Vantage Group
29 North Plains Highway, Suite 15
Wallingford CT 06492
Contact Information
Address 29 North Plains Highway, Suite 15
Wallingford, CT 06492-
Telephone (203) 234-7737 x
Fax 203-793-7817
E-mail rpittman@vantagegroupinc.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

Vantage Group’s commitment is to support the life-long needs of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in safe comfortable settings and create opportunities for each person’s social, emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual growth. 

  • Vantage settings are clean, well-maintained, furnished appropriately, and aesthetically pleasing.

  • We understand our roles, work collaboratively, and challenge each other to do our collective best.
  • We treat everyone fairly and equitably, with dignity and respect.
  • We support individuals in making choices that enhance their learning, and are always working for the betterment of the lives of the people we serve.
      
  • We are are compassionate, empathetic, and carry out our responsibilities with integrity.

  • We consistently behave in a courteous, conscientious, and ethical manner.
  • We see problems as challenges, obstacles as opportunities, and quality decision making as our responsibility.

Vantage Group’s vision is to be one of Connecticut’s preferred human service agencies for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and behavioral health needs.  We utilize progressive practices, current technology, and highly skilled staff to provide an expansive range of services. Vantage consistently strives to be the agency of choice for individuals and families and the employer of choice for human service professionals.

A Great Opportunity Ending Date June 30 2016
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1984
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Rick Carl Pittman MS, CSS
Board Chair Ms. Rebecca Sandmann
Board Chair Company Affiliation retired
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $5,711,939.00
Projected Expenses $5,547,762.00
Statements
Mission

Vantage Group’s commitment is to support the life-long needs of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in safe comfortable settings and create opportunities for each person’s social, emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual growth. 

  • Vantage settings are clean, well-maintained, furnished appropriately, and aesthetically pleasing.

  • We understand our roles, work collaboratively, and challenge each other to do our collective best.
  • We treat everyone fairly and equitably, with dignity and respect.
  • We support individuals in making choices that enhance their learning, and are always working for the betterment of the lives of the people we serve.
      
  • We are are compassionate, empathetic, and carry out our responsibilities with integrity.

  • We consistently behave in a courteous, conscientious, and ethical manner.
  • We see problems as challenges, obstacles as opportunities, and quality decision making as our responsibility.

Vantage Group’s vision is to be one of Connecticut’s preferred human service agencies for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and behavioral health needs.  We utilize progressive practices, current technology, and highly skilled staff to provide an expansive range of services. Vantage consistently strives to be the agency of choice for individuals and families and the employer of choice for human service professionals.

Background

Vantage Group, Inc. is a private, non-profit organization that provides residential, day, employment and in-home family supports for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Vantage Group, Inc. was incorporated in 1982 by a group of parents of those with developmental disabilities (formerly referred to as ‘mental retardation”) and professionals from greater New Haven.   These founders included university professors, pediatricians, social workers, attorneys, and other socially-conscious individuals.
 
Vantage (Vocational and Normalization Training and Group Experience) was the dream of Sam and Ruth Teitleman whose teenage son had significant disabilities and would require professional help 24 hours/day for the rest of his life. The Teitelman’s had two options: keep their son in their home or send him to a state institution. Ruth and Sam were already in their 50’s and knew that they we not going to be able to care for him at home for too much longer. After visiting one of the state institutions, they were convinced that their son would not be well served in that environment. So, the Teitleman’s developed a third option; they created their own agency.
 
They worked in collaboration with the State of Connecticut Department of Mental Retardation and soon had a contract to open the first Vantage house in 1984 for six individuals located in North Haven.  
 
