Community Action Agency of New Haven
419 Whalley Ave.
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 419 Whalley Ave.
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 387-7700 x243
Fax 203-397-7475
E-mail asmith@caanh.net; Dbuzik@caanh.net; cfloyd@caanh.net;
Web and Social Media
Mission
Community Action Agency of New Haven (CAANH) offers pathways to prosperity to those in poverty in the Greater New Haven area through service, collaboration, advocacy, and knowledge generation.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1977
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Amos L. Smith
Board Chair Evelise Ribeiro
Board Chair Company Affiliation Housing Authority of New Haven
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission Community Action Agency of New Haven (CAANH) offers pathways to prosperity to those in poverty in the Greater New Haven area through service, collaboration, advocacy, and knowledge generation.
Background

In 2006, CAANH underwent major organizational changes. Since then, we have focused on providing high-quality customer service, managing programs and motivating talented staff. 

We carry out our mission through direct services, case management, and referrals to other service providers. At CAANH, our customers directly access the following programs and services:

  • Energy assistance
  • Case Management Services 
  • Financial literacy and job readiness programs. 
  • Access to Emergency Food 
  • Diaper Bank 
  • Warren A. Kimbro Re-Entry Program
  • Passport Transitional Services (Homeless) Program
  • Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)
Impact

Our work is about transforming individuals, community, and collective performance—such that, people acquire the skills, knowledge, and relationships to improve their lives. CAANH has managed one of the most incredible turnarounds in operational performance for a not-for-profit organization.

We will continue to implement our impact strategy designed to improve the lives of families in the Greater New Haven Community. Our partnerships and collaborations will anchor our work over the long term in order to reverse the trends of disinvestment among working class and poor families.

 

Needs

In 2017, we will continue to focus on providing timely services to our client families and on strengthening our collaboration with federal, regional, state, and community leaders.

We will continue to implement and evaluate our programs within the framework of Human Services Infrastructure (HSI), Results Oriented Management and Accountability (ROMA), and Results-Based Accountability (RBA).

We are taking steps to build a network of systems that share electronic information to enhance customer service, outcomes, and agency efficiency.

To support our development priorities, we will focus on telling the stories of our beneficiaries and in engaging our funding partners.

CEO Statement

At CAANH we take our mission to heart by offering pathways to prosperity to those in poverty in the Greater New Haven Area through service, collaboration, advocacy, and knowledge generation.

Established in 1978, CAANH has focused on helping individuals and families with limited resources.  We are dedicated to helping individuals help themselves and each other by working across sectors with community partners and state agencies through a strategic delivery of resources. 

Today, through our programs and services, we continue to serve over 28,000 low-income individuals and 11,000 families in New Haven, East Haven, Hamden, North Haven, and West Haven.

In 2018, we continue to focus on providing timely services to our clients and families.  We will continue to implement and evaluate our programs within the framework of Human Services Infrastructure (HSI), Results Oriented Management and Accountability (ROMA), and Results-Based Accountability (RBA).

This is an exciting time for our organization and we look forward to serving our community as the officially designated anti-poverty organization in the Greater New Haven area.

Sincerely,

Amos L. Smith

Board Chair Statement

In 2006, CAANH underwent major organizational changes. Since then, we have focused on providing high-quality programs, managing agency finances, and motivating talented staff.

We carry out our mission through direct services, case management, and referrals to other service providers. At CAANH, our customers directly access the following programs and services:

  • Energy Assistance
  • Case Management Services
  • Financial literacy and job readiness programs
  • Emergency Food pantry
  • Diaper bank
  • Warren A. Kimbro Re-Entry Program
  • Passport Transitional Services (Homeless) Program
  • Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Family Services
Secondary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit /
Tertiary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Areas Served
East Haven
Hamden
New Haven
North Haven
West Haven
Ansonia
Bethany
Derby
Milford
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
CAANH serves five core municipalities: New Haven, East Haven, West Haven, North Haven, and Hamden. 
Programs
Description

The Connecticut Energy Assistance Program assists eligible households with payment for primary heating bills. If the household’s primary heating costs are included in their rent, the household may also apply for assistance.

 
Homebound customers, who are unable to leave their homes unassisted for medical reasons, can also apply for Energy Assistance 

Matching Payment Plan (MPP) is a three way match program. Customers must 1. Qualify for energy assistance and 2. Make all agreed upon scheduled monthly payments determined by Southern Connecticut Gas (SCG). In turn, SCG will match their entire energy assistance award and will match all MPP dollars paid to SGC for 6 months.

