Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation
940 Whitney Ave
Hamden CT 06517-4002
Contact Information
Address 940 Whitney Ave
Hamden, CT 06517-4002
Telephone (203) 562-6312 x
Fax 203-n/a
E-mail contact@cttrust.org
Web and Social Media
CT Trust Headquarters, Eli Whitney Boardinghouse
Mission
The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation preserves, protects, and promotes the buildings, sites, and landscapes that contribute to the heritage and vitality of Connecticut communities. We strive to make a big impact through our programs including field service, grant funding, tax credit financing, advocacy efforts, historic resource surveys, and easement and legacy giving support. We also want to engage and inspire our partners, members, and concerned citizens of Connecticut to join us in preserving the state's plethora of historic buildings and landscapes.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1976
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Wes Haynes
Board Chair Garry Leonard
Board Chair Company Affiliation GSL Arch
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation preserves, protects, and promotes the buildings, sites, and landscapes that contribute to the heritage and vitality of Connecticut communities. We strive to make a big impact through our programs including field service, grant funding, tax credit financing, advocacy efforts, historic resource surveys, and easement and legacy giving support. We also want to engage and inspire our partners, members, and concerned citizens of Connecticut to join us in preserving the state's plethora of historic buildings and landscapes.
Background

The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation was established by Special Act of the Connecticut General Assembly in 1975. The Trust is a non-profit, state-wide membership organization, with a 33-member board, three of whom are appointed by the governor. Its office is the Eli Whitney boardinghouse (c. 1827) in Hamden, CT which the Trust bought and restored in 1989. We have eight staff members, two of which are part time.

In order to engage citizens in preserving historic places, the Trust provides non-profit groups and municipalities with hands-on preservation services attuned to their specific needs. We hold easements, award grants, make loans and advocate for policies supporting historic preservation in local and state government. We also hold workshops and events for local historic district commissions, craftsmen, homeowners, and other interested individuals to learn about preservation law and practices. 

The Connecticut Trust reaches individuals through the field service work of the Connecticut Circuit Riders, web sites (cttrust.org, connecticutbarns.org, towngreens.com and historicdistrictsct.org, and connecticutmills.org), our bi-monthly newsletter, Connecticut Preservation News, and Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts.


Impact

The Connecticut Trust's field service program, the Circuit Riders, is a partnership with the State Historic Preservation Office. Circuit Riders made over 224 on-site technical assistance visits to municipalities in the state in 2017. These site visits are often the first steps in our grant funding process. In 2017, the Trust awarded 40 grants totaling nearly $227,258, leveraging at least $510,376 in matching private investment. On average, for every five applicants, only two grants can be awarded. Since demand always outpaces supply, the Trust is actively searching for creative ways to leverage new investment.

Holding preservation easements is one of the Trust’s most important stewardship activities and oldest programs. Easements offer similar protections to local historic designation and offer an alternative means preserve historic places in perpetuity while providing owners with some financial benefit in many cases. The Trust holds easements on 31 properties, totaling 83 acres across the state. The Trust proactively seeks easements by strengthening partnerships and educating our constituents on the benefits of protecting places in perpetuity.

Identifying and recognizing historic places is important priority for the Trust. Over the years, the Trust has surveyed historic resources under grants from the State Historic Preservation Office in fulfillment of the agency’s responsibility to identify and list properties on the State and National Registers of Historic Places. In 2017, the Making Places project (a survey of industrial places), launched its award-winning website to assist developers in finding available mills for reuse as well as guide people to restaurants and entertainment housed in already reused mills. The Trust wants to find funding for more of these surveys as over half of our constituents surveyed in 2017 deemed this work to be effective in raising awareness about historic places.

 
Needs

    1. Diversify sources of revenue to provide stability, enabling the Trust to sustain its mission through periods where one or another source of revenue is limited.

    2. Plan campaign to build an endowment of $2 million by 2023.

    3. Address head-on the decline in preservation funding at the State level by finding new funding sources to continue our effective and successful grant programs.

    4. Build a more visible presence in communities across the state by offering more events, more robust membership recruitment, and better communications.