Since then, Vantage has grown to serve nearly 80 individuals with developmental disabilities who live in New Haven, North Haven, East Haven, West Haven, Hamden, and Milford. As of January 1, 2016, Vantage employees 89 full-time, part-time, and 71 per diem workers and has an annual operating budget of just over $5 million.  Vantage receives the majority of its funding from the state of Connecticut’s Departments of Developmental Disabilities and Social Services.
Impact

Accomplishments in 2015 

  • Enrolled 5 more individuals into the day and work program

  • Opened two new group homes

  • Increased operating budget from FY14 to FY15 by $370,000

  • Began internship program with Albertus Magnus College and Southern Connecticut State University and affiliation with Yale School of Management

  • Reorganized program operations, adding Director of Quality Assurance and Behaviorist

 

Goals for 2016
  • Create In-home Family Support program for children with Autism
  • Renovate new day program building and increase enrollment from 27 to 40 individuals
  • Increase revenue by $700,000
Needs
  • increase base salary of direct support employees by 5-10% - $145,000

  • development of autism program for children - $35,000

  • repair driveways at 3 group homes - $36,000

  • replace heating system at group home - $65,000

CEO Statement

Because of the vision and groundwork set by its founders, I can proudly say that Vantage is successful and strong. We have been agents in improving the quality of life of those we serve for over 30 years.   The statement of philosophy and beliefs that formed the agency in the early 1980’s continue to guide us today: “ … individuals have the right to choose their own living environment… we will enhance the lives of both the residents and their families.”

Today, many individuals we support live in their own apartments and homes.  Several are competitively employed in businesses of all types. We also serve those who are still living in their family’s homes; providing support to the family as a whole. While successful, we do face significant challenges:

 

More and more people are in need of support

Today, there are over 14,000 individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities living in the state. This number continues to grow. Advances in medical science have significantly decreased the mortality rates of those born with a disability and increased the life expectancy of those we serve.  

 

Aging client base

Life expectancy for adults with developmental disabilities is approaching parity with the general population. A University of Chicago study estimates that there are over 600,000 individuals with developmental disabilities over the age of 60 living in the United States. It is predicted that this will double within the next 15 years.

 

The prevalence of Autism

According to a November, 2015 study, autism now affects 1 in 48 children and is the fastest growing developmental disability in the U.S.  

 

More adults with developmental disabilities are living in their family’s home

State funding that used to be available to help men and women move out of their families’ homes in to residential services have been significantly cut. As individuals turn 22 years old and leave school programs, the option of moving into a supervised home or their own apartment with intermittent supports is less likely.

Funding

State of Connecticut is no longer able to provide funding for all its citizens with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The growing number and need level of these individuals combine with the state and federal fiscal cut backs has put a significant strain on us.

 

Despite these challenges, I am enthusiastic to lead Vantage as we tackle these challenges and live up to our vision to be  “the preferred human service agency that utilizes progressive practices, current technology, and highly skilled staff to provide an expansive range of services.”

 

Board Chair Statement

Growing up with a brother with Down Syndrome was a challenge. We knew life would not be easy for him and we were always afraid that he would be picked on or taken advantage of. My brothers, sister and I were very protective and wondered how he would make it in this world. We knew our parents would not live forever and caring for child with a disability is a difficult task. We all took turns looking after my brother and hoped that he would find a place to live outside my parent’s home with compatible housemates and knowledgeable, caring staff. We found that in Vantage.

When he first came to Vantage, my brother had a lot of skills and was living in an apartment with limited staffing. As he has aged, some of those skills have declined and he now requires more support. So now he lives in a small group home with 24 hour staffing. He works a few days a week, including a part-time volunteer job at Yale; something he greatly enjoys.

I have always been a fierce advocate for my brother.  There was a period of time when I was unhappy with the quality of supports my brother was receiving. I was equally upset about the lack of response from the Vantage senior management. My voice, and the voice of many other family members stirred the board in making a decision to change leadership.

Knowing I am a fighter and deeply committed to the quality of life for my brother, the new Executive Director asked me to join the Vantage Board of Directors to ensure that the family perspective is  always considered in management and governance decisions. Since joining the board, we have recruited 4 more members with a family member with a disability; something that gives me great pride. 

As Chair of the Board, I get to see the things we have accomplished as well as the challenges we face. I am proud that we have able to expand our residential services to include more people. Our employment service has grown so that our clients (like my brother) can enjoy meaningful work. I have seen us grow more sophisticated in our program delivery and management. Vantage is a dynamic organization that I feel privileged to govern.

