Tow Youth Justice Institute
300 Boston Post Road
West Haven CT 06516
Contact Information
Address 300 Boston Post Road
West Haven, CT 06516-
Telephone (203) 932-7083 x
Fax 203-931-6003
E-mail TowYouth@newhaven.edu
Web and Social Media
Mission

The University of New Haven (UNH), with its main campus located in West Haven, CT, is a student-centered comprehensive university with an emphasis on excellence in liberal arts and professional education. UNH's mission is to prepare students to lead purposeful and fulfilling lives in a global society by providing the highest-quality education through experiential, collaborative and discovery-based learning. UNH's Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences (HCLC) strives to meet this goal by creating a "student-centered professional practice-oriented learning environment."

The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) was founded in 2014 as a unique university, state and private partnership established to lead the way in juvenile justice reform through collaborative planning and policy development, training, research and advocacy efforts. It was designed to support and sustain major youth justice reform efforts now underway in the State of Connecticut by promoting the effective practices, programs and policies related to youth justice, focusing on the needs of youth up to the age of 21 and to increase the use of evidence-based practices in the field. The Institute, as an initiative of the Henry C. Lee College, draws upon the intellectual and other resources of the University to fulfill its mission. Its presence within the University will facilitate interdepartmental collaboration on academic, research, and community service projects and programs.


A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.

The University of New Haven’s Bergami Center for Science, Technology and Innovation marks a new and exciting direction for the university and a significant opportunity for The Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences (HCLC), the Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) and the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS). The Innovation Center will be a 40,000 square-foot, state-of-the-art academic building with a makerspace, black box theatre, cutting-edge science classrooms, communications studios, advanced “smart” classrooms, an atrium/café, and space for student and faculty collaboration which will spark creativity and alternate views and approaches to critical thinking.

The building, to be opened in 2020, is designed to draw together resources from across the campus in a primary point of contact for University students interested in innovation and entrepreneurship. Students can develop and test ideas alongside their peers with mentorship from faculty, alumni and corporate partners. The black box is a performance space where students will develop and create projects in music, art, creative writing, theatre, set building and production, graphic design, illustration, sound recording and much more.

Its interdisciplinary design affords all five colleges at the University an opportunity to expand collaborative projects. In this proposal, the Colleges and the TYJI will work together to explore new approaches to juvenile justice reform, while engaging faculty and students in a cutting edge project. Part of HCLC, the TYJI is a university, state and private partnership established to lead the way in juvenile justice reform through collaborative planning, training, research, and advocacy efforts.

This proposed Deep End Story project will become a highly visible opportunity to demonstrate both new learning experiences and the importance of arts-based, community service for our students, who will have the chance to see how positive youth development initiatives that use an arts-centered, strength based approach to youth engagement have a reduction effect on youth participation in antisocial, destructive, and delinquent behaviors, as research shows.

I. The Proposal

Fostering positive development in at-risk youth through arts-based activities is at the core of this project that unites the University of New Haven’s assets in the creative and performing arts with identified youth. The Deep End Story, will become a signature project at the Innovation Center, bringing together multiple partners with shared missions and goals. It will represent a way of breaking out of the deep end of the juvenile justice system where there is an overreliance on confinement, insufficient or ineffective services for offenders and families, and racial imbalance.

Utilizing the black box theatre, the project will bring groups of youth from the New Haven and West Haven communities and from the juvenile justice system to the University of New Haven campus. University students in the HCLC and CAS will lead them in a variety of activities with oversight and mentorship from faculty. Smaller groups of youth might work with University students leading them in a variety of activities that include music, art, creative writing, theatre, set building and production, graphic design, illustration, sound recording and much more. It will provide a creative and safe outlet for at-risk youth to explore their experiences and share their stories, and by working with University of New Haven students, they will be exposed to a positive, learning environment that will hopefully excite them about a better future they never imagined. University students will be empowered to share their skills, in-class theory and excitement to guide youth in a hands-on project-based learning opportunity. Using strength-based practices this opportunity will build trust and working relationships; empower youth to take a lead in their future; set goals for themselves; and together, create sustainable change through learning and experiential growth that allow for eventual outcomes to be measured.

Through the plentiful research on the success of arts-based program, our review of evaluative efforts of arts/justice programs, our experience in working with the juvenile justice population, and the assets of the CAS strongly encourages us that this initiative has the potential for success. We believe the arts has the potential to change youth behavior from law breaking to law abiding and create safer communities for all. We would expect that the program will be fully and independently evaluated.

