United Way of Greater New Haven
370 James Street, Suite 403
New Haven CT 06513
Contact Information
Address 370 James Street, Suite 403
New Haven, CT 06513-
Telephone (203) 772 x2010
Fax 203-773-0332
E-mail knorwood@uwgnh.org
Web and Social Media

Mission

United Way of Greater New Haven brings people and organizations together to create solutions to Greater New Haven's most pressing challenges in the areas of Education, Health, and Financial Stability. We tackle issues that cannot be solved by any one group working alone. 

 

 

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1953
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Jennifer Heath
Board Chair Mr. Andrew Boone
Board Chair Company Affiliation UBS
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $7,601,605.00
Projected Expenses $7,601,605.00
Statements
Mission

United Way of Greater New Haven brings people and organizations together to create solutions to Greater New Haven's most pressing challenges in the areas of Education, Health, and Financial Stability. We tackle issues that cannot be solved by any one group working alone. 

 

 

Background

Urbanization and industrialization grew rapidly in this period of American history, and human needs began to outpace the ability of friends and neighbors to meet them, culminating in the Great Depression.  Precursors to United Way such as Denver’s Charity Organization Society and local War Chests across America formed to meet those needs in a coordinated fashion by raising and distributing funds, assessing community need, advising relief agencies and ensuring financial efficiency.  In 1919, the Community Chest of Greater New Haven was founded.

 

World War II and the postwar era saw the growth of United Way’s formal relationships with large companies, unions and local and national government.  The introduction of payroll deduction made giving more convenient and financially feasible for the average American worker and United Ways took advantage of their increased national presence by running national media campaigns, while still retaining a local focus.  In 1952, the New Haven Community Chest evolved into the United Fund of Greater New Haven, which in 1971 merged with the Community Council to form today’s United Way of Greater New Haven.

 

As the U.S. began to shift from an industrial economy to a service economy, United Way became a field of professional practice, with training and development in core areas of business, programs such as National Corporate Leadership, 2-1-1 infoline and a partnership with the National Football League were developed, As the Internet became an increasingly important communication tool, United Way established its presence online.  In Greater New Haven, United Way increased community participation in our grant-making process and established priority areas to more effectively target community needs. 

 

Our 3 priority areas are we have identified are what we need as the basic building blocks for a good life; education, income and health. A quality education that leads to a stable job; income that can support a family; and good health…yet these are beyond the reach of many residents in our community.

 

Working with many partners, United Way leads initiatives that not only help people in need but also create lasting, community-wide impact resulting in greater education, income and health opportunities for everyone.

 

United Way recruits people and organizations who bring the passion, expertise and resources needed to get things done. Together, united, we can change what we see in the world.

 

 

Impact

1. Education

* Success By 6 is United Way of Greater New Haven’s initiative to ensure that more children throughout the region come to school ready to learn and have a solid foundation for lifelong success. Over the last year more than 1,000 children ages birth through 5 benefited from high-quality early care and education opportunities.

* More than 288 parents benefited from learning more about child development and how they can best support their child's learning.

* UWGNH created the Secure Start Network to help programs provide Circle of Security-Parenting sessions to help parents understand how to improve their relationship with their child through better caregiving.

* UWGNH provided an opportunity for 1,552 children to receive afterschool programming.

2. Income

* Last year, our workforce development partners helped 91 people with significant barriers to employment get a job. 78% of those individuals increased their household income; 57% are in jobs that pay more than $10 per hour; 23% moved above 200% of the Federal Poverty Level (considered a measure of financial self-sufficiency in Connecticut).

* Through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program, more than 3,800 low-income working individuals received free tax assistance and secured more than $9.1 million in returns.


3. Health & Basic Needs

* We have increased children's access to healthy food through the New Haven Public Schools' Food Truck, which served more than 24,000 meals to children and youth during the summer in under-served New Haven neighborhoods.

* 2-1-1 InforLine. Residents from our region made 51,322 service requests during FY 2015. The top three inquiries were for public assistance, housing, and utilities/heat.

Goals

* Children enter school developmentally on track in terms of health, literacy, social, emotional and intellectual skills.

* Young people graduate from high school.

* Families and individuals achieve greater financial success.

* Families and individuals live in stable affordable housing.

* People are mentally and physically healthy and have access to nutritious food.

* Individuals and families have their basic needs met in the areas of housing, food.

Needs

 1.    The Trauma Coalition is a network of partners committed to creating a system of care to treat Adverse Childhood Experiences or ACEs.   The coalition is a collaborative between United Way of Greater New Haven, Clifford Beers Clinic, the City of New Haven and New Haven Public Schools and seeks to eradicate community violence, school failure, reduce incarceration rates, improve overall health and, in short, create a safer, healthier community for children and families.

