Community Action Agency of New Haven
419 Whalley Ave.
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 419 Whalley Ave.
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 387-7700 x
Fax 203-397-7475
E-mail asmith@caanh.net; jlawson@caanh.net; vgoodridge@caanh.net; trobinson@caanh.net
Web and Social Media
Mission
The Community Action Agency of New Haven, Inc. (CAANH) offers pathways to prosperity to those in poverty in the Greater New Haven area through service, collaboration, advocacy, and knowledge generation.
A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.

We invite you to sponsor and join us as we celebrate our Pathway to Prosperity Annual Celebration on June 11, 2020 at the Anthony’s Ocean View in New Haven, CT.

You can choose from levels of sponsorship* ranging from $1,000 to $20,000. In-kind donations of special items and services are also welcome contributions for our Silent Auction.

 All of the proceeds from this fundraiser will go towards CAANH’s programs and services for over 28,000 low-income individuals and 11,000 families in New Haven, East Haven, Hamden, North Haven, and West Haven.

Since 1978, CAANH focuses on helping individuals and families with limited resources through access to energy assistance, case management, and emergency services. Working across sectors with federal, state, regional, and community partners like you, we are dedicated to helping families help themselves and each other.

 If you would like to contribute, please complete, detach, and send the form included in this packet. If you have any questions, comments, or would like to donate in-kind, please call Valencia Goodridge at 203-859-6636 or email her at vgoodridge@caanh.net.

 Your contribution makes a tremendous difference in the lives of parents, guardians, and children in our community. We look forward to celebrating with you and to continue to serve as the officially designated anti-poverty organization in the Greater New Haven area. Thank you.

 

A Great Opportunity Ending Date June 11 2020
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1977
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Amos L. Smith
Board Chair Kenn Harris
Board Chair Company Affiliation National Institute for Children's Health Quality
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission The Community Action Agency of New Haven, Inc. (CAANH) offers pathways to prosperity to those in poverty in the Greater New Haven area through service, collaboration, advocacy, and knowledge generation.
Background

Established in 1977, CAANH focuses on helping individuals and families with limited resources face complex issues. Working across sectors with community partners and state agencies through strategic delivery of resources, we are dedicated to helping individuals help themselves and each other.

Today, through our programs and services, we continue to serve over 28,000 low-income individuals and 11,000 families in New Haven, East Haven, Hamden, North Haven, and West Haven.

We carry out our mission through direct services, case management, and referrals to other service providers. At CAANH, our customers direct access to the following programs and services:

  • Energy assistance services
  • Financial literacy and job readiness program for single mothers/grandmothers
  • Emergency food pantry and diaper bank
  • Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA).
Impact

Our work is about transforming individuals, community, and collective performance—such that people acquire skills and knowledge and strengthen relationships to improve lives.

CAANH weathered a momentous fiscal and organizational turnaround this past year. In 2019, CAANH reduced costs, operational support, and programmatic scope to respond to federal funding delays and state policy shifts.

Moving forward, CAANH rejuvenated its Board of Directors and its cadre of dedicated staff as it renews its commitment to offer pathways to prosperity to those in poverty in the Greater New Haven area.

Through service, collaboration, advocacy, and knowledge generation, CAANH will prioritize donor outreach and community engagement to ensure its sustainable independence in reversing the trend of disinvestment and malaise among working class and poor families.

 

Needs

 In 2020, we will continue to focus on providing timely services to the client and their families. We will strengthen collaboration with our federal, regional, state, and community partners.

CAANH has a pressing need for committed volunteers and donors to support the process of building Board and staff members’ competency. The goal is to raise $25,000 unrestricted funds and utilize a systems network developed to enhance customer service, outcomes, and agency efficiency.

To support development priorities, we will share the stories of beneficiaries and funding partners.