II. Evidence of Potential Success

Evidence for the potential success of Arts-based programming with the juvenile justice population can be found in both local and national research and reports. The U.S Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) Model Programs Guide Literature Review: Positive Youth Development, notes “that participation in these (the use of arts as a strength based approach with juvenile offenders) developmental activities produced several positive outcomes, including Increased safety; increased academic achievement; greater communication in the family; fewer psychosocial problems, such as loneliness, shyness, and hopelessness; decreased involvement in risky behaviors, such as drug use and juvenile delinquency; increased self-esteem, increased popularity, increased sense of personal control, and enhanced identity development; better development of life skills such as leadership and speaking in public, decision-making, dependability, and job responsibility.”

Their Model Programs Guide Literature Review: Arts-Based Programs and Arts Therapies for At-Risk, Justice-Involved, and Traumatized Youths, found that youth from socio-economic disadvantaged environments perform better in school and improve in other factors when exposed to arts engagement than those who did not.

In addition, the Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance, an advocacy group for the children and families involved in the juvenile justice system, engaged youth in listening sessions around conversations about community reinvestment. The 6th recommendation from youth in their report, Walk in Our Shoes, supports the goal of this project:

“To integrate system-involved youth in positive youth development programs that give them a chance to mix with peers who are not involved in the juvenile justice system.”

III. Benefits of the Deep End Story for the University of New Haven Students and Faculty

The Deep End will be a collaborative project in the University. Deans from the university’s various colleges are eager to bridge the work of juvenile justice and the arts across the many disciplines. The project will significantly engage both students and faculty. This exciting University-led project will raise awareness about the field of juvenile justice, and utilize a community and strength-based alternative path for disconnected and disengaged youth. It will also highlight the opportunities and resources that exist at the University of New Haven and its role as an active member of the community. Both colleges have many strong partnerships in the community.

1) Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences Assets and Partnerships

HCLC has become world-renowned for the unique and comprehensive programs for those on career paths in national security, forensic computer investigation, law enforcement, corrections, probation and parole, forensic sciences, fire science, arson investigation, victimology studies and criminal justice. The HCLC Bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice includes an opportunity to receive a concentration in juvenile justice, with a curriculum that has been updated and is now available. This proposal will offer our students the chance to work directly in a constructive way with their younger peers from area high schools and the juvenile justice system.

Within the HCLC, the TYJI was created in 2014 to move forward juvenile justice reform. Through the Institute, community partnerships have been made and strengthened as reform recommendations have become laws and public policy. TYJI has become a desirable opportunity for students to intern and become acquainted with policy development and learn about the JJ system. Strong partnerships exist with Connecticut’s State Departments of Corrections, Child and Families, and Court Support Services Division as well as community organizations

2) The College of Arts and Sciences Assets and Partnerships

CAS’s twenty-five undergraduate programs combine a strong focus on education in the disciplines with solid career preparation. The College is also home to the exploratory majors program for students who have not yet decided on a major. This project may open students’ eyes to a career path in juvenile justice they may have not yet considered.

The CAS adds to New Haven's vibrant cultural environment. The Seton Gallery, a well-established University art gallery, offers a wide variety of renowned artists and sculptors with shows throughout the academic year in addition to a permanent collection featuring the art of Papua New Guinea. University of New Haven is a long-time sponsor of International Festival of Arts and Ideas which has a Fellows program that focuses on at-risk youth and exposes them to an intensive curriculum of arts-based programming and instruction. Starting this past summer, fellows were able to gain college credit at Gateway for a program that included arts, writing and critical thinking. A service learning course offered by a faculty member at Music Haven paired students with area youth working on musical skills. The University has also been a longtime sponsor of the New Haven Symphony Orchestra, where a fair number of students have interned.

Classes that might be utilized for this project include: Theater for Community Impact; Introduction to Acting; Student New Works Festival; Musical ensembles; Student and/or from the community Private lessons; Sound documentation; Documentary/narrative filmmaking; Television narrative/journalism; Photography; Visual arts and design; Hip hop technology; Music technology/recording; and Studio work. Interested students from the community will have the chance to participate in classes, hear lectures, observe capstone projects in the making and much more.

