Architecture Resource Center
1221 Chapel St
New Haven CT 06511-4701
Contact Information
Address 1221 Chapel St
New Haven, CT 06511-4701
Telephone (860) 604-1074 x
Fax 860-871-2658
E-mail annasanko@sbcglobal.net
Mission

ARC programs show students how to use what they're learning in the real world.

Our intent is to provide K-12 students a heightened appreciation of how architecture and design relate to the world around them and to empower them with 21st-century skills and a problem-solving framework that can be applied in every aspect of learning and life.
ARC creates participatory and hands-on programs that:

· Reinforce students’ learning through applied science, technology, engineering and mathematical (STEM) concepts

· Stimulate and foster critical, creative and problem-solving skills for students and teachers

· Establish partnerships among families, schools, communities and businesses

· Encourage meaningful design programs as part of basic education

The mission of the Architecture Resource Center (ARC) is to improve creative and problem-solving skills in K-12 students through the principles of:

· Architecture

· Urban design

· Engineering

· Industrial design

· Graphic design

 
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2006
Former Names
Connecticut Architecture Foundation Inc.
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Anna Sanko
Board Chair Jay F Jacot
Board Chair Company Affiliation Thompson/Edwards Architects
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

ARC programs show students how to use what they're learning in the real world.

Our intent is to provide K-12 students a heightened appreciation of how architecture and design relate to the world around them and to empower them with 21st-century skills and a problem-solving framework that can be applied in every aspect of learning and life.
ARC creates participatory and hands-on programs that:

· Reinforce students’ learning through applied science, technology, engineering and mathematical (STEM) concepts

· Stimulate and foster critical, creative and problem-solving skills for students and teachers

· Establish partnerships among families, schools, communities and businesses

· Encourage meaningful design programs as part of basic education

The mission of the Architecture Resource Center (ARC) is to improve creative and problem-solving skills in K-12 students through the principles of:

· Architecture

· Urban design

· Engineering

· Industrial design

· Graphic design

 
Background

A design education organization, the ARC provides creative learning experiences for K-12 students, teachers and community organizations, which are participatory, interdisciplinary, and collaborative in approach.

  • Teachers learn about the power of the arts to transform education and become comfortable working with the arts and arts language. The interdisciplinary team-teaching approach including mathematics, science, humanities, and the arts help students to see the meaning and connection among those disciplines.
  • Students learn how to express themselves in two and three-dimensional language, how to communicate their ideas, and how to work in teams to solve problems and make new discoveries. Through this process, they also learn about themselves, their relationship to each other, their families, their community and their environment.

ARC develops and implements projects and programs that integrate the built environment and design problem solving as a natural component of learning, from classroom curriculum to statewide initiatives. This is made possible through collaboration with a diverse team of educators, scholars, architects, planners, designers, and leaders of cultural organizations, business, and government agencies. ARC’s program has been cited as a prototype for education/business partnerships and has received local, state, and national awards year after year for education and creativity.

ARC programs are organized into three categories: K-12 School Programs, Community/Festival Programs and Outreach.

  • ARC master teaching artists/designers implement teaching artist residencies in K-12 schools.
  • Community/Festival Programs provide opportunities to collaborate with cultural organizations and social service agencies and participate in festival events.
  • Outreach addresses our state and national efforts to make a lasting impact on the fields of Design and Education through participation in conferences and dissemination of learning materials.
Impact

2017 ARC activities were focused on developing, delivering and expanding our Design Connections Partnership (DCP), now in its 7th year partnering with New Haven Public Schools Math Department, Yale University School of Architecture and Southern CT State University Education Department. 

During 2016-17 school year, we delivered DCP to 24 2nd-grade classrooms in 10 schools. Nearly 650 students, teachers and math coaches were involved in a professional development program that included a 2-week artist residency in each classroom.

Students designed a small playhouse in an imaginary city park. They learned how to read a site plan and determined where to locate their playhouse on the site. Students were given a building program with specific performance criteria to evaluate their solution. Each student created a scaled model and drawings.

Participants learned how to communicate concepts and calculate measurement and scale problems.
 
