Clifford W Beers Guidance Clinic
93 Edwards Street
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 93 Edwards Street
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 772-1270 x
Fax 203-772-0051
E-mail info@cliffordbeers.org
Web and Social Media
Our 93 Edwards Street Location
Mission
Our mission is to provide integrated services addressing mental, physical and social determinants in order to improve health, resiliency, and a quality of life for children, families and communities. 
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1968
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Alice M. Forrester PhD
Board Chair Karen DuBois-Walton PhD
Board Chair Company Affiliation Housing Authority, City of New Haven
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
Our mission is to provide integrated services addressing mental, physical and social determinants in order to improve health, resiliency, and a quality of life for children, families and communities. 
Background
For more than 100 years, Clifford Beers Clinic, one of the largest community-based outpatient behavioral health clinics in the nation, has provided children and families with professional counseling and support across all of our programs.

At the core of our model of care are professionally trained and license clinicians, care coordinators, and a dedicated medical staff who support the behavioral health and wellness needs of children and their families who have experienced trauma including abuse, neglect, witnessing domestic or community violence, and even the loss of a loved one.

We develop alliances and partnerships with Yale New Haven Hospital, Yale University, the New Haven Public Schools and scores of community-based social services and organizations to improve behavioral and medical health outcomes for more than 5,000 children from the Greater New Haven region.

Our commitment to excellence includes a fiscally sound approach to our work through financial transparency and accountability to our funders and donors. We consistently receive high marks and praise from GuideStar, one of the largest charitable and accountability monitors of nonprofit organizations in the nation. Moreover, the trust and faith placed by our committed staff is exemplified through our employee giving program, currently at 100 percent.

Each day we work to strengthen CBC’s sustainability through our three core programs: ACCord (Advanced Care Coordination), an outgrowth of Wraparound New Haven, our new Autism specialty clinic, and our planned expansion of the New Haven Trauma Coalition to schools across Connecticut.

These programs will help us to expand services to more diverse populations while creating a payment model that reflects lower health care costs, greater access to care for our children and families, and provide a major step toward partnerships with commercial insurance providers who see great promise in our work. The following summary is a reflection of these efforts and our unyielding commitment to preserving them well into the future.

 
Impact
Your kindness is why we can deliver the compassionate and complete care families who have experienced trauma need and grow it in ways that address the needs of the community!
 

Each day we measure impact by the number of children and families in crisis who come through our doors in search of the critical help they need to rebuild their lives. For many, it could be repair from exposure to physical and sexual violence, emotional disabilities, poverty, or any one of a number of traumatic experiences that prevent them from living normal, healthy lives. They seek resilience and we work to give them hope.

We also measure impact by the care and compassion our staff provide to children and families – the expertise, dedication, and compassion our clinicians, social workers, care coordinators, and medical team extends to a child or family in crisis. When our families can leave Clifford Beers, they do so with the progress they’ve made and with the knowledge we will always be here when they need us.

Finally, we measure impact through the support we receive from YOU; your continued generosity makes it possible to expand our services and reach even more children and families so desperate for help and guidance. Your financial support has made it possible for Clifford Beers to launch our two newest programs, our Advanced Care Coordination and our autism specialty clinic. We’ve also added more resources to the New Haven Trauma Coalition, largely because of your support and your faith in our work.  

Advanced Care Coordination, or ACCORD, is the result of our successful pilot, Wraparound New Haven, in which our care coordination team can assess the behavioral and medical health of children and families. A plan of care is developed by the coordinator in concert with the family, clinicians, social workers, and the medical team reflecting the most immediate concerns as well as a long-term approach to improving the overall health of the child and other family members.

We also opened the Marne Street specialty clinic in Hamden to provide treatment to children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disabilities; among other things, our decision was predicated on the great success we achieved through Wraparound New Haven and the severe shortage of treatment centers available to children and families in the Greater New Haven region and across the entire state.

We also enhanced our ability to provide critical outreach to children in need of behavioral health services through the New Haven Trauma Coalition, a unique model of care takes place in the school, where children, families, and teachers can assess and address a range of emotional and behavioral health challenges that often serve as barriers to social and academic success. Additional resources allow us to reach even more children as we expand this initiative to other cities and towns across Connecticut.

