Dudley Foundation
2351 Durham Rd
Guilford CT 06437-1034
Contact Information
Address 2351 Durham Rd
Guilford, CT 06437-1034
Telephone (203) 457-0770 x
E-mail ngdudleyfarm@gmail.com
Web and Social Media
Resting in the Sunshine at The Dudley Farm
Mission

To preserve, restore and operate The Dudley Farm Museum as a late 19th century historical, educational and recreational resource to serve the public.

Vision: The Dudley Foundation will provide leadership to the greater community in the promotion of historic awareness and interpretation of the history of the North Guilford community.  
A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.
  • The Dudley Farm is restoring its large barn complex which is also a part of the Connecticut Barn Trail. This project will result in providing a display space for one of the area's best collections of farm equipment and tools while giving visitors young and old the opportunity to experience life on a late 19th century farm. Your contribution will help us make the memories of older generations come alive for current and future generations.
A Great Opportunity Ending Date Oct 31 2018
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1995
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Beth Payne
Board Chair Oliver L Scranton
Board Chair Company Affiliation Maple Grove Farm
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $231,500.00
Projected Expenses $231,167.00
Statements
Mission

To preserve, restore and operate The Dudley Farm Museum as a late 19th century historical, educational and recreational resource to serve the public.

Vision: The Dudley Foundation will provide leadership to the greater community in the promotion of historic awareness and interpretation of the history of the North Guilford community.  
Background
The Dudley Farm House was built in 1844 by Erastus Dudley, a prosperous North Guilford farmer, gristmill and tannery owner. While it had its beginnings as a traditional New England farm, societal and technological change led the farm to adapt, becoming a center of commerce to the people of North Guilford. At one time the Dudleys were actively engaged in a tannery, a grist mill and bone mill, remnants of which are no longer a part of the farm, but still visible in the area. The 10-acre Dudley Farm property still houses a blacksmith shop, carriage shed, a reconstructed sugar house, and of course the "necessary" outhouse. Sheep and oxen graze in the fields while chickens make their presence known. A variety of gardens, including a Community garden, herb garden, flower and vegetable gardens grace the property.
 
Today, the house and barns occupy a portion of the land farmed by the Dudley family for almost 300 years. After David Dudley’s passing in 1991,the property was to be sold with the proceeds to go to the North Guilford Volunteer Fire Company and the North Guilford Congregational Church, but the involved parties recognized the potential benefit of maintaining the area as a small farm. Working cooperatively with the Town of Guilford Probate Court and the North Guilford Congregational Church, the Fire Company was able to obtain the Farm property, preventing its likely disappearance and example of farm life. Noting the rapid development of property in the late 20th century, the Volunteer Fire Company established the Dudley Foundation which created and now manages The Dudley Farm Museum, helping to preserve the region's agricultural heritage. The Dudley Farm Museum has become central to many area activities. It is the first Connecticut farm to start a farmers' market, and celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2015. Various workshops and demonstrations are provided to the public\ featuring skills and activities common to rural New Englanders during the late 19th century. The property provides access to local trails maintained by the Guilford Land Conservation Trust. The Museum is regularly featured in local publications. The Dudley Foundation has a track record for perseverance. Published in 2012 by The Dudley Foundation, Voices from North Guilford tells the story of North Guilford with photos, research, and remembrances, and continues to be sold locally. The Dudley Farm Museum remains unique, with  no other working farm museum in southern Connecticut. 
Impact
Accomplishments:
1) Developed and began implementation of  5-year Strategic Plan
2)Completed StEPs-CT program,  a 26-month integrated program of professional development, facilitated conversation, mentorship, and competitive grant funding for smaller cultural organizations. StEPs-CT is a program of Connecticut Humanities (CTH) and the Connecticut League of History Organizations (CLHO) in partnership with the Connecticut Historical Society based upon a curriculum of best practices developed by the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) called StEPS. The Dudley Farm Museum achieved basic (bronze) National Certification in all units: Mission, Vision, and Governance; Audience; Collections; Interpretation; Historic Landscapes and Structures, and Management, and good (silver) in Audience.
3) Completed 1st phase of our "Big Barn Project", the restoration of our 1840 barn complex, and have started restoration of Phase II.  Phase I and Phase II (of III) are totally funded.
 
