A Place Called Hope
154 Pond Meadow Rd.
Killingworth CT 06419-1120
Contact Information
Address 154 Pond Meadow Rd.
Killingworth, CT 06419-1120
Telephone (203) 8043453 x8043453
Fax 203-8043453
E-mail hope4raptors@yahoo.com
Web and Social Media
Courtyard at A Place Called Hope
Mission
A Place Called Hope (APCH) is a Raptor Rehabilitation and Education Center made up of trained Wildlife Rehabilitators and volunteers who are dedicated to the Preservation of Wildlife.  Our goal is to rescue, re-nest, rehabilitate, and release wild Birds of Prey who have become injured, orphaned or ill with the intention of returning them to the wild after a brief stay at our Center. Those who can not return, due to their injuries often become ambassadors or faculty staff members who then help us to teach the public through educational presentations how to better co-exist with wildlife within one's very own backyard. 
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2009
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs Christine Elaine Cummings
Board Chair Mrs Christine Elaine Cummings
Board Chair Company Affiliation na
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission A Place Called Hope (APCH) is a Raptor Rehabilitation and Education Center made up of trained Wildlife Rehabilitators and volunteers who are dedicated to the Preservation of Wildlife.  Our goal is to rescue, re-nest, rehabilitate, and release wild Birds of Prey who have become injured, orphaned or ill with the intention of returning them to the wild after a brief stay at our Center. Those who can not return, due to their injuries often become ambassadors or faculty staff members who then help us to teach the public through educational presentations how to better co-exist with wildlife within one's very own backyard. 
Background
A Place Called Hope, Inc., founded in 2007 is an all volunteer based 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that specializes in the rescue and care of injured, orphaned or sick Birds of Prey plus within the State of CT. We rescue, rehabilitate, re-nest and release birds as well as educate the public on ways to better co-exist with all wildlife one might encounter within their very own backyard. Our primary mission is to preserve wildlife for the future. We answer to distress calls in regards to injured, orphaned or sick birds within our State with the intention of fixing the problem and returning the bird back to the environment whenever possible. Some do not make it back and often become part of our educational Faculty Staff with a new role in life as an ambassador for its own kind. Through educational presentations, these birds help us to teach the public simple ways to lessen common conflicts often encountered with wildlife. Since 98% of the injuries we see are related to mankind, we feel it is one of our top priorities to help the public understand how to lessen the impact we as humans are having on our wildlife and ultimately our planet.  We offer our presentations within our State and share up to four bird ambassadors in a one hour program targeting all ages. We care for any species of bird but our specialty as well as our Centers design is geared towards Birds of Prey. We rescue birds all over our State from vehicle collisions, building entrapments, chicken coop entrapments, garbage entanglements, cat or dog attacks, secondary poisoning, intentional harm or shootings, window collisions and the 2% that come down from natural causes with the intention of returning the bird to the natural environment after a brief stay at our facility. On average, we cater to between 400 - 500 birds annually. We also tackle re-nesting projects every Spring for nest fall victims since we feel birds are best raised by birds and understand that humans can not possibly raise a wild bird successfully for the ultimate goal of freedom. Some of these projects require our climber to go up 85 feet into a tree to return the nestling so the parents can resume care. We have had a 100% success rate since starting this endeavor of re-nesting in 2005.
 
Impact
In 2016 A Place Called Hope saw 526 Birds at our Center. Each year these numbers inevitably increase as we persist in answering to the unique demand for our services. We continuously expand our facility to accommodate the rotations and strive to provide top quality care and housing. 
In 2016 we put 20 baby Birds of Prey back into their nest structures after becoming nest fall victims. Each bird put back has the potential of creating 100's of offspring should it survive thus increasing the species and helping in the preservation of its own kind. Birds are best raised by birds and our efforts to return them to their parents is one of our themes in educating the public should they find fallen bird babies.
In 2016 APCH offered 95 offsite presentations and 205 onsite tours and attended multiple fairs and festivals in order to spread our message and mission.  In 2017 we would like to see an increase of 30% in the numbers of presentations and tours we offer to the public. We would also like to see a Golden Eagle Aviary completed in order to obtain legal acquisition from USFWS to house a non-releasable Golden Eagle at our Center to add to our Faculty Staff birds for public programming. We would also like to solidify logistics and plans to start fundraising for a special physical therapy Flight Muse to offer rehabilitation cases a space for continuous flight to condition for release. This octagon building measures a minimum of 40 x 60 and will be the most expensive project we have tackled thus far. So far we estimate the cost to be $100,000.  This structure is critical to the conditioning stage of sending these birds back to freedom with the proper strength and stamina required to be free. In 2017, we would like to accomplish a better parking area to accommodate visitors. We would also like to have researched the possibility and logistics of a composting bathroom to offer the public instead of having to open up the private home on the property.  
 
