Connecticut Trust For Historic Preservation
940 Whitney Ave
Hamden CT 06517-4002
Contact Information
Address 940 Whitney Ave
Hamden, CT 06517-4002
Telephone (203) 562-6312 x
Fax 203-773-0107
E-mail contact@cttrust.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation protects and nourishes the vitality of significant buildings, landscapes and communities.
 
Visions:
• Historic preservation activity results in economic growth in Connecticut, through job creation and leveraging public and private investment.
• Historic places are preserved and used to enhance community character and preserve our cultural heritage.

Goal I: Through grants, field service and direct advocacy clearly show the value of historic preservation to Connecticut’s economy, environment and civic identity.

Goal II: Build leadership for historic preservation in public policy; expand legislative and municipal outreach.

Goal III: Become a principal conduit of information for historic preservation, historic architecture and landscapes in Connecticut.

Goal IV: Increase community interest in and action for historic preservation.
 
Goal V: Increase the capacity of the CT Trust to accomplish its mission.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1976
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Helen Higgins
Board Chair Edmund F. Schmidt
Board Chair Company Affiliation CurtissBrinckerhoff lawyers
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation protects and nourishes the vitality of significant buildings, landscapes and communities.
 
Visions:
• Historic preservation activity results in economic growth in Connecticut, through job creation and leveraging public and private investment.
• Historic places are preserved and used to enhance community character and preserve our cultural heritage.

Goal I: Through grants, field service and direct advocacy clearly show the value of historic preservation to Connecticut’s economy, environment and civic identity.

Goal II: Build leadership for historic preservation in public policy; expand legislative and municipal outreach.

Goal III: Become a principal conduit of information for historic preservation, historic architecture and landscapes in Connecticut.

Goal IV: Increase community interest in and action for historic preservation.
 
Goal V: Increase the capacity of the CT Trust to accomplish its mission.
Background
The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation was established by Special Act of the Connecticut General Assembly in 1975. The Trust is a non-profit, state-wide membership organization, with a thirty-three-member board, three of whom are appointed by the governor. Its office is the Eli Whitney boardinghouse (c. 1827) in Hamden, CT which the Trust bought and restored in 1989.
 
The Connecticut Trust’s primary ways to reach individuals are:
• The field service work of the Connecticut Circuit Riders,
• Its granting programs,
• Its web sites, www.cttrust.org, www.connecticutbarns.org,www.towngreens.com and www.historicdistrictsct.org,
• The bi-monthly news letter, Connecticut Preservation News, along with Historic Properties Exchange,
• Its Historic Barns of CT survey project
 
In order to enlist and inform allies in the preservation of historic resources, the Trust:
• Through the Circuit Rider program provides non-profit groups and municipalities with hands-on preservation services attuned to their specific community.
• Awards grants for preservation planning projects and for barns stabilization.
• Serves as a key advocate for historic preservation in state and local government.
• Holds workshops for members of historic district commissions.
• Runs seminars for real estate professionals and those interested in restoration of historic houses.
• Protects properties through preservation easements.
 
There are ten in staff, five of whom are full time; five are part-time.
Impact
The Connecticut Trust's two field service staff, the Circuit Riders, a partnership with the State Historic Preservation Office, made over 500 on-site technical assistance visits to towns and cities in the state.  Their work resulted in $515,259 in  preservation planning and Barns grants awarded by the CT Trust. In 2013, the Trust continues its field service and granting programs, adding a third field service staff. The Trust continues its  partnership with The 1772 Foundation to award grants for preservation of historic sites. Staff and volunteers with the Connecticut Trust's Historic Barns of CT project completed a survey that identified over 8000 barns, with 2058 of those inventoried for the State's Historic Resources Inventory and 200 of those nominated to the State Register of Historic Places. 
 
In 2012-13, Vibrant Communities Initiative, supported by funds from DECD, awarded nine $50,000 grants to municipalities to prepare action plans for underutilized historic resources in their downtowns.  The awards went to Norwich, New London, Lebanon, Waterbury, Hartford, Bolton, New Britain, Danbury and Wethersfield.
 