Goals 2017: 1) Complete barn restoration ;2) Develop interpretive plan for the Museum buildings and landscapes; 3)  Grow volunteer base and increase their level of involvement; 4) Enhance board development with appropriate training; 5) Develop exhibit plan for the big barn. 
 
 
Needs
1) Complete restoration of the "Big Barn" complex and  provide appropriate care and stewardship for the historic structures and natural environment of The Dudley Farm Museum;
2) Develop and implement Collections Assessment Plan to include preservation while providing physical and intellectual access;
3) Assure the sustainability of The Dudley Farm Museum with an effective Board and a working committee structure while building the volunteer base to help assure continuity and project completion;
4) Enhance visitor experience by providing quality visitor services, comfortable access, carefully selected reproduction spaces, and historically accurate and engaging programming for learners of all ages. This includes, but is not limited to, installation of accessible visitor restrooms; visitor accessible pathways; and a life-long learning program. 5) Develop a secure diversified financial foundation by increasing earned income, developing an investment plan, and expanding business and foundation giving.
CEO Statement
The Dudley Farm Museum strives to show to the public rural life in North Guilford from 1860-1920, a period of great sociological, political and agricultural change. This is particularly important as North Guilford was established as the main agricultural part of Guilford in the early 18th century, when farmers in the area petitioned the established church to establish their own Congregational Society. Their success in this endeavor meant they were no longer required to endure the hardship of weekly travel by horse and carriage to Guilford for Sunday Services, which could be as much as 12 miles each way for some, and required overnight lodging. Thanks to this effort agriculture became the mainstay of the area, and remained so well into the 20th century. Our buildings and landscapes illustrate this well. Programs, which are now year round, have ranged from Pieced History, a look at quilts and the textile industry during the period of 1860-1920, to Harvest Day, an annual event free to the public which showcases many of the activities common during that time "down on the farm." Maple syrup is made in our sugar house in the spring, and weddings and other special events use one of our barns, providing some much-needed income.
 
We have been very fortunate to have had college level and post-graduate interns in recent years who have added so much to the vibrancy of our museum. Membership has more than doubled since 2013 as visitors have shown an increased interest in local history and its impact on today's happenings. With oxen, chicken and sheep cared for on the property, along with gardens, children see where the food they eat and the wool they wear comes from. Our electronic mailing, "Dudley Farm Doings", is emailed to over 350 subscribers from around the country, while our Facebook page is "liked" by over 750 people. We work hard to share history with those who join or visit. Our newsletter provides a platform for discussing not only agriculture in the 19th century, but the impact of great social movements, including the temperance movement, suffragettes, immigration, race relations, and elections. We seek to provide information about where we've been to help us ascertain where we are going.
Board Chair Statement Thanks to a grant from Connecticut Humanities, the Dudley Foundation’s Board has developed and is now implementing a 5-Year Strategic Plan. 
This plan will provide direction to the organization in fulfilling its mission “To preserve, restore, and operate the farm as a historical, educational, and recreational resource to serve the general public” for the next five years. Key elements include:
    1. Provide appropriate care and stewardship for the historic structures and natural environment of The Dudley Farm. Current projects include maintenance of the Farmhouse and completion of the Big Barn Project.

    2. Enhance our patrons’ experience at The Dudley Farm by providing quality visitor services, comfortable access, carefully selected reproduction pieces and historically accurate and engaging programming.

    3. Preserve and provide thoughtful physical and intellectual access for the collections belonging to The Dudley Farm.

    4. Assure the sustainability of the Dudley Farm by providing an effective Board with a working committee structure and viable succession plan, a strong membership and volunteer base and a secure diversified financial foundation.

    5. Consolidate The Dudley Farm, Dudley Foundation’s brand identity.
As a member of the North Guilford Volunteer Fire Company which worked to establish this organization as well as a life-long farmer, carrying on the tradition of my family since Guilford's founding, I am pleased to have been a part of The Dudley Farm since its inception. 
Caring for our Farm, its 11 buildings,  and its contents is a monumental task for our part-time Museum Director, the Board of Directors, and the volunteers who give so much of their time.  None-the-less, we are all committed to providing the local community with a sense of  what has made North Guilford so special for more than 300 years. 
 