Needs
1. Maintenance Volunteers; Currently, we hold a cleaning Volunteer Day once a week. We need to find a way to incorporate a separate Volunteer Day to manage maintenance needs outside of routine cleaning.
2. Under-age Volunteers; We stopped taking kids under 16 due to the lack of a Volunteer Coordinator for Kids. We need an adult willing to be in charge of a Volunteer Day specific to kids that can manage simple projects on site outside of aviary structures.
3. Parking Lot; we run into having to limit the amount of attendees to any onsite activity due to a parking issue.
4. Public Bathroom; there is currently no bathroom other than the private residence belonging to Co-Founders. This is challenging with household dogs and cats and strangers entering a private home unattended.
5. Fundraising Events; we need more events per year but must balance full time job work schedules. At some point, President Christine Cummings will need to work for APCH full time and be compensated for her time with a small paycheck. APCH is limited until this transition can physically take place.  
CEO Statement As President and Co-Founder of A Place Called Hope, Inc. it is my utmost priority to carry out our mission of Preserving Wildlife for the Future. Besides the obvious, caring for the numerous rehab patients we cater to, I find that reaching the public through educational opportunities helps us to achieve our mission in regards to preserving wildlife for the future. For any individual who gets to be up close to one of our magnificent ambassadors they also get to experience a truly unique and memorable moment. This experience is further enhanced especially when the hawk, falcon, owl or eagle stares into their eyes. This kind of connection helps us to convince the public that the wildlife and the environment truly matter. Each program bird tells a story of how it came to be in our care which amplifies our message of how to lessen conflicts so that we may better co-exist with one another. It used to be that we were told to "let nature take its course" and just remain uninvolved to any wild animal crisis. Since 98% of the injuries and distress calls we answer to are related to mankind, we stress that it is no longer acceptable to do nothing. We are the cause to the destruction and decline of our environment and our wildlife so it is time to intervene. It is up to us to become a part of the solution by doing simple things to help limit common negative conflicts. For example, cutting up six pack ring holders, picking up garbage that may cause entanglements, eliminating the use of rodenticides, using ultra violet light markers on glass to eliminate window strikes, stopping ceremonial releases of balloons, stopping people from discarding cigarette butts, stressing recycling or re-use of single use plastics, or suggesting alternative containers such as bags or bottles. Together we can make a difference no matter what age we are. A Place Called Hope was founded in 2007 and we are proud to look back and see the difference we have made for the thousands of birds we have rescued and the millions of people we have addressed. We look forward to our Future and will no doubt continue onward with the same dedication as we had when we first developed this organization. 
Board Chair Statement
"Follow your Bliss" is what my very own father told me while I was growing up. Find your "passion" and make it your life. There is no better way to exist than to love what you are working for. These birds are my passion, my life, and my 100%. I like to tell people that we eat, sleep and breathe what we are doing with this nonprofit. If just being in each birds presence were not enough, having the opportunity to rescue and actually save one of these birds is an additional incredible honor. To see one return to freedom is the best gift for all the hard work involved in the rescue and rehabilitation process. Although not all make it home, even helping those that are suffering transition is another honor. We call it a "gift" when there is no alternative and the bird must be euthanized. Having a Faculty Staff of Birds for public programming and on site display is also a joy. Caring for these beings is what we want to do despite the time and effort involved 24 hours a day 365 days per year no matter what the weather is. Our dedication to what we are doing shows whenever a person gets to come out for a tour to meet the birds on site and truly understand what it is we are working so hard for. My heart is full at any given time because I know I am following my Bliss. 