The Trust is launching a Revolving Fund program to provide real estate options and loans for historic buildings.  In 2013 the Trust is actively fund raising to capitalize this fund.  The Trust received a donation of a historic house in Durham, CT.  After investing in minor repairs and replacing the septic system, the house is for sale (Sept, 2013).  Proceeds from the sale will help to capitalize the Revolving fund.
Needs
  • Capitalize  the Revolving Fund to invest in underutilized historic building and neighborhoods.  Aim for $750,000.
  • Barns Grants for private barn owners - $50,000
  • Build general operating endowment through a planning giving program - $250,000
  • Continue to be able to raise money from individual donors whose donation contribute heavily to our operating budget,  We have state funds but they are project directed.
  • Build a more robust presence in communities across the state by upgrading social media outreach and having more public events.
CEO Statement We know Connecticut residents are proud of this state's heritage, from the iconic town greens and white church steeples to the barns scattered in every town as well as historic mills and industrial buildings re-used as housing and, most importantly,  revitalized, vibrant downtowns.  I  believe that the Connecticut Trust matters to a lot of people around the state who care about protecting and preserving community character. The Trust's Circuit Rider program allows us to touch the lives of numbers individuals and organizations each year and through it we are able to award preservation planning grants. We hear from folks all the time about how valuable our assistance has been.  For example, 

"It's been a great boon to us amateurs in the field to know that we can call upon the Trust for help and information and that our efforts will be supported by those of you who are preservation professionals."  (Woodbury)

"You gave us the confidence to move forward with the project, to apply for and secure the grant and to find appropriate professionals to serve as consultants as we prepare to restore the building." (Colebrook)

"As a group of mainly non-professional volunteers, the Trust’s assistance has helped guide us to determine the logical step-by-step process of restoring our building." (Enfield)

"Circuit Riders provide invaluable accurate information and advice to many who are interested in saving a part of their architectural legacy, but don't know how to do it. " (Norwalk)

"The Circuit Rider program has been invaluable to historic preservation efforts in Westport...from evaluating a historic barn, to assistance with grant funding application for a preservation plan for a State Archaeological Preserve, to advice on any number of other issues.  Circuit Riders are a simple phone call away and their expertise is essential to our work.  We are extremely appreciative of the Circuit Rider program. " (Westport)

 Another unique initiative of the Trust is its Historic Barns of CT project, a nationally respected project that puts recognition of our endangered historic barns front and center.  Through our work surveying the barns, we have attracted hundreds of volunteers who never thought of themselves as preservationists but they are now! The Barns website,  www.connecticutbarns.org ,  has a data base of more than 8,000 barns.

The Trust reaches across the state with its programs and services.  In 2012-13, we worked in 155 towns and cities.  It is this kind of personal, on site, responsive service to our citizens that makes the Trust unique.  And, we personally answer all phone calls!
 
Board Chair Statement
Each year I grow prouder of our organization, its people and successes. The Trust has long excelled as a catalyst for worthwhile historic preservation and rehabilitation in Connecticut but today it also holds additional importance as a force for economic development and jobs. Throughout its history, the Trust has grown every year in impact, importance and relevance but, like any nonprofit, we see a changing world about us and we must respond accordingly. 
 
We are looking to increase our partnerships in the community. Historic preservation has always gone hand-in-hand with affordable housing, urban revitalization and tourism. We are working to align ourselves more closely with relevant industries, programs and personnel.
 
With our Vibrant Community Grants, we are establishing significant and long-term relationships with specific towns so that historic preservation helps entire neighborhoods and communities – not just individual structures.
We will have to diversify our funding as current sources are as uncertain as the times. Our mission does not waiver; our ability to act must stay intact as well.
We are working to enhance how the Trust communicates with the public. Our plans for an expanded web presence and effective social media will complement our more traditional means as we look to engage individuals and aligned groups with our preservation services, opportunities and outreach programs.
 
And we continue to research new ways and means of being more effective and broad reaching in the realization of our mission. We are truly a community organization and happy that we exist within just such an informed, engaged and compassionate community as ours.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit /
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Headquartered in Hamden on the site of the historic Eli Whitney complex, the Connecticut Trust serves the entire state.  In 2012-13, Trust staff directly worked in 155 towns and cities.
Programs
Description The Circuit Riders promote the preservation and use of historic resources across CT. In addition to helping with immediate preservation problems, Circuit Riders work with communities to inform them about tools and resources available to help preserve for the future: financial and economic development incentives, tax credits, grants, historic districts, local ordinances, etc.  The Circuit Riders work in partnership with the State Historic Preservation Office.  Through investigative visits, consultations and meetings, the Circuit Rider help to define relevant issues and develop preservation strategies. They offer financial assistance through the CT Trust's Historic Preservation Technical Assistance Grants and Vibrant Communities Initiative grants, over $550,000 awarded in 2011. They facilitate training sessions for local historic district commissions.  The Circuit Riders are preservation professionals who also know how to act as mediators and facilitators with a variety of groups.
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Circuit Rider program continues to show documented success having assisted nonprofits, municipalities and individuals in accurately assessing projects and by guiding many through their own successful projects.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. This program has ramifications that extend beyond historical preservation to economic development, community development, tourism, housing and others.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Activity and success are closely monitored by staff, committees, board and participants.  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

