Nature Conservancy
55 Church Street, Floor 3
New Haven CT 06510-3029
Contact Information
Address 55 Church Street, Floor 3
New Haven, CT 06510-3029
Telephone (203) 568-6280 x
Fax 203-568-6271
E-mail ct@tnc.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
The Nature Conservancy's mission is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends.  A leading conservation organization, we work in all 50 United States and in more than 30 countries. We help solve critical global challenges by significantly improving the health of natural systems. 
 
We live in an age of unprecedented threats to our natural world.  As the planet's population grows, heading toward at least 9 billion people by 2050, corresponding demands for food, water and energy have accelerated the impact on Earth's natural systems.  The resulting effects of climate change are broad, pervasive and unpredictable.
 
The Nature Conserancy is facing this reality by focusing on four global challenges:  1) conserving critical lands; 2) restoring our oceans; 3) securing fresh water; and 4) reducing the impacts of climate change.  To address these challenges, we pursue four broad priorities or solutions: 1) protecting and restoring natural systems; 2) using nature sustainably; 3) broadening the constituency for conservation; and 4) strengthening our organizational effectiveness. 
 
The Connecticut Chapter contributes to this mission by conserving significant natural places and systems within Connecticut, across the region and around the world. 

 

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1951
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Frogard Ryan
Board Chair John Levinson
Board Chair Company Affiliation Founder and President, Westway Capital LLC
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $5,683,000.00
Projected Expenses $5,683,000.00
Statements
Mission
The Nature Conservancy's mission is to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends.  A leading conservation organization, we work in all 50 United States and in more than 30 countries. We help solve critical global challenges by significantly improving the health of natural systems. 
 
We live in an age of unprecedented threats to our natural world.  As the planet's population grows, heading toward at least 9 billion people by 2050, corresponding demands for food, water and energy have accelerated the impact on Earth's natural systems.  The resulting effects of climate change are broad, pervasive and unpredictable.
 
The Nature Conserancy is facing this reality by focusing on four global challenges:  1) conserving critical lands; 2) restoring our oceans; 3) securing fresh water; and 4) reducing the impacts of climate change.  To address these challenges, we pursue four broad priorities or solutions: 1) protecting and restoring natural systems; 2) using nature sustainably; 3) broadening the constituency for conservation; and 4) strengthening our organizational effectiveness. 
 
The Connecticut Chapter contributes to this mission by conserving significant natural places and systems within Connecticut, across the region and around the world. 

 

Background
The Nature Conservancy was established in 1951 by a group of scientists and others concerned about the loss of the planet's natural treasures.  Key among those individuals was Dr. Richard H. Goodwin, botany professor at Connecticut College in New London and former trustee emeritus for the Connecticut Chapter.  In 1960, the Connecticut Chapter formally joined The Nature Conservancy with Dr. Goodwin as director.  Since then, the Chapter has protected more than 50,000 Connecticut acres.  The Connecticut Chapter maintains 60 preserves across the state and has a membership of about 24,000 households.  It has a volunteer Board of Trustees, a staff of 30, and projected total chapter expenditures of $5.6 million in fiscal year 2015.
Impact

During the past year, TNC-CT helped protect almost 500 acres in Connecticut and noted the following key achievements and goals within each conservation priority:

Long Island Sound:
Accomplishments: Through legislature's Shoreline Task Force, TNC-CT introduced two proposals to help improve planning for sea level rise and more frequent storm surge; both were passed by the General Assembly. Completed Long Island Sound Ecological Assessment (LISEA) which identifies ecologically significant areas in Long Island Sound. Coastal Resilience Planning initiative now involves 20 coastal communities and affects the lives and well-being of 500,000 people. Goals: Continue to expand use of Coastal Resilience Tool and planning workshops, working closely with regional planning organizations; provide economic analysis of various adaptation solutions in pilot communities; develop and implement seagrass protection and restoration strategy; improve migratory fish passage in rivers and tributaries of Long Island Sound.

Connecticut River:
Accomplishments: With funding from USDA/Natural Resources Conservation Service, TNC-CT produced a report and series of maps that identify the best remaining floodplains on the CT River and major rivers that feed it.  Planted Dutch Elm Disease-tolerant elm trees at four CT River floodplain sites, complementing planting done in 2012, to help re-establish this regular species in its natural habitat.  With scientists and other stakeholders in the CT River watershed, prepared data to help decisionmakers explore various water management alternatives during Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing process of five hydropower facilities on CT River, with the potential of improving water flow and fish passage  for more than 150 miles. Goals: Continue model development and prioritization studies, and continue to work with operators of largest dams along river to explore ways to alter the amount and timing of water releases to more closely mimic natural flows.