There are plenty of challenges. Being "on call" is how we exist. There is no holiday, birthday, vacation that is not interrupted with a wildlife concern. There is no day off to just relax. Chores are constant. It is not easy to go away even for one day, which would drive most people crazy. When we do travel, it can't be far or for long and we must involve a crew of volunteers to manage the Center in our absence. Having a camera system helps us to check in and monitor but in my own personal case, coming home is the best part of vacation to me. Weather can be a real challenge. Winters in CT can be quite brutal, but that does not mean we can hibernate and neglect the care of our feathered friends. Snow removal must happen each snow fall and since we currently have over 12,000 square feet of aviary structures, there are plenty of places that must be shoveled including rooftops, trails to and from, inside each aviary and the roadway down to the aviaries.  The biggest challenge I personally face is the balance between the nonprofit and the day job. In order for APCH to grow to the next level which includes making us more available for more public and school programming, I am seeing the necessity for me to leave my day job. As terrifying as this thought is, my day job is suffering due to my dedication and focus on the organization and APCH is affected by my job schedule. Our accountant says I am allowed to be financially compensated for the work I do, but since the very start, I have been proud to be a volunteer for this unpaid profession. For the sake of our future, my time must shift and my availability must expand to match the demand for not only programming, but rescues, releases, and rehabilitation. Our Board is in agreement that this transition is inevitable and overdue. I am proud to run this nonprofit and feel that we have been beneficial to the wildlife we cater to as well as the public we reach out to. Our success continues as we look forward to the future. 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Animal Related / Wildlife Preservation & Protection
Secondary Organization Category Environment / Environmental Education
Tertiary Organization Category Education / Educational Services
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
We answer to wildlife crisis calls across the entire state of Connecticut. We share Educational Presentations across the entire state of Connecticut. Our primary event footprint is Middlesex and New Haven County for fundraising events, fairs and festivals but we cover and are available to the entire state.
Programs
Description We travel anywhere within our state to offer Live Birds of Prey presentations which includes four native species of birds found in CT. This program offers the audience a unique, up close experience where often deep connections can be made. Each Bird has suffered from some sort of common conflict with humans, and shares simple suggestions on ways to lessen conflicts that may help avoid these accidents in the future. This presentation includes two diurnal birds and two nocturnal birds offering a well rounded educational experience.
Population Served Families / US /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. With each program we offer, more contacts are made and more programs are scheduled offering APCH new ways to reach our audience and teach the public. Each live experience builds more support as people naturally fall in love with some of our Faculty Staff members. This bond helps to create stewardship for the environment.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The impact of meeting a live animal during a presentation such as this helps to create a feeling of urgency to help stop common conflicts. The lessons/tips we share are easy to consider and are likely done after seeing the impact some of these things may have on an actual animal. This style of teaching will help to ensure a better plan to co-exist with wildlife.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Feedback for our programs are the best way we know whether or not we are making the impression we strive for. Being asked back to the same groups, schools, or events helps us to assess if we are succeeding in our goals. 
 