    5. Build on and expand programs like field services, advocacy, education, surveys and easements.

    CEO Statement

    Connecticut is filled with historic places, from the iconic town greens and white church steeples to the barns scattered in every town as well as breathtaking historic mills and charming pedestrian-friendly downtowns. People around the state enjoy these historic places for the stories they hold, the ideas they represent, the singularity of their physical presence, the backdrops they make for selfies, or simply the feelings they evoke. Our historic places—the envy of many other states—are extraordinary assets. Connecticut citizens who get this see the Connecticut Trust as a determined and effective keeper of the community character they create, for they understand that these historic places do not preserve themselves. When opportunities, challenges or threats to historic places surface, the Trust’s Circuit Riders are there to partner with individuals and organizations and make a positive difference in pointing the way toward the most practicable legal or financial outcome. The Trust is often able to follow up with financial support to get planning, maintenance and repair underway. We often hear from people about how valuable our assistance has been:

    "It's been a great boon to us amateurs in the field to know that we can call upon the Trust for help and information and that our efforts will be supported by those of you who are preservation professionals." (Woodbury)

    "You gave us the confidence to move forward with the project, to apply for and secure the grant and to find appropriate professionals to serve as consultants as we prepare to restore the building." (Colebrook)

    "As a group of mainly non-professional volunteers, the Trust’s assistance has helped guide us to determine the logical step-by-step process of restoring our building." (Enfield)

    "The Circuit Rider program has been invaluable to historic preservation efforts in Westport...from evaluating a historic barn, to assistance with grant funding application for a preservation plan for a State Archaeological Preserve, to advice on any number of other issues. Circuit Riders are a simple phone call away and their expertise is essential to our work." (Westport)

    Other distinctive initiatives of the Trust are our surveys of historic places by type: Town Greens, Barns, Making Places: Mills of CT and Creative Places, places where artists made art. Each the product of methodical research and some crowdsourced to hundreds of enthusiastic volunteers, the results of these nationally respected investigations are available on-line for free.

    Board Chair Statement

    The Trust has long excelled as a catalyst for worthwhile historic preservation in Connecticut but today it also holds additional importance as a force for economic development, jobs, and community revitalization. Throughout its history, the Trust has grown every year in impact and relevance but, like any nonprofit, we see a changing world about us and we must respond accordingly.

    We are looking to increase our partnerships in the community. Historic preservation has always gone hand-in-hand with affordable housing, urban revitalization, sustainability and tourism. We are working to align ourselves more closely with relevant industries, community programs and local needs.

    We also have to diversify our funding as current sources are as uncertain as the times. Our mission does not waiver; our ability to act must stay intact as well. In these times of dwindling State support, our members are more important than ever to support historic preservation. in addition, we need to secure private funding, establish an endowment fund and create planned giving campaigns.

    We are working to enhance how the Trust communicates with the public. The Trust must develop and integrate a formal communications strategy to ensure that it maximizes its potential to inspire and engage, while creating a foundation for long-term institutional stability and effectiveness.

    in the coming year we will continue to research new ways of being more effective and broad reaching in the realization of our mission. We are truly a community organization and happy that we exist within such an informed, engaged and compassionate community as ours.

    Service Categories
    Primary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Fund Raising & Fund Distribution
    Areas Served
    Ansonia
    Bethany
    Branford
    Cheshire
    Derby
    East Haven
    Guilford
    Hamden
    Lower Naugatuck Valley
    Madison
    Milford
    New Haven
    North Branford
    North Haven
    Orange
    Oxford
    Seymour
    Shelton
    Shoreline
    State wide
    Wallingford
    West Haven
    Woodbridge
    Headquartered in Hamden on the site of the historic Eli Whitney complex, the Connecticut Trust serves the entire state.
    Programs
    Description The Circuit Riders, a program in partnership with the State Historic Preservation Office, promote the preservation and use of historic resources. Through the program, staff provides immediate, on-site assistance to historical societies, property owners, developers, elected officials, and local preservation commissions across the state. Circuit Riders provide technical assistance for preservation projects, response to emergency requests from communities facing the loss of important historic places to evaluate options and assist in negotiating either alternatives to demolition or suitable mitigation, financial guidance to help entities develop needed scopes of planning and capital work, and identify pertinent grants and loans, and facilitate training, workshops, and model ordinances to educate communities about preservation strategies. Given their position on the “front lines,” the Circuit Riders often hear of issues and identify trends earlier than anyone else in the state.
    Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
    Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Circuit Rider program continues to show documented success having assisted nonprofits, municipalities and individuals in accurately assessing projects and by guiding many through their own successful projects. With Circuit Rider help, prominent buildings have been saved in several communities when demolition has been proposed.
    Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