One of the main ways that the NHTC is supporting the community to achieve this goal is to provide services and supports to New Haven Public Schools staff, teachers, students and families.

United Way of Greater New Haven is seeking support for Smart About Money, a free budget coaching program that helps households set and achieve their financial goals through a series of one-on-one sessions with trained volunteer budget coaches. 

3.    United Way is looking for support to continue Success By 6 to support access to quality care and education and parents' knowledge of important developmental milestones.

4.    United Way brings together the caring power of people to create change in our region and to improve lives. United Way seeks general operating support to advance our work with the community and achieve our desired result of eliminating the education and income disparities in Greater New Haven.

 

CEO Statement
United Way changes what's possible for children and families. Giving to United Way is the most powerful way to give to your community. Your donation multiplies community impact by combining your gift with gifts from others. More importantly, the money you donate to United Way supports local programs and agencies. Dollars raised in our community stay in our community to help build a better place for us all to live, work and raise our families.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Philanthropy,Voluntarism & Grantmaking Foundations / Philanthropy/Charity/ Voluntarism Promotion (General)
Secondary Organization Category Unknown /
Areas Served
Bethany
Branford
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Madison
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
West Haven
Woodbridge
Greater New Haven region
Programs
Description
Through our Kids Succeed grantmaking, United Way provides grants to local organizations to help them serve more children in high-quality after-school programs. Our community partners for 2013 through 2015 include Boys and Girls Club of New Haven, Centro San Jose, Farnam Neighborhood House, New Haven Reads, and West Haven Community House.
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) / Families / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

·     Improvements in PHYSICAL Indicators: (obesity, chronic physical or mental condition, passing rate on state fitness tests)

·    Improvements in SOCIAL-BEHAVIORAL HEALTH Indicators: (sense of personal safety, reports of drug and alcohol use, reports of exposure to violence, number of out-of-school suspensions)

·    Improvements in STUDENT ENGAGEMENT Indicators: (rate of unexcused absences, reports indicating students feel good about their school and look forward to activities and programs)

·    Improvements in FAMILY ENGAGEMENT Indicators: (number of parents who attend Report Card Night, meetings and conferences, reports indicating parents feel welcome in the school, rate of excused absences)

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
  •  Close the gap between the performance of New Haven students and the rest of the State
  • Cut the drop-out rate in half
  • Ensure that every graduating student has the academic ability and the financial resources to attend and succeed in college

 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
  •  New Haven Public Schools Boost! Status Card (completed annually)
  • Resources and Needs Assessment completed by each Boost! school
  • Youth Feedback Forms
  • Parent Feedback Forms
  • Teacher Feedback Forms
  • Project outcomes and outputs

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Increased number of partnerships occurring between New Haven’s non-profit community and New Haven Public Schools. More youth are involved in meaningful after-school activities.
Description
An initiative to help our community's youngest children be ready to succeed in school.  Success By 6 focuses on three strategies:  1) creating opportunities for children ages 0-5 from low-income families to have access to early care and education; 2) improving the quality of early care and education; and 3) increasing parents' knowledge of the important developmental milestones their children must meet to come to school success-ready.
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / Families / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Success By 6 is working to:
  • create opportunities for children 0-5 from low-income families to have access to high quality early care and education.  
  • improve the quality of early care and education available in our region
  • engage more parents, guardians and caregivers to support their children’s development and learning 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The goal of Success By 6 is to ensure thatchildren enter school developmentally on track in terms of health, literacy, social, emotional and intellectual skills regardless of race or socioeconomic status.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

United Way has adopted Results Based Accountability to track and measure the impact of its programming in the community. As part of this work, United Way researched trends in early care and education and worked with community partners to identify a set of core performance measures to monitor program success and learning. United Way collects mid-year and end-of-year reports from partners; these reports provide data about how much service was provided, how well the services were provided, and how participants are “better off” to help inform our work and to ensure community goals are being achieved.  

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

United Way secured new federal dollars and is partnering with All Our Kin and LULAC to implement a new Early Head Start Program, making quality full-day, full-year care available for 41 infants and toddlers and their families in New Haven.

Nineteen child care programs in New Haven, East Haven, West Haven and Hamden serving over 600 children participated in the Accreditation Initiative supported by United Way, which helped them successfully complete the national accreditation process, a hallmark of high-quality early care and education.

In 2011, nearly 600 parents reported learning from Success By 6 programs how to best support their children's development and learning.  