I am a Board member of the FOH. In that context I have organized numerous environmental and Nature programs at Meigs Point Nature Center as well as special events like the Hammonassett Festival, now held annually. As often as possible I invite participation by A Place Called Hope. They tend to draw the largest crowds being appreciated by folks of all ages. Their presentations are both entertaining but more importantly educational. Their volunteers are passionate and well informed. APCH is worthy of support by any and all sources. Don Rankin, M.D. Friends of Hammonasset

 
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. We often witness people after our presentations actually picking up the area around them. Children tend to do this after an outdoor presentation. We have many people wait to speak to us after our talks to share their very own experiences and often they tell us of what they are doing to make a difference. We always suggest that our audiences arrange local clean up efforts and we are seeing these happen more and more.
Description We offer a live four Owl presentation which focuses on native Owls. In CT, there are 8 different species found. This presentation introduces the audience to the varying sizes and differences between them. Each Owl offers tips on how to better co-exist with all wildlife since 98% of the injuries we deal with are related to man-kind. Owls have unique adaptations to help them survive in the night. This program shares many facts and biology to each species. The mysterious sounds of the night are often solved during this program.
Population Served Families / Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. With every new encounter, a new supporter may develop. The more supporters we have, the better we can preserve our wildlife. With each presentation, a new contact is usually revealed. With each live encounter, we feel the stories shared are easier to remember since there is a live bird that was damaged in a way related to humans. These birds are memorable as it is, but add their negative human encounter and the results are profound. People actually get to see what the damages are in person.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Each live experience helps us to better protect each species. When the audience looks into the eyes of an Owl, a connection is usually made and any fears are often alleviated. After hearing the stories shared about each birds injury, most people want to help stop adding to the issues by actually doing some of the suggestions we promote.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Feedback and being asked to return or referred to other venues helps us to know that we are achieving our goals. 
 

As you know, Christine, I've been involved in nature education for the past 30 years. I've worked for National Audubon and have owned our store since 2007. One of the reasons I chose A Place Called Hope for our 10th Anniversary Celebration Weekend was because I had heard many good comments on the quality of your programs. The programs you did for us on Saturday and Sunday, June 10 & 11 were excellent. We're still getting comments from our customers who attended your program about how much they learned. We've had many raptor and nature presentations at our store over the past 10 years. None was as well-received as yours. Nature education is essential for the health and future of our world. High-quality educational programs like yours are critical to teaching young and old alike the importance of nature to human well-being. A Place Called Hope does that in the very best way possible.


Thank you again for the wonderful programs. We look forward to having you back soon!


Margaret Robbins

Owner


Wild Birds Unlimited

317 Federal Rd. Suite D1

Brookfield, CT 06804

 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. We reach a vast amount of people all over our state. Most of our weekly volunteers have met us during a presentation or event. They see what we are doing and how we are trying to help preserve wildlife and they become moved enough to want to become involved. Volunteering at our Center offers the public a way to be close to these very special birds without having to become a public speaker, or rehabilitator. It gives many people a chance to learn by simply cleaning aviary structures and being close the each species.
Description This course is offered to the public each Spring and Fall season. It is not only a way for us to gain experienced First Responders, but also it is a way to share our knowledge and help to keep the public safe when attempting to rescue a wild animal in distress. This course is designed to offer the individual an understanding of what is often involved when dealing with injured birds of all kinds. Since the birds we cater to are predatory, they are often dangerous to handle so this course helps to teach people how to remain safe while attempting such rescues. It is also designed to teach about the proper ways to transport each animal so further injury does not take place. This lecture includes a power point and video portion to further enhance the subject matter. We charge per person and keep the cost low to encourage more involvement. This is a great way to encourage people to volunteer.
Population Served Adults / US / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. We will inevitably develop a reliable First Responder list that will help us to help wildlife in distress with ease. This means we will not be a select few that must answer to the many calls and demands. This new volunteer list will be individuals that we know have taken the basic steps to understanding what is actually involved in a rescue and transport situation. This list will help all wildlife all over the state get to the proper facility, hospital or rehabilitator in a much more responsive manner than ever before.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. This seminar helps to ensure the safety of both the animal and the rescuer during a crisis. This seminar helps the public to get involved directly and offers a skill set to do so. This seminar allows the public to understand the dangers involved physically and legally so that they may be better informed prior to involvement. This seminar helps APCH build a First Responder list all over our state helping us to achieve our ultimate goals in rescuing wounded wildlife all over the state.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. As our First Responder list grows, we will know we are successful as we find more capable and trained individuals to call upon during animal crisis moments. This seminar also offers the public a real inside look at what is involved and helps each person to make an informed decision whether to proceed or not in this way of volunteering. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
We have added over 150 people to our First Responder List in just three seminars. This saves us critical time and gets each victim to where it needs to go promptly. We have also gained new onsite volunteers from this seminar as people naturally want to gain more experience and knowledge about the species they are likely to encounter.
 