IV. Benefits of the Deep End Story for the Community

The benefits and reach of The Deep End will touch many facets of the community. To create a rich, diverse and meaningful experience for both university students and youth in the community, the program will need collaboration from not only within the University, but also the various local and regional organizations and networks involved with the juvenile justice system as illustrated in the graphic below. The University of New Haven will draw on the relationships built in West Haven and New Haven with Police, Probation, the New Haven Educational Center for the Arts, the Arts Council of Greater New Haven, Long Wharf Theatre, the Shubert Theatre, the Cities of West Haven and New Haven, International Festival of Arts and Ideas, Music Haven, New Haven Symphony Orchestra and more as illustrated in the graphic below. Additionally, the New Haven Board of Education can be a partner through its Hillhouse Public Safety Academy for students interested in law enforcement, juvenile justice, probation, corrections and other types of security work. In addition, this engagement will elicit greater safety and will influence family and neighborhood relationships.

A Great Opportunity Ending Date Dec 31 2020
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2014
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director William H. Carbone
Board Chair Phillip H. Bartels Esquire
Board Chair Company Affiliation Shipman & Goodwin, LLP
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

The University of New Haven (UNH), with its main campus located in West Haven, CT, is a student-centered comprehensive university with an emphasis on excellence in liberal arts and professional education. UNH's mission is to prepare students to lead purposeful and fulfilling lives in a global society by providing the highest-quality education through experiential, collaborative and discovery-based learning. UNH's Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences (HCLC) strives to meet this goal by creating a "student-centered professional practice-oriented learning environment."

The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) was founded in 2014 as a unique university, state and private partnership established to lead the way in juvenile justice reform through collaborative planning and policy development, training, research and advocacy efforts. It was designed to support and sustain major youth justice reform efforts now underway in the State of Connecticut by promoting the effective practices, programs and policies related to youth justice, focusing on the needs of youth up to the age of 21 and to increase the use of evidence-based practices in the field. The Institute, as an initiative of the Henry C. Lee College, draws upon the intellectual and other resources of the University to fulfill its mission. Its presence within the University will facilitate interdepartmental collaboration on academic, research, and community service projects and programs.


Background

UNH's mission is to prepare students to lead purposeful and fulfilling lives in a global society by providing the highest-quality education through experiential, collaborative and discovery-based learning. UNH's Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences (HCLC) strives to meet this goal by creating a "student-centered professional practice-oriented learning environment.”

The Henry C. Lee College (HCLC) has the largest and most comprehensive criminal justice program in New England and is the only one with a Ph.D. program in the state. HCLC also has one of the largest international criminal justice programs in the nation. The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) was established in 2014 to address youth justice issues and to serve as a national model for juvenile justice reform. This academic-based institute is designed to promote, monitor, and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based practices, program and policies related to youth justice and child welfare within Connecticut.

The overarching goal of the TYJI is to serve as a center for youth justice reform, provide sustained leadership within the state, foster evidence-based practices in youth justice and become a model for youth justice nationally. The Institute focuses on four primary objectives toward furthering this goal that aims to increase knowledge, ensure future leadership, and support use of evidence-based practices. The four major objectives are to:

• Develop a youth justice leadership training program targeting law enforcement, policy-makers and leaders in public and private agencies
• Develop a new youth justice curriculum at the university to ensure future generations of youth justice advocates
• Create new interdisciplinary opportunities to enable students to participate in youth justice internships and cooperative work experiences, and
• Engage in research and evaluation to advise policy-makers and practitioners on best practices and evidence-based approaches to youth justice reform.

As it has been three and a half years since its inception, the Tow Youth Justice Institute is in the process of updating its goals and objectives.


Impact

The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) was created to effectively promote juvenile justice issues and assemble both professional and financial resources to address key and long-lasting Connecticut reforms.

Alongside the creation of the Institute in 2014, the Juvenile Justice Policy and Oversight Committee (JJPOC) was developed in 2014 by Public Act 14-217 and charged with evaluating policies related to the juvenile justice system.  The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) is responsible for all staffing support activities of the JJPOC.  Three strategic goals to guide juvenile justice reform efforts by mid-2018 to increase diversion by 20%, decrease incarceration by 30% and decrease recidivism by 10% have been met and JJPOC is developing goals for the next three years. 

Over the past three years, TYJI has engaged and collaborated with the community in a variety of events and topics such as raise the age, community-based treatment in JJ, restorative justice practices, police training, truancy, reforming education for system-involved youth, child welfare, domestic minor sex trafficking, and student events such as America’s Distorted Image: The Over-Incarceration of African Americans, 13th, The Inside Story - Visit the Cheshire Correctional Facility’s New Unit on Youthful Offenders.

