Massaro Community Farm
41 Ford Road
Woodbridge CT 06525
Contact Information
Address 41 Ford Road
Woodbridge, CT 06525-
Telephone (203) 736-8618 x
Fax 203-736-8618
E-mail caty@massarofarm.org
Web and Social Media
Students enjoy a lesson in the Learning Garden.

Mission
Massaro Community Farm's mission is to preserve farmland using organic methods, provide food for the hungry, and create a place where the community can come together for learning, inspiration, and fun. Keep Farming, Feed People. Build Community.   
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2008
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Caty Poole
Board Chair Tassos Kyriakides
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale School of Public Health
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
Massaro Community Farm's mission is to preserve farmland using organic methods, provide food for the hungry, and create a place where the community can come together for learning, inspiration, and fun. Keep Farming, Feed People. Build Community.   
Background
Massaro Community Farm Inc. ("MCF") is a Connecticut not-for-profit membership corporation organized on November 3, 2008. It received a tax exempt determination letter from the IRS on December 15, 2009. MCF is governed by 12 board members elected for three-year terms by its members, and by officers elected annually by the board of directors. 
 
MCF was created by a group of local Woodbridge volunteers committed to continue farming at the location of the former Massaro family dairy farm. Under a long term lease with the Town of Woodbridge, MCF began an organic vegetable farming operation on the 57-acre property in 2010. The Farm was given to the Town by the Massaro family in 2007 on the death of John Massaro Jr..  This gift was conditioned on maintaining the property in conservation. 
 
Our farming operation will have ~10 acres under cultivation in the 2017 season. This supports a 200-member CSA, and allows us to sell additional produce at nearby farmer's markets and to select restaurants. The farm pays rent in the form of produce, donating at least 10% of its weekly harvest all season long to hunger relief agencies. We have worked with several agencies since inception, but current recipients are Salvation Army (Ansonia),  Woodbridge Human Services Dept and the CT Food Bank. 
 
MCF offers farm-based education to youth and adults around organic farming and sustainable land management, and have an ongoing partnership with CT Beekeeper's Association and FoodCorps. We also hold several community-wide events each year, including a farm-to-table dinner, which is our largest annual fundraiser. 
Impact

2016 marked the 100th anniversary since the Massaro family arrived in Woodbridge. We celebrated the centennial by creating a historical town farm map, a pictoral history display, student art, and a Paul Winter Concert this past February.

In 2016, we expanded the farming operation by clearing and fencing several additional acres. We also had higher produce donations than in any other year, or 9,600 pounds (16% of our harvest) to our hunger relief partners.
 
We've improved the administrative practices with seasonal support staff, highlighting the need to expand these positions on a permanent basis. We implemented efficiencies in bookkeeping and recordkeeping, allowing us to more accurately capture our impact and successes in our annual report. And as our founding board members reach term limits, we are recruiting committed individuals who bring necessary skills to our board and working committees. Lastly, we formalized two additional committees that had previously been ad hoc - the facilities and nominating committees.
 
We topped our successes by securing 30 new contributing members who pledged $500 each as sustaining members of Massaro Community Farm. Centennial activities were concluded in February 2017 at a special Paul Winter Consort event.  This event took place under a new partnership with Ansonia's Church of the Assumption, drew a crowd of 500, and exceeded income expectations. 
 
Top goals for the current year include maintaining our commitment to food donations, continuing to fine tune our educational offerings, further support staffing positions through adequate pay, and receiving town approval for an improved safety and parking plan on our property. We also plan to advance our board succession planning, as well as on-boarding and exit processes.  
Needs

To move forward, MCF needs to adequately staff itself to continue fulfilling our mission. This means making permanent the positions of Education Director and Operations Assistant - positions that were previously seasonal. This will allow our Executive Director to devote necessary attention to financial management, planning, and strategy. These two positions add ~$30,000 and nearly 17% to our budget over the prior year. These critical positions will support revenue growth and program offerings. They will also allow us to optimize volunteer efforts, improving our operation as well as our food donation program. 

We also want to ensure adequate pay to existing staff. Thankfully, we've maintained consistency by both our farm manager and executive director, and farm staff. We've increased the leadership salaries modestly in each of the last 2 years but they are still low relative to similar sized organizations. We want to keep pace with the market to ensure retention of these 2 key positions. We also want to pay our farm staff a living wage and keep pace with increasing minimum wages. 
 
