Dwight Hall at Yale
67 High Street
P.O. Box 209008
New Haven CT 06520-9008
Contact Information
Address 67 High Street
P.O. Box 209008
New Haven, CT 06520-9008
Telephone (203) 432.2420 x
Fax 203-432.2425
E-mail dwighthall@yale.edu
Web and Social Media
Dwight Hall students leading an educational demo series for local youth.

Mission

 

The mission of Dwight Hall at Yale is to nurture and inspire students as leaders of social change and to advance justice and service in New Haven and around the world

Dwight Hall, a not-for-profit organization independent of Yale, was founded by undergraduates in 1886 and has operated continuously since then as a student-initiated service organization. As the Center for Public Service and Social Justice, Dwight Hall reflects a diverse Yale student body and a strong history of social justice work in New Haven and beyond. Whether through feeding the hungry, fighting for civil rights, defending the most vulnerable residents, or tutoring and mentoring countless New Haven public school students, Dwight Hall has been a physical link between Yale students and the communities outside of campus and has stood as a model of how college students should engage with the world.

Dwight Hall encourages and nurtures student service and justice initiatives, by guiding and supporting the creation of new organizations tackling urgent and emerging issues or by strengthening and building the capacity of existing student groups. In this way, the needs of New Haven and communities beyond the city are served, while students acquire valuable skills and hands-on experience that they will apply to their work after graduation. Through their participation in Dwight Hall activities, students come to realize that service and justice are not so much about doing and fixing but rather about learning, sharing, engaging, and building community. Dwight Hall's organizations, fellowships, and resources support the transformation of students into agents of social change.
 
Dwight Hall's envisioned future is to be universally known as a model for forging, convening, and nurturing student leadership in service, justice, and social change. activists from the New Haven community.

 

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1942
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Peter G. Crumlish
Board Chair Mr. John R. Meeske
Board Chair Company Affiliation retired
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

 

The mission of Dwight Hall at Yale is to nurture and inspire students as leaders of social change and to advance justice and service in New Haven and around the world

Dwight Hall, a not-for-profit organization independent of Yale, was founded by undergraduates in 1886 and has operated continuously since then as a student-initiated service organization. As the Center for Public Service and Social Justice, Dwight Hall reflects a diverse Yale student body and a strong history of social justice work in New Haven and beyond. Whether through feeding the hungry, fighting for civil rights, defending the most vulnerable residents, or tutoring and mentoring countless New Haven public school students, Dwight Hall has been a physical link between Yale students and the communities outside of campus and has stood as a model of how college students should engage with the world.

Dwight Hall encourages and nurtures student service and justice initiatives, by guiding and supporting the creation of new organizations tackling urgent and emerging issues or by strengthening and building the capacity of existing student groups. In this way, the needs of New Haven and communities beyond the city are served, while students acquire valuable skills and hands-on experience that they will apply to their work after graduation. Through their participation in Dwight Hall activities, students come to realize that service and justice are not so much about doing and fixing but rather about learning, sharing, engaging, and building community. Dwight Hall's organizations, fellowships, and resources support the transformation of students into agents of social change.
 
Dwight Hall's envisioned future is to be universally known as a model for forging, convening, and nurturing student leadership in service, justice, and social change. activists from the New Haven community.

 

Background

Dwight Hall has inspired Yale students to serve and transform the world for more than 128 years.  Founded as the Young Men’s Christian Association at Yale in 1886, Dwight Hall has evolved into a secular and inclusive institution where connections can be forged and cultivated with the New Haven community.  While Dwight Hall has changed significantly since the end of the 19th century, the fundamental concerns for social service and action, which brought the Hall into existence, continue today.  

Historically, Dwight Hall has been an incubator for social justice and provides students with resources and networks for social action. In the 1930s, Dwight Hall students organized annual "peace strikes" to demonstrate their commitment to pacifism. Numerous Dwight Hall students were conscientious objectors in WWI and WWII. Alumnus David Dellinger inspired generations of activists from the late 1930s until his death.