 

To whom it may concern, Since completing the course I have been involved in several Rescue situations, Without the course I would have never had the tools,training and confidence. I have also made my self available to my local community so that others have a contact if they encounter a situation of wildlife in distress. Thank you Peter A Lombardo

Before taking this course I was afraid to approach an injured Raptor. After the course I am more confident in my ability to quickly and safely (for myself and the bird) pick up and transport a bird to APCH for help. Sondra Zak


 
 
 
Description This powerpoint presentation is offered to Veterinary Technicians and students to help prepare them for wild bird crisis in a Veterinary Hospital. This class teaches the basics on what to do and not do upon intake. Basic handling techniques and ways to assess without getting hurt or harming the patient. The legalities and who to contact are also shared.
Population Served Adults / General/Unspecified / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Most Vet Hospitals do not deal with wildlife because of the legalities or the lack of knowledge. This class helps to eliminate that and offers staff safe ways to stabilize patients while finding the species specific rehabilitator required for the wild animal in need.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. A better relationship between Veterinary and Rehabilitation facilities. This helps us to be sure that no further harm is being administered to Bird patients with well intended Veterinary staff. This class helps teach the basics before getting the wild bird into the care of a Federally Permitted Rehabilitator. This class helps keep the handler safe and the patient alive.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Feedback and being asked to return to Veterinary Hospitals to teach the class tells us that this is working. More Animal Hospitals will eventually be willing to intake wild animals if they are aware of the laws and the contacts to help them after initial exams. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. To see an increase in Animal Practices accepting wildlife for the temporary duration while finding the proper licensed rehabilitator for long term care is our goal. The public often finds wildlife and brings the animal in crisis to Vet Hospitals not knowing they could be turned away. With this seminar, staff can learn the basics so that they can help until a licensed rehabilitator is located. 
Description We offer a 1/2 hour program which includes two smaller species of Birds of Prey. Usually a small Owl and a small Falcon are shared with the younger audience to introduce children to Birds of Prey without becoming overwhelmed or frightened. We share props to teach young kids how to better co-exist with all wildlife and often share a story book about a Brave Little Owl to help emphasize a better connection between the wild birds, animals, the environment and young children.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Kids develop an interest after one of these live bird experiences. This interest helps us to preserve wildlife for the future since a connection has been established. Kids grow up caring about what they know and meeting one of these Birds in person has a positive impact. Most kids learn by doing, so whenever possible, we use our props to teach them what we mean by Picking It Up. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. This introductory program entices younger children into the world of Birds of Prey without fear. The smaller Birds are non-threatening and appealing to our younger audience. These Birds are memorable and help us to teach younger kids how to respect wildlife and what can happen to them when we don't.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The thank you notes often shared after these programs depict drawing of the birds shared during the program. The birds are drawn large and usually show how the bird was injured. This tells us the kids are paying attention and are aware of the problems these birds face. The feedback from kids after presentations are often them expressing how they have helped in the past and how they plan to help in the future. Many insist that they are going to grow up to be Wildlife Rehabilitators.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
The younger audience walks away with a newfound connection to wildlife. These kids want to help and are often inspired to do so by cleaning up their own backyards after meeting one of our birds.
 

A Place Called Hope is a phenomenal organization who is always there when we are in need. From rescuing our owlet and re-nesting it on our property, to visiting our campers regularly throughout the summer, to being a phone call away if we have a question about a bird that is injured or in need (or just a general bird question too!). They are Bushy Hill Nature Center's go-to resource for all things related to birds! Christine, Todd and Grace are always eager to help and educate our campers and community any time we ask. An example of this is for the last three summers APCH has volunteered their time throughout the summer to visit with our youngest campers on their overnights. They bring their owls for the campers to meet them up-close and personal. Not only do they educate our kiddos on the owls, sharing their sounds and habits with them so they can recognize their sounds in the night, but they take it a step further and include other nocturnal animals that the campers might hear or see at night. In addition to this, they also educate the children on their impact on the birds and animals and teach them how humans and our habits effect these magnificent creatures. They teach about the importance of proper trash removal, recycling, use of pesticides, etc. APCH has such a powerful and positive impact on our programs, the campers and their families. They are a valuable and vital resource to us and our community! --