CAANH provided application assistance to 10,372 families (FY2017) and to date have provided assistance to 7,750 families. 
Population Served Families / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Elderly and/or Disabled
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

·        100% of eligible clients who apply receive energy assistance

·        100% of eligible clients avoided a crisis through a utility payment

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

All clients served by CAANH demonstrate movement toward self-sufficiency. Energy assistance helps clients move toward self-sufficiency by providing monetary assistance towards their heating costs. This increases their disposable income so that they can focus on other basic needs. 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

At CAANH we measure the success of our programs through three core methods. First, we conduct an agency wide customer satisfaction survey. We poll over 300 customers annually who receive services from all of our programs. In 2011, 99% of customers stated that they were served in a professional manner and were treated with respect while 97% of customers stated that they received the services they needed. Our second method of monitoring success is the use of Results Oriented Management Accountability (ROMA). ROMA provides goals, performance measures and interventions in order to measure program and agency success. A third, method we use is Results Based Accountability (RBA). RBA helps us to set population level results for the agency as well as performance measures for our programs. Sometimes these measures are the same as what we collect for ROMA while other times the unique measures we create in RBA help to deepen the story of the work that we do.

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
An increase in the number of customers who are eligible for assistance.   
 
 
Description

The Emergency Food Pantry provides food to CAANH customers who are in need.   

The Diaper Bank provides diapers to eligible low-income households in New Haven once a month.
 
Population Served Families / Families / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

 568 households basic needs were met through food security
100% of households received nutrition information

24,260 diapers distributed
488  children received diapers
400 families received diapers
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

568 households basic needs are met through food security
24,260 diapers distributed
488  children received diapers
400 families received diapers

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

At CAANH we measure the success of our programs through three core methods. First, we conduct an agency wide customer satisfaction survey. We poll over 300 customers annually who receive services from all of our programs. The 2012 Customer Satisfaction Survey categories of “excellent” and “good”  indicated that  96% of customers stated that the CAANH staff  treated  them with respect; 95% of customers stated that the CAANH reception area was clean, comfortable, and welcoming; 90%  of customers stated that the CAANH  front desk staff were knowledgeable; 95% of customers stated that CAANH case workers are knowledgeable;  and 95% of customers stated that they received the services they needed. Our second method of monitoring success is the use of Results Oriented Management Accountability (ROMA). ROMA provides goals, performance measures and interventions in order to measure program and agency success. A third, method we use is Results Based Accountability (RBA). RBA helps us to set population level results for the agency as well as performance measures for our programs. Sometimes these measures are the same as what we collect for ROMA while other times the unique measures we create in RBA help to deepen the story of the work that we do.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

• 28,900 meals served
• 565 clients basic need is met through food security
• 24,260 diapers distributed
• 488  children received diapers
• 400 families received diapers

“Delores”, a 55 year old woman who had lost her job and was struggling to keep her home,  came to CAANH to apply for Operation Fuel.    Delores not only got help with her UI bill, but she was signed up for the food pantry and  Associates for Training and Development (A4TD).   She is now working as an A4TD participant in a local non-profit helping other people that are the same situation she was before her involvement with CAANH. 

    

Description

The S.M.A.R.T. Women and Manage Your Future programs support single mothers and youth in their journey toward self-sufficiency. These programs offer financial literacy, job readiness, and  life skills sessions designed to empower individuals to meet the demands of daily living and become economically self-sufficient.

Population Served Adults / Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Single mothers attend all sessions of their Cohort. The sessions include Life Skills, Financial Literacy  and Job Readiness Training.   
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Single mothers receive on going Case Management services focused on stabilizing their families, providing a path towards self-sufficiency.  Obtaining and maintaining employment to support their families.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Success is monitored when the individuals use the skills obtained during the sessions to maintain a budget, find and maintain employment.
Description The mission of the Warren A. Kimbro Re-Entry Program is to assist formerly incarcerated New Haven residents successfully return to the New Haven community after their release from prison through Case Management Services.
Population Served Adults / At-Risk Populations /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Success transition to New Haven community and connected to programs and services that they are in need of that will help them no to reaffend.
 
