Spanish Community of Wallingford
284 Washington St
Wallingford CT 06492-0089
Contact Information
Address 284 Washington St
Wallingford, CT 06492-0089
Telephone (203) 265-5866 x
Fax 203-294-2256
E-mail info@scowinc.org
Web and Social Media

Mission
Our mission is to respond to the need of the Latino Community by assisting them to succeed in the U.S. society, and to enable Latinos to maintain and share their rich varied cultures with the broader community.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1972
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Maria Campos Harlow
Board Chair Mr. Jeffrey Necio
Board Chair Company Affiliation Masonicare
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $300,000.00
Projected Expenses $300,000.00
Statements
Mission Our mission is to respond to the need of the Latino Community by assisting them to succeed in the U.S. society, and to enable Latinos to maintain and share their rich varied cultures with the broader community.
Background

The Spanish Community of Wallingford (SCOW), a.k.a. Comunidad Hispana de Wallingford, Inc., was founded in 1972 by a small group of Latinos in Wallingford, Connecticut, who experienced difficulties finding translators, interpreters, employment, and medical assistance within  the community.  The founders envisioned the organization to be the leading agency to help develop and involve the Hispanic community. To this day, it has been successful in implementing its mission, “to respond to the needs of the Latino Community by assisting them to succeed in U.S. society, and to enable Latinos to maintain and share their rich varied cultures with the broader community.

We assist the community to access all types of social services available in the area. We also provide language translation/interpretation and transportation to important appointments at schools, doctors, attorneys, and immigration offices. Traditionally, SCOW has served primarily the Latino Community, but, in the past two years, an increased number of non-Latinos have been seeking our services. The federal programs Energy Assistance, Women Infants and Children (WIC), and Access Health Connecticut information and registration are also being offered at SCOW.
 
In recent years, our emphasis is on building and conducting educational programs for all ages, understanding that success for members of the Latino community - especially the children - will only be possible with a strong educational foundation.  Just four examples of over a dozen programs include:
Adelante America Youth Leadership Program: 50 high school students participate in this program designed to help them deal with the challenges of adolescence in immigrant families.
Pasos Adelante: 20 middle school students participate in a youth leadership program that mirrors Adelante America.
SCOW School of Music: 20 students presently participate in this program which provides the study of music to children 6 to 17.  It includes singing as well as learning to play one or more of five instruments. 
STEM Leadership and Enrichment Academy: This program has been expanded considerably.  Not only do we have the three-week summer program that we have run for three years, but we have incorporated STEM curriculum into both Adelante America and Pasos Adelante.
Impact

Last year, our agency and staff received recognition and accreditation by the US Department of Justice to provide

assistance in certain types of legal immigration procedures to eligible candidates. This service is only available to immigrants who cannot afford to retain attorneys. The motivation behind this process is that oftentimes unscrupulous individuals take advantage of vulnerable immigrants and provide misleading advice that leave them vulnerable or with fake expectations of achieving a status for which they unfortunately, may not qualify.

The transition of the Mariachi Academy of Connecticut to the hands of the Mariachi Mexico Antiguo has been completed and it will no longer be a program of the Spanish Community of Wallingford. We are happy to see the program grow and expand to other communities. Our Music Director, Evangeline Mendoza will remain at SCOW in the same capacity and our music program is now known as SCOW School of Music. The School includes lessons in classical music, piano and a drum circle.

Our board of directors and staff recently completed our FY2016-2019 strategic plan with the assistance of a capacity building consultant. The process included a community assessments that included feedback from community leaders, funders, and clients of our agency. The goals of the strategic plan include: 1) the improvement of our office operations to make our work more efficient, 2) the implementation of new marketing strategies to better promote our programs and services within our community and to attract new donors, 3) the expansion of our fund development initiatives, 4) the improvement of the evaluative process for our programs and services.

Needs
1) Hire a full-time Assistant Executive Director so that the Executive director can concentrate her efforts on fund development and community outreach and marketing.  Cost: $50,000.
2) Hire a full-time Assistant Program Director so she can provide support to the increasing number of programs, services and students participating in the programs. Cost:$35,000.
3) Recruit and train volunteers. Cost: $800.
4) Hire a part-time BIA-certified staff person to provide immigration assistance services.  Cost: $19,000. 
CEO Statement

Because you are reading this, I must first thank you for your interest in our agency.  There are many worthy organizations to which you can donate, and of course I want to share my passion for our work in order to inspire you to invest in the Latino community through supporting SCOW.