DCP Funding to date:
  • $125,000    CT Office of the Arts 
  • $115,000    National Endowment for the Arts
  • $63,000      Community Foundation of Greater New Haven
  • $115,000    Local and state community foundations 
Highlights
• At the invitation of Jane Chu, Chairman for the National Endowment for the Arts, the ARC ED presented the ARC program to National Council of the Arts in Washington D.C.
• ARC created a DVD video of NHPS teacher discussing benefits of My Playhouse©
• Received an award from the Arts Council of Greater New Haven for our program! 
 
2018 Goals
• Implement DCP in 24 3rd-grade classrooms in 10 NHPS. The 3rd grade problem is the design of a new bedroom. Math problem-solving matches grade level competencies.
 
• Collaborate with scientists, NHPS and higher ed faculty to seek an NSF grant to research and quantify the effectiveness of our program methodologies and content aimed at improving math achievement. The project would be first such research in the U.S. focused on during-school elementary learning. 
 
• Locate Board members for fundraising support!
 
Needs

1 Management: Compensation for a salaried executive director to support tasks related to development of sustainability strategies as well as funding for staff professional development (leadership, fund, and financial development and design ed study) and organizational change work.

2 Unrestricted Funds: ARC funding is exclusively project-based. The day-to-day expenses like website hosting, design, maintenance, office equipment upgrades, and general supplies are not covered by these grants. We have no endowment and are responsible for raising our total budget each year.

3 Digital Marketing: We need a budget for a paid consultant to direct and manage website design & administration, hosting, social media outreach, email and direct mail messaging used collectively to create campaigns designed to raise funds to support the organization.

4 Board Members: We are currently seeking to expand Board membership, particularly for those with interest and experience in marketing and social media, technology and fundraising. Please get in touch if you are interested in applying!

5 Business Sponsorships: The support of local businesses provides a great boost to ARC’s work. Sponsorship opportunities available generally include in-kind donations of classroom materials & supplies.

CEO Statement

What’s not to like working with students–

"This program is so cool, cooler than all the other programs, Ms. Sanko you rule. We all love this program."

 

"You speak kid language, that is something special that not many adults have, I can understand you in a way that nobody else can."

 

“ You talk in a way that you know that we will understand."

 

"I learned a lot, I paid attention to every word she said....I was so excited to be with her everyday...she is my favorite!"

 

“Ms. Sanko is like the master of buildings. She is like Albert Einstein“

 

In ARC programs, student understanding of, communication around, and engagement with STEM subjects is enhanced through the use of architecture and design-based interdisciplinary curricula.

Through these design problem-solving applications students learn basic subjects in an interactive environment that promotes the recall and reuse of information. They learn to make logical connections, identify cause and effect, draw analogies, and think critically at the highest level. Using simplified techniques from the design professions, students learn to plan, design, construct models and drawings, experiment, discover, interpret, discriminate, revise and justify their thinking.

Neighborhood architectural walking tours are conducted to learn how to “read” a building, both structurally and aesthetically. Building materials and their qualities are observed, recorded, and analyzed. Students discuss rural, suburban, and urban land use similarities and differences. Common community values are discussed to understand design project ramifications: overall town character, social, physical, economic, environmental, and traffic and parking issues.

Students learn about structural, mechanical, and electrical engineering design principles. They explore current building materials, methods, and construction technologies. Structural design is discussed with hands-on applications tested. Energy systems are examined and applications introduced that take into account local and global environmental issues.

Students explore the idea that in the form and function of a designed object, what works well does not necessarily look good and enhance life. A well-designed functional and aesthetic object or environment will enrich life, foster communication, hold attention, and/or add emotional depth to an experience. It moves us, delights us, enhances life, and/or gives meaning.

Students learn about the team of people who plan, design and construct their buildings. They discuss government rules and regulations for building use and design.
Board Chair Statement

I first became acquainted with the Architecture Resource Center (ARC) fifteen years ago when I was Treasurer of the Connecticut Architecture Foundation (CAF). The ARC initiated hands-on community design programming as the education component of the CAF.

Growth was slow until our first big success with the New Haven Cultural Landscape Program, an arts and humanities-based program for all fifth grade New Haven Public School students and teachers. We received $250,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities and National Endowment for the Arts to create a program that included a publication, professional development and student workshops.
 