Thirty-two individuals working in the youth justice field at state agencies, non-profit providers, law enforcement, state and local government, educators, policymakers, community leaders, faith leaders, parents, and advocates, throughout the State of Connecticut are fellows of the Transforming Youth Justice Leadership Development Program, bringing best practices, strategies for reform and new skills learned to their vocation.

A new youth justice curriculum at the University, has been implemented to create more future youth justice reformers. The University of New Haven is one of only a handful of universities in the United States that offers a multi-course concentration focused on juvenile justice and delinquency prevention.


Needs

As the Institute has grown, several areas have revealed a need for expansion of funding and resources.  In all areas of TYJI’s work, collaboration with the Henry C. Lee College and the University of New Haven resources are critical for continued success.  To continue an annual Cohort of the Transforming Youth Justice Leadership Development Program, funding needs will be sought through a variety of sponsorships, scholarships and grants.  TYJI has become a source of information on current issues in the JJ field and educates legislators, advocacy organizations, schools, State agencies, academic institutions and youth groups. Continued planning around strategic communications is underway to meet the changing landscape.

Each year, TYJI engages in a strategic planning process to adjust and align the goals with the current and unfolding needs in youth justice. Funding and resource needs include support for  the state level reform work of JJPOC, the leadership development program, the restorative justice practice work, and new research opportunities to support evidenced-based practices as they are developed and evaluated.

CEO Statement  

In Connecticut, through its landmark legislation, a successful "raise the age" campaign and aggressive reforms, many juvenile justice issues have significantly improved. Connecticut now has the lowest rate of incarcerated youth in the nation, however, more work must be done. Most importantly, there is a need to identify the means to sustain the progress.

The juvenile justice system across the country remains deeply flawed with over-reliance on confinement, insufficient or ineffective services for offenders and families, is racially imbalanced and is connected to an inherent school-to-prison pipeline. According to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, despite a 41% drop in the rate of youth in confinement between 2001 and 2011, youth of color continue to be held in formal supervision and state facilities at much higher rates than white youth.

Connecticut continues in a positive direction and we will find ways to sustain the significant improvements. The vision and generous support of the Tow Foundation working in tandem with the extensive experience in criminal justice at the University of New Haven’s Henry C. Lee College, are creating such an opportunity. No other organization in the state or the New England region are dedicated to youth justice issues based on a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary, research-driven model.

The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) represents a unique opportunity to establish a research-based institute that can support and sustain youth justice reform efforts in the state and the northeast. We will:

- keep a focus on the critical issues in youth justice,

- improve knowledge and diverse leadership capacity in public agencies and nonprofit organizations and local communities, and

- foster academic research to inform best-practices

Through the “Transforming Youth Justice: A Leadership Development Program,” the Institute will encourage present and future leaders to guide and expand the youth justice reform efforts and insure on-going system and culture change toward a justice system that will truly provide opportunities for children and families. The Institute, focused on youth up to the age of 21, is a model for sustaining progressive reform and demonstrating how alternative approaches can be institutionalized. We realize that the success of establishing an effective and vibrant institute relies on engagement of a broad range of stakeholders from government, the community and academia.

Above statement by William H. Carbone, Executive Director, TYJI 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis
Secondary Organization Category Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy / Research Institutes and/or Public Policy Analysis
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
State wide

The initial 2016 leadership cohort members were selected from the 20 towns covered by the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. Applicants worked or lived within the 20 town area to be eligible for the first group of community and state level leaders in the "Transforming Youth Justice: A Leadership Development Program." The 2017 cohort also served the 20 town region, but extended beyond the regional borders to reach individuals across the state that were dedicated to youth justice reform. This second cohort of 16 very diverse individuals (6 from South Central CT region) completed their 9-month leadership development experience.in November 2017. A third statewide cohort of 16 began in March 2018, with cohort  members representing all aspects of the juvenile justice system as well as mental health, community non-profits, the faith community, and individuals with personal involvement in the juvenile justice system.
Programs
Description

The Transforming Youth Justice: A Leadership Development Program is designed to promote, monitor and evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based practices, programs, and policies related to youth justice, focusing on youth up to the age of 21. The TYJI Leadership Program is a critical initiative of the Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) that aims to support present and future leaders through a nine month experiential leadership development experience. Cohort groups are limited to 16 diverse individuals representing all aspects of the community and the youth justice system in Connecticut. Selected cohort members enhance their leadership skills and knowledge of juvenile justice reform strategies in order to advise policy-makers on best practices, become resources in organizations and communities, and assure that youth make a healthy transition into adulthood. This group leadership experience combines interactive classroom instruction and small group discussion followed by coaching and peer support during collective “capstone” projects.