Excess funds up until now have largely been put towards programs & farm infrastructure. Any excess funds in 2017 going forward will largely be put towards staff and overall board development, which, in turn, will foster improved community connections and success through ongoing programs and services.   
CEO Statement

The Massaro Community Farm (MCF) continues the historic agricultural traditions begun in 1916 by the Massaro family. After many years in the for-profit life sciences business, I found myself drawn into issues of equitable food access across all socioeconomic groups in our communities. MCF specifically appealed to me because of its openness and commitment to give 10% back to the community. 

The fact that this venture got off the ground at all is a miracle, considering its founding board members were raising funds to save this historic farm during a period of financial crisis in this country. But its continued success is, in large part, based on its unique location and structure. The truth is that non-corporate and private farms struggle to bring in enough revenue to support themselves, and are forced to find additional, often unrelated, revenue streams. At MCF, the side by side operation of the growing production, together with the tax-exempt nonprofit, allows us to optimize several revenue streams, balancing income from produce sales, fundraising events, individual contributions and grants all while being a resource for the greater community.
 
The farm has also had the benefit of invested residents and thoughtful management. Our directors manage conservatively, carefully managing expenses against income. Our farm manager has taken full advantage of CT & USDA funding opportunities to help us build out the farm infrastructure and to improve the land with invasive management and replanting native species. 
 
These factors, together with our geographic location spanning diverse neighborhoods, allow us to make the most of our immediate support base in Woodbridge, and deliver much needed services to our community in need next door - largely in Ansonia. There isn't another farm in our region that is both a working farm and can provide the education that we offer. 
 
These are the aspects that first drew me to MCF. And the daily gift of being on the farm and interacting with all these constituencies is what continues to inspire me. I'm also excited about the newer partnerships we've formed with Valley United Way,  The Boys & Girls Club, the YMCA, the Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce and others to bring our food and education to the community, working to change long term behaviors when it comes to food and encouraging self-sufficiency.  
Board Chair Statement
I became involved with Massaro Farm several years ago, first as a CSA subscriber, then as a volunteer for the event that drew me in - Dinner on the Farm. I was so amazed that this jewel existed in our small town that I couldn't resist finding ways to support it. Little did I know that I'd be honored by serving as board president a few years later. 
 
I was fortunate to get involved when many founding board members were still engaged, lending their support and their wealth of historical knowledge. Now we are starting to see some of those members cycle off, which leaves us with the ongoing challenge of most nonprofits - to recruit and retain new board members who will add value to the overall organization. Additionally, we face other routine issues, like creating certain policies, enlisting best practices, improving administrative operations. But these seem like small hurdles to overcome because the farm, though young, has such a strong base of support in the surrounding community, especially from its CSA subscribers.
 
Being on the farm and being able to bring my children to pick up our fresh produce each week throughout the season reminds me of values still more common in practice in my homeland of Greece. In today's fast paced world, I want my children to know what it means to grow and pick your own food, taste the difference when food is freshly picked, and know the story of the farm where it was grown. 
 
As a clinician, I not only appreciate the value of good food for my family, but the difference in can make it people's lives who otherwise could not afford organic produce. Protecting this open community space and supporting the contributions to the surrounding community in need are what drive my passion for the work we do at the farm and the greater impact we can have.  
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Agricultural Programs
Secondary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Food Banks, Food Pantries
Tertiary Organization Category Environment /
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Derby
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Milford
New Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Woodbridge
Hamden
Massaro Community Farm, located in Woodbridge, serves the immediately surrounding towns.  Most of our youth-based education and food donation programs serve the residents of Ansonia, Derby and Woodbridge. Our workshops and food sales draw clientele and interest from the more extended towns of the other towns named above. 
Programs
Description Massaro Community Farm partners with local hunger relief organizations to bring at least 10% of our healthy, organic produced food-and often more-to those in need. This produce goes to recipients primarily in Woodbridge, Ansonia and Derby. Our fresh produce supplements the mostly nonperishable foods clientele are receiving from area food pantries. Though we also give bulk items to The CT Food Bank, which has the capacity to redistribute these items across the greater New Haven area. Amounts donated range from 7-9,000 pounds per season, or more, and can have a market value between $20-30,000. Selecting and sorting produce for donation takes 5-10% of staff time each week. 
Population Served At-Risk Populations / Homeless / Elderly and/or Disabled
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Short-term success will be evidenced by our actual food donations, calculated each season by pounds donated and market value of the donated produce. The result is providing increased access to healthy, nutritious food to those in need in the towns surrounding the farm. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. It is the goal of Massaro Community Farm to donate 10% of its food production to local hunger relief organizations for the foreseeable future.  Understanding that each growing season is different, MCF anticipates that the amount we are able to donate will vary slightly fromyear to year, some times exceeding our target donation totals, other times reducing the amount we are able to donate.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The success of this program will be monitored by tracking the types of produce donated, the weight and value of produce donated, and the organizations donated to.  Data will show weekly, monthly and yearly food donation totals.  Staff  follows up with organizations donated to so as to ensure our produce is being well utilized.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. In its fourth year of production at Massaro Farm (2013), food donations to local hunger relief organizations totaled 8,157 pounds. Testimonials and follow up with our partner organizations indicate that, as pantries shift to individual choice options, clientele greatly appreciate fresh produce and very little goes to waste. Due to privacy issues, we do not go into more detail obtaining individual data on use of donated produce. 
Description