 

Why Latinos and why now? Well, Latinos are but the latest wave of immigrants coming to America.  Like our predecessors, we came because the United States is still the brightest beacon of hope in the entire world.  We have brought with us a tremendous work ethic, strong family and religious values and the same drive to succeed on our own merit as have so many others.  We also bring fascinating, vibrant and exciting cultures – dozens of them, actually – to add to the amazing cultural tapestry that is America.

 

Our agency exists to help Latinos to overcome the obstacles common to all immigrants: learning a new language, navigating a new, very complex society, reaching out for acceptance in our new home and finding work to support ourselves and our families.

 

Latino men, women and children are an incredibly powerful human resource for the United States.  SCOW’s mission is to empower each one who seeks our assistance to reach their full potential as quickly as possible and thus make their full contribution to their new homeland.  

 

Please join me in this most fulfilling and joyful adventure.  

Board Chair Statement

I want to address our successes and challenges but first I would like to begin with why, I, a middle class Caucasian, has found participation in SCOW to be the most rewarding public service endeavor that I have ever experienced.  

My participation in, and devotion to SCOW derives from one word: People.  This is an organization completely focused on helping people.  It isn’t about promoting a political cause.  It’s not about an element of community life.  It’s not about fighting a dreaded disease.  While all of these are worthy of a volunteer’s time, I know that every minute that I donate to SCOW will go to helping deserving and motivated individuals improve their lives.

The people I am talking about are fascinating, optimistic, hard-working, family-oriented, faith-centered and determined individuals.  Latinos bring with them all these attributes as well as a cultural mix full of energy and joy.  Given just a little bit of assistance from agencies like SCOW, these wonderful people will succeed for their families and will enrich our entire country.

One other people aspect that makes participation in SCOW so rewarding: the agency staff and our Board.  Our organization’s staff is, of course, Latino.  Better said, Latina, as the entire staff is comprised of vivacious, energetic, caring, focused women whose heritage originates from all over Latin America.  It took tremendous courage for them to emigrate here, and to see how hard they work to help others in the same situation is inspiring.

So what are our challenges?  The first, of course, is money; money to fund the programs that will help people help themselves.  The second: politics. The plight of undocumented immigrants is one of America’s hot button issues. Stereotyping millions of Latinos as merely lawbreakers does a terrible disservice to them and is destructive to both the American economy and culture.  And it sometimes makes our job more difficult than it should be. The population we serve is composed of individual human beings just trying to make their way in the world and attitudes towards them change instantly upon meeting our clients.  Getting the general public to this point, though, is sometimes an all-too slow process.

Our successes as an organization mirror our challenges.  In the past five years, we have been successful in raising money to create and run our educational programs.  Our agency has also been successful at creating opportunities for the greater community to get to know the Hispanic community through cultural events and by increased Latino participation in community events.  The more interactions that we in the greater society have with our Latino neighbors, the more that we can appreciate just how special they are.

If you are still reading this, I must thank you.  Every word I have written comes from my heart, and I hope I have explained why SCOW has so touched it.  I am extremely proud of the United States of America for being the place on the planet that people come to pursue freedom and opportunity.  And I am equally proud of being part of making that happen for so many good people who come from all over Latin America and rely on SCOW.