"You gave us the confidence to move forward with the project, to apply for and secure the grant and to find appropriate professionals to serve as consultants as we prepare to restore the building."  - Colebrook

"Circuit Riders provide invaluable accurate information and advice to many who are interested in saving a part of their architectural legacy but don't know how to do it."  -  Norwalk

 "...Circuit Riders are a simple phone call away and their expertise is essential to our work.  We are extremely appreciative of the Circuit Rider program. "  - Westport

"To a group of non-professional volunteers, the Trust’s assistance has helped guide us to determine the logical step-by-step process of restoring our building."  - Enfield

 

Description Historic Barns of CT, a project funded by the Community Investment Act of the State of CT,  has been a signature CT Trust program since 2005 when the Trust first began windshield surveys of the most famous barns in the state. By 2010, when support for more staff and more programming became available from the state, the program expanded, using staff and volunteers to survey over 8000 barns.  Staff and consultants then wrote 2058 Historic Resource Inventories giving more detail on each barn.  In this final phase of state support, staff is writing 200 State Register of Historic Places nominations for the most distinctive barns.  In addition, and beyond the scope of state funding, the Trust is planning a major barn conference for spring 2013 which will attract barn enthusiasts from across the country.  This event will require specific fundraising for underwriting.  Also, looking forward, the barns staff plan to create a Barns trail and will be looking for financial support.
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Identify and document over 8,000 barns.  Write 2000 Historic Resource Inventories and by 2013 complete 200 nominations of historic barns to the State Register of Historic Places.  Gain enabling legislation to allow 10 year local tax abatements for historic barns as long as they are maintained for ten years.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Awareness of the importance of barns to our economy and our culture will grow and historic barns will be preserved and re-used.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Our activities are monitored by staff, volunteers, community leaders and an interested public.  We observe the progress and any results of all projects on an ongoing basis and many of our projects must show documented progress to apply for additional funding or assistance.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. "We thank the Connecticut Trust for helping us protect and restore the Smyrski Farm's historic red barn.  Without their generous support, this important project would never have been completed."  Weantinogue Heritage Land Trust.
Description In 2008, the CT Trust established The Barns Grant, with funds from the Community Investment Act of the State of CT.  As a result of a board decision in fall 2011, barns grants using state funds will now only be given to non-profits and  municipalities who own barns over 75 years old.  Private barn owners are no longer eligible.  However, it is the private owner who is most in need of small amounts (average $5000 each grant) of bricks and mortar grant funding.  The Trust is now actively fundraising to create a privately funded Barns Grant for private owners.  Grant funds support efforts to preserve the iconic historic barn of CT.  The grants are used for conditions assessments, feasibility of adaptive re-use opportunities, and capital improvements, usually roof or sill repair.  All applicants must demonstrate the outstanding characteristics of their barns and how repair/restoration will benefit  the public, either as an agricultural resource or as part of the historic landscape of a community.  All applicants are required to show community support for their project.
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Hundreds of barns around the state will have small grants to allow for immediate stabilization repairs to roofs, sills and foundations.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Historic barns will be preserved and re-used.  The Barns Grant is a program that stimulates change and is a catalyst for larger projects. For instance, a barn in Hamden that we awarded a conditions assessment (a $10,000 project for which we funded half in 2008), has recently completed a $200,000 project, all due to our initial investment.
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Barns grants successes are monitored by final reports that detail project completions, amount of outside, non-state money leveraged and number of short term jobs created for the project.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

The Barns Grant is a program that stimulates change and is a catalyst for larger projects.  For instance, a barn in Hamden that we awarded a conditions assessment (a $10,000 project for which we funded half in 2008), has recently completed a $200,000 project, all due to our initial investment.  "The CT Barns Grant positioned the Museum to be able to do a full rehabilitation for the 1816 Barn with funds from a Connecticut Legislative grant through the Commission on Culture and Tourism. The feasibility study was vital to moving forward with the process of planning and development.” 