Description

A Coordinated Access Network is a region designated by the CT Department of Housing responsible for coordinated entry into shelter services.

Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network is a collective effort of providers, embedded in GNH Opening Doors, implementing coordinated entry and exit services.

Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. 75% of children who are tutored will improve their reading abilities and 90% of tutors will report improved personal development as a result of their participation.  
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Experience Corps defines success for both populations involved in the program -- the children being tutored and the older adults who are tutoring. Children involved in Experience Corps will be reading at or above grade level.  The older adults who are tutors will feel more connected to their community as a result of their services.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success is measured by teachers' assessments (pre and post) of students' abilities in the five components of reading: comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, phonics, and phonemic awareness); assessments of the tutors' impact on students; and the tutors' perceptions of the program.  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. While working with two young students from the first grade class one late winter morning, we were asked to read a story about a picnic.   [O]ne of the students said she had never been on a picnic and didn’t really know what it was.  I suggested that we ask their teacher if we could go outside for a future tutoring session and make it a "picnic".  When we returned to class I mentioned our discussion to Ms. Jacob and she said probably half of the class had never been on a picnic.  I asked if we might take the whole class on a picnic one day and she thought it was a great idea.  About a month later, when the snow was gone and the sun was shining, we all scampered outside to a lovely spot by a flowering crab tree and spread out blankets and settled down for a picnic and story.   It was a really fun activity and an opportunity for the children to make a concrete connection to literature while adding to their life experience. Footnote: at the end of the school year when the students were given a choice of rewards, the class chose a picnic!
Description
A program that matches volunteer financial coaches with households who want help reaching their financial goals.  Volunteer budget coaches meet one-on-one with participants over the course of six months to analyze income and expenses, determine financial goals, and develop a household budget.  
 
Population Served Adults / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

SAM graduates will have: increased household income, reduced household debt, saved at least $300, increased utilization of mainstream financial services

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

SAM participants reported that 90 days after completing the program:

·     50% increased the frequency with which they use and follow a budget

·     50% increased awareness of their spending patterns

·     50% continued to decreases their expenses

·     100% continued progress on achieving their financial goals after the programs

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

SAM collects data on a comprehensive set of performance measures that track the program’s quantity and quality of services and impact on the households served at the point of assessment, program completion, and post-completion.  A formative evaluation conducted by Technical Development Corporation (TDC), a nonprofit consulting and research group specializing in evaluation of nonprofit program services, demonstrated that SAM had a significant impact on imroving participating household’s financial position and documented a high-level of confidence among participants in their understanding of financial practices and ability to apply this knowledge.  

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

A family in New Haven with a moderate income had a child in her first year of college, and the parents were facing what felt like insurmountable red-ink at the end of each month. The parents and student were working, but the bills didn’t add up. By working with a SAM budget coach, the family learned to look at their income and expenses collectively – including the new obligations that college required – and discovered ways to decrease their household expenses. Staying in college is more viable and the household is more stable now that the family is in the black at the end of the month.Volunteer budget coaches bring a wealth of financial and community knowledge to the program, and provide a highly effective and efficient way to provide much needed services to residents struggling with financial uncertainty.

 

Description
Raising funds to meet emergency needs around food and shelter to help move people out of crisis.
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / Unemployed, Underemployed, Dislocated / US
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

The Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven and United Way of Greater New Haven launched Neighbor-to-Neighbor LifeLine (N2N) in the winter of 2009 to raise awareness and funds to address an increase in critical housing and hunger needs in Greater New Haven by investing in local organizations that meet emergency needs & help people avert or pull-out of crises.  

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The ultimate goal of Neighbor-to-Neighbor LifeLine is to provide families and individuals the footing for longer-term financial security by helping people avoid crisis in the first place. United Way invests in programs that provide economic opportunities for those in need affording individuals and families the support they need to achieve or maintain economic success and independence.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

United Way brings together a diverse set of stakeholders who make investment decisions that will have the greatest impact in our community. To that end, volunteers came together to make funding recommendations based on a competitive application process and their expertise around the needs and resources in our community.

United Way works closely with Neighbor-to-Neighbor grantees throughout the year to ensure more people are receiving the support they need to stay out of crisis. Grantees are responsible for providing mid-year and end-of-grant reporting information demonstrating how they are making a difference in the lives of people they serve.  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

As organizations face diminishing resources and increasing demands for services, the community has rallied around this effort helping to raise nearly $2 million to provide more individuals and families with one-time emergency food, shelter and relief assistance to get back on their feet. 