MCF provides curriculum based field trips for grades K-12, giving students the opportunity to engage in hands on activities of our farm operation.  Additionally, the farm has hosted a FoodCorps service member for nearly 4 years. The service member works in the Ansonia community to improve nutrition education, planting school gardens, integrating garden curriculum into the classroom and introducing healthy foods. FoodCorps is a perfect farm-to-classroom connection.

Each August, we hold a two week camp for 6-9 year olds, covering environmental appreciation and farming.
 
Adult classes and workshops cover topics such as backyard beekeeping, chicken owning, and other aspects of organic gardening and sustainable land management. Sometimes these are offered in partnership with other agencies like CT NOFA and CT Beekeeper's Association. In the pursuit of our mission, we use our facilities to engage participants of all ages, abilities and cultural backgrounds. 
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Adults / Infants to Preschool (under age 5)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Short term success will be evidenced by demand for, and participation in our educational programs.  The impact of these programs, will depend on the nature of the specific offerings.  For example, by offering a program on beekeeping and native pollinators, we may see an immediate outcome in the community as people plant and maintain native species which encourage a thriving ecosystem for bees and native pollinators.  A spring garden class might have the immediate impact of someone starting their own home garden.  Given that we plan to offer educational opportunities around food, agriculture and nature, it is likely that our education programs will impact program participants in a variety of ways.

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Ultimate changes will include an appreciation for open space and local food by the surrounding community, as evidenced by increased demand for and attendance at farm educational offerings and events. The farm offers a unique example of a biodiverse farm and mixed use business model. Long term success will be measured by increased demand and attendance for particular programs, as well as the farm becoming a community resource to its partners, including area schools, Boy & Girl Scout Troops, and other like-minded organizations. An example of this success could be the farm becoming a resource for starting and maintaining school gardens among valley schools. 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success will be evidenced by the success of fee-based educational offerings, participation in programs, and feedback from these programs.  Educational offerings will include, when applicable, feedback surveys on programs. As a community driven organization, we strive to meet the educational needs and interests of the community.  As such, we maintain an open ear to the community as to what types of programs we should offer through our newsletter, surveys and our annual meeting, to name a few.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
The farm's education committee has increased the number of students coming to the farm for farm-based education each year since we began in 2013. In 2016, we recorded ~1000 students in on-farm educational programming. 

We also recorded 450 attendees in our adult workshops on topics related to organic land management and gardening. 

The farm continues to draw steady crowds in all areas of education. 

Description
Massaro Community Farm is dedicated to the preservation and stewardship of Massaro Farm, so that it may thrive as a farm, producing food and providing educational opportunities for the greater New Haven and Lower Naugatuck Valley communities.  Massaro Farm is managed with an eye towards longevity so that it will remain a community resource for generations to come.
 