During the 1950s and 60s, Dwight Hall advocated for the Civil Rights movement in the South while participating in the freedom rides, sit-ins, and marches. The University Chaplain at the time, William Sloane Coffin, collaborated closely with Dwight Hall to organize these activities. Dwight Hall served as the central location for East Coast student activists participating in freedom rides. Students from several universities would board buses on Friday afternoon and return on Sunday night.

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Dwight Hall students were vociferously active in the anti-Vietnam movement. In 1970, Dwight Hall served as a neutral space where both Black Panthers and FBI could gather to discuss and negotiate.

In the 1980s, Dwight Hall continued to be a hub of activism. Many students advocated against apartheid in South Africa and supported the environmental movement. In the 1990s, the Student Labor Action Coalition supported local efforts to negotiate a fair contract with Yale, numerous student organizations formed the Student Coalition Rallying Against Proposition 187 (SCRAP 187), United Farm Workers at Yale successfully petitioned to ban California table grapes from Yale University dining halls in order to improve the plight of the farm workers, and the Yale Hunger and Homeless Action Project helped get the New Haven Living Wage bill passed.

Currently Dwight Hall supports over 90 service programs and fellowships while fostering coordinate efforts with New Haven organizations with similar missions.. Many of New Haven's non-profit organizations - including Columbus House, New Haven Home Recovery, Marrakech, and Haven Free Clinic - were developed with key support from Dwight Hall Summer Fellowship projects. Dwight Hall alumni have also created national organizations - such as Jumpstart, College Summit, Peer Health Exchange, Unite for Sight, and Mercado Global - that were either launched from their Dwight Hall projects or grew out of their service experiences as student leaders.

Impact

Dwight Hall supports over 90 student-led service groups and fellowships which contribute over 150,000 hours of direct service and advocacy each year. The efforts of these volunteers impact 20,000 people in the State of Connecticut alone. Listed below are examples that demonstrate the range of our service programming.

  • The Education Network promotes positive youth development through groups like Yale Children’s Theater, which produced 4 plays and a workshop series to encourage confidence and self-expression last year.
  • The International Network inspires thoughtful and responsible service abroad and advocacy at home. For example, Uganda Hope Network collaborates with Hope for African Children and Cosma Foundation to impact the lives of 150 households.
  • The Public Health Network enhances community outcomes through awareness, service, and collaboration as exemplified by Hypertension Awareness and Prevention Program at Yale (HAPPY), which regularly provides free screenings to New Haven residents.
  • The Social Justice Network builds coalitions between groups advancing human rights, enabling member groups like Elmseed Enterprise Fund to provide over 30 small, low-interest loans totaling $70,000 to local entrepreneurs.
  • Fellowships promote intensive, community-based service experiences for students, such as the Public School Interns who collaborate with 12 New Haven Public Schools for academic engagement and enrichment services.
  • Co-Op After School (CAS). Over 375 students participated in the 2014-2015 academic year in nearly 50 courses in academic enrichment, personal development, community service, or the arts.
  • Socially Responsible Investment Fund (SRI). Students invest a portion of Dwight Hall’s reserve funds in local community banks and publicly traded companies committed to sound environmental, labor, and governance policies, yielding positive economic and social returns.

Needs

Unrestricted contributions to Dwight Hall support the the following organizational needs:

1) Resources for student-initiated service and advocacy projects. Dwight Hall provides member organizations with funds to implement their programs, access vehicles and bus passes to transport volunteers, and supplies to coordinate their efforts.
 
2) Leadership Development to improve program quality. Dwight Hall engages leaders in the Greater New Haven community and a global network of alumni to conduct training and workshops. It coaches and mentors student leaders to recognize community assets, support issues that are identified by the community, design and implement a theory of change, evaluate impact, and plan for successful transitions.
 
3) Resources to activate a Social Innovation Laboratory. Dwight Hall enables experimentation and collaboration as a Social Innovation Laboratory. The Lab provides a forum for students to bring forth their ideas for social change, equips them with tools and resources, and connects them with experts for feedback and guidance.
 
4) Strengthened relationships and collaboration between students, Dwight Hall, and New Haven community agencies through Fellowship programs.
 