    This program ultimately helps communities plan better for preservation by using the outcomes of emergency situations as a way to plan better in the future. By educating about demolition delays, town preservation ordinances, local historic districts, zoning regulations and incentives for historic rehabilitation such as tax credits, local preservationists can prepare for issues surrounding historic buildings. Additionally, the technical assistance and potential Trust grant funding recommended by Circuit Riders is indefinitely valuable for the owner regarding the maintenance of their building.

    Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Activity and success are closely monitored by staff, committees, board and participants.  We will be implementing ways to track the success by following up with surveys after Circuit Rider visits.
    Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

    "You gave us the confidence to move forward with the project, to apply for and secure the grant and to find appropriate professionals to serve as consultants as we prepare to restore the building."  - Colebrook

    "Circuit Riders provide invaluable accurate information and advice to many who are interested in saving a part of their architectural legacy but don't know how to do it."  -  Norwalk

     "...Circuit Riders are a simple phone call away and their expertise is essential to our work.  We are extremely appreciative of the Circuit Rider program. "  - Westport

    "To a group of non-professional volunteers, the Trust’s assistance has helped guide us to determine the logical step-by-step process of restoring our building."  - Enfield

    Description

    The Making Places program originated in Investment in Connecticut: State Historic Preservation Plan 2011-2016 which recognized Connecticut’s “heritage in industry and manufacturing” and the challenges to preservation and rehabilitation resulting from environmental contamination, vacancy and other factors. The plan recommended a statewide survey of industrial buildings to list as many eligible industrial properties on the National Register in coming years to increase the number of industrial buildings eligible for tax credits, thereby encouraging their re-use. Consistent with these goals, the Trust’s Making Places program began in 2013 as a joint project with the State Historic Preservation Office to identify, document, and promote the re-use of Connecticut’s historic mills through historic resource inventory, preservation education, and raising public awareness of both the challenges to rehabilitation and economic development potential and benefits while providing technical assistance.
    Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
    Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

    Making Places re-granted $339,100 to assist pre-development planning in the adaptive reuse of nine historic industrial complexes. The grants assisted in leveraging $2.6 million in subsequent investment ($7.60 to each dollar granted) in mill preservation projects.

    Technical assistance from staff and through our professional service consultancies (TACS) assists owners of historic mills to solve defined problems. To date, the Making Places program has provided TACs for fourteen mill properties, providing structural, architectural, environmental, code, market feasibility, and tax credit consulting.

    From the November 2017 launch of the mill website to March 7, 2018, there have been nearly 7,300 users. Several organizations have cross- linked with our website. Preservation consultants, historical societies, architects, environmental professionals, and CT Main Street Center have expressed appreciation for the tool.

    Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

    The uses of the survey data have been reimagined for 21st century cultural stewardship for a wide audience through the Trust’s website Mills: Making Places of Connecticut. It makes accessible, in one place, documentation of historic factories across the entire state, with land use data useful to preservation minded developers, and opportunities for the public to experience industrial spaces. Our vision is that the website, regularly updated, become a go-to tool which will spur research and nominations to the State/National Register as well as growing appreciation of industrial space.

    Making Places staff work with an ever expanding network of owners, brokers, architects, consultants, developers and municipal officials, connecting them with each other, with redevelopment opportunities, and with information on resources and incentives. Ultimately, our goal is the active continued use of as many of these mill buildings as possible, through loft conversions, mixed uses, or manufacturing.

    Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Our activities are monitored by staff, volunteers, community leaders and an interested public, as well at the State Historic Preservation Office.  We observe the progress and any results of all projects on an ongoing basis and many of our projects must show documented progress to apply for additional funding or assistance.
    Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

    A Making Places grant provided Hands-on-Hartford with the construction documents that enabled them to build-out a former tire warehouse into supportive housing; the facility opened in March 2016. The formal review of environmental documentation by TAC team professionals was the baseline information used by the City of New Haven to obtain a Brownfields assessment grant for the long vacant New Haven Clock factory; an Oregon based developer is now negotiating to redevelop the factory into artist apartments. With technical assistance from Making Places, the owner of the Hilliard Mill in Manchester stabilized the earliest building at the site and is now making plans for rehabilitation of two other buildings.

    The website Mills: Making Places of Connecticut has been nominated for several awards, and has won an award of merit from the Connecticut League of History Organizations for its contribution to state and local history; and CT Main Street Center.

    Description
    In fall 2018, Wesleyan University Press will publish Connecticut Architecture: Stories of 100 Places, by Christopher Wigren, the Trust’s deputy director. The first comprehensive illustrated history of Connecticut architecture, the book features more than 200 illustrations and is organized thematically. Sections include concise entries that treat notable buildings, neighborhoods, and communities, emphasizing the importance of the built environment and its impact on our sense of place. The text highlights key architectural features and trends and relates buildings to the local and regional histories they represent. A project of the Trust, the book reflects more than 30 years of fieldwork and research in statewide architectural survey and National Register of Historic Places programs.  
    Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
    Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Through publication of the book, a broad audience, including professionals, students, and interested laypeople, will learn about Connecticut’s built environment. Readers will gain an increased knowledge of and appreciation for significant architecture in Connecticut. In addition, readers’ understanding of what constitutes significant architecture will become more diversified, encompassing buildings of a wide range of periods, types, and styles as well as significant structures of other kinds (such as bridges), significant town and neighborhood plans, and significant designed and vernacular landscapes.
    Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. While the book will cover a finite number of sites, readers should be able to apply material from the book to gain a better understanding of and appreciation for other works of architecture. In addition, readers will become more knowledgeable and appreciative users of architecture, more able participants in the processes of commissioning and maintaining works of architecture, more informed about town planning decisions, and more interested in preserving historic resources.
    Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

    Publication of the book will provide many opportunities for public presentations, reviews, along with informal feedback to track public response. In addition, the Trust will have a strong interest in monitoring how often, and in what ways, the book is used in teaching, in providing support to preservation efforts, and as a source for state and local history.

    Description The Trust has operated a preservation easement program for more than twenty years and now holds easements on some thirty properties, including office buildings in New Haven, condominium complexes in Norwich and New Milford, a number of single-family houses, and open land that provides historic settings for early farmhouses in Ledyard and Ashford.
    Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
    Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
    From Investment in Connecticut: The Economic Benefits of Historic Preservation, PlaceEconomics, 2011 about the reuse of the former SNET building in New Haven:

    “A preservation easement pertaining to the exterior of the building and the first-floor public areas held by the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation was upheld and ensured that these areas remained unchanged. The project was part of a larger citywide effort to revitalize downtown New Haven that began in the late 1990s. Much of this development centered on upgrading the buildings and streets surrounding Yale University, including The Eli. A 2002 New York Times article focusing on this revitalization quoted Henry Fernandez, New Haven’s economic development administrator as saying that in two more years, “we will have rehabilitated the 50-square-block-area of downtown New Haven, almost entirely with private money.”

    Description

    The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation presents awards to honor outstanding achievements in protecting and enhancing Connecticut’s significant buildings, landscapes, and communities. Awards recognize achievement in significant efforts in the restoration, preservation or adaptive use of historic resources, consistent stewardship over time, sustainability practices in historic buildings, effective leadership in the field, and young preservationists who demonstrate involvement, achievement or potential in preservation.