 
 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / History Museums
Secondary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Agricultural Programs
Tertiary Organization Category Recreation & Sports / Physical Fitness/Community Recreational Facilities
Areas Served
Guilford
Branford
East Haven
Madison
North Branford
Shoreline
While Guilford, and specifically North Guilford, is the subject of our museum, the subject matter of necessity often includes information from around the state. Visitors are most commonly from New Haven County, but have also come from many other states and countries, including but not limited to England, Germany, Thailand, Australia, 
Programs
Description
Since its inception The Dudley Foundation has embarked on a long-term commitment to restore, preserve and maintain all the many structures located on the farm which comprise The Dudley Farm Museum. It has already met success in renovating the farm house and numerous other buildings on the property.
What remains is the biggest and hardest undertaking, the Big Barn Project (BBP). The centerpiece of the Foundation property, this large three-part barn stores the Museum's many tools and pieces of farm equipment, as well as hay for the animals which inhabit the Museum property. With restoration, this barn will continue to be used for animal shelter and hay storage, but will also be made into a educational display area to showcase our many pieces of 19th century agricultural equipment.
Population Served Families / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Since beginning work on the restoration of the barn complex, we have completed "Phase I", which includes the granary section of the barn. As a result we have already been able to use this portion of the barn for temporary displays, including a display on 19th century butter-making. The Phase II of the restoration project has begun, which encompasses the northern portion of the barn. We anticipate this section to be complete by June of this year. A collections assessment is to begin this fall which will then allow the development of an interpretation plan. Complete restoration will provide improved shelter not only for our farm animals but also our extensive inventory of farm equipment.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The overall goal  is to fully restore the Dudley Farm to its mid-19th century condition. This goal is driven by a number of factors:
- Of the five historic museums in Guilford, The Dudley Farm Museum is the only one not from the 17th or 18th centuries.
- It is a working farm.
- It is a one-of-a-kind museum in Southern Connecticut.
- It embodies the history of farming during the 19th century, coinciding with the industrial revolution.
The long-term objectives include:
- Recording and documenting the history of this farm during the dramatic shifts in in farm operation which occurred during the 19th century.
- Restoring the property in the same manner used during the original construction.
- Demonstrating to the public 19th century arts and skills.
- Enriching the community's knowledge of Guilford's rich and significant impact on Connecticut agriculture.
- Promoting family farm-based activities.
- Providing rotating relevant historical displays.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. As this project continues to evolve, interest from the public is increased with resultant increase public offerings, visitation, and volunteer growth. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Our sugar house really steamed things up in February of 2017.  While our syrup production was for demonstration only, the public was invited to taste a sample of sap and syrup and see how local families made maple syrup in the late 19th century. Publicity included Facebook, website, and a front-page article in the local paper as well as an article in The New Haven Register.  As a result we had more than 40 visitors on each of  four Saturday afternoons to our property at a time when our museum is closed. Visitors also walked around the farm and visited our farm animals. "We had a great time!" was a frequently noted comment on our visitor log.
Description The Dudley Farm Museum is committed to providing educational programs of public interest which take advantage of museum resources, focus on the period of 1860-1920, and utilize local talent. These have included programs on genealogy; author presentations of books of local interest; craft programs for adults and children, and recently a program on The Blizzard of 1888 which featured one of our many quilts.