That really got us noticed when the program received local, state and national awards and became the impetus for the Foundation spinning us off to become an independent 501(c)3 organization so we could focus on developing similar programs. We were fortunate to have received several significant grants to launch a development and expansion effort.
 
Operating independently, we have taken our programs into a number of school systems in Connecticut, The programs have served as prototypes for design education programs nationally. Our attention has been on urban school districts. As we move forward, the New Haven Public School district will be the focus for program development and research of our strategies for student Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) achievement.

 

To get a good idea of what we do I recommend watching the short videos on our website , see Gallery. They feature our Executive Director Anna Sanko implementing the classroom workshop program. When I watch these I am struck by several things, among them, I wish I'd had a program like this when I was in grade school, and, more of our children should be exposed to similar programs in their schools. If you watch the video clips several times you begin to notice that a lot of things are going on in the classrooms. Good things.

 

We have been able to get this far through the generosity of community foundations and state and federal funding agencies. We aim to take exciting programs like these into more classrooms and make them available to educators nationwide.
 
Jay F. Jacot, Associate AIA
President
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Education / Elementary & Secondary Schools
Secondary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Visual Arts
Tertiary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Areas Served
New Haven
State wide
ARC's attention pressing forward is K-12 programming in Greater New Haven Public Schools (NHPS). NHPS operates the largest Interdistrict Magnet School Program in the state, open to all CT residents. Ninety percent of ARC work is currently focused in NHPS grades 1-5. These programs are piloted, tested and exported throughout CT. We have partnered with many schools in the Capitol Region, Tolland, Windham, Waterbury, and New London areas and look forward each year to new and returning participants. 
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments

 

I am pleased that our 2010 pilot work together at Mauro-Sheridan School in New Haven has led to expansion throughout the district. The relevance of the program is demonstrated by a partnership with the New Haven Public Schools Art, Social Studies, and Math Departments.

I look forward, as always, to participating as an advisor and professional development presenter. This initiative is another in a long line of important projects undertaken by ARC to use the field of architecture and the rich resources of our local built heritage as a platform for teaching and learning for a critical audience: the young people of the State.

You have been pioneers in this area and those of us in the design professions and teaching at the collegiate level are very appreciative of your efforts and the opportunities we have had to collaborate with you. Your work is important because it strengthens students’ learning of architecture, an under-represented category of the arts, and also because it helps students make important connections among various disciplines in a real-world context.

ARC provides attractive programs for students at the Yale School of Architecture and we will partner through our Yale Urban Design Network Workshop organization to provide classroom and tour guide support. It is a wonderful opportunity for our students to work alongside your experienced master teaching artists in New Haven classrooms. I valued both the process and product of my involvement with your development of the award-winning curriculum based on the architecture and heritage of New Haven, New Haven’s Cultural Landscape: its changing people and places. I believe that through these efforts we are helping to create a new generation of architecturally and environmentally literate students, future citizens and professional, who will actively value and protect the buildings, landscapes, neighborhoods and towns that we value!

Professor Alan Plattus
Director
, Yale Urban Design Workshop
Board Member

Programs
Description

  • In grades 1-5, students use architecture and design as a problem-solving tool to integrate math and science learning with sequential and comprehensive art and design-based learning in order to create state standards-based STEM lessons
  • Encourage students to apply academic concepts in authentic tasks while developing relevant technical skill sets
  • Foster students' sense of civic engagement
  • Each year 25 classrooms from a particular grade level participate. Students are presented with a design problem to solve. They develop written summaries, drawings and models of their design concept. Solutions are used to solve grade level appropriate math problems (i.e., perimeter, area, cost estimating). Ten schools are involved: 600 students, 25 classroom teachers, and 10 math coaches.  The program is a partnership with the NHPS Mathematics Department.

 

Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Adults / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

·      Educators have an increased ability to discuss works of art and design and connect them to their students' lives and the NHPS curriculum


· Educators understand design vocabulary, how the application of the design process impacts problem solving ability and helps link elements among the disciplines

· Educators are able to implement new teaching strategies and activities

· Increase in student achievement in math and student attitude and interest in learning.