As a result of Neighbor-to-Neighbor LifeLine:

  • 836,581 additional meals were served to children and adults.
  • 3,141 individuals received emergency shelter or housing services to prevent homelessness
  • 955 individuals received emergency heating, medical and other assistance
  • 12,941 individuals received services to help them avert or pull-out of a crisis
 
Program Comments
CEO Comments
UWGNH is focused on providing leadership around some of the most challenging issues facing Greater New Haven. We have been honored to work in partnership with the New Haven Public Schools Reform project by dealing with the difficult challenge of bringing the resources of the whole community into the lives of our students. The ground breaking work this partnership created will have a life of its own going forward and for this we are both grateful and proud.Our leadership with the 100 day challenge to end chronic homelessness has resulted in improvements in the way we serve our homeless of which over 250 previously homeless people have moved into permanent housing.
The challenge we all face involves finding ways for our community to mobilize its caring power. We know that our friends and families want to make a difference. They want to see people's lives improve and they want fairness and opportunity for all. Our work going forward will involve the innovation needed to align the caring power of the community with work that will directly help people flourish.
CEO/Executive Director
Jennifer Heath
Term Start July 2016
Email jheath@uwgnh.org
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 21
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 18
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate 75%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 7
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 4
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 18
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr. Jack Healy -
Senior Staff
Title Chief Financial Officer
Title Vice President, Income and Health
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Board Chair
Mr. Andrew Boone
Company Affiliation UBS
Term June 2015 to June 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Ashika Brinkley New Haven Health Department
Timothy Cashman Wells Fargo
Jack Cockerill US Trust
Tom Crowley
Kellyann Day New Haven Home Recovery
Nitza Diaz-Candelo CERC
Joseph Dornfried Carmody Torrance Sandak & Hennessey
Josh Geballe Core Informatics
Josh Geballe Core Informatics
Ronald Harichandran University of New Haven
Caroline Hendel
Michael Holmes Yale New Haven Hospital
Janet Lindner
Rebecca Matthews Wggin & Dana
Sonia Nobrego Yale-New Haven Hospital
Ted Norris
Mark Perkins Halloran & Sage
Roger Sciascia Wienstein & Anastasio
Clarky Sonnenfeld Little Wonder
Eizabeth Stewart Murtha Cullina
Susan Thomas Melville Charitable Trust
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 17
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 13
Female 9
Board Co-Chair
Janet Lindner
Company Affiliation Yale University
Term June 2016 to June 2017
Email janet.lindner@yale.edu
Standing Committees
Board Governance
Executive
Finance
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $7,601,605.00
Projected Expenses $7,601,605.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Form 990s
IRS 9902016
IRS 9902015
IRS 9902014
IRS 9902013
IRS 9902012
IRS 9902011
IRS 9902010
IRS 9902009
IRS 9902008
Audit Documents
Audit2016
Audit2015
Audit2014
Audit2013
Audit2012
Audit2011
Audit2010
Audit2009
Audit2008
IRS Letter of Exemption
Tax Exempt Form
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,702,091$1,525,805$2,013,889
Government Contributions$1,478,792$590,557$542,953
Federal--$590,557--
State------
Local------
Unspecified$1,478,792--$542,953
Individual Contributions$3,690,088$4,487,766$4,533,685
------
$44,897$50,223$285,469
Investment Income, Net of Losses$31,001$94,464$82,365
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$53,678$85,977$72,948
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$5,780,262$6,313,322$6,748,942
Administration Expense$788,320$791,752$757,405
Fundraising Expense$648,773$588,379$675,488
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.970.890.92
Program Expense/Total Expenses80%82%82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue9%9%10%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$3,720,352$4,193,758$4,560,244
Current Assets$2,327,053$2,522,726$2,796,742
Long-Term Liabilities$1,788,511$2,211,878$1,745,660
Current Liabilities$1,300,879$898,358$732,032
Total Net Assets$630,962$1,083,522$2,082,552
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountYale University $1,301,947Dept. of Health & Human Service $590,557Yale University $1,189,122
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountYale New Haven Hospital $208,653Yale University $526,369Yale New Haven Hospital $251,333
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountKnights of Columbus $161,778Yale New Haven Hospital $231,633AT&T $219,796
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.792.813.82
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets48%53%38%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 370 James Street, Suite 403
New Haven, CT 06513
Primary Phone 203 772 2010
Contact Email knorwood@uwgnh.org
CEO/Executive Director Jennifer Heath
Board Chair Mr. Andrew Boone
Board Chair Company Affiliation UBS

 

Related Information

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