Population Served Adults / General/Unspecified / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Our short-term success is most immediately measured by visitor attendance and comments. As a result of our programs we have increased volunteer involvement and discovered new donation sources.  Post program surveys indicate a desire for more programs and indicate that new knowledge and understanding resulted from attendance. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. As an historical institution our programs focuses on developing an understanding of past events through an appreciation of agricultural and household artifacts from rural New England in the late 19th century. This includes an appreciation for buildings and landscapes as well as spinning wheels and plows! The period we reflect is particularly rich with sociological and technical change. We hope that visitors leave here wanting to know about their community, appreciate local history, and recognize The Dudley Farm Museum as a valuable resource.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. SurveyMonkey is used after many of our programs to garner information about knowledge gained, enjoyment of the program, and suggestions for future programs.  While not required to, responders are asked to leave their contact information and are given the opportunity to ask for further information about the topic presented. It is interesting to note that programs almost invariably bring new visitors to our door: "We had no idea this was here!" is often heard.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Recently the Dudley Farm Museum presented: "Pieced History", which examined how the textile industry in New England changed after the Civil War and how that impacted quilting. We featured our newly-conserved 1893 crazy quilt as well as a large number of quilts owned by the presenter. Held on a Sunday afternoon, the program was attended by more than 40 adults - in a room with a seating capacity of 49. Even though the program ran long, many in the audience stayed to ask questions and examine the quilts in a more "up-close and personal" manner.
Description The Farmers’ Market not only reflects the old-time practice of selling produce at a roadside stand, but also provides an opportunity to build a community of supporters who return again and again to the Dudley Farm. People can purchase produce, home baked goods and handcrafts; bring their children to visit the livestock and romp on the hillside; visit exhibits in the Farmhouse Museum, attend workshops, listen to music, or just come to have a cup of coffee and visit.
Vendors are encouraged to share their knowledge of producing the items they are selling including, but not limited to, organic farming and gardening, handcraft production, materials, methods and inspiration.  The more choices the market offers its consumers, the more attractive and exciting the market becomes for them.
Population Served Adults / Families / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Market management is a huge challenge which requires a cooperative effort by all involved. This is particularly true of an all-volunteer program. This year we are focusing on vendor-led management, and have implemented frequent meetings with vendors and Dudley Foundation officers to help formulate a plan of action. Already that has led to a greater understanding by all concerned of the challenges being faced. The market is opening by the beginning of June; steps to enhance its viability have been taken, including plans for increased publicity. This will help reduce vendor drop-out and maintain or increase customer activity.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Our farmers' market is entering its 22nd year, being the second oldest market in the state.  None-the-less, market failure nation-wide is high, and Connecticut is not immune from this. A leading cause of market failure is lack of effective market management. Our long-term goal is to continue to have a market which can be sustained. To do so we must:
  • Creatively promote the market to consumers
  • Enforce the market’s rules and regulations fairly and with a minimum of conflict
  • Represent the market to the local municipality and community groups
  • Administer the day to day operations of the market, both on-site and off.
  • Arbitrate disputes that may arise between vendors and/or with consumers
  • Work with a board of directors or market committee
  • Maintain the financial records of the market
  • Understand the needs of fall vendors and balance them with the needs of the consumers and the community at large
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. While we have never lost money with this program, success can be measured by 1) tallying vendor participation, with the goal of >25 vendors per market; 2) vendor reported data including numbers of customers; and 3) increased net income to the Foundation during the market season. There will be a written plan of action available to be reviewed at market meetings. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. The Farmers' Market has become a community gathering spot with many loyal visitors. Periodic surveys of those who shop here have provided many positive comments as well as pointing out real deficiencies. Visitors know which vendor to seek out for fresh goat cheese; organic eggs; delicious bakery items, plants and seasonal vegetables. Our vendors leave here very happy after our Holiday Open House and Market,often having to replenish their stocks before the second day of this 2-day event. The market has shown an ability to persevere - we have been here for more than 20 years!
Description