 

CEO Statement

Every one of us in CAANH – from the Board of Directors to our staff and volunteers – know how it is to struggle with debt, family issues, sickness, and other life challenges that threaten to cripple us. We also know how to turn lives around – with information, collaboration, hard work, a clear vision, and a lot of heart.

When I joined in 2006, CAANH was in debt, riddled with scandal and inefficiencies. We took a hard look at ourselves, got back on our feet, and set on the path of growth and operational excellence. What fueled us was the vision of creating empowering experiences for individuals and families who came to us for help.

In 2018, we will celebrate our 40th year as a community action agency changing the world one person, one family, one block at a time. We are working smarter: continuously developing our staff to be responsive change agents and using technology to be more efficient.

We continue to focus on providing timely services to our client families and on strengthening our collaboration with federal, regional, state, and community partners. We continue to implement and evaluate our programs within the framework of Human Services Infrastructure (HSI), Results Oriented Management and Accountability (ROMA), and Results-Based Accountability (RBA).

We are taking steps to build financial reserves and to utilize a systems network developed to enhance customer service, outcomes, and agency efficiency.

This is an exciting time for CAANH. We look forward to serving the Greater New Haven community as its officially designated anti-poverty organization.

Amos L. Smith

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Family Services
Secondary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit /
Tertiary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building /
Areas Served
New Haven
East Haven
West Haven
North Haven
Hamden
CAANH serves five core municipalities in Connecticut: New Haven, East Haven, West Haven, North Haven, and Hamden. 
Programs
Description

The Connecticut Energy Assistance Program (CEAP) assists eligible households with payment for primary heating bills. If the household’s primary heating costs are included in their rent, the household may also apply for assistance.

Homebound customers, who are unable to leave their homes unassisted for medical reasons, can also apply for Energy Assistance 

Matching Payment Plan (MPP) is a three-way match program. Clients must qualify for energy assistance and make all agreed-upon scheduled monthly payments determined by Southern Connecticut Gas (SCG). In turn, SCG will match their entire energy assistance award and will match all MPP dollars paid to SGC for 6 months.

CAANH provided application assistance to 9,047 families (FY2018) and to date have provided assistance to 6,089 families. 
Population Served Families / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Elderly and/or Disabled
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
  • 100% of eligible clients who apply receive energy assistance
  • 100% of eligible clients avoided a crisis through a utility payment

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The aim is for all clients served by CAANH to move toward self-sufficiency. Monetary energy assistance helps with heating costs during cold months. Released from this concern, families are empowered to look beyond their basic needs. 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

At CAANH we measure the success of CEAP or LIHEAP by the number of client-households served during the energy season.

In broader terms, CAANH monitors program success through an agency-wide customer satisfaction survey, the use of Results Oriented Management Accountability (ROMA) framework, and Results Based Accountability (RBA) measures.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

March 6, 2018

Dear Daisy Sanchez, Sharon Willard, Magali Flecha:

William and Hazel J--- would like to thank you all for our new furnace. We know that it was not easy but you preserve (sic) to the end. We want you to know much we appreciate what you went through to get the furnace for us. You all were so understanding along the way you help us to stay focus. We will always be thankful and grateful to the weatherization team.

You showed team work and what it means to work together to get things accomplice (sic). We give you A+ for excellent team work. God Bless you and keep you in His care.

The installation team did an excellent job with the furnace very well done. They were very courageous they went beyond what they had to do. We thank them for the extra help. We give them an A for professionalism. They left our home just like they found it, that is a good sign for during the job right. We recommend them to do other jobs. The team, Krall Oil, Alpine Heating and Colling:

Larry, Tod, and Kenny. Thank you for choosing them.

Yours Truly

(signed)

William A J---

 
 
 
Description

The Emergency Food Pantry provides food to CAANH families who are in need.   

The Diaper Bank provides diapers to eligible low-income households in New Haven once a month.
 
Population Served Families / Families / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Short-term success is achieved when 85-100% of families who request assistance from the Food Pantry and the Diaper Bank are assisted. 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Long-term success means that the need for Food Pantry and Diaper Bank will become obsolete.

