentor who collaborates with the Executive Director to facilitate all major goals of the Center. Dr. McKee is the Principal Investigator (PI) of our NIH-funded Yale Specialized Center of Research (for which Dr. Mazure is the Scientific Director) on gender and smoking, and the Research Director of our NIH-funded junior faculty training grant (Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health; for which Dr. Mazure is the PI). Each of these major grant awards provides opportunities to leverage the efforts of Women’s Health Research at Yale in studying women’s health and mentoring new investigators in this content area. Dr. McKee also will oversee one of our newest initiatives — mentoring undergraduate students in research through our Center. The Deputy Director is a Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale School of Medicine, and has sufficient funding such that she receives no salary support from WHRY.

Title Executive Administrator
Experience/Biography Mona Gregg is the Executive Administrator for WHRY. She is responsible for managing the overall business affairs of our diverse and continually growing interdisciplinary women’s health research center. She has administrative oversight of all program activities, including staff hiring and development, community engagement and Advisory Council liaison, and financial oversight of the center's budget and research award activities. Ms. Gregg also works closely with the Executive Director and Deputy Director on the Center’s strategic plan.
Title Communications Officer
Experience/Biography

The Communications Officer, Rick Harrison, is responsible for developing and implementing strategies to promote community awareness regarding research findings that have clear implications for the public health. This includes having the background and writing expertise that facilitates the transformation of scientific information into print and electronic materials, and connotes the important findings of our research while being easily read by the public.

Title Grants & Finance Administrator
Experience/Biography

The Grants & Finance Administrator is Marco Mutonji. He performs all functions required to manage the budget, and oversees the grant portfolio for our Center and for our Pilot Project Program. This includes the management of all University, Federal and State regulatory grant requirements for Women’s Health Research at Yale’s own research and training grants, as well as for our Pilot Project Program’s grants to other researchers.

Title Media and Design Specialist
Experience/Biography

The Media and Design Specialist is Carissa Violante. She is responsible for continued development, branding and management of our Center’s electronic and print outreach. This includes website, video, social media, and our quarterly Newsletter, each of which is designed to appeal to various audiences seeking empirically-tested, reliable, new and emerging health information.

Title Senior Administrative Assistant
Experience/Biography

The Senior Administrative Assistant is responsible for providing overall clerical and administrative support for the Center. This includes daily oversight of initial contacts from the community with the Center, managing all mailings and e-communications with the community, maintaining our database, and handling all scheduling and meeting planning.

Collaborations
Women’s Health Research at Yale collaborates with a wide variety of community groups (eg. Guilford Chapter AAUW, Madison Newcomers Club, North End Club) as well as with NPR in providing health information to the community. We have closely collaborated with the Community Services Administrator for New Haven in assessing the health of women and girls in New Haven, and have fostered research that builds community relationships to advance health (eg. MOMS Partnership led by Dr. Megan Smith).
 
WHRY also collaborates with a variety of different research entities. These include other research groups in order to undertake interdisciplinary studies of complex, “real-world” health questions and to leverage funds that can underwrite more research projects. We collaborate with faculty throughout the Yale School of Medicine and beyond in order to engage scientific experts in studies of gender differences in health and women’s health. Women's Health Research at Yale also collaborates with the cardiology team at the OhioHealth Healthcare System to deliver regular installments of our “Heart Health Q&A” which provides answers to questions on timely topics in cardiac care, including questions on your heart and medications, exercise, diet and hormones.
Comments
CEO Comments


   
Board Chair
Carol F. Ross
Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Term Sept 2011 to Dec 2015
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Diane F. Ariker Community Volunteer
Susannah Rabb Bailin Community Volunteer
Elisa Spungen Bildner J.D.Community Volunteer
Kim A. Healey Community Volunteer
Sharon Wolfsohn Karp M.D.Community Volunteer
Susan Lustman Katz J.D.Community Volunteer
Bobbi Mark M.B.A.Community Volunteer
Kevin McCann J.D.Community Volunteer
Ellen Gibson McGinnis J.D.Community Volunteer
Roslyn Milstein Meyer Ph.D.Community Volunteer
Marta E. Moret MPHCommunity Volunteer
Wendy Underwood Naratil Community Volunteer
Eve Hart Rice M.D.Community Volunteer
Patricia Russo Community Volunteer
Lynne Schpero Community Volunteer
Diane Young Turner Community Volunteer
Dinny Seton Wakerley Community Volunteer
Patricia Doukas Zandy J.D.Community Volunteer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 17
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 18
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Written Board Selection Criteria Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Constituent Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Congresswoman Rosa L. DeLauro Community Volunteer
Rosemary Hudson Community Volunteer
Eileen S. Kraus Community Volunteer
Joann Woodward Community Volunteer
Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman Community Volunteer
Standing Committees
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Kitty Northrop Friedman J.D.Community Volunteer
Kimberly Goff-Crews Community Volunteer
Linda Koch Lorimer J.D.Community Volunteer
CEO Comments
Despite the hard won advances in women’s health, progress has been painfully slow. Many more gains are needed if we are to address the significant life-altering effects of health disparities for women. Importantly, this challenge is met with recent signs within key governmental agencies, such as the National Institutes of Health, that further progress may be possible in requiring that females be studied and data examined by gender in federally-funded research. However, this will only happen if we actively engage in the process of change and show the value of the direction we advocate. This means that WHRY must take full advantage of the opportunities for studying women’s health and demonstrating the health value in doing so. With the support of the community, we can continue both to generate health findings that improve health and communicate these results to the benefit of our citizens. This work is the foundation needed to convince those who set the conventions for scientific inquiry and for health policy that women’s health must be a national priority.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $800,000.00
Projected Expenses $800,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 5%
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
WHRY: Advancing Health Equity for Women2015View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$270,951$356,187$455,559
Government Contributions$161,963$183,653$144,284
Federal$161,963$183,653$144,284
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$164,131$158,042$85,561
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses$181,554$124,592$111,882
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$652,203$662,350$544,721
Administration Expense$139,417$162,382$166,635
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.981.001.12
Program Expense/Total Expenses82%80%77%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets------
Current Assets------
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets------
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets------
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments
The financial documents (990s and audits) are for Yale University.  The previous three years of financial information listed in the profile (and the graphs) are those of the Women’s Health Research, a program of Yale University.

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  Financial information is input by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

 

 

Address 135 College Street, Suite 220
New Haven, CT 06510
Primary Phone 203 764-6600
CEO/Executive Director Carolyn M. Mazure Ph.D.
Board Chair Carol F. Ross
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer

 

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