Karen Lenahan, MPA
Museum Manager
Eli Whitney Museum

 

Description The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation will complete the Buildings of Connecticut volume of the Society of Architectural Historians’Buildings of the United States series. Primary editorial responsibility lies with Christopher Wigren, the Trust’s Deputy Director. An architectural historian trained at the University of Virginia, he edits the Trust’s bimonthly magazine,Connecticut Preservation News; he also writes regularly about architecture and historic preservation for the Hartford Courant and has authored or co-authored National Register nominations for the Merritt Parkway, a district in Guilford, and individual buildings in New Haven and Orange, Connecticut.For many years Chris was associated with Elizabeth Mills Brown, the original author of the Connecticut volume, first as research assistant and then as co-author. Betty transferred her papers to the Connecticut Trust before her death in December, 2008.  Expected to be complete in 2014, the project requires underwriting.
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Through publication of the book and the anticipated online version, a broad audience, including professionals, students, and interested laypeople, will learn about Connecticut’s built environment. Readers will gain an increased knowledge of and appreciation for significant architecture in Connecticut. In addition, readers’ understanding of what constitutes significant architecture will become more diversified, encompassing buildings of a wide range of periods, types, and styles as well as significant structures of other kinds (such as bridges), significant town and neighborhood plans, and significant designed and vernacular landscapes.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. While the book, as a guidebook, will cover a finite number of sites, readers should be able to apply material from the book to gain a better understanding of and appreciation for other works of architecture. In addition, readers will become more knowledgeable and appreciative users of architecture, more able participants in the processes of commissioning and maintaining works of architecture, more informed about town planning decisions, and more interested in preserving historic resources.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Publication of the book will provide many opportunities for public presentations, reviews, along with informal feedback to track public response. In addition, the Trust will have a strong interest in monitoring how often, and in what ways, the book is used in teaching, in providing support to preservation efforts, and as a source for state and local history.

Description
Since 2001, the CT Trust has offered HouseTalk educational workshops that combine the expertise of historic architects, historic consultants, restoration contractors and even do-it-yourself homeowners with a visit to a historic property that is either being considered for restoration or is in the process.   In 2012, workshops will be held in Clinton, featuring the exquisite 18th century Stanton house, currently in flux as a house museum; two lighthouses in New London, and the old Litchfield Jail in Litchfield.
The Ledge Lighthouse sits in the harbor; it will require a boat trip for attendees.  The Litchfield Jail, since 1812 a state facility adjacent to the iconic town green, is on the market for a private owner to rehabilitate and re-use.   The program is offered to Trust members and to others in the area of the presentations and is one of the Trust's very popular offerings.  Each workshop requires underwriting. 
 
 
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Program Comments
CEO Comments Making the case for historic preservation is one of the key challenges the CT Trust and other preservation organizations face.  At the CT Trust, we encourage/urge public policy advocates, state decision makers and local leaders to understand that historic preservation, embraced and articulated as a state and local policy, will deliver significant value to Connecticut.  Historic Preservation activity, from pre-development generates jobs (and does not require major investment in new materials) AND it also increases neighborhood value by bringing new residents, new businesses and new tax dollars. If you invest in existing resources in commercial centers existing businesses will stay and new ones will come.  If you tear down the historic center, as Derby did, and then have the developer pull out, the struggle for re-growth is long and painful. Historic Preservation is the ultimate underlying strategy for environmental sustainability. What does historic preservation offer that new construction cannot? Cultural identity. As new uses, new residents and new businesses inhabit our historic buildings and sites, they add layers of culture that foster and deepen our sense of place. It is again this layering, Building ON, that is key. What is neater than living in the exact apartment in the Wauregan Hotel in Norwich from whose balcony Abraham Lincoln spoke; or in a loft in an armory where firearms were made throughout the 19th century, as at Coltsville?
CEO/Executive Director
Helen Higgins
Term Start Nov 1997
Email hhiggins@cttrust.org
Experience

