New Haven Free Public Library Foundation
NHFPL Foundation
133 Elm Street
New Haven CT 06510-2003
Contact Information
Address NHFPL Foundation
133 Elm Street
New Haven, CT 06510-2003
Telephone (203) 946-7454 x
Fax 203-946-8140
E-mail tyergeau@nhfpl.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

The New Haven Free Public Library Foundation raises funds to support the mission of the New Haven Free Public Library.

The New Haven Free Public Library is a community treasure focused on creating experiences for all ages that support cultural connections, economic engagement, lifelong learning and young minds. The Library serves as a powerful force as we create strong neighborhoods, acknowledge the academic success of every school child, and help the city become a jobs generator.

NHFPL Values

· Promote the joy of reading.

· Deliver superlative library programs that meet the needs of the community.

· Introduce technology that is relevant, user-friendly and can help with issues surrounding the digital divide.

· Acquire collections that help customers gain knowledge, as well as pleasure.

· Connect people to people.

· Create services that provide opportunities for both learning and recreation.

· Engage knowledgeable staff and assist them in providing the best customer service possible.

 
A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.
Help NHFPL expand its partnerships with social service agencies to provide one-on-one consultation and referrals to adults, teens and families in need of housing, food, and support to meet their daily living needs.
A Great Opportunity Ending Date 2016
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2003
Former Names
Patrons of the New Haven Free Public Library
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Martha L. Brogan
Board Chair Priscilla Dannies
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $227,400.00
Projected Expenses $227,400.00
Statements
Mission

The New Haven Free Public Library Foundation raises funds to support the mission of the New Haven Free Public Library.

The New Haven Free Public Library is a community treasure focused on creating experiences for all ages that support cultural connections, economic engagement, lifelong learning and young minds. The Library serves as a powerful force as we create strong neighborhoods, acknowledge the academic success of every school child, and help the city become a jobs generator.

NHFPL Values

· Promote the joy of reading.

· Deliver superlative library programs that meet the needs of the community.

· Introduce technology that is relevant, user-friendly and can help with issues surrounding the digital divide.

· Acquire collections that help customers gain knowledge, as well as pleasure.

· Connect people to people.

· Create services that provide opportunities for both learning and recreation.

· Engage knowledgeable staff and assist them in providing the best customer service possible.

 
Background

The New Haven Free Public Library (NHFPL) began its remarkable relationship with the citizens of New Haven in 1886 when the City passed the enabling legislation and appropriated $12,000 to establish a free public library.  After several facilities proved inadequate, the City engaged renowned architect Cass Gilbert to design the stately building on the historic New Haven Green with support from a major gift of Mary E. Ives in memory of her spouse, Hoadley Ives.  The Ives Memorial Library opened its doors in 1911.  In addition to the Ives Main Library, the Library has four unique, strategically located neighborhood libraries and a Readmobile circulating throughout the community. 

The Library has enjoyed a reputation as one of the best libraries of its size in the state, boasting a collection of over 400,000 items, in 13 languages and a range of formats. The NHFPL provides a wide variety of programming and events supporting literacy, computer skill development, cultural enrichment and education for all ages. As we move into the 21st century, the NHFPL aims to position itself as a key educational resource for New Haven to foster lifelong learning and civic engagement. While the Library holds a beloved and respected position in the community, funding of staff positions and resources has not kept pace with growth in facilities and service demands. As the population of New Haven evolves—welcoming new immigrants, seniors, and a diverse youth cohort—the Library is uniquely positioned to help residents flourish during critical transitions in their lives.