An ancillary benefit to the rest of what we do is that we've now had four farm staff go on to start their own farming operation. This is both a result of our location, management and the outstanding leadership style of our farm manager. Farm Manager Steve Munno's leadership and knowledge of a diversified operation guides would-be farmers forward with the knowledge they need to succeed and is breaking down the stereotype of farmers being over 50. 
Population Served Families / Adults / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Short-term success will require careful balance of the amount of acres under production, including expenses of same, against the income we can bring in from the sale of our produce. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long-term success will be proven by the farm's continued service to the community providing food and educational opportunities.  Ultimately, Massaro Community Farm could serve as a model for other farms and towns to follow for preserving farm land, keeping local farms in production, and using farms to benefit the community at large.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Success is tracked carefully and regularly throughout the season by recording amount of produce harvest and sold, as well as amounts donated. Continued demand for our product is measured by rate of subscription to our CSA and success of retail produce sales. Seasonal results are also evaluated in conjunction with feedback from customers. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Examples of program success include demand for our subscription program (fulling subscribing 200+ CSA shares) , and high rate of return customers each season (70%). Other examples include continued ability to secure State Ag grant funds to reclaim additional acreage and put under production as needed. 
Description Massaro Community Farm allows other groups to use our facilities for educational purposes. We also allow rental of our space on a limited basis for private events and parties.
Population Served Adults / Families / Other Economic Level
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. In 2013, the farm was the venue for our first farm-based wedding. Feedback was overwhelmingly positive and we anticipate hosting other fee-based private events at the farm. This will build our reputation, goodwill and support for long term survival of the farm. We also hosted several nonprofit group meetings at the farm and also see increased support for the farm as evidenced by a successful year end fundraising campaign.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. We hope to be a resource for the farm, ie, a place where other groups seek to provide information and education or merely entertainment by using farm facilities. This will be evidenced by other nonprofit groups, such as surrounding garden clubs using the farm space to hold meetings or demonstrations. We also foresee the farm being used as a venue for small, private events, such as weddings, birthdays and anniversaries.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is measured by close contact with external organizers, by modifying or increasing features/items made available, such as the installation of wi-fi in our barn in order to host external group meetings. Additional supplies were also purchased in anticipation of more fee-based events at the farm. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Examples of program success include increased demand for events at the farm, ranging from large group outings to small nonprofit meetings at the farm. We are unable to respond to all requests to host events (ie, greater than 200 ppl) due to limitations of parking, and the excessive wear and tear certain events may have on the farm. However, hosting small groups has increased goodwill in the community greatly, and fee-based events add to our revenue stream and offset additional expenses. 
Program Comments
CEO Comments
Massaro Community Farm strives towards attaining a balance between feeding people, sharing our space with the community, providing education, and sustainable land stewardship.
 
Balance, among all things, will be the key to our long term survival. This means each year we evaluate the farm activities that can provide revenue vs. those that provide a benefit. Increasing land under cultivation doesn't necessary mean we will grow more, but that we will rotate our crops more. How much we are actively growing in any season has to be measured against the cost of staff we can support, with the same applying to our programs and services. Overall, the farm is very careful to balance expenses relative to income in any given year. Additionally, we have begun nurturing our relationships with business and individual donors so that funders feel valued for their contributions to our success. 
 
 
CEO/Executive Director
Caty Poole
Term Start Apr 2013
Email caty@massarofarm.org
Experience
Caty Poole began working with our organization in the winter of 2011/2012 as a volunteer. A few months later she was hired as our part-time outreach and development coordinator (thanks in large part to a grant from CFGNH). Before becoming our full-time executive director, Caty also worked as part-time farm/field staff.
 
Caty comes to us after a long career in the for-profit life sciences industry. Her experience includes project management, strategic planning, financial planning, and investor communications. These diverse skills have allowed Caty to wear many hats for our fledgling organization as it grows. Her 
 