Population Served Adults / At-Risk Populations / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Goals:

  1. To build the capacity of present and future leaders as agents of change in transforming youth justice from a community response paradigm,
  2. To advance leadership development skills and knowledge of best practices in reform, organizational and community change, and enhance self-awareness, and
  3. To be a resource to the organizations, communities, and systems serving youth through an ongoing network of dedicated, trained leaders.

Objective 1: Increased participant knowledge and understanding of juvenile justice reform issues and best practices.

Objective 2: Increased abilities for participants to act as agents of change in their own agencies, programs or networks, and to transform policies, procedures, systemic approaches, legislation and actions to better serve youth.

Objective 3: Increased use of personal and professional leadership skills among participants to further reforms, organizational or community level change, and increased self-awareness of leadership style and effective leadership strategies.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Three high priority areas are critical for maintaining the momentum on youth justice, for solidifying leadership at state and local levels, and for positioning Connecticut and the Institute to serve as a national model for reform.

· Youth Justice Reform

Issues include "cross-over" youth in both child welfare and juvenile justice systems, police training about adolescents, exemplary diversion programs, liaison between school and police, responses to mental health needs, reentry in a supportive community, and mediation to reduce conflict and racial tensions.

· Leadership – personal and professional and abilities to promote positive change at community, organizational and statewide system levels, leading to transformational leadership that is “focused on creating a system of self-sustaining change by facilitating a shared vision, recognizing diverse perspectives, and inspiring others to be part of change efforts.” (2014, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, p 32)

· Core Skills, including communications, consensus-building, outreach and access to key leaders, research on innovative and evidence-based program practices, and increased youth and family engagement to improve outcomes and reduce costs.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Evaluation methods include the following range and type of feedback mechanisms:
1. Pre-Post Surveys
2. Leadership Goal and Action Steps (per person)
3. Session evaluations (9 monthly sessions)
4. Final leadership cohort evaluation (summary for 16 member cohort)
5. Capstone Projects (summary of priority projects selected by group)
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

100% of the cohort participants will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of current juvenile justice reform issues and best practices for juvenile justice.

95 % of participants will demonstrate increased ability and commitment to act as agents of change in agencies, programs or networks through completion of a capstone project. Capstone projects may include implications for transforming policies, procedures, systemic approaches, legislation and/or community actions to better serve youth and families.

95% of participants will demonstrate enhanced personal and professional leadership skills pertaining to systemic reforms, organizational or community level change, and increased self-awareness on leadership styles and effective strategies.

The emphasis will be on learning how to develop new and unique collaborations with entities such as public housing, schools, religious organizations, and affinity groups with a consistent emphasis on strengthening cultural competencies.

Description The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) has established an initiative to advance Restorative Justice Practices (RJP) in youth justice reform in CT. This community-based approach is an essential framework for supporting youth development and offering guidance for providers, youth and families in a model proven effective to resolve conflicts and restore relationships. TYJI collaborates with CT stakeholders to bring training, technical assistance, conferences, programming and events to support the implementation of RJP along the continuum of youth services. Applications of RJP are successfully improving school climate and discipline as a diversionary tactic against the school-to-prison pipeline, addressing behavioral health needs and social-emotional connections, as well as meeting the treatment needs of youth in juvenile justice systems of community supervision, delinquency commitment, and re-entry.  This work is being done in collaboration with the Children’s Health and Development Institute (CHDI) and the Connecticut School-Based Diversion Initiative (SBDI).  
Population Served Victims / Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Adults
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Description In collaboration with university students and faculty, several research projects are currently in progress. Through the legislative mandate state in Public Act 14-217, several studies are underway to inform the work of the Juvenile Justice Policy Oversight Committee. To make these studies possible, data was provided from the Judicial Branch’s Court Support Services Division (CSSD), the Department of Children and Families (DCF) and the Department of Corrections (DOC) that provides insight to services received and outcomes for youth who were justice-involved from 2005 to 2015. Additional projects include a video review examining use of restraint in state-run facilities and interviews with youth to better understand how they perceived the conditions of their confinement, particularly when discipline is used. Beyond the work mandated by legislation, the TYJI research team has also complete a survey of truancy intervention models used in the United States, as well as a content analysis of truancy and chronic absenteeism definitions. Also, course catalogs from the largest Criminal Justice programs throughout the United States were examined to determine how common it is for universities to offer multiple classes on youth justice topics.
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / At-Risk Populations /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Program Comments
CEO Comments

In Connecticut, through its landmark legislation, a successful "raise the age" campaign and aggressive reforms, many juvenile justice issues have significantly improved. Connecticut now has the lowest rate of incarcerated youth in the nation, however, more work must be done. Most importantly, there is a need to identify the means to sustain the progress.