· Students understand the role of math and science in real world problem solving and their lives and have an improved comprehension of related career opportunities.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

We believe that the DCP's innovative approach will make a lasting impact on the fields of design-based and integrated STEM education for the following reasons:

· By using design as a thinking process, students and teachers gain a new method of solving problems

· Students and educators will be able to see how mathematics and science apply to their lives thus increasing both their understanding of concepts and conception of mathematics and science applications in life

· The design activities and PD methodology can be disseminated throughout New Haven and the U.S.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Specific assessment of educator and student learning involved a basic mixed methods approach, including:

· Informal interviews with the project director

· Self-report summative surveys administered to the participating classroom teachers

· A pre/post teacher developed math assessment

· A review of students work

· Interview and self-report surveys requiring individual participant reflection

· Teacher reporting of specific and observable evidence of increases in knowledge and interest in the project concepts and content

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

· Teachers gained an increased understanding of design projects and design language (8.47)

· Students gained an ability to communicate in 2 or 3 dimensions (8.41)

· Students’ ability to produce quality work (8.59)

The project also administered a district developed pre and post-content assessment to measure mathematics understanding, especially with the geometric skills. Of the ten schools in which fifth grade participants were assessed, every school showed increased scores from the pre- to post-assessment, with an overall average change of 29%.

A summation of the overall impact of this project was provided by one teacher who wrote that, "this was a great project that integrated content across the curriculum while providing opportunities for differentiation and for all students to use their own personal strengths and styles to solve a problem."

Additionally teachers found that the project integrated concepts from multiple disciplines and made math "real" for their students. According to a majority of teachers, "this is a hands-on project that requires students to engage in self-directed problem solving in order to construct their house." From the students' perspective, the majority wanted to know what design problem would they be solving in sixth grade!

Description

ARC was awarded an Interdistrict Cooperative Grant to implement a week-long series of workshops during summers 2013 and 2014 to help girls from RSD#13 and the New Haven Public Schools develop leadership skills and to stimulate their interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) learning.

 Students learned about the team of people who plan, design, and construct the buildings, spaces and environments in their community. They explored structural, mechanical, and electrical building systems concepts and investigated the latest materials, construction methods and technologies in sustainable architecture. Students also heard directly from industry and education partners about career and educational pathways, further encouraging them to pursue careers in STEM-related fields.
 
The program is a partnership with Farnam Neighborhood House and the Higher Heights Youth Empowerment Program in New Haven. 
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Females /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

 

According to data collected on the assessment and from the instructor surveys, the participating girls realized increases in content knowledge as well as improved confidence as learners. The assessment showed a 33% percent increase in content understanding.
 
Instructors observed changes in the girls’ attitude toward STEM learning as a result of the project’s collaborative design. Each activity, including the financial literacy and health and life choices sessions, had math and STEM skills embedded, requiring that students apply those skills to successfully meet the goals of each lesson. Girls, finding these activities to be motivating and stimulating, willingly engaged in the instructional activities and demonstrated pride and self-confidence as they successfully completed each activity. The academic criteria of the activities made the math skills real, relevant, meaningful and practical. Girls also increased their interest in pursuing leadership opportunities and future STEM careers.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

 

 

Instructors observed changes in the girls’ attitude and confidence toward learning as a result of the project’s innovative, engaging, and real-life collaborative design problem solving. The girls were motivated to willingly engage in the learning activities and demonstrated pride and self-confidence at the end of the week during the culminating activity in which projects and the relevant learning skills were shared. 

 

According to the student comments, the most important thing learned during in the DTC were math skills and the understanding that they can be successful learners. Many attributed this result to the engaging activities and the instructors who wanted to help them become better learners and students.