    Over just the past two years, we have given thirty awards to individuals and groups all over Connecticut. Five of those awards have been given in the Greater New Haven area to an assortment of preservation efforts including a dedicated preservation professional, housing projects, an art museum and New Haven's courthouse.
    Population Served General/Unspecified / /
    Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
    Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
    Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. We hope to encourage and bring enthusiasm to preservation projects by recognizing them publicly.
    Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The general public has shown significant interest in the Trust’s awards. There have always been far more nominations than awards, and attendance at the annual ceremonies has hovered around 150 people. In the past two years, we have had 50 nomination, each year awarding only awarding 10-15 individuals, businesses or non-profits.
    Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
    From press releases of some of our award recipients:
     
    "Winning the award “is a great honor,” Fiano said. “It validates the countless hours and days” local volunteers have put into renovating and improving the farm." Bolton Heritage Farm, 2018 award recipient

    “This award is a wonderful honor,” said Greenwich Land Trust Executive Direct Will Kies. “It really represents the hard work and thought that went into the renovation of this historic property. The vision Louise Mueller had ... and the team on our end that worked to make that vision come true, we owe everybody a big thank you.” Greenwich Land Trust, 2017 award recipient

     
     
    Program Comments
    CEO Comments

    Making the case for historic preservation is one of the key challenges the CT Trust and other preservation organizations face. At the CT Trust, we encourage/urge public policy advocates, state decision makers and local leaders to understand that historic preservation, embraced and articulated as a state and local policy, will deliver significant value to Connecticut. Historic preservation activity, from pre-development, generates jobs (and does not require major investment in new materials) AND it increases neighborhood value by bringing new residents, new businesses and new tax dollars. If you invest in existing resources in commercial centers existing businesses will stay and new ones will come. If you tear down the historic center, as Derby did, and then have the developer pull out, the struggle for re-growth is long and painful. Historic preservation is the ultimate underlying strategy for environmental sustainability. What does historic preservation offer that new construction cannot? Cultural identity. As new uses, new residents and new businesses inhabit our historic buildings and sites, they add layers of culture that foster and deepen our sense of place. It is again this layering, that is key. What is neater than living in the exact apartment in the Wauregan Hotel in Norwich from whose balcony Abraham Lincoln spoke; or in a loft in an armory where firearms were made throughout the 19th century, as at Coltsville? Or the former SNET building in New Haven, now the Eli, with stunning views toward East Rock?



    CEO/Executive Director
    Mr. Wes Haynes
    Term Start Jan 2018
    Email whaynes@cttrust.org
    Experience

    40 years experience in historic preservation working for non-profits, architectural firms, and as a private consultant; with CT Trust since 2013 as a Circuit Rider and Director of the Making Places Program.

     

    Co-CEO
    Ms. Jane Montanaro
    Email jmontanaro@cttrust.org
    Experience Jane has been on staff of the Connecticut Trust since 2005 and Director of Preservation Services since 2014. Jane served as Interim Director from July 2017 to January 2018 when the Trust restructured to co-director leadership.
    Staff
    Number of Full Time Staff 6
    Number of Part Time Staff 2
    Number of Volunteers 5
    Number of Contract Staff 0
    Staff Retention Rate 100%
    Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
    African American/Black 0
    Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
    Caucasian 8
    Hispanic/Latino 0
    Native American/American Indian 0
    Other 0 0
    Staff Demographics - Gender
    Male 4
    Female 4
    Unspecified 0
    Former CEOs and Terms
    NameTerm
    Helen Higgins Jan 1999 - June 2015
    Mr. Daniel Mackay June 2015 - July 2017
    Senior Staff
    Title Deputy Director
    Experience/Biography At the CT Trust for 20 years as architectural historian and editor of CT editor of CT Preservation News
    Formal Evaluations
    CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
    CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
    Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
    Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
    Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
    Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
    Collaborations
    The CT Trust is a statutory partner with the State Historic Preservation Office, Department of Economic and Community Development.  The CT Trust is also a partner with Connecticut Preservation Action, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Connecticut Humanities Council and CT Main Street Center. We collaborate with numerous local preservation groups, historical societies, museums and municipalities through our granting and advocacy programs.
    Awards
    Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
    Master Builder AwardHabitat for Humanity of Greater New Haven2013
    Merit, for Mills of CT websiteCT Main Street Center2018
    Merit, for Mills of CT websiteCT League of History Organizations2018
    Comments
    CEO Comments