Global Programs/Brazil:

Accomplishments: The CT chapter has established a unique partnership with the trustees of The Nature Conservancy in Brazil. The Brazil Program has restored 2.4 million trees in Brazil’s highly endangered Atlantic Forest, and helped establish Water Funds in Brazil, an innovative mechanism to mobilize local funding for watershed protection that benefits the land and the people who make their livelihoods from it.
Goals: The CT chapter’s goal is to continue to raise awareness and support for its global conservation programs, with special interest in the partnership with our Brazil program to protect its unique biodiversity.

 

Needs
Operating Income $1.6M:  TNC provides expertise on land and water conservation; leadership among public/private organizations and on environmental stewardship; public outreach/education; development of science-based strategies for land and water protection. 
CT River and CT Freshwater $1M: To protect and restore the River so it can flow freely and supply water and essential services to 2.3 million in its vast basin, or watershed. Programs: re-manage water for people and nature; reconnect rivers and streams; restore floodplains; and protect critical habitat.
Long Island Sound  $1.3M: To protect and restore the Sound to optimum health for the benefit of people and nature. Programs: preserve and restore seascapes; prepare for climate change/adapt to sea level rise; develop an ocean plan to protect diversity and human use; improve water quality.  
International Programs $300,000: To protect and restore lands and waters in key geographies around the world.  Programs include: ensure sustainable agriculture; preserve freshwater supplies; protect standing forests; adapt to climate change; manage native lands; promote conservation projects with indigenous communities.  
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Environment / Natural Resources Conservation & Protection
Areas Served
Internationally
Throughout the United States
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
National
International
Other
The Nature Conservancy works in all 50 United States and more than 30 countries.  The Connecticut Chapter is the organization's representative for the entire state, working to protect freshwater and marine environments and more than 50,000 acres throughout the state.   
Programs
Description The CT River courses more than 410 miles through 4 states – Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont. It provides homes to bald eagles, egrets, and cardinal flower and swamp rose-mallows. The river and the landscape surrounding it have been degraded by turn-of-the-century manufacturing mills, unsustainable farming practices and urban and rural development. The goals of the Conservancy’s Connecticut River program are to protect and restore the 410-mile Connecticut River and its 20,000 miles of tributaries  -- one of the most obstructed river systems in the nation – so it can flow freely, provide habitat to important species, and support human needs, livelihoods and recreation.  Priority programs work in collaboration with communities, individuals, businesses and institutions to improve road-stream crossings, identify opportunities for removing dams on key tributaries, protect critical watershed lands and partner for better river management.  
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Specific program outcomes will be to:
1) bring back the American elm
2) improve road-stream crossings
3) remove dams on key tributaries
4) protect critical watershed lands
5) partner and collaborate with various organizations for better river management
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Overall program goal is to protect and restore the 410-mile Connecticut River and its 20,000 miles of tributaries so it can flow freely and provide habitat to important species like the dwarf wedge mussel, Puritan tiger beetle and Jesup's milk-vetch, which are found nowhere else on earth.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Restoring the CT River to a more natural flow, and improving the surrounding watershed, is monitored by using baseline monitoring of floodplain forest species, geomorphic assessment, and fish and wildlife passage along key river and tributary passages.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Improved river connectivity, resulting in more natural flow, will over time, restore the American Elm to a more robust place in the floodplain forests; improve the health of the overall watershed' and protect the habitat of species in and along the river.
Description

Long Island Sound supports rich diversity of life in salt marshes, seagrass meadows, natural shorelines and dune system, and seafloor habitats threatened by water quality degradation, over development,  and sea level changes. The goals of the Conservancy’s Long Island Sound program are to protect and restore the Long Island Sound so that it supports healthy natural habitats, serves as a sustainable economic engine for Connecticut and New York and provides a safe, clean resource for human use. Its programs including preserving and restoring seascapes, preparing for climate change and adapting to sea level rise, developing an ocean plan to protect natural diversity and accommodate human use and partnering to achieve common conservation objectives.  

Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Immediate outcomes will be to:
1) preserve and restore seascapes
2) prepare for climate change and adapt to sea level rise and more frequent storm surge, through the use of the Coastal Resilience Tool and planning workshops
3) develop an ocean plan to protect natural diversity and accommodate human use
4) work to identify and reduce excessive nutrient loads, such as nitrogen run-off, for conservation of sensitive ecosystems
5) improve migratory fish passage by removing dams and installing fish passageways in rivers and key tributaries of Long Island Sound.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Program long-term goal is to protect and restore the Long Island Sound so that is supports healthy natural habitats, serves as a sustainable economic engine for Connecticut and New York, and provides a safe, clean resource for human use, providing oppportunities for livelihoods and recreation.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

One key success indicator will be the utilization of the Coastal Resilience Tool – Led by The Nature Conservancy, the Coastal Resilience Project partnership also involves the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Columbia University Earth Institute/NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and the Association of State Floodplain Managers. Originally developed for Long Island in 2008, the Coastal Resilience Tool has since been expanded for Connecticut’s coastal communities on Long Island Sound and is being evaluated as a model for other global coastal communities. This web-based tool allows planners and decision-makers to explore different flooding scenarios from sea-level rise and storm surge, analyze the potential ecological, social and economic impacts, and make decisions and provide progressive solutions to address these issues today.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Data gathered from the Coastal Resilience Tool will be utilized to enhance and improve its functionality as it continues to roll out regionally.
Description

The Brazil program prompts groundbreaking partnerships to protect such unparalleled natural treasures as the Amazon tropical rainforests, the Caatinga arid scrublands, the Cerrado grasslands, the Atlantic Forest and the Pantanal wetlands. The goals of the Brazil program are to restore and protect the home of the world’s largest rainforest, the most biodiverse tropical savanna, the largest wetland and the most endangered tropical forest by partnering to conserve 140 million acres by 2015.

Its programs include ensuring sustainable agriculture, preserving freshwater supplies, protecting standing forests, adapting to climate change,managing native lands, and promoting conservation projects in collaboration with indigenous communities.    

 

Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Program outcomes will include the following:
1) secure clean water supplies for cities like Sao Paulo and Rio de Janiero
2) escalate efforts to restore Atlantic Forest with 1 billion native trees
3) promote water producer programs to pay people for protecting and restoring areas on their property important for generating clean water
4) help indigenous people steward  over 260 million acres of native lands by strengthening collaborative efforts to protect their lands and waters through support of the Amazon Indigenous Training Center.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long-term goals of this conservation effort in Brazil are to restore and protect the home of:
1) the world's largest rainforest
2) the most biodiverse tropical savanna
3) the largest wetland area
4) the most endangered tropical forest...
by partnering to conserve 140 million acres by 2015.  This partnership will contribute to helping to stabilize the Earth's climate by slowing deforestation and developing sustainable ranching and agricultural practices.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Brazilian government has recognized the Conservancy's efforts at reducing deforestation by awarding the Chico Mendes Environmental Prize, and program success will continue to be achieved through collaboration with indigenous communities.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Specific program success will include establishment of new water funds in order to improve the health of the local watershed area and planting of additional trees to reduce deforestation.
CEO/Executive Director
Dr. Frogard Ryan
Term Start Apr 2011
Email fryan@tnc.org
Experience Dr. Frogard Ryan
Connecticut Chapter State Director
 
Dr. Frogard Ryan joined the Connecticut Chapter of The Nature Conservancy in April 2011 as its State Director.  In this capacity, she is the chief executive and conservation strategist for the New-Haven-headquartered Connecticut Chapter. Her responsibilities include implementing the Conservancy’s conservation approach, producing tangible and lasting conservation results and maintaining our core set of organizational values as well as overseeing fundraising, marketing, budgeting and setting priorities. As State Director, she is the Connecticut Chapter’s chief liaison to the Worldwide Office and Board of Trustees and is the chief spokesperson for both internal and external constituents.

Frogard brings to the Connecticut Chapter a solid track record of conservation experience and success. Previously, she was the Director of Field Conservation for Eastern Colorado, where, working closely with private landowners and government agencies, she was responsible for putting together complex transactions to conserve large landscapes of ranchlands. She has also worked extensively with the Colorado Chapter’s Board of Trustees and major donors.  Among the many recognitions of her work was her selection in The Nature Conservancy’s Class of 2010 Leadership Excellence Program. She recently returned from a special assignment to Arusha, Tanzania, where she mentored the Executive Director of the Tanzania Land Conservation Trust in developing a short-term and long-term strategic plan and shaping the board, which included a former president of Tanzania.