Jen Gannon Malaguti

Director

Bushy Hill Nature Center

860-767-2148 ext 104

www.bushyhill.org

 
Program Comments
CEO Comments
Grace Krick - Vice President
The mission of APCH aligns with my beliefs, goals, hopes and what is important to me overall. I am proud to be a part of this organization and feel privileged to work alongside others who share like values. We face many challenges. Time management is certainly one. Being able to reach all that need our care in a timely manner is critical to what we strive to do. The Political climate is uncertain for the planet resulting in resistance to our cause. Finances and funding are getting harder to obtain. Cost for supplies, building and maintenance, food and medical care only increase with each year. With challenges come opportunities. We are meeting these challenges in many different ways. Training interested community members to help rescue and transport sick or injured birds in a timely manner. Continued educational efforts especially geared towards children and the young who will one day be in charge of our planet. We are becoming more proactive in getting to know our representatives and making them aware of how we feel about issues that affect our wildlife and environment. We address the financial concerns by planning and organizing more Fundraisers, donations, seeking new grant sources, educational programming and teaching seminars. As a part of this mission, I personally feel that I am doing my part in making a difference. I wouldn't have it any other way. 
CEO/Executive Director
Mrs Christine Elaine Cummings
Term Start Jan 2007
Email hope4raptors@yahoo.com
Experience Christine Cummings is the Founder and President of APCH. I have worked with animals my entire life as caretaker, animal technician, wildlife rehabilitator, and had attended College for a Bachelor of Arts degree as well as a degree in Art Education. Teaching is important to me since I believe children are our future. Despite my training, my need to continue to work with animals was still my priority so I decided to open my own business in my young twenties. I have owned and operated my own Professional Dog/Cat Grooming Business since 1984 and have been a licensed wildlife rehabilitator since 2005. Running and operating my own professional business has helped me to develop the necessary skills to run and operate this non-profit organization. Having a College Education has helped to prepare me for the clerical and organizational skills required for such an endeavor. My teaching background has pulled it all together in the realm of public presentations. I have come full circle in the ability to work with animals, both domestic and wild as well as educate the public both young and old. I am doing what I was born to do, as I follow my bliss and strive to make a difference for the animals I cater to. 
Co-CEO
Mrs Grace Louise Krick
Term Start Jan 2007
Email drrehabber@gmail.com
Experience Grace Krick has been a wildlife rehabilitator for the past 20 years. Her nursing background has helped propel her in this hands on care field. Her nursing background has also prepared her to interact with the public in a gentle and caring manner. Grace had been on the Board of another non-profit organization similar to APCH for 15 years prior to this organization's founding date. Her experience has brought much to the table. Her sensitive nature helps both human and animal alike.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 15
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 0%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 0
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation N/A
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Collaborations
Meigs Point Nature Center
The Friends of Hammonasset
Bushy Hill Nature Center
Other Licensed Wildlife Rehabilitators 
Comments
CEO Comments
Ranger Russ Miller - Board Member -
I have been an environmental educator for over 20 years and am the Director of Meigs Point Nature Center and it is for this reason that I volunteer as a board member of APCH. I believe education is the strongest resource available to protect and preserve the natural world. Educational programs offered by APCH are an excellent way for the public to understand and appreciate Raptors and wildlife. This knowledge can then be a direct conduit to save these magnificent birds when injured. Native species have many challenges to survive in the wild without the obstacles presented by human contact. With more cars on our roads every year the number of injuries caused by human contact also increases. APCH has the challenge of correcting the imbalance caused by these direct and indirect contacts. The increase puts a strain on an all volunteer organization. APCH has been increasing seminars to train more responders to transport with injured wildlife. With a mission based on the preservation of wildlife, APCH is doing its part.
Board Chair
Mrs Christine Elaine Cummings
Company Affiliation na
Term Jan 2007 to Dec 2023
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr Ned Hurle Community Volunteer
Mrs Grace Louise Krick Vice President
Mrs Marilyn Lavezzoli Community Volunteer
Mr Russ Miller Community Volunteer
Mr Todd Michael Secki Secretary/Treasurer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 3
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Board Co-Chair
Mrs Grace Louise Krick
Term Jan 2007 to Dec 2023
Email drrehabber@gmail.com
CEO Comments
Marilyn Lavezzoli - Board Member -
I began volunteering in 2009 and was immediately impressed with the commitment that APCH made to the preservation of wildlife. There is never a situation too far, too high or too impossible when it comes to rescuing a bird in trouble. There is always an attempt made. I joined the Board of Directors in 2010 and have been actively involved in every aspect of the organization ever since. It never gets old. I feel honored to be a part of this special group of people and the amazing work that we do. In the almost nine years I have been involved I have seen incredible growth with many plans for continuing projects in the future. We've come a long way yet there are still many things that need to be done. Some of those projects include; Golden Eagle Aviary, Parking Lot, Composting Bathroom, Flight Conditioning Building and an Education Center. APCH has gained an enormous following and a reputation for going to great lengths to help injured birds. We do programs, seminars, fundraisers all around the State to help us in our efforts to do so. We have big dreams. As we continue to grow, we see a need to enlist more people with the love of nature to help us achieve these dreams. 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $55,000.00
Projected Expenses $40,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
990-EZ2016
990-N2015
990-N2014
990-N2013
IRS Letter of Exemption
non-profit EIN Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$55,206$27,250$28,764
Administration Expense$8,763$20,850$8,514
Fundraising Expense$1,725$1,500$500
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.170.861.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses84%45%71%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue3%4%2%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$33,655----
Current Assets------
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets$33,655----
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Community Foundation of Middlesex County $2,000Ailan Louis Loeb Foundation $7,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --ALLF $7,000Killingworth Foundation $1,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Guilford Foundation $5,000 --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%----
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments
For 2017 first quarter, our expense was greater at $25,344.69 because of our property tax bill equaling $3901.61 and an unexpected tree emergency costing us $4000 to remedy. We are also still under construction and the first quarter in labor alone was $6,603 not including supplies/materials.  
 