While we have much to brag about, there are challenges to be met. These include: adequate funding for both operations and growth, attracting and retaining quality staff, and serving clients with more intensive medical and behavioral needs. To address these challenges, the board and the Executive Director have formalize plans as part of the 2015-2018 strategic plan.

 

The updated plan will address:

  • Diversification of funding.  Vantage can no longer rely solely on state contracts. Fundraising must increase, but so must other revenue streams. 

 

  • Enhanced workforce. Vantage must position itself to be the “employer of choice” so that caring, motivated staff will seek out employment here. Increased wages and ability to move up in the organization must be part of the strategy. 

 

  • New programmatic emphasis.  As the population ages, different skill sets are needed and service models must be adjusted to meet the increasing medical needs. We need to adapt to those with more pronounce medical and behavioral needs.

    Vantage is up to the challenge.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Developmentally Disabled Services/Centers
Areas Served
Branford
East Haven
Hamden
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Wallingford
West Haven
Programs
Description

Residential services for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
Whether a client is living in an agency group home or in his/her own apartment, this program provides 24 hour per day services.  Each individual receives assistance in all aspects of daily living and community membership.  


All programs are licensed and receive funding from the CT Department of Developmental Services for service provision. Those living in group homes receive additional funding from the Department of Social Services for room and board.  Those in their own apartments usually received some housing allowance to offset their rent.  
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Services are designed to help each client maximize his/her self-sufficiency and independence.  This is individualized and therefore can be subjective and is not translated into objective outcomes.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Since each client has a life-long intellectual and developmental disability, the need for some degree of service will remain throughout his/her life.  The nature and intensity of the service may vary based on health, age, and cognitive ability.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Annual goals are developed with each individual and/or his guardian (if applicable.)  These goals are futher broken down into specific objectives.  These objectives are evaluated after six months and modified as needed.  Annually, these goals are fully reviewed.  New goals are set at this annual meeting or previous goals are continued.  Additionally, the State of Connecticut conducts periodic licensing and quality service reviews, giving feedback to the agency on the effectiveness of the programs.
 
Vantage employs a full-time Quality Assurance Director who conducts internal audits to monitor service delivery, program success, and compliance with state and agency policies and procedures
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

 Names are fictitous, but stories are real

AB's story: 
Vantage assisted AB to move out of a 6-person group home into his own apartment.  He had been telling us for years that his dream would be to have his own place that he could consider his own home.  After two years of intensive planning and training by the Vantage clinical team, AB finally moved into his own place.

CD's story: 
CD's family could no longer support him at home.  His aggressive behaviors made him a danger to himself and those around him.  He was hospitalized in the psychiatric unit of a local hospital for nearly 11 months.  When he came to Vantage, his behaviors were still pronounced and he had significant medical and dental issues.  
In his first year at the agency, the clinical team developed a comprehensive plan to address his mental and physical health:
1. CD was referred to a local psychiatrist who worked closely with Vantage staff to address his mental illness and help control his disruptive behaviors.  Today, he is psychiatrically stable, regularly attends a day program, and has not had any significant behavioral issues in nearly two years. 
2. CD has had three dental surgeries, several root canals, and many fillings over the past two years.  He, now, regularly attends dental appointments and receives daily dental care
3.  CD was nearly blind and required surgery on both eyes.  These were successful and restored most of his sight.  He was also nearly deaf and additional surgery significantly improved his hearing.   The Vantage nursing services continually monitors his physical health.
Description

The day program provides educational, therapeutic, and socialization services to maximize each participants potential. The program also offers many volunteer opportunities so individuals connect and give back to the community.  

Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Services are designed to help each client maximize his/her self-sufficiency and independence.  This is individualized and therefore can be subjective and is not translated into objective outcomes.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Since each client has a life-long intellectual and developmental disability, the need for some degree of service will remain throughout his/her life.  The nature and intensity of the service may vary based on health, age, and cognitive ability.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.  
Annual goals are developed with each individual and/or his guardian (if applicable.)  These goals are futher broken down into specific objectives.  These objectives are evaluated after six months and modified as needed.  Annually, these goals are fully reviewed.  New goals are set at this annual meeting or previous goals are continued.  Additionally, the State of Connecticut conducts periodic licensing and quality service reviews, giving feedback to the agency on the effectiveness of the programs.
 
Vantage employs a full-time Quality Assurance Director who conducts internal audits to monitor service delivery, program success, and compliance with state and agency policies and procedures
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. In July 2013, three local human service agencies closed their day program. This left many individuals without a place to go and engage in meaningful activities.  Vantage accepted 5 individuals from these programs.  All of these clients were considered to have "behavior problems" and were reputed to be in need of constant supervision.  After a short period of time, the Vantage clinical team concluded that boredom was the cause of these maladaptive behaviors.  By engaging each in the Vantage program of community membership, volunteering, yoga, music, and art therapy, the presenting behaviors decreased significantly and their quality of life has significantly improved.  Several guardians have come forward and congratulated us on our work.
Description
Individualized and Group Supported Employment services help individuals identify and secure meaningful employment at prevailing wages or the DOL approved adjusted wage.  Individuals receive on the job support from a vocational counselor/job coach.  Often, the vocational counseling fades his/her direct support to the individual but monitors the work situation, assisting as needed. 
 
   
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Each person entering the Vantage Employment Program undergoes an intensive vocational assessment to determine strengths. weaknesses, and areas of vocational interest.  This assessment is then used by trained vocational specialists to aid the person to find an appropriate job by teaching appropriate work behavior, creating a resume, training in interviewing, and searching for a job.  
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The goal of this program is to place individuals with developmental disabilities in community-based jobs at prevailing wages - "Real work for real pay."  We hope to connect each person with a job of their stated preference and skill level.  The ultimate plan for each worker would is to eventually eliminate (or significantly reduce) paid staff support and allow the workplace itself support and direct the individual as it would any other employee.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.  
Annual goals are developed with each individual and/or his guardian (if applicable.)  These goals are futher broken down into specific objectives.  These objectives are evaluated after six months and modified as needed.  Annually, these goals are fully reviewed.  New goals are set at this annual meeting or previous goals are continued.  Additionally, the State of Connecticut conducts periodic licensing and quality service reviews, giving feedback to the agency on the effectiveness of the programs.
 
Vantage employs a full-time Quality Assurance Director who conducts internal audits to monitor service delivery, program success, and compliance with state and agency policies and procedures
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
AB's story:
AB was unable to keep a job due to several factors: being late for work, engaging in inappropriate work behavior, etc.  Through the Vantage employment program, he learned appropriate work behaviors and the importance of being punctual.  His vocational specialist was able to find him a job in a local restaurant.  After a short time of job coaching and support, he became independent on the job.  He is well-liked by his supervisor and co-workers.  Overtime, his assigned hours have increased.  Recently, he has obtained a second job to supplement his income.
CD's story:
CD was bored in his day program.  He constantly stated that he wanted to work, but he required a good deal of supervision due to his lack of safety skills.  The vocational specialist was able to develop a light custodial and clerical job at the Vantage office.  One day per week, CD has been hired to clean the administrative offices.  When needed, he stuffs and stamps envelops, as well as shreds documents.  This past year, CD has secured a volunteer job at Yale University providing light janitorial and office work.
Description
This program provides in-home, personal support to individuals of all ages who live in their own home or with their families. Services may
include: assistance with daily living skills, personal care, maintaining the household, community connection, etc.
 
Clinical services (including nursing, behavioral planning, and nutrition) are also available to family members.  Staff also can provide supervision and meaningful activities to individuals in their own home while caretakers pursue their own interests or responsibilities. 
Population Served People/Families with People of Developmental Disabilities / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Vantage assesses the clinical, behavioral and social needs of the family and their adult child.  Based on this assessment, an individual plan is developed that connects the family to community-based resources, or, if appropriate, assigns Vantage staff to the home.  
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The in-home support program has two services.  One service is to help individuals living on their own or with roommate(s) to continue to live as independently by providing staff supports as needed.  These services are designed to keep individuals from entering group homes or other more restrictive settings.