Overall teachers reported that the opportunity that girls from different backgrounds had to work together on a high-interest collaborative project allowed them to see the similarities and capabilities across different diverse groups.
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

The following quantitative results were collected from the instructor survey on increases in the girl’s content learning and application skills:

Academic

Items- DTC helped girls 

•better understand design concepts and content 9.33

•better understand STEM concepts and content 9.33

•increase their interest in learning 9.33

•increase their confidence as learners 9.33

Items-As a result of DTC girls realized positive change in 

•Attitude toward Learning 80%

•Understanding of Design 80%

•Interest in STEM Courses 80%

•Problem Solving Skills 100%
 
Social 
Items- DTC helped girls 

•respect peers form other racial/ethnic/economic groups 9.17

•engage in learning with other from different racial/ethnic/

economic backgrounds 9.67 


Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Instructors saw this opportunity as a “life changing experience” for many of the girls. As one wrote, the girls were allowed by the neutral and supportive environment of the camp to share and collaborate with others from different racial, ethnic and/or socioeconomic backgrounds. The project design encouraged communication and collaboration, which led to genuine interest in each other. The safe environment established by the project led to the sharing of information among the girls, giving each a respectful understanding of the lifestyles, interests and experiences of those different than themselves.


Written comments indicated that some of the girls initially had difficulty making friends and hoped that this might be remedied by the camp. In every case this happened, with the girl’s discovering that they could make and be friends with all girls, including those from different backgrounds. One girl summarized the feelings of the others with, “This was an awesome camp. I can’t wait to come back.”

Description

Design Connections© is a design curriculum for students in grades 1-12. During a 6-10 day school residency program,  master teaching artists engage students in units of study involving projects and activities centered in the students’ community through an examination of local architecture and design. Development of a design vocabulary, application of the design process to problem solving, and the use of two and three-dimensional methods of communication are established as linking elements among the disciplines.

The student grade level determines the complexity of concepts and design problems as the designed world becomes the thematic foundation for all curriculum subjects.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / At-Risk Populations / Minorities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Students became familiar with the concepts and tools of architecture and design, learning how to communicate their ideas in two and three dimensions through drawings, murals and model making. Each student brought her/his individual strengths and insights to the task at hand, thereby experiencing what it feels like to contribute to the accomplishments of the group. A sense of pride, self-empowerment, and social responsibility permeated the space. Students learned that they are capable of growth and that they have the capacity to think on higher levels, positively affecting their self-esteem and motivation.




Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Teachers wrote that the experience helped them understand how to use the context of their students' lives to make learning more understandable and relevant. They also noted it provided their students with various problem-solving techniques and tools and gave them ideas and choices for future learning. It also provides exposure to new career and learning opportunities increased their confidence levels for the future.


Nearly every participating teacher indicated (in ratings and written comments) that they learned:

· New content

· New career information

· New teaching strategies

· The importance of using hands-on activities with students to increase interest, access and learning

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

• "This project made it clear that students of varying abilities can reach high expectations when given the opportunity. Students fully grasped concepts and communicated with in-depth understandings. They have learned to work cooperatively and to accept each other's ideas."

• "Within a short amount of time, students calculated perimeter, area, and cost estimating problems to scale with actual building drawings that they had created. Students remained on task and were engaged in the learning process, proud of what they accomplished. The design workshops reached many students because of its differentiated learning styles."

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Comments from student evaluation of the activities included:

• "I learned to make something I thought was impossible."

• "I learned how to measure and why it is important."

• "I learned how to build models. I can use this knowledge for when I have free time at home."

• "I learned how to use my timetables."

• "I learned how to do math much better than I used to know."

• “The math was amazing, I never understood the meaning of perimeter and area until she (the teaching artist) explained it using my project.”

• “I had no idea that we could figure out the cost for a building with our 4th-grade math.”

• “I learned how to measure using my design project. I didn't really know how to do it before.”

 
 
 
 
Description

All of our in-school programs made possible through community collaborations can be adapted to community and festival events. Past examples of festival events include:

  • Envisionfest 2013 & 2014 in Hartford CT, where we served 2,000 participants implementing hands-on, participatory, art and design activities at City Hall.
  • Since 1991, we have served communities at festivals including First Night Hartford, First Night Bridgeport, International Arts and Ideas New Haven, and the New Britain Sesquicentennial.
  • OpSail CT 2000 festival, New London CT, where we organized activities for 7,000 people over the course of 4-days.
  • Special Olympics '95, New Haven CT where we worked with over 20,000 participants during a 7-day arts festival.

 

Population Served Families / Minorities / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Description
Outreach addresses presentations, participation, and dissemination of learning materials.
 