Impact

Accomplishments

  • This year, the Library welcomed more than 600,000 visitors each year at its five locations.
  • Upgraded to free high speed internet--both broadband and wifi--ensuring digital access equity for all residents. 
  • Expanded the collection with online databases that provide creative skills tutorials, online magazines, industry research and statistics and hundreds of movies, videos and audiobooks.
  • Offered more than 2,400 community programs, workshops, seminars and events, many free of cost
  • Engaged nearly 3,000 local youth in the first year of the dedicated Teen Center at the Ives Main Library

Current Year Goals

  • In partnership with the New Haven Public Schools, attain universal distribution of public library cards by 2017
  • Offer enhanced summer learning programs and READy for the Grade, to prevent summer slide in reading
  • Build a culture of innovation at the NHFPL by dedicating a space for civic engagement and problem-solving through the application of emerging technologies, access to community data, and resources to fuel the imagination and creativity
Needs

 1. To foster economic engagement and technology literacy, we are developing an Innovation Zone by renovating an existing space on the first floor of the Ives Main Library. This is a new educational space designed to offer patrons opportunities to learn about new technology. It is based on the premise that technology is a catalyst for learning. Digital media engages learners in new ways, provides connections for lifelong learning, and changes the way people gain, exchange, as well as create information and knowledge. The space is designed to allow for use of various new and emergent technologies, including a 3-D printer station, tablets, e-readers, mobile phones with staff and student volunteers to demonstrate and instruct in usage.

2. To increase literacy, we envision an expanded and re-created Young Minds and Family Learning Center encompassing the second level at the Ives Main Library. Learning, play, collections and technology will be visually and physically merged for efficient use of space and to foster creativity. The Center will house state-of-the-art technology and completely updated print, audio and visual collections. Our charge is to create tomorrow’s readers today and support academic success.

3. E-books, audio books, digital, audio, video, online resources – the ways we learn and play expand every year. The Library currently lags behind State benchmarks in its online resource budget.  We are seeking to expand support for new databases as well as the e-devices for accessing and reading content electronically.


CEO Statement
The constellation of New Haven Free Public Libraries—extending from the historic Ives Memorial Library on the Green to our four neighborhood libraries and ReadMobile—welcomes more citizens through its doors than any other public cultural institution in the City. Along with 620,000 users visiting our facilities in the past year, NHFPL also attracts a growing number of virtual guests to our Digital Main Street—a vibrant online collection of e-books, online magazines, and databases that are available 24/7, anytime, anyplace for all registered NHFPL users. We are striving to restore our operating budget to 1% of the City’s General Fund and obtain 85% of our budget from the City and 15% from external sources including individual donors, foundations, grants and endowment income.
Martha L. Brogan, City Librarian and Director
Board Chair Statement

No other public institution is fully open to all in the way that a public library is. Parents, seniors, children, teens, job-seekers, students, book-browsers; we serve the varied needs of the entire New Haven community. And now, during this challenging economic time, the true value of the public library shines through even more.

I encourage you to stop by your neighborhood branch or at the Ives Main Library to see how many people are using our resources and enjoying our programs. As the city of New Haven struggles with budgetary concerns, your support allows us to provide all residents with access to literacy.

Thank you.
 
Priscilla Dannies
President
NHFPL Foundation
Board of Directors 
 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Citizen Participation
Secondary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Tertiary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Arts,Culture & Humanities NEC
Areas Served
New Haven
All of New Haven and the Greater New Haven area. 
 
In New Haven, library branches are in the Town Green District, Dixwell / Newhallville, the Hill Neighborhood, Fair Haven, and Westville.  Zip Codes include 06510, 06511, 06512, 06513, 06515, 06519, 06520.
 
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments The role of the 21st-century public library is rapidly evolving and increasingly valued as a community center, innovation hub, and "third space" where all sectors of society converge for learning and civic engagement.
Programs
Description

We believe that a vital community consists of individuals pursuing personal growth and civic improvement. NHFPL supports learning at every stage of life, from infant through active maturity. 


Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

The library’s key metrics, how we measure residents’ usage of our five libraries, Readmobile, and our website, remain strong. In FY 2014 circulation of books and dvds, including e-books, was up by 3%, with children’s circulation increasing by close to 7%. Library visits increased by 2% over the previous year. Use of 188 public computers increased by 4%, driven in part by an increase in the number and quality of classes at Ives Main and classes for Spanish speakers at the Wilson and Fair Haven branches. The library’s website, nhfpl.org, continues to expand as a virtual branch with collections of downloadable e-books, audiobooks and magazines and a growing number of research and tutorial databases. Database use has increased 210% over the past four years. Reference staff answered close to 80,000 questions for users. This data indicates that the library’s commitment to offering community-relevant resources, providing instruction in their use and convenient access to them is succeeding on a daily basis.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The 2014-16 Strategic Plan outlines goals that position NHFPL as a resource-rich self-learning destination for all New Haven residents. City and donor dollars will continue to build collections and innovative grants will continue to support our customers’ education and interests. Ongoing development of staff skills and competencies is a key factor in constructing the digital bridges that will allow all New Haven residents to use evolving 21st century technologies. Staff are creating instructional aids (Camtasia videos on LaCie) for staff access to aid in self instruction for needed job-related tech skills to better support customer services.

In 2014, 161 classes, including classes in Microsoft Office, were conducted by staff for 935 attendees. The slate of classes is expanding to include use of devices, tablets and e-readers. An innovation space is planned for Ives that will focus on new technology exploration, provide collaborative work and small class space, resources for small businesses and include the Non-Profit Resource Center.

Description

Our focus on Economic Engagement supports workforce readiness, economic vitality and neighborhood health and stability.

NHFPL is a dynamic partner in the city’s economic infrastructure. Our five buildings operate as learning, cultural and community hubs, contributing to the stability, safety and livability of our neighborhoods and the city.

Our programs support small business and entrepreneurial growth, career development, workforce readiness, and non-profit vitality and sustainability. We offer print collections and online databases that provide valuable information for businesses, job seekers, as well as librarians trained to lead
Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

In 2014 the library served as a training resource for residents seeking computer skills development, job hunting instruction and small business and entrepreneurial knowledge. Since 2011 an ongoing series of workshops for business start-ups offered by SCORE and the SBA twice yearly focuses on planning, feasibility analysis, marketing and finances. A partnership with Elmseed Enterprise Fund is providing consultation services for individual start-up businesses as part of NHFPL’s small business support.

Staff help individuals fill out online applications, send emails, create resumes and access online job listings on a daily basis. Workshops and programs for non-profit organizations include grant writing, gift solicitation, management and sustainability. Our business and non-profit database collection includes The Foundation Directory Online and Foundation Grants to Individuals Online, Legal Information Center, Reference USA, Foundation Maps, GuideStar, Wealth Engine and Jobs Now.

Connection was made with the Spanish American Merchants Association to share and disseminate information and offer referrals to each organization. In 2014 close to 100 ESL classes were held, programs with Junta and computer classes in Spanish are conducted at Fair Haven and Wilson libraries.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

NHFPL’s libraries directly affect New Haven’s economic well-being.

NHFPL will continue to develop a broad set of programs to help resident’s improve their lives and financial viability. Our four branches act as community anchors and safe places for after-school homework, tutoring and programs for children and teens while their parents are at work. They are community centers that bring neighbors together for civic activities, knitting and chess clubs and cultural events like this year’s Day of the Dead celebration at Fair Haven library. They offer over 188 computers for use, access to information, classes and workshops and provide individuals a connection to their city and neighborhood. All of these activities contribute to stability and economic possibility.

Our focus on small business programming and support will continue and broaden with the addition of the innovation space planned for the Business area at Ives. It will function as a work space with computers, meeting space with white boards, wifi, printers, a fax and other equipment for use by entrepreneurs and non-profit start-ups.

orative work and small class space, resources for small businesses and include the Non-Profit Resource Center. 
Description

NHFPL is a primary link to the rich cultural environment that makes our city such a special place. Film series, musical performances, author appearances, curated art exhibits, historical tours and Chinese New Year celebrations are only some of the events that fill the calendars of our five libraries and outreach programs. The Library’s events connect our users to both the particular character of their neighborhood and to the broad activities in the city and beyond.

Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

In 2014 our libraries offered 2,066 programs for both adults and children with attendance of close to 40,000. Programs for adults numbered 640 and drew an audience of 10,411. They ranged from local cultural historian Colin Caplan discussing New Haven’s rich history of theaters to Yale’s Paul Kennedy talking about his most recent book to foreign films series and documentaries. Our exhibit space hosted, on average, one show each month.

The library partnered with SiteProjects to showcase Whispering Galleries, an interactive erasured poetry exhibit June through August at all libraries. As a participant in a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Service, NHFPL is producing two series of programs to engage older residents in active arts creation as part of the Creative Aging in America’s Libraries project.

For the third consecutive year, NHFPL received funding from the Graustein Foundation to continue the Engage Stage Page partnership with Long Wharf. NHFPL continued its micro-branch at Long Wharf’s lobby and is holding community conversations led by LWT staff and community leaders on themes surrounding the season’s plays.

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Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The library will continue its strong programming schedule, with particular attention to the many cultures represented in New Haven. A new performance area seating up to 120 people will be opened in early spring, 2015. It has a portable stage, special lighting and acoustics to allow for readings, author talks, poetry slams, musical and other performances. A new gallery space will open at the same time; it will offer flexible panels and exhibit lighting.

 

 

Description

Our charge is to create tomorrow’s readers today. Our goal is to help develop engaged citizens and support academic success.  The Young Minds area– programming, collections and efforts focused on ages birth to 18 and their families – is the foundation of the Library’s work. Mornings, afternoon, weekends, our youth areas are humming with activities ranging from Stay and Play to Lego Club to high school class visits. The library is a primary partner with the public schools in summer literacy programs to reduce summer reading skill loss. Families of all cultures find the library through bi-lingual children’s programs and then learn of our wide array of acculturation and language-support programs.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Juvenile circulation of books increased system-wide by 6.9% in 2014, up from 135,306 in 2013 to 144,777 in 2014. The Young Minds staff gave 1,416 programs for 29,368 children and parents/caregivers.

The 2014 Summer Reading Program experienced the highest number of finishers, 2,391 in its history; staff presented 570 literacy and educational programs with attendance at over 12,300.

Along with core programs like the summer reading program and bilingual Stay & Play for toddlers there were new programs added. The new Readmobile launched in October, 2014. It continues pre-literacy instruction at Early Learning Centers, added 6 new Headstart visits and an additional day to its schedule. It appears frequently at neighborhood events. An Alexion grant-funded STEM program for 10-11 year-olds that teaches CAD design and creation of objects on the Young Minds’ 3-D printer started in 2014 and is ongoing.

Year two of the New Alliance READy for the Grade grant, designed to minimize summer reading slide, doubled the number of participating children to over forty. During the seven-week program librarians provided 1,352 hours of tutoring, reading and literacy-related activities. Each child logged in 33 hours of reading /tutoring and 83% of students maintained or exceeded their spring school-tested reading levels.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The Young Minds department will be continuing to grow its programming to encourage a love of reading and the spoken and written word and to help parents  raise successful students and productive adults.

A new teen center will open in spring, 2015 at Ives. Gaming, study, instruction, book and writing clubs will take place here; the Center will be a model for similar centers in the four branches.

5%;mso-fareast-font-family: "Times New Roman";mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"'>The library partnered with SiteProjects to showcase Whispering Galleries, an interactive erasured poetry exhibit June through August at all libraries. As a participant in a National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Service, NHFPL is producing two series of programs to engage older residents in active arts creation as part of the Creative Aging in America’s Libraries project.

For the third consecutive year, NHFPL received funding from the Graustein Foundation to continue the Engage Stage Page partnership with Long Wharf. NHFPL continued its micro-branch at Long Wharf’s lobby and is holding community conversations led by LWT staff and community leaders on themes surrounding the season’s plays.