However, as long as there are families living in poverty in the New Haven region, we will continue to mobilize resources to support households' basic food security needs and children's basic health and hygiene needs. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

At CAANH we measure the success of the Food Pantry and the Diaper Bank by the number of client-households served.

In broader terms, CAANH monitors program success through an agency-wide customer satisfaction survey, the use of Results Oriented Management Accountability (ROMA) framework, and Results Based Accountability (RBA) measures.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Delores is a 55-year old woman who lost her job and was struggling to keep her home. She came to CAANH to apply for Operation Fuel.

Delores not only got help with her United Illuminating (electric) bill, but she was also signed up for the Food Pantry and  Associates for Training and Development (A4TD). 

 She is now working as an A4TD participant in a local non-profit helping other people that in crisis situations similar to where she was before coming to CAANH.    
Description

The S.M.A.R.T. Women program supports single mothers (or grandmothers) in their journey toward self-sufficiency. This program offers financial literacy, job readiness, and  life skills sessions designed to empower individuals to meet the demands of daily living and become economically self-sufficient.

Population Served Adults / Females / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. At CAANH we measure the success of the SMART Women program by the number of clients who are successfully discharged from case management, i.e., those who have successfully achieved the agreed upon goals in their Individual Service Plans (ISP). These individual goals may include health care, child/elder care, job/income stability, debt management, savings, or home investment.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long-term success of the SMART Women program results in solo mother/grandmother caregivers who are able to provide for their families' basic health and economic needs, on the path towards self-sufficiency.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. In broader terms, CAANH monitors program success through an agency-wide customer satisfaction survey, the use of Results Oriented Management Accountability (ROMA) framework, and Results Based Accountability (RBA) measures.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

One of my biggest barriers was my limited English skills. The SMART Women Coordinator encouraged me and gave me tips on how to find resources and to keep learning. She said, “Don’t say you can’t speak English, because you are doing it!” Those words went down to my heart and are still there.

After I graduated from SMART, I started my internship at CAANH in the Family Service Department while I worked a part-time job in the afternoon. I also started working on my bachelor’s degree in Human Services at Albertus Magnus College! I was then offered a job as an Energy Case Worker. I was so excited, thankful, and grateful for the opportunity.

Yisel Ortiz

Energy Assistance Client, SMART Women Graduate, now CAANH employee

Description
The Passport Transitional Services (PTS) Program uses a comprehensive, coordinated case management approach to reach homeless or at-risk for homelessness individuals, perform assessments, and connect them to partner-organizations and services that help them address their housing, health, and other needs.
 
Population Served Adults / At-Risk Populations /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Short-term success of the PTS program results in increased number of homeless/at-risk to be homeless individuals enrolled in CAANH's case management services, with Individual Service Plans (ISP).

70-100% of PTS clients obtaining safe housing within a year of enrollment
70-100% of PTS clients working with CAANH and partners on achieving their individual basic needs goals, e.g., permanent housing, employment, medical and mental health care or treatment. 
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long-term success in the PTS Program is clients obtaining safe, permanent housing as they continue to work on their physical and/or mental health issues.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Success is monitored by Case Managers following up with individuals/clients. Case Managers visit their residences to directly assess and reassess if their housing and health needs are being addressed.
 
In broader terms, CAANH monitors program success through an agency-wide customer satisfaction survey, the use of Results Oriented Management Accountability (ROMA) framework, and Results Based Accountability (RBA) measures.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

A CAANH Case Manager started case management services for a woman (BW) going through life and family crises. BW had an open case with the Department of Children & Families (DCF), among other issues.

The Case Manager reached out to the DCF worker to discuss how BW can be supported to make good choices for her child, as she was at risk of losing her income source and becoming homeless. The Case Manager helped BW reach out to her family for initial assistance, as well as leverage her skills and qualifications to obtain a higher-paying job.