The juvenile justice system across the country remains deeply flawed with over-reliance on confinement, insufficient or ineffective services for offenders and families, is racially imbalanced and is connected to an inherent school-to-prison pipeline. According to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, despite a 41% drop in the rate of youth in confinement between 2001 and 2011, youth of color continue to be held in formal supervision and state facilities at much higher rates than white youth.

Connecticut continues in a positive direction and we will find ways to sustain the significant improvements. The vision and generous support of the Tow Foundation working in tandem with the extensive experience in criminal justice at the University of New Haven’s Henry C. Lee College, are creating such an opportunity. No other organization in the state or the New England region are dedicated to youth justice issues based on a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary, research-driven model.

The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) represents a unique opportunity to establish a research-based institute that can support and sustain youth justice reform efforts in the state and the northeast. We will:

- keep a focus on the critical issues in youth justice,

- improve knowledge and diverse leadership capacity in public agencies and nonprofit organizations and local communities, and

- foster academic research to inform best-practices

Through the “Transforming Youth Justice: A Leadership Development Program,” the Institute will encourage present and future leaders to guide and expand the youth justice reform efforts and insure on-going system and culture change toward a justice system that will truly provide opportunities for children and families. The Institute, focused on youth up to the age of 21, is a model for sustaining progressive reform and demonstrating how alternative approaches can be institutionalized. We realize that the success of establishing an effective and vibrant institute relies on engagement of a broad range of stakeholders from government, the community and academia.

Above statement by William H. Carbone, Executive Director, TYJI
CEO/Executive Director
William H. Carbone
Term Start July 2014
Email wcarbone@newhaven.edu
Experience

Mr. William Carbone, Senior Lecturer and Director of Experiential Education at HCLC, and Director for the Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI), has recently retired from many years of distinguished service to the State of Connecticut. He became Director of the Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) in 2014, given his extensive experience within the field of juvenile justice.

Mr. Carbone was formerly the Executive Director of the Court Support Services Division (CSSD) in the Connecticut Judicial Branch. He directed and managed over 1,600 employees involved with adult and juvenile probation, family services, juvenile detention, alternative sanctions, and pretrial release. The division was also responsible for a network of private, community based nonprofits that provide services to over 10,000 adult and 1,000 juvenile clients daily. During his time in this position Mr. Carbone was involved as a leader in all of the major juvenile justice reforms accomplished in Connecticut. These included: the reduction in youth incarceration by more than 70%, the largest decrease in the nation; the removal of all status offenders from detention; raising the age of juvenile jurisdiction from 16 to 18; the creation of a continuum of evidence-based programs that have resulted in significant recidivism reduction; and new efforts that have reduced school based arrests. Prior to this he served as Under Secretary of the Management and Justice Planning Division of the State Office of Policy and Management.


Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 5
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director of Youth Justice Initiatives
Experience/Biography

Erika Nowakowski, has a Master’s degree from the University of CT School of Social Work with a focus on Policy and Planning. She is currently the Director of Juvenile Justice Initiatives with the Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) at the University of New Haven, and is working with the CT Juvenile Justice Policy Oversight Committee in fostering and sustaining youth justice reform efforts. Prior to arriving at TYJI she worked for 8 ½ years for the State of CT Judicial Branch Court Support Services Division as a project manager for several statewide initiatives, Quality Assurance, implementation and ongoing adherence to Gender Responsive Services, contract compliance, and training coordination. She also worked for 4 years with the Council on Accreditation in New York City and provided Technical Assistance to private nonprofit and state agencies seeking accreditation. She also worked with Wheeler Clinic for 3 years in various roles as a case manager with the Emergency Mobile Psychiatric services, managing and coordinating system of care community efforts, and later developing and implementing best practices for recruitment of foster parents.