• At the invitation of Jane Chu, Chairman for the National Endowment for the Arts,  ARC executive director presented the program to the National Council on the Arts in Washington DC in March 2017.
 
• ARC presented a workshop, Math Applications from 2D to 3D, at the 2016 DESIGN-ED Conference in Delaware.
 
• ARC presented a workshop, Architecture & Design STEM to STEAM Learning, at the 2015 Learn x Design International Conference in Chicago, II and the 2015 CT Office of the Arts Higher Order Thinking Institute in Hartford, CT.
 
• Executive Director selected to participate on the DESIGN-ED Advisory Board. DESIGN-ED is a national coalition of educators, designers, and business who support design education initiatives in K-12 schools. 

• Executive Director served as a Panelist for the Discover Design Competition for high school students throughout the U.S., Chicago Architecture Foundation, 2014, 2013.



 
Population Served / /
Program Comments
CEO Comments
an abridged parent letter
 
Dear Ms. Sanko:

I write as a parent who has had the opportunity to participate in your downtown walking tours with my child's elementary classroom. In addition, I participated in her classroom workshops from presentation of the design project through facilitation of the learning process step by step.

 

I better appreciate the term “master teaching artist” as I witnessed your excellent management of the classroom environment to communication of expectations for student achievement, creating a climate that encouraged all students to achieve! All students were on task at all times, it was an amazing feat. However, when taken into account how you effortlessly and seamlessly connected the problem solving to their own lives it was quite easy to understand the “hook.”
 
 
Here are some of the comments the students shared with me:
  • I loved it because it made me learn and made me know my community better.
  • I learned how to make different kinds of drawings and models to show my ideas.
  • It’s very fun to be creative and put things together.
  • I liked talking about why we did things and how we might change things.
  • It was great fun figuring out how to solve the problems.
  • It was difficult and frustrating sometimes but fun too. It was challenging.
  • I learned to make something I thought was impossible.
  • I learned how to use my timetables, measure and how to work with scale and multiply halves.
  • I learned how to use my math in a creative way. 

 

The programs were a success because students incorporated various disciplines while creating their 2D and 3D artwork. Students needed to use math skills to design and construct their buildings and used knowledge from social studies to discuss the dynamics of the city. Complex structural principles were presented and delivered in very understandable language with hands-on activities to better grasp meaning. So many connections for engaged learning and ultimately a chance to see where they might fit in–to imagine their responsibilities in that site. Students are invited to become producers of knowledge that they can share with the larger community. This kind of empowering education can invite the caring and responsible behaviors that distinguish a worthy, democratic citizenship.

 

The quality of the student work was amazing and the opportunities for personal expression unlimited. My daughter and her classmates spoke so highly of their work with you I felt I had to write to support the funding efforts for other children. 

 

Thank you for your program!"
CEO/Executive Director
Anna Sanko
Term Start July 1991
Email annasanko@sbcglobal.net
Experience

Anna Sanko has an MA in Education from Goddard College, a degree in Industrial Design from Pratt Institute, a CT Interior Design license, and is a CT Office of the Arts Master Teaching Artist. She has practiced professionally for 15 years in architecture and design firms, providing design services for corporate, medical, school, government, retail, and industrial facilities throughout the U.S.

She is ARC founder and executive director. Her development experience has secured the Center over $2,000,000 in grants, contracts, materials, and services. She implements professional development and student workshops and has an extensive background working with the underserved at-risk students in CT. Anna leads ARC efforts to develop and create design curricula and design publications. Her vision and determination have resulted in an individual National Endowment for the Arts grant for the purpose of writing and documenting the “Call to the Visionary Artist” program. She was editor, photographer, and contributing writer for the teacher and student editions of the “New Haven's Cultural Landscape: its changing people and places”. Anna is the artistic director and project manager for all ARC festival programming.
 
She has successfully taken the program to national and international audiences through conferences and workshops in the U.S. and Europe. Her work has resulted in numerous local, state, national, and international awards. She has participated on numerous CT Department of Education and CT Business and Industries Curriculum Advisory Committees. She is a certified facilitator for CT Department of Environmental Protection education programs. In 2014 she was selected to serve on the Advisory Board for DESIGN-ED, a national coalition of educators, designers, and business who support design education K-12 initiatives.
 