BW recently applied for housing assistance to prove she can maintain a household and provide a safe shelter for her child. Once this is in place, she will be qualified for additional assistance and ultimately, she will be able to close her DCF case.

CAANH continues to support BW with case management services until she reaches the self-sufficiency goals she set out on her Individual Service Plan (ISP).

CEO/Executive Director
Amos L. Smith
Term Start May 2006
Email asmith@caanh.net
Experience
Amos L. Smith the President and CEO at the Community Action Agency of New Haven, Inc. (CAANH).  Smith manages a budget of over $2 million that serves over 36,000 individuals and 10,000 families, covering a span of 25 towns.  He supervises seven senior administrators who are responsible for 38 employees.  Smith reports to a Board of Directors comprised of 15 members.
 
Prior to joining CAANH, Smith was employed over eight years at The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. As the Director of Health Grantmaking and Director of Programs, he was responsible for overseeing the various focus areas as well as grantmaking within the Health focus area.  In addition, he served as the Principal Investigator for the federally-funded New Haven Healthy Start project, whose focus is to improve maternal and child health outcomes for women in New Haven.  He and his colleagues at The Foundation were featured in a national report that highlighted the work of The Foundation relating to its work on Policy Related Matters and Fatherhood, with The New Haven Family Alliance and The Yale Consultation Center staff.
 
During his tenure as Deputy Director of Hartford Department of Social Services, Smith led a team of professionals from the Hartford community to study issues of urban violence and skilled negotiation for advancing peace at the University for Peace in Colón, Costa Rica. He is the recipient of many awards from numerous organizations in the Hartford area including the following: CREN, The Hartford Action Plan on Infant Health, Alpha Kappa Alpha Fraternity and The Farmington Valley Chapter of LINKS.
 
Smith is also a Senior Fellow of the American Leadership Forum. He held a faculty appointment at the University of Connecticut, School of Medicine in the Department of Community Medicine. Smith is President of the New England Association for Community Action. He is on the Board of the Friends Center for Children in New Haven.  He has worked for three Fortune 500 companies, all of which are concerned with health and healthcare-related issues. 
Co-CEO
Jenell Lawson
Email jlawson@caanh.net
Experience
Jenell Marie Lawson joined CAANH in 2009 as the Director of Human Resources and became Vice President of Human Resources in 2014.
 
As an integral member of the Executive Management Team, Jenell is responsible for talent identification, mediation, recruitment consultation with other leaders regarding staff deployment. She is also responsible for responding to and identifying emerging trends in the workplace and ensures that technical training and development needs remain consistent with the demands of the workplace. Other responsibilities include: overseeing organizational development, recruitment and staffing, employment law, performance management, employee relations, compensation and benefits, she assists with program development, and grant writing. In partnership with the President/CEO, she establishes human resources strategies and methodologies that align with the mission of the organization in additional to shared oversight for programs.
 
Prior to joining CAANH, Ms. Lawson worked at CuraGen for 10 years, where she was the Manager of IP Operations of the Intellectual Property Department. Jenell has also worked as Realtor and Freelance Paralegal where she negotiated prices, executed contracts for purchases and leases, client and landlord mediation, and completed due diligence for pre-claim investigation.
 
Jenell holds a Master in Criminal Justice/Public Administration, and a Master in Business Administration (MBA), both from the University of New Haven. In addition, she has a Paralegal Certificate and is a Notary Public.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 23
Number of Part Time Staff 10
Number of Volunteers 1
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 80%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 20
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 8
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 32
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Vice President, Human Resources
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