The Dudley Farm received certified organic status in 1999 for what today has become The Dudley Farm Community Garden. This garden has 19 full plots, some which have been divided in half. Community gardeners pay a fee for the seasonal use of a garden plot, and follow prescribed organic gardening practices. Volunteers and Community Garden members have made significant improvements to the garden area by clearing trees, designing and building a garden shed, installing a watering system and expanding the parking area.

The Heritage Garden is planted annually with heirloom vegetables and flowers, and often serves as an attractive backdrop for weddings. The home's flower garden was planted and designed in using early photographs of the farm which show flowers in front of the house and wisteria growing up the porch columns.  The Herb Garden, first planted in 1997, contains many varieties of herbs commonly found in gardens in the late 1800’s. Maintaining these gardens is very labor-intensive. 
Population Served General/Unspecified / Adults / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Gardens will be maintained as needed with appropriate oversight by the Garden and Landscape committee. Routine maintenance will result in less need to "start from scratch" each spring.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Maintenance of the various gardens on the property add to the ambiance of the farm and overall visitor satisfaction. Success will be seen by continued volunteer enthusiasm for the project as well as positive responses and comments from visitors. Changes in garden design and structure will be implemented as appropriate, determined in part from farm records and practices common during the late 1800's.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The success of the program will be monitored routinely with reports provided to the Board of Directors as requested by the Chair of the Garden and Landscape Committee.  Additionally, comments and observations made by visitors and Board members will be noted and conveyed to the Committee.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Our Community Garden is a sell-out each year, and gardeners have taken an active role in identifying needs as well as in maintaining that area. Under the leadership of the Chair, the gardeners and public are routinely invited to and attend educational programs focusing  on organic gardening techniques.
Description The Dudley Farm Museum provides a Harvest Day event annually in October. This event, free to the public, serves to thank the public for their support while inviting new visitors to the Farm. Events may include: corn shelling and grinding (and then feeding the chickens!), apple cider pressing, weaving, spinning, blacksmithing, oxen demonstrations; children's games of the period, hewing timber; whittling; soap making, and other skills and activities commonly performed on the 19th century New England Farm. The program is held concurrently with the Farmers' Market, and often features those craftsmen producing their items. Thanks to the dedication of the many Board Members and volunteers who participate costs are kept to a minimum while visitor satisfaction is high.
Population Served Families / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Adults
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Short-term success will include a tired but satisfied corps of Harvest Day volunteers as well as remaining within established budget. Returned surveys will note an increased awareness of and appreciation for those skills required to run a family farm in 19th century Connecticut.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The Annual Harvest Day celebration has a long history with The Dudley Farm, with attendance growing each year. Long-term success markers include a growing attendance; increased membership, and increased participation by members who have appropriate skills to share. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Returned surveys will note areas where visitors learned or experienced something new or gained an appreciation for the skills, knowledge, or abilities needed by families living on a farm in 19th century New England. Additionally, those involved in presenting to the public will be asked to give their appraisal of the event. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Our annual Harvest Day continues to be popular, even when forced to be postponed or hit with a rare October snow storm. Visitors frequently ask when Harvest Day will be so that they can plan the day with their families. Each year new exhibitors have offered their services. 
Program Comments
CEO Comments
In addition to the programs noted above, The Dudley Farm Museum is a frequently chosen venue for weddings, anniversaries, and other special events in order to take advantage of  our scenic property. Our Gift Shop is well-supported by The Dudley Farm Quilters, an all-volunteer group which crafts items which are then  donated for sale.  Additionally, they have annually produced queen-sized quilts which are raffled off to benefit the Museum. Speakers are frequently invited to share their expertise on topics of historical interest, most recently presenting Pieced History which discussed how 19th century changes in the textile industry changed the American Quilt. We are fortunate to be an entry to property owned by Guilford Land Conservation Trust, thus encouraging a walk in the woods - and a visit to the Dudley Farm grounds. We also house the Dawnland Collection, which contains many locally collected Native American artifacts donated to the Foundation by a local gentleman with ties to the Quinnipiac Nation.
In 2015 we initiated a Brunch to support The Big Barn Project. Now in its third year, this popular community event  raises our visibility and provides the public with  an inside look at what's going on "down on the farm."
The Dudley Farm Museum is of course in a rural part of Guilford, while the other four museums in town are essentially within walking distance of each other. But our museum is unique and is worth the drive from anywhere! 
CEO/Executive Director
Beth Payne
Term Start Mar 2015
Email director@dudleyfarm.com
Experience
The current director started as a volunteer three years ago, bringing with her a professional history as a manager. The roles of the many positions and committees were then developed and defined by an ad hoc committee, and became the seed for developing an operations manual, which now sees daily use. It became obvious at that time that a director/curator was needed to prevent further decline. After much consideration the current director was offered a part-time position (ten hours per week) as an independent contractor two years ago to see to the day-to-day operations. With extensive experience in developing and implementing policies and procedures, the museum director completed the development of the operations manual, as well as a disaster plan. The museum director’s hours were increased last year to 20 per week as the Board recognized the contributions being made by the director to the organization as well as the rapid growth the museum has experienced, more than doubling in the past two years. 
Co-CEO
N/A
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 60
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Collaborations
North Guilford Congregational Church
St. Johns Episcopal Church, North Guilford 
North Guilford Volunteer Fire Company (non-government agency)
Shoreline Outdoor Education Center (nonprofit)
5 Historic Museums of Guilford  (nonprofit)
Connecticut League of History Organizations (nonprofit)
Guilford Savings Bank (funder)
Connecticut Humanities as StEPs-CT participant
Guilford Preservation Alliance (nonprofit)
Guilford Land Conservation Trust (nonprofit) 
Summer Hill Foundation (funder - private foundation)
 