Title Director of Development and Communications
Experience/Biography

Donna Pfrommer joined the Tow Youth Justice Institute team as the Director of Development and Communications. She has over 15 years of experience working in the non-profit sector, most recently, ten years at United Way of Coastal Fairfield County focused on resource development, communications, and brand management. At United Way, she raised millions of dollars for community investment, developed marketing campaigns, expanded the organization’s presence, and enhanced communications. Pfrommer received her Bachelor’s Degree in Marketing from the Dolan School of Business at Fairfield University.

Title Office Manager
Experience/Biography Susan Cusano, a long-time employee of the University of New Haven, was recently hired as Office Manager of the Tow Youth Justice Institute. She has worked in a variety of positions during her 30+ years at UNH, including Administrative Assistant to the Dean of Student Affairs and Assistant to the Dean of the Henry C. Lee College. She enjoys working with students and is a mentor to several students to this day.
Title Executive Director, Tow Youth Justice Institute
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

The Tow Youth Justice Institute since its inception in 2014 has exemplified a collaborative initiative. This cooperative effort came through longstanding partnerships involving the University of New Haven and the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences, the Tow Foundation, and the State of Connecticut. The Institute embraced stakeholders from state agencies, nonprofits, state and community leaders, police and education, public sector funders, community foundation leaders, and advocacy groups and coalitions. The Institute has convened legislators, policy makers, juvenile justice staff and youth system advocates to hear from respected researchers and reform leaders from states, universities and national justice entities at several TYJI forums on child welfare, restorative justice, police-community relations, data collection, system accountability, and best practices for youth and families. Our collaborators contribute human and financial resources to fuel momentum on youth justice reform. The “Transforming Youth Justice: A Leadership Development Program,” demonstrates the Institute’s commitment by working with 16 diverse stakeholders each year and their networks at the community and state level.  In addition, strong collaborations exist through the members of the JJPOC and its workgroups, Advisory Council members and their networks, Restorative Justice Practices partners and trainees, Student Clubs on campus, and non-profit partners that provide experiential education opportunities to HCLC students. Current support from numerous community foundations and prospective funding partners and sponsors demonstrate our commitment to addressing youth justice in a collaborative manner.


Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
"Best for VETS" AwardMilitary Magazine2016
One of 381 Best CollegesPrinceton Review Guidebook2017
Recognition for College of Business (top 5% worldwide)Business School Rankings2016
Comments
CEO Comments

In Connecticut, through its landmark legislation, a successful "raise the age" campaign and aggressive reforms, many juvenile justice issues have significantly improved. Connecticut now has the lowest rate of incarcerated youth in the nation, however, more work must be done. Most importantly, there is a need to identify the means to sustain the progress.

The juvenile justice system across the country remains deeply flawed with over-reliance on confinement, insufficient or ineffective services for offenders and families, is racially imbalanced and is connected to an inherent school-to-prison pipeline. According to the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, despite a 41% drop in the rate of youth in confinement between 2001 and 2011, youth of color continue to be held in formal supervision and state facilities at much higher rates than white youth.

Connecticut continues in a positive direction and we will find ways to sustain the significant improvements. The vision and generous support of the Tow Foundation working in tandem with the extensive experience in criminal justice at the University of New Haven’s Henry C. Lee College, are creating such an opportunity. No other organization in the state or the New England region are dedicated to youth justice issues based on a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary, research-driven model.

The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) represents a unique opportunity to establish a research-based institute that can support and sustain youth justice reform efforts in the state and the northeast. We will:

- keep a focus on the critical issues in youth justice,

- improve knowledge and diverse leadership capacity in public agencies and nonprofit organizations and local communities, and

- foster academic research to inform best-practices

Through the “Transforming Youth Justice: A Leadership Development Program,” the Institute will encourage present and future leaders to guide and expand the youth justice reform efforts and insure on-going system and culture change toward a justice system that will truly provide opportunities for children and families. The Institute, focused on youth up to the age of 21, is a model for sustaining progressive reform and demonstrating how alternative approaches can be institutionalized. We realize that the success of establishing an effective and vibrant institute relies on engagement of a broad range of stakeholders from government, the community and academia.