The second service helps families support their disabled child (regardless of age) within their own home.  Some families wish to keep their loved one at home, while others have no other option due to the lack of available placements and/or state funding.  Vantage helps parents stay employed and pay attention to their own needs while trained staff attend to their child.  
 
Vantage will help keep the individual at home or help the family secure out of the home residential placement.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

 

Annual goals are developed with each individual and/or his guardian (if applicable.) These goals are further broken down into specific objectives. These objectives are evaluated after six months and modified as needed. Annually, these goals are fully reviewed. New goals are set at this annual meeting or previous goals are continued. Additionally, the State of Connecticut conducts periodic licensing and quality service reviews, giving feedback to the agency on the effectiveness of the programs.

Vantage employs a full-time Quality Assurance Director who conducts internal audits to monitor service delivery, program success, and compliance with state and agency policies and procedures.

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
AB's story:
AB lived at home with his elderly parents (who are both in their 80's.)  His father has ongoing medical conditions and is often unable to get out of the house.  He is a very active young man who enjoys sports, music and other community activities.  To address his social and recreational needs Vantage was able to develop a very simple program. The parents, AB and the Vantage support worker developed a weekly recreational schedule.  The staff bring him to these events.
 
Due to their advancing age, AB's parents have determined that AB needs to live elsewhere.  Recently, a local service agency has accepted him into their residential services.  Vantage staff helped with the transition into his new home and continue to weekly help him participate in community activities.
Description  

On November 1, 2016, Vantage Group was awarded funds from the Community Foundation to develop a program that supports children with autism (ASD) who display maladaptive behaviors in their family's home in Greater New Haven

  

The Autism program is developed around the concepts and clinical foundations of Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA); which is the only intervention that has continually demonstrated its effectiveness in helping children with special needs and behavioral difficulties.

 

Vantage enters into a partnership with the families; not just act as outside clinical resource.   Parents are taught how to implement the behavior program; to prompt and reinforce the child through his or her various daily activities.   Studies show that children whose parents are actively engaged in behavioral support programs make measurable gains, i.e. significant decreases in behaviors, more time on productive tasks, and increased emotional connection with others.

 


Population Served / /
Program Comments
CEO Comments

Essentially there are five challenges facing Vantage:

  • Clients with more significant needs 
    Over the years, advances in medicine make it possible for more individuals born with disabilities to survive infancy and grow into adulthood. These individuals are now coming into the adult service delivery system in great numbers. Many of those being referred for services require more significant medical supports than we have been providing. We need to build our nursing and therapeutic service capacity.

  • The aging of clients  
    According to a University of Chicago study, in the United States there are currently over 600,000 individuals with developmental disabilities who are now over the age of 60. It’s predicted that number will double to 1.2 million during the next 15 years. Out of 70 individuals supported by Vantage, 14 are over 60 years old and 41 are over 50. Many already have medical issues. These conditions coupled with those associated with the normal aging process, are a real concern.   Again, this requires us to build the appropriate clinical supports in our existing programs and create new programs as needed. 

  • Prevalence of autism
    The current reality is that 1 in 88 children are diagnosed with autism.  Among boys, the numbers are 1 in 54. Some will require ongoing support to live full, meaningful lives. There is a serious lack of services for children and adults living with this condition. Vantage needs to determine where we fit in serving this population. 

  • Connecticut’s fiscal realities
    The current service delivery system is financially unsustainable. At one time, when the individuals reached age 22 and exited the school system, they had options. They could start a new life in a supervised group home. Or they would be helped to set up their own apartment.

    Today, with state budget limits, families can’t count on those options. When their son or daughter reaches 22 years old, they are more likely to continue to remain in the family home. That calls for new kinds of services from Vantage, including reaching out to support individuals and their families in their own homes.