 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Centers to Support the Independence of Specific Populations
Secondary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Tertiary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Cultural & Ethnic Awareness
Areas Served
Wallingford
Other
While Wallingford is our primary coverage area, we do serve individuals and families from Meriden, Durham, North Haven,  Cheshire and others.  Our doors are open to anyone, and we offer programs of benefit to everyone.
Programs
Description
Funded by the United Way of Meriden and Wallingford and the Liberty Bank Foundation, Adelante America serves 50 high school students, and is centered around providing appropriate support to deal with the challenges of adolescence in immigrant families, preparing them for the independence and responsibilities of adulthood.
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / At-Risk Populations / Hispanic, Latino Heritage
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
- Students are successful in their secondary education.
- Students are involved in their community and they hold positions of leadership.
- Students become better employees because they can work in a group setting.
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Of the 32 youth participating, 100% of the students seeking volunteer opportunities participated in a project where they learned useful life skills, 90% of the students participating in the program demonstrated to have a better understanding about the job search process, are able to submit an application and are prepare for an interview, 90% of the students participating in the program reported to have an increased self worth. 80% of the students participating in the program reported to have higher control over things that happen to them, 80% of the students participating in the program reported to have an increase in positive connections with adults and 90% of the students reported an increased awareness in the importance of a good education.

Description
This program provides children with an interesting and enjoyable introduction to the world of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. SCOW is the host for these events.  Additionally, STEM curriculum has been added to our three-week summer program, as well as both our Adelante America Program and our new Pasos Adelante program (described below).
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Hispanic, Latino Heritage / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
- Students develop and lifelong interest in STEM disciplines.
- Students are focused and successful in their education.
 
Description
For many years, SCOW has held a three-week program for approximately 35 children from 6 to 9 years of age that participate in STEM enrichment programs two days per week, as well as field trips to places such as the Peabody Museum in New Haven.
 
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Hispanic, Latino Heritage / Minorities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
- Students continue their learning experience through the summer.
- Students have a opportunity to learn, have fun and interact with other kids during the summer.
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

100 % of students were involved in math and science learning activities during the program.

2. 100% demonstrated an increased engagement in participation and improved attitude toward learning.

3. 100 % of students learned new scientific terms and vocabulary.

4. 85% demonstrated an improvement in their social skills and formed new friendships through participation of group projects.

5. Teen volunteer who participated in the summer program as a chaperone was given a job opportunity in the Wallingford's STEM Program that will continue throughout the year because of his leadership.
Description

SCOW Music School provides training in music to 25 children aged 7 to 17. They receive basic music instruction and theory by singing songs in Spanish and learning to play classic musical instruments. The children choose one of six instruments to study: guitar, violin, trumpet, vihuela, guitarrón, or piano. 

 
It is the mission of the school to strengthen the children’s knowledge and appreciation of their heritage through its music and to bring awareness of this culture to the greater community.
 
 
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Hispanic, Latino Heritage / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
- Students learn discipline.
- Students learn how to be a member of a team.
- Students learn to read and perform music.
- Students learn public performance etiquette.
- Parents and students share something that they enjoy.
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
- Students learn life-long skills and appreciation for music and their heritage.
- Students learn to play at least one instrument.
- Students gain confidence.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
- Improvement in the student's music abilities.
- Attendance  and practice in the program. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
100% of the students participating in the program: learn to read music notation,  play two instruments and to perform in ensembles. 
Graduating seniors receive scholarships funded by students' fundraisers. 
"Performing at such significant venues and showing the audience the music of my culture has made me recognize the value of being Mexican. It motivates me to know that my parents came to this country to form a better life. Everyday I wake up thinking about all of the sacrifices they have made to give my sisters and me the life they never got. When I'm on a stage, ready to play, I know my parents are out in the audience, proud of me. I know they love that I have chosen to expand my knowledge by learning about my Mexican heritage. The music I once found boring brought my family together. Mariachi is in my blood. I am grateful that I had the opportunity to form part of a music school that not only thought me music, but also connected me to my culture." Daisy Lopez,  Class of 14'
 
 
Description
In order to capitalize on the overwhelming success of the Adelante America program (described above), we now have a Pasos Adelante program for students in 8th and 9th grades.  It is generally accepted that these are often the pivotal years in a child's development.  A youth leadership program helps guide students in these most vulnerable years, similar to the way the Adelante program has guided high school students.  STEM curriculum has been added as well, in hopes that it will entice students to develop an interest in these areas.  
 