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
No to recidivate if they receive programs and services that assist them in obtaining basic needs both mentally and physically.
Success of this program is based on 
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Case Managers meet with the individuals to develop an Action Plan to assist them in their transition back to New Haven.  Case Managers along with the individual complete action items to move them toward self-sufficiency.  This Action Plan is reviewed monthly to monitor progress.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. We were introduced to a young man by engaging him at the Halfway house.  He only had the clothes on his back, had a broken spirit and was afraid of becoming homeless.  We initially met his immediate needs. Before becoming incarcerated he had completed most of a CNA training program but needed to take a few more credits and sit for his licensing exam.  Travis is currently a traveling CNA and has obtained housing through assistance from our partners.
Description
The Passport Transitional Services (PTS) Program uses a comprehensive , coordinated approach to reach out to vulnerable or homeless individuals, perform assessments and connect them to partner organizations and supportive services that best address their needs.
 
Population Served Adults / At-Risk Populations /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Placing individuals in a shelter who are currently living on the streets with no where to go.  Once in the shelter we can Case Manage them to initially meet their basic needs. Basic needs are primarily food and health insurance. Once their basic needs are met we continue to monitor their progress and offer them support towards self-sufficiency.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Obtained permanent housing and continue to work with the customer to address their any physical and/or mental health issues.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Success is monitored by following up with individuals.  Case Managers are dispatched to the locations where the customers reside to provide a more direct intensive service to assess and reassess their needs.  
 
At CAANH we measure the success of our programs through customer satisfaction surveys, Results Oriented Management Accountability (ROMA) and Results Based Accountability (RBA). 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. A customer who received Case Management Services through the PTS Program presented herself at the agency.  She and her two school aged children were homeless, sleeping in the car.  After receiving food from the Emergency Food Pantry the case manager worked with her to secure housing in New Haven.  She and her children are no longer homeless, living in the car.  They have a roof over their heads and the children have a stable home environment which allows them to function at a higher level in school.
CEO/Executive Director
Amos L. Smith
Term Start May 2006
Email asmith@caanh.net
Experience
Amos L. Smith the President and CEO at the Community Action Agency of New Haven, Inc. (CAANH), which is one of the largest non-profits in New Haven.  Smith manages a budget of over $2.1 million that serves over 36,000 individuals and 10,000 families, covering a span of 25 towns.  He supervises seven senior administrators who are responsible for 38 employees.  Smith reports to a Board of Directors comprised of 15 members.
 
Prior to joining CAANH, Smith was employed over eight years at The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. As the Director of Health Grantmaking and Director of Programs, he was responsible for overseeing the various focus areas as well as grant making within the Health focus area.  In addition, he served as the Principal Investigator for the federally-funded New Haven Healthy Start project, whose focus is to improve maternal and child health outcomes for women in New Haven.  He and his colleagues at The Foundation were featured in a national report that highlighted the work of The Foundation relating to its work on Policy Related Matters and Fatherhood, with The New Haven Family Alliance and The Yale Consultation Center staff.
 
During his tenure as Deputy Director of Hartford Department of Social Services, Smith led a team of professionals from the Hartford community to study issues of urban violence and skilled negotiation for advancing peace at the University for Peace in Colón, Costa Rica. He is the recipient of many awards from numerous organizations in the Hartford area including the following: CREN, The Hartford Action Plan on Infant Health, Alpha Kappa Alpha Fraternity,  and The Farmington Valley Chapter of LINKS.
 
Smith is also a Senior Fellow of the American Leadership Forum. He held a faculty appointment at the University of Connecticut, School of Medicine in the Department of Community Medicine. Smith is President of the New England Association for Community Action. He is on the Board of the Friends Center for Children in New Haven.  He has worked for three Fortune 500 companies, all of which are concerned with health and healthcare-related issues. 
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 19
Number of Part Time Staff 16
Number of Volunteers 1
Staff Retention Rate 90%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 18
Asian American/Pacific Islander 3
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 7
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 22
Female 13
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Vice President, Human Resources
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