Above statement by William H. Carbone, Executive Director, TYJI
Board Chair
Phillip H. Bartels Esquire
Company Affiliation Shipman & Goodwin, LLP
Term July 2016 to June 2018
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Michael Ambrose Skiorsky
Marc Benhuri Benhuri Center for Laser Dentistry
Samuel S. Bergami Jr.Alinabal, Inc.
Kenneth W. Biemacher Kane Russell Coleman and Logan, PC
William L. Bucknall Jr.United Technologies Corp.
Cecilia K. Carter PepsiCo
Chi K. Chukwu etouches
Mr. Roger Cooper J.P. Morgan Chase (retired)
John DeStefano Jr.Start Bank
Eileen Eder Artist and Professor
Dolores Ennico Olin Corporation
John J. Falconi GE Technology Infrastructure
Michael Fedele Pinnacle Group
Lawrence P. Flanagan AARP Services, Inc.
Rosa M. Gatti RetiredESPN
Michael Gianoni Blackbaud
Jeffery P. Hazell Bar Harbor Lobster Co., Inc.
Robert M. Lee The Lee Company
Allen Love TD Bank
Raymond J. Margiano Foot Solutions, Inc.
Dennis R. McGough RetiredOlin Corporation
Kevin A. Myatt Yale-New Haven Health
David J. Peterson Jr.Media Online
Rose Polidoro Rose Polidoro Enterprises, Inc.
Michael J. Quiello United Airlines
Ernest F. Schaub EnPro Industries, Inc.
Anthony Scillia Marcum LLP
Stephen P. Tagliatela Saybrook Poiint Inn and Spa
Ms. Rowena Track Cigna Corporation
Allison K. Walker Schieffelin The Lightening Quotient
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 22
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 2 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 23
Female 6
Unspecified 2
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Dr. Byron Kennedy City of New Haven Health Department
Pamela Allen New Haven Reentry Roundtable
Alexis Bivens Fairfield County’s Community Foundation
Mendi Blue-Paca Fairfield County’s Community Foundation
William H Carbone University of New Haven Tow Youth Justice Institute
Christina Ciociola Community Foundation for Greater New Haven
Dr. Alice Forrester Clifford Beers Child Clinic
Dr. Mario Gaboury University of New Haven Henry C. Lee College for Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences
Reverend Bonita Grubbs Christian Community Action
Sarah Healy Eagan JDState of Connecticut Office of the Child Advocate
Judith McBride Hartford Foundation for Public Giving
Dr. Judith Meyers Child Health and Development Institute of CT
Christoper M O'Connor Yale New Haven Health
Frances Padilla Universal Health Care Foundation
Donna Pfrommer University of New Haven Tow Youth Justice Institute
Marc Schindler Justice Policy Institute
Emily Tow-Jackson Tow Foundation
Sandra Trevino Yale Center for Clinical Research
Mark White Juvenile Justice State of New York
CEO Comments

The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) operates under the Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Sciences, at the University of New Haven.  Dean Mario Gaboury is well recognized for his visionary leadership of the Henry C. Lee College, and his initiative to create the Tow Youth Justice Institute within the University of New Haven. In close collaboration with the Tow Foundation, state level leaders, and multiple funders, the Tow Youth Justice Institute is exerting leadership through academic course offerings combined with experiential placements, legislative reform recommendations emanating from the Juvenile Justice Policy Oversight Committee (JJPOC), community leadership development cohorts, and training on restorative justice practices with educators and community practitioners.

 

The Tow Youth Justice Institute (TYJI) established an Advisory Council in April, 2017. Advisory Council members represent state and local, public and private sector leaders within Connecticut that are committed to youth justice reform and best practices for juvenile justice based on research studies and evaluation findings. These individuals provide significant input into the future plans for the Institute, and help establish the strategic partnerships necessary for ongoing sustainability of the Institute's mission as a leader in youth justice reform.

 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2018
Fiscal Year End June 30 2019
Projected Revenue $5,626,926.00
Projected Expenses $5,401,849.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
IRS Letter of Exemption
UNH IRS Letter of Determination
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$310,697,992$310,697,992--
Current Assets$49,556,803$49,556,803--
Long-Term Liabilities$133,623,562$133,623,562--
Current Liabilities$30,597,962$30,597,962--
Total Net Assets$146,476,468$146,476,468--
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountTuition & Fees $196,900,583 ----
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountResidence & Dining $36,941,972 ----
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountInterest Income & Other $5,332,742 ----
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 300 Boston Post Road
West Haven, CT 06516
Primary Phone 203 932-7083
Contact Email TowYouth@newhaven.edu
CEO/Executive Director William H. Carbone
Board Chair Phillip H. Bartels Esquire
Board Chair Company Affiliation Shipman & Goodwin, LLP

 

Related Information

Promote Civic Vitality

Greater New Haven’s vibrancy is linked to its communities’ support of its neighborhoods, public gardens and sports, as well as its commitment to the protection of its people and pets.