It is only because of your support that we can measure real impact – on the lives of the children and families we serve and who benefit from our more than 100 years of experience, compassion, and dedication.

Needs
You, our friends, agree with us that delivering mental health services requires innovation.  Anticipation.  Execution.
Thank you for working with us as we do these things, and thank you for helping the Clinic’s reputation to grow statewide and nationally.  Our need remains fairly steady: financial support.  The cost to deliver care is rarely fully reimbursed by insurance, so your support often bridges the gap so that children and families can be treated.  
What's more, innovation requires start-up costs, and there you play such an important role.  We could not be nearly as innovative and forward-thinking as we are without the financial support of you, our friends.  Whether it be looking for new space in the community from which we can deliver accessible care or bringing on new staff to meet the demand for services, you are a key player in making it all happen!  
CEO Statement
Thank you VERY much for supporting our work!
 
I can't say enough what your friendship to our Clinic means: 
 
It means that a teen girl -- who started cutting her arms after she had been abused by a much older man she met online -- can get help.  It means she can start to feel good about herself again!
 
It means a little boy -- who sits in school with his hair combed neatly and his pants pressed but in anguish knowing his daily afterschool beating is waiting for him -- can get help.  Get safety.  Find healing.  
 
It means a diabetic child who doesn't go to school because she cannot leave her grandmother home alone in an unheated apartment can get help from our compassionate staff by connecting the family to services in the community. 
 
These are just three examples of children and families you are helping through your support of Clifford Beers Clinic.  We help over 1,600 children and families every year as they work through anxiety, depression, school problems, attention difficulties or loss of a loved one. 
 
If we weren't so fortunate to know kind people like you, the odds against these families would be great.  The science is pretty convincing that untreated trauma -- like the circumstances described above -- is a direct cause of emotional angst, social problems, and significant health problems.  Today, we know that heart disease -- even cancer! -- can be caused by letting stress and trauma fester untreated. 
 
But we do have you, and that changes everything for the families we see!  We are so glad to have you with us as we deliver care AND bring awareness to the problem of untreated trauma.  I am so glad you are onboard with us as we advocate in front of legislators and decision makers to have untreated trauma declared the single greatest public health crisis to come along in decades -- and force a public health response to it!!!
 
I invite you to learn more about our work at www.cliffordbeers.org.  In particular, there you can review our results.  Our outcomes are encouraging, and we believe our efforts are having an impact. 
 
All because of you.  Thank you very, very much.
Board Chair Statement
Clifford Beers Clinic is at the forefront of caring for children and families with need for mental health care, and I am thrilled to serve as its board president. 
 
I am also the executive director of the Housing Authority for the City of New Haven -- an agency tasked with providing quality, affordable housing for the city's residents.  In that position I've become familiar with the chronic stress and trauma exposure facing many families in our community, and I'm so thankful that a place like Clifford Beers Clinic exists to help.  And CBC helps in whatever way best helps those who need it.  For example, the Clinic knows it's not easy to take your teen to therapy if you have to bring him, your two other grade school children, and your baby (in her stroller!) for two bus rides to get a therapy session. 
 
The answer?  Going to the need.  Through very strong and gratifying partnerships and collaborations, CBC is in more places with more faces than ever.  We're working alongside physicians at Fair Haven Community Health Center, we're operating with Yale University School of Medicine at a "hub" in Stop 'n Shop on Whalley Avenue, we're a presence at Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital, and we're in several New Haven public schools!
 
I am fortunate to work with a very talented and dedicated collection of men and women who serve with me on the CBC board of directors, and I'm grateful for their efforts.  I am also grateful to have a visionary leader at the helm of the Clinic who can identify and seize opportunities to improve care in an ever-changing healthcare landscape. 
 
I am of course most thankful for you -- our friends, partners and supporters who believe that with compassionate care we can make meaningful contributions to healing children and families . 
 
Because of you we are making our community healthy and well!
 