Access Health CT
 Addeco
 Associates for Training and Development  (A4TD)
 American Association of University Women   (AAUW)
 Bank of Southern CT
 Beulah Heights Social Integration Program
 Christian Community Action Agency
 Clifford Beers
 Community Mediation 
 Connecticut Association for Community Action
 Connecticut Association for Human Services
 Connecticut Center for Arts and Technology
 Connecticut Food Bank
 Connecticut Department of Social Services
 Connecticut Department of Energy
 Delaney's Tap Room Restaurant
 Departmenr of Energy and Environmental Protection
 Early Childhood Council
 Ed Cherry (Architect)Greater Dwight Development Corporation
 Gateway Community College
 Greater New Haven Asset Building Collaborative
 Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce
 Greater New Haven Diaper Bank
 Greater New Haven Opportunities Industrialization Centers of America (OIC)
 Higher Heights Youth Empowerment Program
 Howard K. Hill Funeral Service
 JUNTA for Progressive Action
 Kelly Ann Day Home
 Male Involvement Network
 Marrakech, Inc 
 National Association of Letter Carriers
 Neighbor Works New Horizon
 New Alliance Foundation
 New Haven Early Childhood Council
 New Haven Boys and Girls Club
 New Haven Family Alliance
 New Haven’s Family Resource Centers
 New Haven Healthy Start
 New Life Corporation
 North East Utilities
 Northeast Institute for Quality Community Action (NIQCA)
 Law Office of W. Martyn Philpot (Lawyer)
 Operation Fuel
 Planned Parenthood
 Post University
 Quinnipiac University
 Southern CT Gas
 Training Education and Manpower (TEAM)
 United Illuminating
 U.S. Dept of Health & Human Services
 U.S. Dept of Internal Revenue/VITA
 The Women’s Business Development Council
 Youth at Work (City of New Haven)
 Youth Rights Media

 

 

 

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Participant in FDIC 2004-2006 longitudinal evaluation of the intermediate-term impact of Money Smart.Federal Deposits Insurance Corporation (FDIC)2007
FDIC recognizes your leadership in promoting and facilitating youth financial education.Federal Deposits Insurance Corporation (FDIC)2010
Best Practice AgencyNIQCA2011
Board Chair
Evelise Ribeiro
Company Affiliation Housing Authority of New Haven
Term Oct 2016 to Oct 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Karen Bellamy KJB,Associates LLC
Alan Bowie Carmody, Torrance, Sandak Law
Jocelyn Dent TD Bank
Frank Dixon CT PTAP
Diane Ecton Youth Continuum, Inc.
Kenn Harris New Haven Healthy Start
Howard Hill Howard K. Hill Funeral Services
Willie Holmes Barkley Associates
Wilson Luna Gateway Community College
Jameca Malloy Mental Health Associates
Edwin Martinez Space Craft Mfg. Inc.
Joseph Rybaruk Reich, Schweitzer & Weiss
Carolyn Streets Engineering, Science Math University School
Stephen Monroe Tomczak Southern CT State University
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 10
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 9
Female 6
Standing Committees
Audit
Executive
Finance
Nominating
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Sept 30 2018
Projected Revenue $2,202,228.00
Projected Expenses $2,137,504.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Multi-Year Report2015View
CAANH Brochure2015View
CAANH November Newsletter2015View
Manage Your Future Brochure2015View
Mature Adults Activities Program Brochure2015View
Single Mothers Actively Reaching the Top Brochure2015View
NHRegister CAANH Article2014View
Community Action Makes the Long Walk Back2014View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Total Revenue and Expense Totals ChartHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Revenue$11,070,926$10,038,219$12,576,285
Total Expenses$11,102,568$10,050,018$11,460,121
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$2,502,158$498,911$317,801
Current Assets$2,403,341$372,850$136,685
Long-Term Liabilities$566,803$671,449$786,731
Current Liabilities$3,054,303$914,768$606,577
Total Net Assets($1,118,948)($1,087,306)($1,075,507)
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDSS $10,082,015Dept. of Social Services $9,368,393CT Dept. of Social Services $9,678,874
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Energy & Environmental Protection $395,285Dept. of Energy & Environmental Protection $175,131CT Dept. of Energy & Environmental Protection $559,686
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --United Illuminating $90,663 --
Comments
CEO Comments

CAANH’s historical debt issue which dates back to the 1990’s has been the major financial challenge faced by the Agency.  In 2006, there was a change in Agency leadership.  This change occasioned the introduction and implementation of sound and responsible financial practices.  To ameliorate the debt, the agency’s Board of directors has formed a committee whose  sole focus is on debt remediation. The Board is pursuing every option available including possible equity arrangements or debt forgiveness.  In mid 2012, the Agency received an acknowledgement from the State agreeing to consider a reduction in the historical debt owed to the State.  In addition, the Agency is working with the other main debtor to negotiate a mutually acceptable arrangement to remediate that portion of the historical debt.

CAANH continues to provide needed services to the Greater New Haven Community.  

Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 419 Whalley Ave.
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 387-7700 243
CEO/Executive Director Amos L. Smith
Board Chair Evelise Ribeiro
Board Chair Company Affiliation Housing Authority of New Haven

 

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