 Associates for Training and Development  (A4TD)
 Beulah Heights AME
 Christian Community Action Agency
 Clifford Beers Guidance Clinic
 Connecticut Association for Community Action
 Connecticut Center for Arts and Technology
 Connecticut Food Bank
 Connecticut Department of Social Services
 Connecticut Department of Energy
 Gateway Community College
 Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce
 Greater New Haven Diaper Bank
 Howard K. Hill Funeral Service
 JUNTA for Progressive Action
 Male Involvement Network
 Marrakech, Inc 
 New Haven Early Childhood Council
 New Haven Family Alliance
 New Haven Healthy Start
 New Life Corporation
 Northeast Institute for Quality Community Action (NIQCA)
 Law Office of W. Martyn Philpot (Lawyer)
 Operation Fuel
 Planned Parenthood
 Southern CT Gas
 Training Education and Manpower (TEAM)
 United Illuminating
 U.S. Dept of Health & Human Services
 U.S. Dept of Internal Revenue/VITA
 Youth Rights Media

 

 

 

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Participant in FDIC 2004-2006 longitudinal evaluation of the intermediate-term impact of Money Smart.Federal Deposits Insurance Corporation (FDIC)2007
FDIC recognizes your leadership in promoting and facilitating youth financial education.Federal Deposits Insurance Corporation (FDIC)2010
Best Practice AgencyNIQCA2011
Board Chair
Kenn Harris
Company Affiliation National Institute for Children's Health Quality
Term Jan 2019 to Oct 2022
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Dawud AminCity of New Haven
Alan BowieCarmody, Torrance, Sandak Law
Diane EctonYouth Continuum, Inc.
Donarell Elder
Willie HolmesBarkley Associates
Erik JohnsonCity of Hartford
Edwin MartinezSpace Craft Mfg. Inc.
Allen McCollumCapital Investments, LLC
Rodney Moore
Stephen Monroe TomczakSouthern CT State University
Kara TurmanYale University
Snow TurnerA on A
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 11
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 10
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Board Co-Chair
Edwin Martinez
Company Affiliation Space Craft Mfg. Inc.
Standing Committees
Audit
Executive
Finance
Nominating
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Additional Boards: Advisory Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. Jeff KlausWebster Bank
Mr. Larry StewartLMS inc
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01 2019
Fiscal Year End Sept 30 2020
Projected Revenue $10,356,677.00
Projected Expenses $10,212,668.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Multi-Year Report2015View
Single Mothers Actively Reaching the Top Brochure2015View
NHRegister CAANH Article2014View
Community Action Makes the Long Walk Back2014View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201720162015
Total Revenue$10,425,690$11,070,926$10,038,219
Total Expenses$10,207,395$11,102,568$10,050,018
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201720162015
Total Assets$273,207$2,502,158$498,911
Current Assets$181,428$2,403,341$372,850
Long-Term Liabilities$554,081$566,803$671,449
Current Liabilities$619,779$3,054,303$914,768
Total Net Assets($900,653)($1,118,948)($1,087,306)
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201720162015
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDept. of Health & Human Services $9,132,434DSS $10,082,015Dept. of Social Services $9,368,393
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountDept. of Energy $335,365CT Dept. of Energy & Environmental Protection $395,285Dept. of Energy & Environmental Protection $175,131
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --United Illuminating $90,663
Comments
CEO Comments

CAANH’s historical debt issue which dates back to the 1990s has been the major financial challenge faced by the Agency.  In 2006, there was a change in Agency leadership.  This change occasioned the introduction and implementation of sound and responsible financial practices.  To ameliorate the debt, the agency’s Board of directors has formed a committee whose sole focus is on debt remediation. The Board is pursuing every option available including possible equity arrangements or debt forgiveness.  In mid-2012, the Agency received an acknowledgment from the State agreeing to consider a reduction in the historical debt owed to the State.  In addition, the Agency is working with the other main debtor to negotiate a mutually acceptable arrangement to remediate that portion of the historical debt.

CAANH continues to provide needed services to the Greater New Haven Community.  

Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 419 Whalley Ave.
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 387-7700
CEO/Executive Director Amos L. Smith
Board Chair Kenn Harris
Board Chair Company Affiliation National Institute for Children's Health Quality

 

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