5) Marketing and Communication improvements.
CEO Statement Ultimately, Dwight Hall recognizes that long-term solutions to the world's problems come from focusing on developing passionate innovative leaders. Dwight Hall promotes a culture of action and reflection that encourages student leaders to share best practices, learn from successful leaders, and collaborate on solving societal challenges. Dwight Hall believes that the best way to achieve long-term solutions is to apply the energy and talents of students towards needs and opportunities in their immediate New Haven community. By actively engaging students as residents of New Haven, Dwight Hall nurtures meaningful involvement that is respectfully aligned with the community's own vision for social change.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Community Service Clubs
Secondary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Leadership Development
Tertiary Organization Category Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy / Minority Rights
Areas Served
New Haven
State wide
International
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
Programs
Description Dwight Hall has over 90 student-led service programs that provide direct services and advocacy in greater New Haven.  To foster program development and sustainability, service programs are given guidance, support, and resources through one of Dwight Hall's four Networks.  
  1. The Education Network contains 21 student-led programs that promote best practices for positive youth development.
  2. The International Network contains 14 student-led programs inspire thoughtful and responsible service abroad and advocacy at home.
  3. The Public Health Network contains 15 student-led programs that enhance community outcomes through awareness, advocacy, service, and collaboration.
  4. The Social Justice Network contains 17 student-led service programs that build coalitions between groups advancing human rights.
Population Served K-12 (5-19 years) / Adults / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
  1. Improvements in literacy, mathematics, and total youth development
  2. Advocacy and resources leveraged for positive and sustainable impact abroad 
  3. Medical care and knowledge shared with underserved populations
  4. Advocacy  and resources leveraged for social justice and community development
  5. Overall cultivation of self-respect, confidence, social consciousness, and leadership ability within volunteers and those served
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
  1. Sustainable, positive impact within the New Haven community and beyond
  2. Dwight Hall students become civic-minded leaders
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
  1. Youth feedback forms
  2. Parent feedback forms
  3. Community feedback forms
  4. Program outputs and outcomes
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Two example of recent program success are...

  1. Engineers Without Boards (EWB) adopted the Roh, Cameroon project in 2012 with hopes of constructing an efficient system that would improve access to clean water thereby reducing the incidence of water-borne illness. EWB traveled to Roh for the project’s first implementation trip in May 2013. The team worked alongside the people of Roh to construct a water storage tank, teach households how to disinfect water vessels with bleach, and coordinate with local vendors for sustain a bleach supply.
  2. The Musical Cure is a group of student musicians that perform in hospitals and other health centers in the New Haven community. Since 2001, volunteers provide about an hour's worth of music in the form of a small, informal concert. Residents enjoy the regular musical experiences and develop one-on-one relationships for enrichment and connection.

 

 
Description
Dwight Hall supports a series of Fellowships that foster collaboration between Dwight Hall and organizations within the New Haven community.  
 
These partnerships focus on literacy, educational enrichment, economic development, community building, family empowerment, and public health within the New Haven Community.

Fellowships:

 

  1. Urban Fellows Program
  2. Public School Internship Program
  3. Management and Marketing Fellows Program
  4. Early Childhood Education Fellowship Program
  5. Academic Mentoring Program at Yale (DHAMPY)
  6. Municipal Policy Assistant Program
  7. Summer Fellowship Program
  8. Rev. John G. Magee Fellowship

 

Population Served General/Unspecified / At-Risk Populations / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
  1. Cultivation dialogue for community engagement
  2. Collaborative action for community development
  3. Leveraging resources and volunteers for local impact
  4. Improved academic engagement and social development for youth participating in Dwight Hall's Academic Mentoring Program
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Dwight Hall fellowships create, maintain, and sustain partnership for community development and positive change.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
  1. Youth feedback forms
  2. Parent feedback forms
  3. Community feedback forms
  4. Program outputs and outcomes
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Dwight Hall has 7 Fellowship Programs.  Dwight Hall Summer Fellows spend their summer in New Haven working full-time on a  project they have designed in direct response to a community need.  Former Fellows have worked with organizations such as CitySeed, Planned Parenthood, and Community Mediation.  They have completed projects ranging from the development of a resource guide on homeless health care resources to the development of a 10-year neighborhood plan in conjunction with community leaders.  
Description

Co-Op After School (CAS) maintains a supportive, nurturing, safe environment that provides students with opportunities for enrichment outside of the normal school day.  CAS offers over 30 unique programs in creative writing, dance, music, theater, visual arts, architecture, academic enrichment, and civic and cultural engagement for 300 students (nearly half the student body).  Dwight Hall is a CAS partner and is proud to support youth development through the arts.

Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Teachers will often report that students are less likely to miss school on days that they have a CAS class. Teachers will also note that students involved in CAS are so committed to it because it gives them a chance to study something outside of their chosen major.

CAS was highlighted as an example of the positive benefits of after school programs. CAS engages students positively in their school community instead of unhealthy or negative experiences. It also places a high priority on academics; students are encouraged to use After School time to meet with their teachers even if that means they miss part of their course. Their academic success comes first. 

CAS employs Co-op high school teachers, but also works with a wide network of Yale students who teach courses on screenwriting, philosophy, and poetry, among other things. CAS students will often remark that they like having the opportunity to learn from college students because they aspire to be like them.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
  1. Academic and artistic enrichment for total youth development and self-expression
  2. Expanded access to higher education through wrap around services
  3. Cultivation of self respect and worth as a young scholar, artist, and citizen
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

 

  1. End of semester evaluations to all of the students
  2. Teachers evaluations on individual student performance

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

 

  1. To expand higher education access, CAS offers a college prep course to sophomores and juniors. Juniors are guided through the process individually by one of Co-op's guidance counselors.  The course is open to non-CAS students to drop in because this is the type of information that we want all students to have access to.
  2. The SLAM poetry course was taght by Co-op’s own students who cultivated the idea from an end-of-program evaluation.
  3. A young student who just returned from maternity leave enrolled in the CAS culinary course where students learn how to shop for nutritious food on a budget, follow recipes, and create their own meals. She shared her appreciation of the open welcome CAS gave her upon her return and noted how she values this culinary knowledge for herself and development of her child.
  4. At the end of the Fall semester, students with 90% attendance or higher were participated in an attendance-incentive party. Over 75 students attended.

 

Description

Socially responsible investment (SRI) strategy considers both financial returns and social good.  Created in 2008, the Dwight Hall Socially Responsible Investment Fund is the first undergraduate-run SRI fund in the country. 

A Student Advisory Committee collaborates with the Board of Trustees to ensure the financial success of the fund while simultaneously raising awareness about the importance of incorporating environmental, social, and corporate governance issues into the investment process. Student committee members have the opportunity to learn about the criteria and methods by which socially responsible investment funds can be managed while developing investment acumen.

Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
  1. Contribute to the success of Dwight Hall
  2. Inspire the creation of similar funds at other colleges
  3. Make socially responsible investing both accessible and exciting to college students.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
  1. Student Advisory Committee
  2. Dwight Hall Board of Trustees 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Dwight Hall Socially Responsible Investing Fund won a 2013 Connecticut Higher Education Community Service Award from Governor Malloy in 2013.
CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Peter G. Crumlish
Term Start June 2013
Email peter.crumlish@yale.edu
Experience

The Dwight Hall at Yale Board of Directors has unanimously selected Peter Crumlish as Executive Director for Dwight Hall at Yale. Crumlish brings a wealth of leadership experience to this position, having served as the Director of Resource Development for Neighborhood Housing Services of New Haven, and as a past Director of College Counseling at Hebron Academy and Director of Partnerships for Parks in New York City.  He is a summa cum laude graduate of the Yale Divinity School.  Peter served two years in the Peace Corps, training teachers in the Philippines, and currently serves as a member of the board of directors for the Calvin Hill Day Care Center and the Congo Leadership Initiative.

“We are delighted to have Peter join our organization. He brings a passion for service and advocacy that has been demonstrated in both his career and service activities,” said Connie Royster, chair of the Board of Directors.

Crumlish was selected after an extensive search process that involved students, board, and staff in considering numerous candidates. “He impressed people with his background in service on a national and international level and his experiences in community engagement,” said a member of the student executive leadership team. “Students at Dwight Hall are committed to a wide variety of service and advocacy causes and welcome someone who shares these same values in building stronger communities."