Thank you so much for your kindness and your support of Clifford Beers Clinic. 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Mental Health Treatment
Secondary Organization Category Youth Development /
Tertiary Organization Category Human Services /
Areas Served
New Haven
Ansonia
Branford
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Madison
Milford
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Shoreline
West Haven
Woodbridge
Clifford Beers Clinic serves over 17 towns in the Greater New Haven Region. We have offices in New Haven, West Haven, Guilford and Woodbridge, and we are also located in four New Haven-area schools.  We serve families from New Haven, West Haven, Branford, East Haven, Guilford, Hamden, Madison, Milford, North Branford, North Haven, Ansonia, Orange, and Woodbridge, along with other towns along the shoreline.  
Programs
Description

Children and families who have experienced trauma need help.  They need social connection.  They need community-based resources to perhaps meet basic needs.  They need therapy.  They need streamlined care to address their biopsychosocial needs, and often it is not just a child but an entire family who needs care.  At CBC, we do all of this.  Today, we do it not just at our 93 Edwards Street location but also in schools, community health centers, doctors' offices, hospitals, and even a local supermarket.  In this way we are removing traditional barriers to care (like transportation and stigma) and reaching more children and families than ever to address a wide array of traumatic experiences.  Through our efforts we are strengthening families and creating a community that is both happier and healthier.    

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.  At CBC, our research department works hard to assess families at intake and compare that to discharge.  Data from FY16 regarding problem severity (which examines problems with a child's behavior) and functioning level (which examines a child's difficulties interacting with people and otherwise functioning, e.g., self-care) indicate we are making good progress.  At discharge, 56% of parents/caregivers reported the child moved out of clinical (unfavorable) range into normal range for problem severity -- that's more than every other child in our care!  At discharge, 53% of parents/caregivers reported the child moved out of clinical (unfavorable) range into normal range for functioning -- also improvement for more than half the children in our care!  
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Typically, CBC measures success by comparing assessment data at intake vs. discharge.  Because the average length of stay for our children and families is six months, long-term success is difficult to measure empirically; however, many children and families in our care stay in touch with the clinicians and therapists with whom they worked, and often we hear wonderful stories.  For example, some years ago we served a teenage girl with an extensive trauma history and significant needs (i.e., her drug-addicted mother threw her out, she had no housing, she had little other family support) and we recently learned she graduated high school with honors and was awarded a science scholarship at a public university!  Another boy who was once in our care bumped into his former CBC therapist, and he reported he was married and attending fathering classes so he would not repeat the mistakes his father made.  Fortunately, these are just two of the many stories that indicate our efforts have impact! 

 

 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. CBC uses a wide variety of screening and assessment tools at various points during treatment.  Our clinicians complete assessments at various points of care, and families complete assessments, too.  Intake and discharge assessments ("paired data") are used to track progress, and our research department is constantly releasing reports that track overall progress.  The data is used to not just track improvements and success but also to inform clinicians and other CBC direct-service providers where improvement in care can occur.  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Jasmine's story is a good one to share! 

When we met her, Jasmine was an energetic two year old.  Her mom, Bethany, brought Jasmine to CBC concerned by Jasmine's social-emotional development.  Jasmine had lots of tantrums and was aggressive (throwing, hitting and biting).  Teachers had a hard time controlling Jasmine.

Almost instantly, our CBC team saw several issues with the interaction between Jasmine and Bethany.  Bethany was very concerned with appearance and poise, and Jasmine's behavior was very contrary to that.  Jasmine sensed how her behavior impacted her mother, and she would then behavior even more poorly -- creating a negative feedback loop of behavior and punishment.  They were rarely free to enjoy each other!
 
We helped them work through that.  Schedules, routines, reward systems and regulation activities were put in place.  Also, a new school more suitable to Jasmine's strength and energy was found.  Expectations have been adjusted, and today Jasmine is positive, having far fewer tantrums, and verbally advanced.  "Many thanks to CBC!" said Bethany.  "The storm has passed, and because of you we survived!"
 
Description

Earlier this year CBC moved ahead with a decision to develop and operate a specialty care clinic for children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disabilities. Our decision was predicated on the current shortage of treatment centers available to children and families across Connecticut where reported cases of children and young people who struggle with autism spectrum disorder have grown significantly from just over 1,300 in 2000 to well over 8,000 in 2015. 