In addition to the above, memberships in the following organization provide professional development opportunities which have benefited the Dudley Farm Museum:
Connecticut League of History Organizations; Association of Living History Farms and Agricultural Museums; New England Museum Association; Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation; the American Association for State and Local History Organizations, Connecticut Humanities.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization2013
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Bronze Certification, AudienceAmerican Association for State and Local History2015
Bronze Certification, Mission, Vision and GovernanceAmerican Association for State and Local History2015
Silver Certificate, AudienceAmerican Association for State and Local History2015
Bronze Certification, InterpretationAmerican Association for State and Local History2016
Bronze Certification, Stewardship of Historic Structures and LandscapesAmerican Association for State and Local History2016
Bronze Certification, ManagementAmerican Association for State and Local History2015
Bronze Certification, Stewardship of CollectionsAmerican Association for State and Local History2016
Board Chair
Oliver L Scranton
Company Affiliation Maple Grove Farm
Term Oct 2016 to Oct 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Caryl Anderson Community Volunteer
Bill Black Retired
Janet Chittenden Dudley Community Volunteer
Mark Dudley Kirtland H. Crump Antiques
Jerri Guadagno Retired
Bob Guadagno Retired
Don Homer Retired
Phyllis Naples-Valenti Naples Farm
Kendrick Norris Retired
George Page Page Insurance
James Powers Guilford Public Schools
Doug Williamson Williamson Design and Planning
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 9
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Directors and Officers Policy
Board Co-Chair
Janet Dudley
Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Term Oct 2016 to Oct 2017
Email jcdandmtd@hotmail.com
Standing Committees
Executive
Nominating
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $231,500.00
Projected Expenses $231,167.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902015
Form 9902014
Form 9902013
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS determination
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$87,166$5,937$14,355
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions------
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses$77$60$61
Membership Dues$6,520$6,340$5,750
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$3,050($16,542)$7,663
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$6,386$7,422$6,204
Administration Expense$17,255$12,243$10,873
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses4.100.001.63
Program Expense/Total Expenses27%38%36%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$670,871$594,711$621,998
Current Assets$128,015$51,855$96,219
Long-Term Liabilities$42,619$39,642$43,059
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets$628,252$555,069$578,939
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountSummer Hill Foundation $50,000Guilford Savings Bank $1,000Guilford Savings Bank $1,165
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountGuilford Savings Bank $1,000Goldberg Family Foundation $500Goldberg Family Foundation $500
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountGoldberg Family Foundation $500 -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets6%7%7%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Goal $300,000.00
Dates May 2015 to Dec 2018
Amount Raised To Date 182117 as of Feb 2017
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments The economy in Connecticut, and indeed nationally, remains unsettled. Donating to preserve the agricultural history of Guilford is usually not the first priority of a person's charitable donor list. Despite that, we are able to capitalize on the current growing interest in ancestry, heritage and sustainable agriculture which allows us to approach local families with ties to those interests. In recent years we have aggressively sought grants and support for projects outside the normal operations of the Foundation, Solicitation are also made to local companies which have shown an interest in those interests.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 2351 Durham Rd
Guilford, CT 064371034
Primary Phone 203 457-0770
Contact Email ngdudleyfarm@gmail.com
CEO/Executive Director Beth Payne
Board Chair Oliver L Scranton
Board Chair Company Affiliation Maple Grove Farm

 

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