This program is also mainly funded by the United Way of Meriden and Wallingford. 
Population Served / /
Program Comments
CEO Comments
We would like to start by listing our many opportunities: 1) We are the only organization in town with the linguistic and cultural knowledge to serve the Latino community, the fastest-growing segment of both Wallingford and American society. We are proud to say that we are the go-to agency not only for our clients, but also for town government.  We have a high level support from both the municipal government and the social service community because of that capability, all of whom are anxious to welcome Latinos to participate in the community.  2) We are embarking on the development of a new 3-year strategic plan. 3) If funding allows, our plans include elevating our program coordinator position to that of a full-time program director and the hiring of a social worker to bring our social service assistance to a whole new and even more effective level for our clients. 
 
As for challenges, there are two of note; one unique to the people we serve and one common to all nonprofits that provide social service programs.
 
The unique challenge we often face is convincing adults in the Latino community to participate in some of the programs we offer.  There are several factors that lead to this challenge: First of all, as opposed to many of their children, the parents and other adults did not grow up here in America.  They come from cultures where social service agencies such as ours are not as prevalent, so they are not accustomed to availing themselves of help.  Secondly, their English language skills sometimes make them a bit shy or tentative, despite our agency being completely bilingual.  Thirdly, many of them work at least two jobs if not more, leaving them only time to care for their families and no time for self-improvement (a pattern replicated in many communities struggling with economic issues, of course).  Once we are successful in enticing them to join a program at SCOW, often because their children already do, they are enthusiastic participants.
 
The other challenge is tracking outcomes, especially long-term outcomes, in a social service setting.  We understand and applaud the RBA model, but it is sometimes difficult to measure the impact of programs designed to improve quality of life and individual wellbeing.  We are developing such metrics, but staffing for implementation and evaluation is proving expensive despite its importance.
 
 
CEO/Executive Director
Mrs. Maria Campos Harlow
Term Start Feb 2010
Email mharlow@scowinc.org
Experience

Maria Campos-Harlow was welcomed into the Spanish Community of Wallingford first as a Board member, then Board Chair and finally as Executive Director as of the fall of 2010. She has since revitalized the agency in many ways by: developing multiple educational, cultural and health programs for all segments of the Latino community; building alliances with many sectors of the Wallingford social service and municipal government community; and creating programs and activities that have showcased the vibrant Latino cultures. Maria also represents SCOW and her community by serving on many boards and committees. The presence of the Mariachi Academy of Connecticut, the Adelante America programs for youths 13-18 years old and the hosting of the STEM Academy at SCOW are examples of her many accomplishments in rebuilding the organization.


Maria was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia, where she received her B.A. in Political Science from Universidad de los Andes. She moved to the United States in June, 2001. She has since received a Professional Certificate in Court Interpreting from New York University, as well as a Certificate in Non-Profit Business Excellence for Catholic Leaders at the University of Notre Dame.

Maria has been recognized with numerous awards for her commitment to creating opportunities to improve the lives of Latinos in the Greater Wallingford area including, in 2014, Midstate Chamber of Commerce’s Excellence in Education Award; in 2015, Girls Inc.’s Smart, Strong and Bold Award, Midstate Chamber of Commerce – Hola Committee’s Shining Star and Liberty Bank’s Willard M. McRae Community Diversity Award.