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 50%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 5
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 3
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Ms. Jeannette Archer-Simons (Interim)Aug 2012 - May 2013
Mr. Alex A. Knopp July 2008 - Sept 2012
Senior Staff
Title Director of Development and Alumni Relations
Experience/Biography Over 12 years experience with Dwight Hall with previous service as Program Director.
Title Director of Finance
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
Dwight Hall collaborates closely with community-based organizations to ensure that its student-run member organizations meet articulated needs in the New Haven community. Member organizations are required to specify a host community agency during the membership application process and evaluate progress towards their goals in conjunction with these agencies.
 
In its Fellowship programs Dwight Hall requires students to identify a supervising official at their respective placement's host agencies to ensure that students are meeting the needs of organizations.  Dwight Hall also requests that host agencies provide supervision and development opportunities to Fellows and to confirm that the goals of Fellows meet organizational and community needs.
 
Co-Op After School is made possible through competitive grant funding from the CT State Department of Education and the program highlights a unique partnership between Dwight Hall, New Haven Public Schools, Cooperative Arts and Humanities Magnet High School, and Yale University.
Board Chair
Mr. John R. Meeske
Company Affiliation retired
Term July 2014 to June 2015
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Nancy Alexander Senior Partner, Ideas for Action LLC
Justin Ash Investment Associate, Bridgewater Associates
Kate Cooney
David Dodson President, MDC Inc.
Mark R. Dollhopf Executive Director, Association of Yale Alumni
Carl Eifler Managing Director, BlackRock
Anthony Fumagalli Student, Yale College Class of 2015
Dean Pamela George Yale College Dean's Office
Ricardo Henriquez Senior Manager of Community Investment, United Way of Central and Northeastern CT
Laura Huizar Marvin M. Karpatkin Fellow, ACLU, Latino Justice PRLDEF
Catherine "Shea" Jennings Student, Yale College Class of 2016
Dara Kovel Vice-President, Connecticut Housing Finance Authority
Sharon M.K. Kugler Chaplain, Yale University
Sandra Lee Counselor, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Zoe Mercer-Golden Panorama Education
Michelle Rosenthal Engagement Manager, McKinsey & Company
Rahul Singh Student, Yale College Class of 2015
Chaitanya Singhania Student, Yale College Class of 2016
Rev. Samuel N. Slie (Emeritus Board Member)
Tim Tompkins President, Times Square Alliance
Bradford Williams Student, Harvard Business School
Jonathan Yu Student, Yale College Class of 2016
Rev. J. Philip Zaeder (Emeritus Board Member)
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander 4
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 13
Female 11
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 80%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Risk Management Provisions
Directors and Officers Policy
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
CEO Comments
      
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $968,774.00
Projected Expenses $968,771.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Spring 2014 Guide to Service and Advocacy2014View
Spring 2014 Fact Sheet2014View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$605,190$741,703$445,897
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions------
------
$251,722$222,069$133,500
Investment Income, Net of Losses$375$1,874$174,051
Membership Dues------
Special Events$33,386----
Revenue In-Kind------
Other--$760$49,375
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$686,375$747,480$592,735
Administration Expense$118,948$173,634$136,358
Fundraising Expense$27,026$36,395$26,380
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.071.011.06
Program Expense/Total Expenses82%78%78%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue4%5%6%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$6,068,482$8,116,617$5,763,539
Current Assets$535,164$954,464$1,718,619
Long-Term Liabilities$616$7,286$12,173
Current Liabilities$68,902$118,406$51,641
Total Net Assets$5,998,964$7,990,925$5,699,725
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Yale University - President's Office $140,531Yale University - President's Office $140,531
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --State of CT - Dept. of Education $119,071State of CT - Dept. of Education $133,500
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Marie & John Zimmermann Fund $75,000Marie & John Zimmermann Fund $80,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities7.778.0633.28
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments                                                                   
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 67 High Street
P.O. Box 209008
New Haven, CT 065209008
Primary Phone 203 432.2420
Contact Email dwighthall@yale.edu
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Peter G. Crumlish
Board Chair Mr. John R. Meeske
Board Chair Company Affiliation retired

 

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