    We adopted a new five-year strategic plan in January 2018. The plan was prepared in-house following a survey of our constituents, who informed us that they were not aware of the full range of historic preservation programs and activities that the Trust offers. The plan aspires to build a stronger, more impactful organization that broadens and inspires new constituencies and partnerships, engaging them through our current programs. Co-authored by Vice Chair Sara Bronin and Trustee Peter Stockman with input from board and staff, the new plan outlines 21 strategic goals that continue existing programs but change the ways we fund, promote, and deliver them.

    Diversifying our sources of funding in the near term and building an endowment for the future are two of the plan’s priorities. They respond to the realities of evaporating funding for historic preservation under the Community Investment Act (CIA). Our well-known re-grant programs, for example, grew and diversified in the past decade with steady financial support from the CIA and 1772 Foundation. The Trust has been very effective at re-granting these dollars for basic planning, maintenance and repairs, but CIA funding is no longer available. The plan recognizes our need to form relationships with new private funding partners.

    We also learned from survey responses that we have been working too quietly behind the scenes. The plan aims to strengthen our brand, integrate our print and digital media, and amplify our message. Part of this entails developing hard data, such as updating our study on preservation’s economic impact. It also involves forming new partnerships and broadening our board’s makeup to enlarge our message, opening new eyes and ears to the benefits of historic preservation on social, cultural, economic and environmental quality of life.

    Success with these new strategic goals will underpin our existing programs and secure their future. Circuit Riders will continue to make site visits and remain central to our fieldwork, grants, endangered properties interventions, and workshops. We aim to grow our easement holdings beyond the 31 properties now protected. Our awards program will continue to recognize and convey outstanding preservation stories. We will generate new thematic surveys of historic places that matter and promote their public appreciation and/or re-use. We will persist in advocating for public policies. And Connecticut Preservation News will continue to keep our members informed of the progress in the stewardship of historic places around the state.