Co-CEO
Experience


Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 6
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 5
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Ms. Carmen Guillen Jan 1990 - Dec
Ms. Blanca Santana Jan 1996 - Nov
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
WE CARE
CT STEM Academy
Master’s Manna Food Pantry
Most Holy Trinity Church
Wallingford Adult Education
Wallingford Housing Authority
Wallingford Public Library
Wallingford Recreation Department
Wallingford Police Department
Wallingford Youth & Social Services
Wallingford Senior Center
Wallingford Public Schools
Wallingford Day Care Center
United Way of Meriden and Wallingford
Choate Rosemary Hall
New Opportunities of Meriden
Ulbrich Boys and Girls Club
CT Works of Meriden
Meriden and Wallingford Chrysalis of Meriden
Girls Inc. of Meriden
Board Chair
Mr. Jeffrey Necio
Company Affiliation Masonicare
Term July 2015 to June 2016
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mrs. Patricia Cymbala Owner of WEB Wide Ink
Ms Karen Grava University of New Haven
Mr. Jeffrey Hernandez Ion Bank Wallingford Branch Manager
Mr. Stephen W. Knight Community Volunteer
Ms Alexandra M. Long Choate Rosemary Hall School
Mr. Francisco A. López
Mr. Thomas Moffo Wallingford Public Schools
Mr. Robert F. Parisi Wallingford Town Councilor
Mrs. Evelyn Robles-Rivas Principal fo Worthington Hooker School
Ms Camila Rubino R.N., MSNMidstate Medical Center
Mr. Anthony Ruiz High School Student and Adelante Youth Leadership Program President
Ms. Tamara Swift Wallingford Public Schools Teacher
Mr. Philip A. Wright Wallingford Probate Judge
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 8
Hispanic/Latino 6
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 6
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Automobile Insurance
Commercial General Liability and D and O and Umbrella or Excess and Automobile and Professional
General Property Coverage
Medical Health Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Standing Committees
Executive
By-laws
Nominating
Finance
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Mrs. Maria Aguirre Volunteer
Mrs. Flor Artaiz Social Worker
Mrs. Griselda Avila Business Owner
Mrs. Ana Avila Volunteer
Mrs. Sandra Dominguez Business Owner
Mr. Joel Dominguez Volunteer
Mr. Felipe Pacheco Community Organizer
Mrs. Maria Yolanda Perkins Volunteer
Mrs. Julieta Rodriguez Volunteer
CEO Comments

Comments from Executive Director Maria Harlow:

Our most exciting opportunity is the development of our second three-year strategic plan.  So much growth has occurred since we wrote our last one, and the process of drawing up a new one will engage everyone in the work of SCOW, strengthen our agency and help us define our direction.  Despite the enormity of this project, everyone is looking forward to the setting of new goals and the sharpening of our focus that this exercise will bring.

As for challenges, there are three worthy of note, but first let me start off by saying that SCOW is blessed by having a talented, devoted and diverse Board of Directors whose work is totally focused on what is best for our agency and our community.  I receive tremendous support, valuable guidance and true friendship from this group of special individuals. 

The first challenge is Board composition.  Because we are an organization whose mission is to support the Latino community, it is important that the membership of our Board reflect that fact.  However, it is not always easy to find members of the Hispanic community that are ready to devote the energy and time required of an effective Board member.  Because of the present demographics of the Latino community, earning a living and raising a family often consumes all of their time. 

The second challenge is one familiar to many nonprofit Boards: getting Board members focused on fundraising.  Despite their enthusiasm for our mission, it is often difficult for members to step outside their comfort zone, roll up their sleeves and do the often-awkward work of fund development.  Add to that the fact that our primary service area is Wallingford, a middle-class town of less than fifty thousand. Our Board members’ networks are therefore often intertwined, limiting the number of prospects from whom to solicit support.

The third challenge – another familiar one to many nonprofits we talk with as well - is attendance at Board meetings and the staffing of officer positions.  Please refer to the first challenge discussed above for part of the explanation.  The other is that Board members of nonprofits tend to be active community members in multiple organizations.  Our Board members certainly fit into that category. We are attempting various strategies to shorten meetings and moving meeting dates to accommodate these busy people.

 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $300,000.00
Projected Expenses $300,000.00
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$73,681$21,957$10,576
Government Contributions$215,608$181,725$202,393
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$215,608$181,725$202,393
Individual Contributions------
------
$8,599$39,275$32,645
Investment Income, Net of Losses$58$42$43
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$86,422$82,953$72,379
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$302,382$278,586$252,288
Administration Expense------
Fundraising Expense$57,572$16,456$21,103
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.071.101.16
Program Expense/Total Expenses84%94%92%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue20%8%10%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$226,804$156,872$124,155
Current Assets$220,307$147,257$110,718
Long-Term Liabilities$30,997$31,898$32,429
Current Liabilities$52,435$6,016$3,674
Total Net Assets$143,372$118,958$88,052
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities4.2024.4830.14
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets14%20%26%
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

FThis profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 284 Washington St
Wallingford, CT 064920089
Primary Phone 203 265-5866
Contact Email info@scowinc.org
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Maria Campos Harlow
Board Chair Mr. Jeffrey Necio
Board Chair Company Affiliation Masonicare

 

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