 
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 4
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 8
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 3
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

• Design Connections Partnership (DCP) is a collaboration with New Haven Public School (NHPS) Mathematics Department and 10 schools each year. Alan Plattus, Professor of Architecture and Urbanism at the Yale University School of Architecture, provides expertise in the areas of architectural design, history, and urban planning and participates as a presenter at ARC professional development. Karyn Gilvarg, AIA, Executive Director of New Haven City Planning, has served as an advisor and provided school tours of the City Planning facilities for DCP participants.

• New Haven Museum Education Department partners to develop design publications and neighborhood architectural walking tours for NHPS.
 
• The Farnam Neighborhood House and Higher Heights Youth Empowerment Program partner to implement design camp experiences and after-school programming for NHPS K-8 students.
 
 • Yale University Gilder Lehrman Center partnered to provide a National Endowment for the Humanities, Landmarks of American History professional development institute for 80 teachers from the U.S.
 
• Yale University Teacher Education School and New Haven Museum partnered to provide professional development for NHPS teachers.
 
• American Institute of Architects/CT partner to implement design education activities at festivals. 

 

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
site visit by Jane Chu, ChairmanNational Endowment for the Arts2015
Board Chair
Jay F Jacot
Company Affiliation Thompson/Edwards Architects
Term June 2000 to June 2020
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Jill Jenkins Kaicad Interior Planning and Design
Alan Plattus Yale School of Architecture
Anna Sanko Architecture Resource Center
Darlene Susco iDsusco.com
Kathleen Tracy Retired West Hartford Public School Principal
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 5
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Standing Committees
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Jo-Ann E. Castano Castano Design Associates
Tanya Cutulo, AIA The Morganti Group
Samuel Gardner, AIA Gregg Weiss & Gardner Architects LLC
Lisa Pietrosimone New Haven Public Schools
Lorrie Quirk New Haven Public Schools
CEO Comments

I have watched and participated as the Architecture Resource Center (ARC) moved from a festival based program in 1991 to an established in-school program for K-8 New Haven Public Schools. In 1997 David Marshall, then Senior Program Manager at the Connecticut Commission on the Arts declared, “No other arts organization in Connecticut offers in-school programming of equivalent scope and quality. Executive director Anna Sanko has done a remarkable job of designing and executing an exemplary program.” The comment holds as true today!

Since 1966, the American Institute if Architects (AIA) has been involved in elementary and secondary education, working on the national level to help clarify issues and develop methods and materials to raise the public consciousness. AIA awarded ARC the 1997 Institute Honors Award given to recognize and encourage distinguished achievements that constitute a beneficial influence of either the environment or architectural profession. The impressive local, regional, and national awards and honors received by the ARC are acknowledgement of the positive impact on the greater community and architectural profession.

ARC has skillfully navigated the fundraising venues of federal agencies receiving major awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities and National Endowment for the Arts. I have no doubt that their current strategy with the National Science Foundation will be successful!

Samuel Gardner, AIA
Former President, Architecture Resource Center
Partner, Gregg Weiss & Gardner Architects, LLC
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2017
Fiscal Year End June 30 2018
Projected Revenue $90,000.00
Projected Expenses $90,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$67,132$96,299$94,664
Administration Expense$3,719$5,136$864
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.010.681.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses95%95%99%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$11,261$10,684$42,905
Current Assets$11,261$10,684$42,905
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets$11,261$10,684$42,905
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Econ & Community Dev. $35,000CT Commission on the Arts $25,684CT Commission of Arts, Tourism & Culture $29,430
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountNational Endowment for the Arts $20,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $15,000CT Dept. of Ed. $22,590
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountNewAlliance Foundation $9,500New Alliance Foundation $10,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $15,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 1221 Chapel St
New Haven, CT 065114701
Primary Phone 860 604-1074
Contact Email annasanko@sbcglobal.net
CEO/Executive Director Anna Sanko
Board Chair Jay F Jacot
Board Chair Company Affiliation Thompson/Edwards Architects

 

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