  • Additional funding beyond state contracts
    It is reckless to assume that the state can continue to fund programs at the current levels.  Vantage has to augment its funding through charitable gifts while continuing to operate efficiently.  

    Vantage’s cost of providing services increases each year.  Health insurance premiums continue to rise. The cost of utilities increases. This past July, Vantage’s business insurance premiums rose by $13,000.

    Vantage employees, often with families, start out at $12 an hour. Across the nation, fast-food workers are demanding $15 an hour. Many of Vantage workers are eligible for Husky, food stamps, and other entitlements for the working poor. Most have to hold second jobs.  This is untenable. Human service work must pay a livable wage to recruit and retain a professional workforce.

    All this points to an increased emphasis on pursuing additional resources through private donations, foundations, and grants.

Vantage has been a preferred provider of services to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities for over 30 years. We were on the forefront of moving individuals out of state institutions into typical neighborhoods.  Over the years, our commitment to quality of life for those we serve has never wavered and is still as strong as it was in the early 1980’s.

Through good, sound business practices and a board commitment to the stability of Vantage, we are presently in good financial shape. However, it would be irresponsible to be complacent. Vantage vows to stabilize and improve our financial condition - and those of our workforce - as we develop new service models to serve our clientele with compassion and a commitment to excellence.  

 

 


 

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Rick Carl Pittman MS, CSS
Term Start Feb 2011
Email rpittman@vanatgegroupinc.org
Experience

2011- Present             Vantage Group, Inc., North Haven, CT

 Executive Director

Chief Executive Officer of human service agency that provides residential, day, employment and in-home services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. 

 

2002 – 2011                New England Village, Inc., Pembroke, MA 

 Director of Residential and Professional Services

Directed the programmatic and fiscal operations of residential, clinical, and other supports to adults with developmental disabilities. 

 

1998 – 2002                BAMSI , Brockton, MA 

Senior Executive

Responsible for programmatic and fiscal operations of residential, medical and therapeutic programs throughout Eastern Massachusetts. 

 

1990 – 1998                CCI, Yarmouth Port, MA

Executive Director   

Chief Executive Officer of human service agency that provides residential, day, and employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. 

 

1989 – 1990                HARBOR Services., New Bedford,   MA

Executive Director

Chief Executive Officer of human service agency that provides residential, day, and employment services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. 

 

1987 – 1989                Bay Cove Human Services, Inc., Boston, MA

Director

Directed the administrative and clinical operations of Developmental Disabilities Division. 

 

1982 – 1986                CAC, Duxbury, MA

Director 
Developed and managed programs in Massachusetts and California. 

  

Education

University Of Massachusetts, Boston, MA 
Master of Science, Human Services Management, 2006

  Harvard University, Cambridge, MA  

Graduate Certificate of Special Studies in Management and Administration, 2002

                               

Stonehill College, North Easton, MA

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, 1976

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 66
Number of Part Time Staff 23
Number of Volunteers 0
Number of Contract Staff 9
Staff Retention Rate 76%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 74
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 4
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 25
Female 64
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr. William Cramer Jan 2001 - Nov 2010
Ms. Patricia Heavren May 1997 - Oct 2000
Senior Staff
Title Director of Programs and Operations
Title Business Manager
Title Human Resource Manager
Title CFO
Experience/Biography

Previous CFO for Kenndey Center, Trumbull and ARI, Stamford

Previous CEO ARI, Stamford
 

Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Bi-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

Connecticut Community Providers Association - member

State of Connecticut Family Support Work Group - This group is creating policies for how families with a disable child can more effectively access services.  Executive Director is member.
Arc of Greater New Haven - Share resources and have submitted collaborative grants to improve the lives of each client base. 
 