Executive Leadership

Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, Executive Director 1997-Present 
Ex Officio member of Commission on Culture and Tourism, 2003-ConnecticutHumanities Council, 1995- 2002
Chairman, 1997-2000          
Chairman, Grants Review, 2000- 2002
ConnecticutLeague of Historical Societies, 1990- 1997
President, 1992-1996         
Chairman, Strategic Planning   1996-1997
Dorothy Whitfield Historic Society, Guilford, CT 1990- 1997
President, Vice President, 1991-1996  
Chairman, History Committee, 1996- 1997
Darien Historical Society Executive Director, 1986-1989       

Appointments:
 
The Acorn Club, 2000. Founded in 1899; one of four women elected to membership. Secretary-Treasurer, 2005-

Connecticut Coordinating Committee for the Promotion of History, elected to membership 2000.

 Vice –President, 2003-2005

Advisory Board, Webb Deane Stevens Museums, Wethersfield, 2003-

EDUCATION          

         Columbia University, Teachers College         Master of Arts

         Smith College, History                                   Bachelor of Arts

 

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 5
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 5
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Laura Clarke Jan 1991 - Aug 1997
Charles Granquist Jan 1986 - Jan 1981
Senior Staff
Title Deputy Director
Experience/Biography At the CT Trust for 20 years as architectural historian and editor of CT editor of CT Preservation News
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
The CT Trust is a partner of the State Historic Preservation Office, Department of Economic and Community Development.  The CT Trust is also a partner of the  National Trust for Historic Preservation.
The CT Trust collaborates with numerous local preservation groups and municipalities through its granting programs.  For the Vibrant Communities Initiative program the collaborating cites/towns are Hartford, Waterbury, New London, Norwich, Lebanon, Danbury, Bolton, Wethersfield, New Britain.
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Master Builder AwardHabitat for Humanity of Greater New Haven2013
Comments
CEO Comments The CT Trust will not directly address a new strategic plan until 2013.  However,   the board has been engaged in a discussion and approval of establishing a Revolving Fund.  The questions asked, challenges and opportunities presented, all address the strategic direction for the Trust in the next 5-7 years.  The CT Trust was founded by state special act in 1975 to, among other things, establish a revolving fund, then called a revolving loan fund.  For 15 years it was successful but then a combination of a bad major investment, a declining real estate market and lack of capital doomed the fund.  Resurrecting the concept has not come easily.  It has grown from the success of the Circuit Rider program and the success of the Trust's planning grants.  It seems the natural next step is to get into actually saving or helping to save and rehab endangered buildings.  This is a model that has been highly successful in other states and it seemed time for the Trust to re-look at the model for CT.   In 2013 the Trust has been developing the legal documents for a Revolving Fund and raising money to capitalize the fund.  The Trust hopes to reach at least $400,000 once it sells a historic house donated to it in 2013.  The Trust will make efforts to match this gift with other donations.
Board Chair
Edmund F. Schmidt
Company Affiliation CurtissBrinckerhoff lawyers
Term May 2011 to May 2014
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Margaret Anderson Community Volunteer
Michael Blair Real Estate, Stonington
Sara Bronin Attorney/architect
Frank Chairamonte Selectman, Harwinton
Jeanne Chesanow Cheshire, Community Volunteer
Robert Faesy Faesy Architects
Walter Fiederowicz Investment Advisor, Litchfield
Henry Griggs Deacon John Grave house, Madison
Mary Ann Handley Retired State Senator
Adrienne Farrar Houel The Green Team, Bridgeport
Charles Janson Robinson and Cole, Darien
Natalie Ketcham 1st Selectman, Redding
Leslie King Attorney, New Haven
Garry Leonard RocheDinkeloo Architects
Jeffrey Morgan Restoration contractor
Edward Munster Community volunteer, Haddam
Jeffry Muthersbaugh Heritage Recruiting, Danbury
Thomas Nissley real estate agent, New Canaan
Edith Pestana Environmental Justice, DEEP
Matthew Peterson Carmody, Torrance, attorney
George Schoellkopf Gardening expert
Caroline Sloat Community Volunteer
Myron Stachiw Preservation Consultant
Robert Svensk Latin American Underwriters, Southport
John Toomey Retired
Elizabeth Torres Bridgeport Neighborhood Trust, director
Marye Wagner Community Volunteer
Damaris Whittaker Pastor, Center Church, Hartford
Richard Wies Gregg, Wies and Gardner, architects
Regina Winters Zared Enterprises, architect
Patrick Zailckas Attorney, Waterbury
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 25
Hispanic/Latino 3
Native American/American Indian 1
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 19
Female 13
Unspecified 0
Governance
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 10%
Board Co-Chair
Charles Janson