Ned Hurle - Board Member -
I spent my professional career (35 years) in the transportation/environmental field. I know well the stress that humans, in a small urbanized state, place upon wildlife. In retirement, I can give back time and effort to assist, in real time, the protection and stewardship of raptors in need. Through volunteer and board work I can further the education of public citizens, especially the next generation, in the value that these important species have to our human environment. I am also gratified when a youngster, upon seeing a raptor in all of its glory for the first time, goes home with a sense of wonder at being so close to a vibrant, wild creature. This child will, most likely, have a greater appreciation of how raptors fit into our overall environment. I firmly believe that an educated populace will result in a more caring and environmentally responsible society. The challenges are many and sometimes daunting. They include developing a reliable and sustainable source of funding for capital improvements, infrastructure maintenance, and program delivery. While our core constituency is generous in providing donations, it is not an overly wealthy community. Consequently, APCH has begun to search out and engage more long term funding opportunities such as working with larger community and environmental foundations to hopefully secure a more robust funding stream. The Board is dedicated to networking with similar organizations to further this goal. This is a work in progress and refinements in approaches will evolve. Another challenge is expanding our use of our very dedicated volunteers and our overall "environmental community", and to do this as efficiently as possible. Progress in this is evident in updating the web site to be more user friendly by the volunteer staff. Cross training of volunteers to provide broader expertise has also increased in 2016/17 as had the addition of a mid-week volunteer day to accomplish more focused tasks. The most recent "Rescue and Transport" seminars conducted by APCH have added over 120 additional personnel who now know the basics of safely rescuing and transporting injured raptors to APCH. The establishment of a county or regional response list will greatly streamline this very important "first touch" aspect of helping a bird in need.  Keeping up with the ever increasing demand for rescue, rehabilitation, re-nesting, and release of raptors in need is always a challenge for an all volunteer organization. APCH's programs stress the importance of removing dangers that these birds face in the human environment. A new "Pick It Up" campaign highlights the importance of removing wildlife endangering trash from the environment before it causes damage.
 
Address 154 Pond Meadow Rd.
Killingworth, CT 064191120
Primary Phone 203 8043453 8043453
Contact Email hope4raptors@yahoo.com
CEO/Executive Director Mrs Christine Elaine Cummings
Board Chair Mrs Christine Elaine Cummings
Board Chair Company Affiliation na

 

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