 
Program Comments
CEO Comments The NHFPL Strategic Plan, funded through a CFGNH capacity-building grant, establishes institutional and achievement metrics for seven strategic goals, affecting the four programmatic focus areas.  These include:  city collaboration; communicating our impact; enhancing customer experiences; building digital bridges; creating engaging environments; optimizing customer and staff potential; and raising revenue.
CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Martha L. Brogan
Term Start Sept 2014
Email mbrogan@nhfpl.org
Experience

Ms. Brogan brings more than three decades of experience as a professional librarian to the position and enjoys a national reputation as an innovative leader in the application of digital technologies to the humanities and civic affairs, and in the design of collaborative learning spaces.  She has maintained residence with her spouse in New Haven for twenty-five years, arriving with her family in 1990 to serve as the Social Sciences Librarian at Yale University.  Her two (now adult) sons matriculated from the New Haven Public Schools during which time Ms. Brogan was actively engaged as a parent with the K-12 school system, including advocating for the establishment of school-media library centers throughout the district.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 8
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 0%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 2
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Christopher J. Korenowsky Oct 2010 - Jan 2014
Mr. James C. Welbourne - Sept 2010
Senior Staff
Title Development Officer
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation No
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Collaborations

The NHFPL Foundation and the New Haven Free Public Library collaborate broadly across the community. Partner groups which support the Library's efforts through philanthropy, artistic contributions and voluntarism include (but are not limited to): Arte, Inc., the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, the Seedlings Foundation, the Graustein Foundation, NewAlliance Foundation, Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale University, the State Library of Connecticut, New Haven Public Schools, Music Haven, Long Wharf Theatre, Literacy Volunteers of Greater New Haven, Literacy Council, Early Childhood Council, Connecticut  Humanities Council, Arts Council of Greater New Haven, International Festival of Arts & Ideas, Comcast, SCORE, and many other local nonprofit agencies as well as private donors.

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2015
United Way of Greater New Haven2015
Board Chair
Priscilla Dannies
Company Affiliation Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology
Term July 2016 to June 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Edward S.K. Bottomley CAMA, Inc.
Laura Cahn Community Advocate
Elsie B. Chapman Community Advocate
Fran DeToro H. Pearce Realty
Edward Harris Retired, Dean of Library Science, SCSU
Thomas M. Haskell
Wm. Frank Mitchell Art Consultant
Michael J. Morand Deputy Chief Communications Officer, Yale University
Tori Rysz Marketing & Communications, Yale University Office of Development
Mary Ellen Savage Community Advocate
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 8
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 6
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Standing Committees
Audit
Nominating
Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
CEO Comments
The NHFPL Foundation raises funds in support of the Library which has a separate governing board consisting of nine members who are representative of the wider community on which the Mayor serves ex-officio.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $227,400.00
Projected Expenses $227,400.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Documents
Form 990s
9902015
9902014
9902013
9902012
9902011
9902010
9902009
9902008
9902007
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$191,185$280,946$291,022
Administration Expense$7,552$8,027$7,814
Fundraising Expense$11,329$12,041$11,724
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.190.720.88
Program Expense/Total Expenses91%93%94%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue6%7%5%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$196,696$157,544$321,177
Current Assets$196,696$157,544$316,110
Long-Term Liabilities$238$944$944
Current Liabilities----$110,895
Total Net Assets$196,458$156,600$209,338
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountNew Alliance Foundation $35,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $39,835International Association of Greater New Haven $80,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountNorthern Trust Charitable Program $25,000New Alliance Foundation $35,000New Alliance Foundation $35,150
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountJ.J. Archer Foundation $13,000Graustein Memorial Fund $16,667Graustein Memorial Fund $25,375
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities----2.85
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%1%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address NHFPL Foundation
133 Elm Street
New Haven, CT 065102003
Primary Phone 203 946-7454
Contact Email tyergeau@nhfpl.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Martha L. Brogan
Board Chair Priscilla Dannies
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale University, Professor Emeritus of Pharmacology

 

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