Caty has also been a lifelong organic gardener, and was responsible for the building and management of an organic community garden in Trenton, NJ.  
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 200
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Outreach & Development Coordinator
Experience/Biography Caty comes with many years of expertise with management, strategic planning, financial statement and governance in the for-profit corporate sector. With a lifelong interest in organic growing and a passion for community development, Caty is able to balance the many needs of our fledgling organization.
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
MCF collaborates with a number of other organizations in pursuit of its mission, and the list continues to grow.  Currently the list includes: Massaro Farm CSA, which conducts the farming operations at the Farm; Ansonia Salvation Army, Woodbridge Human Services, and CT Food Bank which act as food bank distributors for the donations of food made by MCF to needy residents of the communities it serves; Connecticut Beekeepers Association who maintain an active bee apiary at the farm and conduct beekeeping workshops; FoodCorps, who provides a service member to work with the Ansonia community on improving nutrition education among youth; the farm is a member of VITAHLS, a coalition in Lower Naugatuck Valley dedicated to improving health and fitness in schools; CitySeed (the farm is a regular vendor at Edgewood Farmer's Market). The Farm is also a member of the Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce (Lower Naugatuck Valley) and the Woodbridge Rotary.
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Food Donation RecognitionWoodbridge Human Services2016
Centennial AwardGreater Valley Chamber of Commerce2016
Comments
CEO Comments
The farm has continued to make great strides (for a young organization) towards formalizing policies, procedures and accounting practices, with the idea of a long term, mature organization in mind. We continue to refine our operating procedures and board policies. However, we still have additional work that we'd like to complete, such as finalizing our new multi-year plan, board exit reviews, and creating employee service day plan for businesses.
We also have plans to increase membership and financial support from surrounding towns that we are confident can be successful over time. So far, we have achieved our financial and program goals by following our strategic plan, and feel confident that board and management efforts - as long as they are continually and carefully guided - will continue to yield solid results in the form of fiscal and program growth. 
Board Chair
Tassos Kyriakides
Company Affiliation Yale School of Public Health
Term Apr 2017 to Apr 2018
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Anne Boucher 3M
James Calkins Chef & Caterer
Louisa Cunningham Retired, Yale Art Museum
Jonathan Gorham Green Media Ventures, business and media development
Amey Marrella Retired, CT State Dept of Ag
David Schneider Retired Estates Attorney
Cathy Shufro Yale University lecturer and journalist
Robert Tucker Architect
Alan Tyma Attorney, Independent Practice
Catherine Wick Second Nature Garden Design, landscape designer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 5
Standing Committees
Education
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Building
Nominating
CEO Comments
The President of our organization is our board chairman.  We have four standing committees, as described above. The biggest challenges will be to recruit board members who can meet the list of skill sets we've identified as core to supporting our organization, along with recruiting board members who represent the diverse we constituency we serve. Specifically, we'd like to have additional board representation from the Lower Naugatuck Valley. 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $198,700.00
Projected Expenses $185,775.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Food Donation Summary2016View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$24,350$30,808$64,541
Government Contributions$46,185$64,454$0
Federal$21,185----
State$25,000----
Local------
Unspecified--$64,454--
Individual Contributions------
------
$33,919$27,162$34,443
Investment Income, Net of Losses------
Membership Dues$32,088$17,594$31,558
Special Events----$38,552
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$60,219$56,191--
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$166,546$168,439$140,317
Administration Expense$29,478$26,349--
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.001.011.21
Program Expense/Total Expenses85%86%100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$152,144$153,608$94,669
Current Assets$45,915$42,313$40,892
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets$152,144$153,608$94,669
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Agriculture $25,000US Dept. of Agriculture $49,522The Werth Family Foundation $20,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountWerth Family Foundation $22,000The Werth Family Foundation $22,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $17,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountUS Dept. of Agriculture $21,185CT Dept. of Agriculture $20,000Citizens Bank $8,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments

The farm has not had a formal audit prepared by a third party, however we do consult with an external accounting professional from time to time. Footnotes to financial statements are generally included in attached profit & loss statements, except for 2014.

Please note that 2014 revenues were significantly higher than budgeted primarily due to exceeding fundraising targets for Rock to Rock and Dinner on the Farm, as well as grant funds obtained by our farm manager for land clearing and adding new high tunnels. The biggest deviation in expenditures was in machinery and land improvements. A storage shed was planned for the Learning Garden area that was temporarily postponed until a location for additional parking could be determined. 
 
During its first several years, the farm focused on rebuilding infrastructure to support the farm operation and to provide educational programming. Near term challenges include filling newly created positions and meeting income projections for the year. Long term challenges are to recruit board members that meet specific skill needs and balancing income generating activities with services provided, both in the farming operation and in education offerings and food donations.  
 
Historical knowledge and consistency from management, board/committee members and volunteers have greatly advanced our organization to becoming one that will survive over the long term. We feel confident that will continued careful management and partnering with other like minded agencies we will continue to provide thousands of pounds of fresh food to those in need each year and re-introduce many area youth and adults to the value of having a farm in our community. 
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile

Address 41 Ford Road
Woodbridge, CT 06525
Primary Phone 203 736-8618
Contact Email caty@massarofarm.org
CEO/Executive Director Caty Poole
Board Chair Tassos Kyriakides
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale School of Public Health

 

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