Despite this, there are only four autism spectrum disorder diagnostic-only centers in our region; the remaining 16 centers are located almost two hours away in the southern and northern parts of the state; there are less than ten across the state that focuses solely on the treatment of autism spectrum disorder. Stated for opening in fall, 2017, the Marne Street Clinic in Hamden will provide diagnosis and treatment services, counseling for siblings, educational and legal advocacy, occupational therapy, nutrition support, and other services needed to foster wellness and health.

With your support Clifford Beers can expand its expertise and services to this underserved population, raise awareness about autism diagnosis and treatment, and assist families as they navigate the health care system.


Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Why? Because we learned that although diagnostic services were largely available, too many families had difficulty finding appropriate care once their child received an autism (or related) diagnosis. We simply could not let that stand since, across Connecticut, in just 15 years there was a 515% increase in children and young people who struggle with autism spectrum disorder.

Your support has made our efforts possible to do something incredibly exciting. This fall we will open our Marne Street Clinic in Hamden! It’s just off the Merritt Parkway and about a half mile south of Hamden High just off Dixwell Avenue, and it will provide diagnosis and treatment services, counseling for siblings, educational and legal advocacy, occupational therapy, nutrition support, and other services needed to foster wellness and health.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. CBC uses a wide variety of screening and assessment tools at various points during treatment.  These tools are completed by our clinicians, and many times they are completed by parents/caregivers and even the children themselves.  These tools track progress, and our research department is constantly releasing reports with results.  The reports are used not just to see how our children and families are faring but also to inform clinicians and other CBC direct-serve providers where improvement in care can occur.
Description

Our increased presence in the community has us grouping together several programs/services.  These include: "bridging," which provides short-term counseling for children and families in the immediate aftermath of a report of sexual abuse; Child First, which occurs in homes of family with children 0-5 to help ensure strong parent-child bonds are formed; MOMs, which is a partnership devoted to reducing the chronic stress of mothers in the community by setting up convenient locations (like a grocery store!) where they can connect to resources to help meet basic needs (diapers, housing, food); Newtown Recovery, which helped to support Sandy Hook after the tragedy of December 2012; and EMPS, which is a mobile response to a crisis in the community.

EMPS Crisis Services:EMPS Crisis Services provides an immediate response to children, adolescents and their families when a behavior health crisis is occurring. When a family dials 2-1-1, EMPS Crisis Services staff respond to a location within 45 minutes of the call.

Again, with your support we are able to offer care in different formats to help meet the needs of the families . . . and to create a happier, healthier community! 
 
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

EMPS Crisis Services provides a good example of short-term success.  EMPS aims to (1) serve children and families in their homes, (2) divert use of costly hospital ERs, and (3) keep children out off expensive inpatient care.  The average length of stay is 11 days, and the idea is to stabilize the issues and thoughtfully problem-solve. Treatment plans our drafted, and our data indicate that for FY16 77% of children met their treatment goals.  During treatment, 4 out of 5 children (81%) of children with a history of inpatient psychiatric care were not readmitted.  Also telling is the parent's ability to manage their child; at intake, 39% felt incapable of managing their child, but for FY15 this drops to 19% -- which means only 1 in 5 parents felt incapable of managing their child after treatment.    

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Clinical assessments and screens are used at intake and discharge to track progress and inform treatment.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Stephen was seen by our EMPS clinician.

It happened fast for him.  He had significant rage, wanted to hurt someone, and was hospitalized.  School suspension followed.

Once released from the hospital but during his school suspension, EMPS was contacted.  For six weeks our EMPS clinician worked with Stephen and his family to keep Stephen safe, provide support and advocacy, and work through his feelings of regret and remorse.  CBC's clinician also attended several school meetings to help Stephen get back to school while explaining the process to his parents.
 
Our clinician secured home-schooling support for Stephen and worked hard to keep Stephen and others safe.  Ultimately, it was deemed best for Stephen to attend a new school where he would receive what he needed, including school counseling and extra time on assignments.
 