Frogard came to The Nature Conservancy in 2004 from the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in Colorado Springs, where she was the Director of Education and Volunteer Services.  She has a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from the College of Veterinary Medicine in Hannover, Germany and a Masters’ Degree in Basic Science from the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs. 

 

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 23
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate 94%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 28 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 0
Unspecified 28
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Dr. Lise Hanners Apr 2002 - Aug 2010
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Collaborations
The Nature Conservancy collaborates with numerous partners, including local, state and federal governments; other non-profit organizations; corporations and individuals.
Board Chair
John Levinson
Company Affiliation Founder and President, Westway Capital LLC
Term Dec 2011 to Sept 2014
Email JohnL@westwaycapital.com
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Ms. Frances Ashley Community Volunteer
Leigh Bonney CFO, The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust
Rodrigo Canales Ph.D.Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior, Yale School of Management
Michael Donnelly EsquireMurtha Cullina LLP
Daniel C. Esty Hillhouse Professor of Environmental Law and Policy, Yale University
James H. Heym Ph.D.Biotechnology Consultant
David R. Jaffe President and CEO, Ascena Retail Group
Lindsey Larsen Yale Board Fellow
Elizabeth McCance Ph.D.Associate Professor of Biology and Environmental Science, Norwalk Community College
J. Todd Miranowski Silver Point Capital
John Pritchard EsquireRetired Senior Partner, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP
Allen Rosenshine BBDO Worldwide (retired)
Michael Sconyers EsquireAckerly Brown LLP
Nick Tiller Founder and Chair, Sustainable America
Sarah Kimberly Welch AXA Distributors
Gary Yohe Ph.D.Woodhouse/Sysco Professor of Economics and the Huffington Foundation Professor of Economics and Environmental Studies, Wesleyan University
Michael Zea McKinsey & Company
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 17
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 13
Female 5
Standing Committees
Finance
Marketing
Executive
Scientific Advisory
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $5,683,000.00
Projected Expenses $5,683,000.00
Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Documents
Form 990s
9902013
9902012
9902011
9902010
9902009
9902008
990 Statements2008
IRS Letter of Exemption
TNC IRS Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Revenue$859,133,843$949,132,306$997,037,763
Total Expenses$752,216,964$756,406,814$852,695,208
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$496,636,465$530,679,683$502,290,527
Government Contributions$110,757,915$149,744,370$149,419,718
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$110,757,915$149,744,370$149,419,718
Individual Contributions$1,791,599$2,145,634--
------
$183,578,557$151,038,082$232,038,350
Investment Income, Net of Losses$54,258,421$98,797,014$100,604,554
Membership Dues------
Special Events$1,580,668$3,098,408$1,741,110
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$10,530,218$13,629,115$10,943,504
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$542,168,978$558,787,835$672,756,640
Administration Expense$122,163,948$114,270,650$106,405,453
Fundraising Expense$87,884,038$83,348,329$73,533,115
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.141.251.17
Program Expense/Total Expenses72%74%79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue14%12%11%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$6,168,924,112$6,006,480,347$6,013,579,638
Current Assets$355,560,620$291,813,898$283,153,762
Long-Term Liabilities$708,924,097$734,927,018$784,700,125
Current Liabilities$53,328,019$50,447,424$48,320,787
Total Net Assets$5,406,671,996$5,221,105,905$5,180,558,726
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities6.675.785.86
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets11%12%13%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
Please note:  Form 990s and Audited Financial Statements are generated by The Nature Conservancy World Office; current year budget expenses and revenue is for the Connecticut Chapter and is unaudited.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 55 Church Street, Floor 3
New Haven, CT 065103029
Primary Phone 203 568-6280
Contact Email ct@tnc.org
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Frogard Ryan
Board Chair John Levinson
Board Chair Company Affiliation Founder and President, Westway Capital LLC

 

Related Information

Protect the Environment

Stewardship of our natural resources is essential if we wish to guarantee that present and future generations enjoy clean water, good air quality and open spaces. When you support organizations that protect the environment you address immediate need today while ensuring a greener tomorrow.

Promote Civic Vitality

Greater New Haven’s vibrancy is linked to its communities’ support of its neighborhoods, public gardens and sports, as well as its commitment to the protection of its people and pets.