    Board Chair
    Garry Leonard
    Company Affiliation GSL Arch
    Term May 2015 to May 2018
    Board of Directors
    NameAffiliation
    Margaret Anderson Community Volunteer
    Sara Bronin Attorney/architect
    Frank Chairamonte Selectman, Harwinton
    Mary Catherine Curran Attorney
    Robert Faesy Faesy Architects
    Jeremy Frost Community Volunteer
    Ellen Gould Community Volunteer
    Jane Grant Community Volunteer
    Henry Griggs Deacon John Grave house, Madison
    Garrett Heher Community Volunteer
    Adrienne Farrar Houel The Green Team, Bridgeport
    Charles Janson Robinson and Cole, Darien
    Leslie King Attorney, New Haven
    Edward Munster Community volunteer, Haddam
    Jeffry Muthersbaugh Heritage Recruiting, Danbury
    Edith Pestana Environmental Justice, DEEP
    Matthew Peterson Carmody, Torrance, attorney
    Edmund Schmidt Community Volunteer
    George Schoellkopf Gardening expert
    Caroline Sloat Community Volunteer
    Myron Stachiw Preservation Consultant
    Elaine Stiles Assistant Professor of Historic Preservation, Roger Williams University
    Peter Stockman Deep River Group
    Robert Svensk Latin American Underwriters, Southport
    Maisa Tisdale Freeman Houses, Bridgeport
    John Toomey Retired
    Marye Wagner Community Volunteer
    Greg Waterman Bank of America
    Richard Wies Gregg, Wies and Gardner, architects
    Board Demographics - Ethnicity
    African American/Black 2
    Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
    Caucasian 28
    Hispanic/Latino 2
    Native American/American Indian 0
    Other 0 0
    Board Demographics - Gender
    Male 18
    Female 14
    Unspecified 0
    Standing Committees
    Executive
    Board Development / Board Orientation
    Building
    Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
    Distributions / Grant Making
    Finance
    Legislative
    Nominating
    Program / Program Planning
    Advisory Board / Advisory Council
    Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
    NameAffiliation
    Martha Alexander Community volunteer, New Haven
    J. Barclay Collins IIRetired, Sharon
    William Crowe MayoCrowe attorneys, Hartford
    Jared Edwards SmithEdwards Architects, Hartford
    Inger Elliott Retired, Stonington
    Theodore Ells Retired
    Gerald Farrell Jr.Lawyer, Wallingford
    Walter Fiederowicz Retired
    Mimi Findlay Community volunteer, New Canaan
    Mrs. Lynn Friedman Community Volunteer
    Glenn Geathers City of Hartford Community Redevelopment
    Lee G. Kuckro Retired, Wethersfield
    Stephen Lash Christies, Stonington
    Charles T. Lee Anderson,Kill & Olick, Stamford
    Peter L. Malkin Malkin Holdings, Greenwich
    Cesar Pelli PelliClarkePelli Architects, New Haven
    John W. Shannahan Retired, Suffield
    CEO Comments
    The CT Trust is very fortunate to have a very congenial and consensus-directed board.  Their approach is, how can we get things done, not how do we micromanage programs and projects.  Committee meetings are essential venues for expressing and sorting out points of view. I think the Trust's committees do an excellent job in this regard.  Board meetings are information packed, serious and lighthearted at the same time.  The entire staff comes to board meetings and selected staff to committee meetings.  The communication between board and staff is excellent and respect for each other is real.
    The biggest challenge in governance is sustaining a diverse board of trustees.  This means not only having minority representation, it also means diversity in income levels.  Because we serve urban neighborhoods, municipalities and small non-profits, we want representatives from these areas.  Not all of our trustees are wealthy.  We ask each new trustee to donate up to $2000 annually but quickly have to back down and say, we are flexible.  There is a challenge to building a diverse board where all feel equally important to the growth of the organization and delivery of its mission. It has been set out in the five-year strategic plan to increase diversity, yet no specific criteria is established for board member selection.
     
     
    Financials
    Fiscal Year Start July 01 2017
    Fiscal Year End June 30 2018
    Projected Revenue $1,029,725.00
    Projected Expenses $1,196,029.00
    Spending Policy N/A
    Credit Line No
    Reserve Fund Yes
    Detailed Financials
    Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
    Fiscal Year201620152014
    Total Assets$2,193,374$2,443,089$1,903,926
    Current Assets$1,861,978$2,102,908$1,166,203
    Long-Term Liabilities$430,643$409,282$560,224
    Current Liabilities$642,439$838,694$677,284
    Total Net Assets$1,120,292$1,195,113$666,418
    Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
    Fiscal Year201620152014
    Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Economic & Community Dev. $981,160 -- --
    Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe 1772 Foundation $390,996 -- --
    Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
    Capitial Campaign
    Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
    Goal $2,000,000.00
    Dates 2019 to 2023
    Amount Raised To Date 230000 as of Mar 2018
    Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
    Comments
    CEO Comments

    The Connecticut Trust is audited each year by the firm of Carney, Roy and Gerrol, P.C. Certified Public Accountants in Rocky Hill. CT. A Single Audit for the State of CT is a requirement given the number of grants the Connecticut Trust receives from the State Historic Preservation Office, its statutory partner. Recently, the auditor has recommended that the Connecticut Trust make a few changes regarding its accounting practices, which we have implemented. First, the Connecticut Trust has moved from a cash system to an accrual system, converting from Sage/Peachtree accounting software to QuickBooks software. In addition, the Connecticut Trust has switched from having a bookkeeper come into the office twice a month, to employing the services of an accounting firm, ARI, in Glastonbury, CT to assist with weekly tracking of deposits and payments.

    Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
    Address 940 Whitney Ave
    Hamden, CT 065174002
    Primary Phone 203 562-6312
    Contact Email contact@cttrust.org
    CEO/Executive Director Mr. Wes Haynes
    Board Chair Garry Leonard
    Board Chair Company Affiliation GSL Arch

     

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