Today, Stephen is in that school, stable, and EMPS connected him to therapy where he is learning to express himself appropriately.  He has a safety plan that is effective, and Stephen and his parents have told CBC that the efforts of EMPS made all the difference.
Description This category encompasses several services: Care Coordination, which is an effort to keep children in their homes (and out of costly psych hospitals) and work with the family, community resources, and providers to strengthen the family; Community Support for Families, where DCF refers families to us where the children aren't in danger but the family needs help to connect to existing resources and supports; CATCH, which targets families who have experienced sexual abuse or domestic violence; our Child Advocacy Center partnership, where children and families can go after a disclosure of sex abuse and law enforcement, medical personnel, and social workers can help the family in a one-time effort (which avoids re-traumatizing the child); the NH Trauma Coalition, a school-based effort providing care coordination and counseling as well as trainings in trauma to school staff; LAUNCH, which looks to partner with physicians to screen children for trauma and involve the community in an overall wellness effort, and; Music Therapy, now provided in one NH school as a way to help children who have experience trauma. 
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The average length of stay for our children and families is six month.  Because of this, it is difficult to measure long-term success; however, we often hear from clients long after they leave our care since many stay in touch with their clinicians.  For example, some years ago we served a teenage girl with an extensive trauma history and significant needs (i.e., her drug-addicted mother threw her out, she had no housing, she had little other family support) and we recently learned she graduated high school with honors and was awarded a science scholarship at a public university!  Another boy who was once in our care bumped into his former CBC therapist, and he reported he was married and attending fathering classes so he would not repeat the mistakes his father made.  Fortunately, these are just two of the many stories that indicate our efforts have impact!
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Sandra still cannot tell you which hurt more: the constant, dull ache in her heart caused by her husband’s endless verbal assaults, or those times when his fists would leave her bloodied and bruised. She can tell you, though, that the most tortuous part of her 12-year marriage was seeing her husband harm their young son, Joseph . . . and being paralyzed by fear to do anything about it.

Paralyzed, that is, until you helped Sandra shed her fear, stand up, speak up, and get help.

First, it was important to stabilize the family and get Sandra and Joseph into a safe place -- a service provided by their CBC care coordinator. Next, our care coordinator began working with Joseph’s school and teacher; they were given some insight into Joseph’s trauma history. Fortunately, Joseph was attending a CBC Trauma Coalition school, so his teacher already had an understanding of trauma, its impact, and how to help! (It also made care convenient since Joseph could receive support services at his school.)

At the same time, Sandra was also in our care. That's because we know the whole-family approach provides the best chance for success. Sandra and Joseph were in family therapy to heal from their hurt and anger, and our family advocate worked with Sandra to ensure the family would be kept safe and protected. In doing so, Sandra developed the tools to advocate for her and Joseph once out of our care.

Given the depth of their hurt, Sandra and Joseph are still with CBC, but not for too much longer. "It’s hard to describe, but we really are better," says Sandra. "Being safe and out of fear, I can feel my body is just better and I can see it in Joseph."

Sandra has historically had a hard time of describing what happened, but she’s learning to do so. She’s learning to feel, to articulate those feelings, and to move forward.

 

Description

ACCORD (Advanced Care CoORDination), which began as a pilot in 2013 via a $10 million federal innovation grant, uses care coordinators, clinicians, and medical staff to provide a thoughtful comprehensive care to complex families. The approach is “whole-istic.” By that we mean it addresses the whole family – every member! – and the whole person, i.e., their physical, behavioral and social health. The idea is to work with the family and come up with a workable health care strategy that the family, in time, can come to embrace and manage on their own. A key piece of ACCORD is that the planning meetings occur in the family’s home. This removes the transportation barrier which, in turn, better positions the family for success! 

Early success with ACCORD is very promising! Through the pilot we have: served more than 1,800 children and family members; achieved significant cost savings because of our efforts to reduce emergency room care, and; secured a contract with Anthem Blue Cross/Blue Shield to cover the cost of our model to their subscribers all over the state.

With your support we can bring this care to more children and families (those not insured by Anthem as we work to attract additional commercial insurance carriers. 


Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Some time ago, Rosaria and her family faced many difficulties; her oldest son was acting out in school, and all her kids were aggressively fighting with each other.

Truthfully, the household was in chaos. Rosaria couldn’t find a job, housing was unstable, and she was coming to terms with her own significant trauma history.