Company Affiliation Robinson and Cole attorneys
Term May 2011 to May 2014
Email cj@rc.com
Standing Committees
Advisory Board / Advisory Council
Board Development / Board Orientation
Building
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Distributions / Grant Making
Executive
Finance
Legislative
Nominating
Program / Program Planning
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Martha Alexander Community volunteer, New Haven
J. Barclay Collins IIRetired, Sharon
William Crowe MayoCrowe attorneys, Hartford
Jared Edwards SmithEdwards Architects, Hartford
Inger Elliott Retired, Stonington
Gerald Farrell Jr.Lawyer, Wallingford
Mimi Findlay Community volunteer, New Canaan
Mrs. Lynn Friedman
Glenn Geathers City of Hartford Community Redevelopment
Lee G. Kuckro Retired, Wethersfield
Stephen Lash Christies, Stonington
Charles T. Lee Anderson,Kill & Olick, Stamford
Peter L. Malkin Malkin Holdings, Greenwich
Cesar Pelli PelliClarkePelli Architects, New Haven
John W. Shannahan Retired, Suffield
CEO Comments
The CT Trust is very fortunate to have a very congenial and consensus-directed board.  Their approach is, how can we get things done, not how do we micromanage programs and projects.  Committee meetings are essential venues for expressing and sorting out points of view. I think the Trust's committees do an excellent job in this regard.  Board meetings are information packed, serious and lighthearted at the same time.  The entire staff comes to board meetings and selected staff to committee meetings.  The communication between board and staff is excellent and respect for each other is real.
The biggest challenge in governance is sustaining a diverse board of trustees.  This means not only having minority representation, it also means diversity in income levels.  Because we serve urban neighborhoods, municipalities and small non-profits, we want representatives from these areas.  Not all of our trustees are wealthy.  We ask each new trustee to donate up to $2000 annually but quickly have to back down and say, we are flexible.  There is a challenge to building a diverse board where all feel equally important to the growth of the organization and delivery of its mission. 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2013
Fiscal Year End June 30 2014
Projected Revenue $1,790,552.00
Projected Expenses $1,790,552.00
Spending Policy Percentage
Percentage (if selected) 3%
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902012
Form 9902011
Form 9902010
Form 9902009
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS letter of determination
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201220112010
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$121,679$181,353$384,097
Government Contributions$1,350,208$886,185$924,013
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$1,350,208$886,185$924,013
Individual Contributions------
------
$50,726$57,577$35,186
Investment Income, Net of Losses$1,982$3,948$2,758
Membership Dues$115,840$105,414$120,231
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$4,262$6,055$8,517
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Program Expense$1,410,328$1,103,809$1,137,136
Administration Expense$120,568$118,309$103,672
Fundraising Expense$114,576$63,079$55,622
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.000.971.14
Program Expense/Total Expenses86%86%88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue8%6%4%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Total Assets$1,119,471$1,488,530$978,543
Current Assets$758,337$1,159,904$700,860
Long-Term Liabilities$556,546$1,048,164$107,724
Current Liabilities$263,771$140,904$228,966
Total Net Assets$299,154$1,488,530$641,853
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201220112010
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Economic and Community Development $1,250,208CT Commission on Culture & Tourism $786,185 --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Humanities Council $100,000CT Humanities Council $100,000 --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --CT Housing Finance Authority $77,887 --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.878.233.06
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets50%70%11%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments The process of preparing the audit and the 990s goes very smoothly, starting in August.  The CT Trust's bookkeeper prepares for the auditor documents and files as do staff that administer grants.  The auditor comes in for one day of on-site work and then prepares his reports from off site.  He meets with the Finance Committee to answer questions and once all is finalized, he issues the final reports.  A Single Audit for the State of CT is a requirement given the number of grants the CT Trust receives from the State Historic Preservation Office, its partner.
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 940 Whitney Ave
Hamden, CT 065174002
Primary Phone 203 562-6312
Contact Email contact@cttrust.org
CEO/Executive Director Helen Higgins
Board Chair Edmund F. Schmidt
Board Chair Company Affiliation CurtissBrinckerhoff lawyers

 

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