Yale University School of Management - recipient of pro bono consultation
 
Albertus Magnus - web design internship
 
Southern Connecticut State University - accounting internship 
 

 

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2016
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits2016
Board Chair
Ms. Rebecca Sandmann
Company Affiliation retired
Term July 2016 to June 2018
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Dr Wafeek Abdelsayed Ph.D.Southern Connecticut State College
Mr. Robb Camm CDI Corporation
Mr. Greg Chester Hancock Pharmacy
Ms. Mary Donohue Achillion Pharmaceutical. Sister of a woman with disability
Ms. Debra Drexler EsquireCHRO
Mr. John Loehmann CPARetired
Ms. Joanne LoPresti-Miller Webster Bank
Dr. Larry Marks Ph.D.Yale University. Father of child with disability
Dr. Donald Rocklin MDYale University, Cardiology Associates
Ms. Rebecca Sandmann Retired
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 middle-eastern
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 5
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Blanket Personal Property
Business Income
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
Computer Equipment and Software
Crime Coverage
Disability Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Employment Practices Liability
General Property Coverage and Professional Liability
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Internet Liability Insurance
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Professional Liability
Risk Management Provisions
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Workplace Violence
Standing Committees
Executive
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Finance
Nominating
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $5,711,939.00
Projected Expenses $5,547,762.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$56,612$32,603$61,335
Government Contributions$4,849,326$4,434,094$4,172,082
Federal------
State$4,755,222----
Local------
Unspecified$94,104$4,434,094$4,172,082
Individual Contributions------
------
$441,967$392,336$535,213
Investment Income, Net of Losses$7,114$16,401$3,231
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$4,520,991$4,173,509$4,058,052
Administration Expense$715,463$692,944$680,910
Fundraising Expense----$1,731
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.021.001.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses86%86%86%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$2,104,124$1,912,327$1,836,363
Current Assets$710,802$571,844$534,478
Long-Term Liabilities$775,993$792,223$689,331
Current Liabilities$508,214$409,626$445,535
Total Net Assets$819,917$710,478$701,497
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Dev. Services $4,755,222CT Dept. of Developmental Services $4,434,094CT Dept. of Developmental Services $4,172,082
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.401.401.20
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets37%41%38%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Goal $12,000.00
Dates Nov 2015 to June 2016
Amount Raised To Date 11070 as of Jan 2016
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments

Projected Surplus Explanation

Based on the budget figures stated above, it appears the Vantage Group will realize a profit of $220,725 in FY16.  It is important to note that both the revenue of $5,455,158 and the expense of $5,234,433 are both projections, and are subject to change during the fiscal year.

Revenues are driven by client participation in programs, which in the past have been affected by refusal of services, illness, or death.  Revenues are also at the mercy of changes in the state budget. 
 
Annual expenses are always a "best guess" estimate based on historical and anticipated costs.  These are also variable and are affected by such things as overtime costs, increases in service costs, insurance increases, and unexpected expenses (particularly in facility maintenance and repairs.) 

It should also be noted that Vantage is prohibited by state regulations to retain any state funds at the end of the fiscal year. These funds must be reverted back to the state of Connecticut or issued to staff in the form of a merit-based bonus. Vantage has always chosen the latter. The average wage of a direct service worker is under $13.00 per hour. In FY15, Vantage was able to award each of its full and part time employees a bonus check averaging $1,300. 

Financial Challenges

As stated above, Vantage cannot keep surpluses from state funded programs.  Such public policy does not allow Vantage to build equity and can create year-end cash flow concerns. Additionally, since state reimbursement for services is often delayed by 30 -45 days, cash flow must be managed carefully throughout the year.

Another factor that makes financial management challenging is the state practice of reimbursing capital improvements in future years, not at the time incurred. This creates yet another drag on cash flow and sometimes necessitates accessing the line of credit at the bank. As a result, capital improvements must be prioritized and are often delayed until funding can be obtained from an outside source.

 Over the past three years, Vantage has increasingly relied on individual donations, foundations and grants to underwrite projects, support overhead, and help build equity to continue financial stability.

 

 

Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 29 North Plains Highway, Suite 15
Wallingford, CT 06492
Primary Phone 203 234-7737
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Rick Carl Pittman MS, CSS
Board Chair Ms. Rebecca Sandmann
Board Chair Company Affiliation retired

 

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