After beginning treatment, Rosaria’s reaction to the wealth of knowledge available to her was, as she says, Kapow!

"I never knew there were so many opportunities in my neighborhood offering help to parents like me," she says. "I just thought this was how my life would always be, a constant struggle."

A strengthened family struggles far less. You strengthened this family in wonderful ways. Rosaria was connected to a mentor for her oldest son, a pharmacy to help cover the costs of the family’s medications, and a therapist who has helped Rosaria better understand her son’s pressure to be the man of the house.

Rosaria, too, got a lot out of her time in a parent support group offered at the Clinic.

The best part? This strengthened family now has the courage to embrace a wonderful new challenge.

On a recent trip to Ohio to visit her elderly mother and family, Rosaria and her children had an epiphany. "It was an a-ha moment!" Rosaria laughs, "Ohio it is! My children loved being there, we need a fresh start, and we deserve it. So we’re leaving for Ohio in August!"

To prepare, Rosaria has already connected to Ohio-based services, found a new doctor, and located an after school program for her children. And she did it ON HER OWN.

THANK YOU! This does not happen without you!


Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.  Monthly reports are generated by third parties who review data.  There is a constant loop of analysis and feedback guiding the team to inform care.
Description  

You certainly know how challenging it can be to get the care you and your family need. It’s time consuming, and office-based care is generally when you are at work and the kids are in school. One solution for this – one we’ve been working on for the last five years – is the New Haven Trauma Coalition. Through the NHTC, care takes place in the school, where children, families, and teachers can assess and address a range of emotional and behavioral health challenges that often serve as barriers to social and academic success. The model of care we developed with the New Haven Public Schools outpaces what hundreds of school districts are doing to address these issues across the nation. We are regularly invited to present our model (and its successful outcomes!) to school districts across Connecticut and around the country. Moreover, we’ve been commissioned to write a book about our model of care, our successes and challenges, and how such a program can be replicated in school communities across America.

Your continued support will help us expand this care to those times when school is not in session. The void left for these kids during winter and summer breaks is just too big. And because part of the NHTC work is to help all school personnel see behavior through the trauma lens, your support will help us reach more schools who could benefit from learning about the impact of trauma on behavior! .

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families / K-12 (5-19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.  

For the past few years, we have enhanced our ability to provide critical outreach to children in need of behavioral health services through the New Haven Trauma Coalition. This unique model of care takes place in the school, where children, families, and teachers can assess and address a range of emotional and behavioral health challenges that often serve as barriers to social and academic success. The model of care we developed with the New Haven Public Schools outpaces what hundreds of school districts are doing to address these issues across the nation. We are regularly invited to present our model – and its successful outcomes – to school districts across Connecticut and around the country. Moreover, we’ve been commissioned to write a book about our model of care, our successes and challenges, and how such a program can be replicated in school communities across America.

Your generous gift will fund the Trauma Coalition’s future initiatives including making programs and services available during those times when schools are closed but children still require help. And it will allow us to introduce our care coordination model so that we can address myriad concerns including food and housing insecurity, transportation, workforce development, and other challenges that often exacerbate behavioral health issues in children and their families.

Program Comments
CEO Comments
As you know, our goal is a healthy, thriving community made up of families who receive lots of love and support!
 
The single greatest challenge to achieving that is the necessary funding to see it through. 
 
We are working hard to design a way of giving care that is better and cost saving, and through our work with Wraparound New Haven we are seeing promising results on both counts.  You have been wonderful in your support of our work and our vision for a healthier New Haven community. 
 
Thank you so much, and thank you for whatever kindness you can continue to show us.  You have brought us to a place where we know we are really on to something, and because of you we're poised for success! 
 
With the constant economic challenges we face I cannot thank you enough for staying with us as we provide care to children and families who need it most.
 
Securing adequate funding for the work of Clifford Beers Clinic is always challenging, which is why Clifford Beers Clinic is forever grateful for the gifts it receives from a very caring community of supporters.   
CEO/Executive Director
Alice M. Forrester PhD
Term Start Sept 2007
Email aforrester@cliffordbeers.org
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 181
Number of Part Time Staff 18
Number of Volunteers 21
Staff Retention Rate 81%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 35
Asian American/Pacific Islander 4
Caucasian 95
Hispanic/Latino 53
Native American/American Indian 1
Other 11 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 31
Female 167
Unspecified 1
Plans & Policies
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Date Strategic Plan Adopted July 2017
Management Succession Plan? Under Development
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr. Chester J. Brodnicki LCSWDec 1989 - Aug 2007
Senior Staff
Title Vice President of Clinical & Community-Based Services
Title Chief Financial Officer
Title Vice President of Strategic Advancement
Title Medical Director
Title VP of Business Development
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits2010
Connecticut Council on Philanthropy2010
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2010
United Way of Greater New Haven2010
Board Chair
Karen DuBois-Walton PhD
Company Affiliation Housing Authority, City of New Haven
Term Oct 2012 to Oct 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
William S. Colwell Esq.Parrett, Porto, Parese & Colwell, P.C.
Ricci Cummings Community Volunteer
Jacqueline Epright Yale New Haven Hospital
Stephanie S. Farber PhDRetired
Maureen Frank Start Community Bank
Lynn Gabbard New Haven Acadmey & CT Adoption Services
William T. Kosturko Retired
Stephen H. Kovel Hull's Art Supply & Framing
Richard Leibiger Connecticut Vinyl Exterior
Christopher Levesque Forecuity LLC
Serena Neal-Sanjurjo
Ted Novicki United Illuminating/ Avangrid
Thomas J. Sansone EsqCarmody Torrance Sandak & Hennessy, LLP
Dominic B. Schioppo Jr.New England Financial Group, LLC
Yan Searcy PhDSouthern CT State University
Fredrick Streets M.Div., MSW, DSW, DDDixwell Church
Richard Sussman PhDHartford Foundation for Public Giving
Tina C. Weiner Yale University Press
Cheryl Williams Community Volunteer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 15
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 10
Female 9
Unspecified 1
Standing Committees
Finance
Nominating
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Building
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2017
Fiscal Year End June 30 2018
Projected Revenue $15,600,000.00
Projected Expenses $15,600,000.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 0%
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Revenue$14,427,912$14,171,000$9,628,047
Total Expenses$14,288,564$11,198,044$9,816,268
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,261,477$3,670,422$849,669
Government Contributions$10,478,630$7,871,743$5,876,273
Federal--$1,275,869--
State--$5,567,714$4,863,523
Local------
Unspecified$10,478,630$1,028,160$1,012,750
Individual Contributions----$35,957
------
$2,580,960$2,431,146$2,607,472
Investment Income, Net of Losses$38,896$98,389$62,654
Membership Dues------
Special Events$61,624$67,578$127,251
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$6,325$31,722$68,771
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$11,678,561$9,327,419$7,998,600
Administration Expense$2,073,506$1,560,011$1,387,261
Fundraising Expense$536,497$310,614$430,407
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.011.270.98
Program Expense/Total Expenses82%83%81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue5%3%6%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$6,317,733$6,636,545$3,460,858
Current Assets$3,112,860$3,359,952$713,848
Long-Term Liabilities$985,426$1,052,228$650,000
Current Liabilities$1,110,604$1,248,163$697,412
Total Net Assets$4,221,703$4,336,154$2,113,446
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --DCF $5,567,714DCF $4,863,523
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --US Dept. of Health & Human Services $1,275,869SAMHSA $530,350
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Seedlings Foundation $1,255,000Seedlings Foundation $260,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.802.691.02
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets16%16%19%
Comments
CEO Comments
We continue to counteract the challenges associated with rising costs in nonprofit health care work with opportunities that present themselves.  We are constantly looking for new grants, new funders, and new donors, and we make every effort to expand existing relationships.  Clifford Beers Clinic remains grateful for all past and current support and welcomes all opportunities to discuss with past, present and newly interested funders ways in which the Clinic delivers care and how funds are used to treat children and families affected by trauma.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 93 Edwards Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 772-1270
Contact Email info@cliffordbeers.org
CEO/Executive Director Alice M. Forrester PhD
Board Chair Karen DuBois-Walton PhD
Board Chair Company Affiliation Housing Authority, City of New Haven

 

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