Shelton Historical Society
70 Ripton Rd.
P.O. Box 2155
SHELTON CT 06484-1155
Contact Information
Address 70 Ripton Rd.
P.O. Box 2155
SHELTON , CT 06484-1155
Telephone (203) 925-1803 x
Fax 203-925-1803
E-mail shcdirector@gmail.com
Web and Social Media
Mission

The mission of the Shelton Historical Society is to preserve elements of the community’s history in order to create lasting and meaningful connections between Shelton’s past, present and future generations through education, maintaining a museum with its collections, and providing a voice in the community regarding matters of historical significance.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1969
Former Names
Huntington Historical Society
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Tracey C. Tate
Board Chair Mr. Martin E. Coughlin
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Shelton Historical Society is to preserve elements of the community’s history in order to create lasting and meaningful connections between Shelton’s past, present and future generations through education, maintaining a museum with its collections, and providing a voice in the community regarding matters of historical significance.

Background

 Shelton Historical Society, a vital institution that serves a regional audience of over 2,000 visitors annually, operates Shelton History Center, a one acre site that contains the c. 1820 Brownson House, the c. 1860 Wilson Barn, the 1872 Trap Fall Schoolhouse, and three other outbuildings. The Brownson House is interpreted to reflect 1913 and the life of rural New England farmers. The Wilson Barn contains the nationally award winning exhibition 3 Centuries of SheltonFrom Farming to Industry and Beyond. Buildings are open to the public during regularly scheduled hours, by appointment, or through group tours. 

            The Society accomplishes the goals of the mission through various methods which include, but are not limited to: 

  • conducting tours at the SHC and at historic points of interest around Shelton;
  • developing temporary exhibitions;
  • overseeing the care and restoration of local monuments;
  • collecting and safeguarding artifacts and documents that support the mission;
  • documenting the rapidly changing landscape, natural and architectural, of the City of Shelton; 
  • discovering and disseminating information that supports knowledge and understanding of events and people who have shaped local and regional history;
  • facilitating a monthly book discussion group in collaboration with the Shelton public library system;
  • offering summer enrichment programs for children ages 7-12, and Boy and Girl Scout programs for advancement requirements;
  • conducting museum educators’ workshops;
  • collecting and presenting oral histories in the community;
  • presenting public programs for adult learners;
  • participating in a Teaching American History grant;
  • assuming leadership roles in organizations promoting historical preservation and education: National Heritage Committee; Long Hill Burying Ground, an historic cemetery; and Civil War Soldiers Memorial.

            The SHS has developed enrichment programs for all grade levels. The second and eighth grade programs have been incorporated into the curriculum of the Shelton School system. Teacher workshops have been conducted and pre and post visit materials have been prepared and distributed.

            The fulfillment of the Society's mission is enhanced through the work of part-time staff and volunteers. These dedicated individuals provide support in all departments, assisting with everything from administrative duties, cataloging of artifacts and library materials, teaching educational programs, and coordinating special events. 

                                   

 

Impact

Accomplishments

 1. The Shelton Historical Society initiated the long term goal of reinterpreting the Brownson House to 1913. This period, rarely documented in Connecticut, was a key point in Shelton’s and the country’s past. Visitors will be able to explore such topics as immigration, the formation of labor unions and their impact on local and national industrial development, women’s suffrage, and technological improvements in agriculture.  The room decor has been completed and the interpretation will be unveiled in 2017, but plans for accompanying educational components are underway.

2.  The Society was one of 25 historical organizations in Connecticut selected through a competitive application process to participate in the pilot program of STEPS-CT (Standards and Excellence Programs for History Organizations) presented jointly by Connecticut Humanities and Connecticut League of History Organizations. The curriculum, developed by the American Association for State and Local History and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, sets national standards for museums like ours. The two-year program shows organizations and their Boards how to assess, establish or improve policies, procedures and practices for institutional advancement. The Shelton Historical Society has achieved basic National Certification in all units: Audience; Interpretation; Mission/Vision/Governance; Collections; Historic Structures and Landscapes; and Management and the silver level in two of them:  Historic Structures and Landscapes; and Collections.

3. After suffering water damage during a rainstorm to ceilings, walls, floors, and storage spaces on all floors of the Brownson House in late 2015, Shelton Historical Society has repaired the structure and continues the effort to reinterpret the house to 1913.  The roofs of all structures on the Shelton History Center site have been oiled as required periodically for preservation of the wood shingles.
 
4. Because the water damage forced the handling of everything in the main artifact storeroom, items were removed from soaked boxes, cleaned, and housed in new acid-free containers while they await full cataloging procedures. 

Goals for 2017

1.  Implementation of goals set forth in the strategic plan will begin, especially in the area of collection care now that recovery from the water damage has taken place.  Collection assessment, cataloging, photographing, and research will allow Shelton Historical Society to gain intellectual control of the possessions it holds in public trust, disseminate accurate information, and expand exhibit potential, therefore growing audiences.

 2. Increase endowment fund, individual and corporate memberships, and community support.

3. Plan educational components to dovetail with the new interpretation of the house.

4.  Modify elementary school programs to reflect changes in state Social Studies framework and standards.
 

 

Needs

The Shelton Historical Society’s most pressing needs are:

 1.      Funds to increase staff hours to continue to assess and catalog artifacts and documents in the collection of the Society.

2.      Funding for materials to complete the reinterpretation of the Brownson House as well as the research and writing of educational materials to support the new interpretation.

3.      Recruitment and training of volunteers in order to expand the educational and adult programs and to assist with artifact handling and cataloging.

4.  Modification of educational programs for elementary and 8th grade classes to coordinate with the state Social Studies framework that was adopted in 2015.

5.      Complete the reinterpretation of the Brownson House so that it can be open to the general public after having been closed due to water damage.  This includes details, ephemera, and hands-on activities for each room to illustrate the lifestyle of the early 1900's.

CEO Statement

The Shelton Historical Society is fortunate to have its attractive Shelton History Center campus with its six buildings and dedicated people who bring enthusiasm and professionalism to the organization. It has built respected curriculum-based educational programs and brought them to a school community that joins its nationwide counterparts in stressing science, technology and math to the detriment of Social Studies. To be relevant to today’s students and their schools’ needs, we emphasize science and technology themes within the context of local and national historical trends. After all, modern technology once consisted of the typewriter and telephone instead of the computer and the ubiquitous smart phone. One of our board members, a school administrator, has begun a grass roots movement to demand that State standards require more in the Social Studies curriculum. The Shelton Historical Society agrees and the movement has gained the attention of key scholars and legislators.   

A 14’ long toboggan, a patched and repaired 1800’s work dress, a yellow silk ball gown worn to President Cleveland’s inauguration, a series of letters from an informant hired by a factory owner to determine union activity, and a restored horse-drawn carry-all that transported 1920’s children to school are some of the truly special items in our collection that speak to specific moments in local history but reflect the broader national views. These artifacts teach and inspire us all; they should be collected, protected, and interpreted to enrich and enlighten our community’s citizens. Providing a safe environment is a fundamental responsibility of all heritage institutions and those who care about them. 

Caring for the collections and the historic structures that house them is a monumental task for the part-time staff, the Board of Directors, and the volunteers who support them. Maintenance of the 19th century buildings is inherently difficult and expensive if we are to respect their architectural integrity. It is a challenge to create programs and exhibits to appeal to visitors while respecting the structures and their contents at the same time.

If we are to continue to save and share our heritage for generations to come, all of this must be continued during difficult and uncertain economic times.

Board Chair Statement

An historian wrote, “A community that forgets its past loses its soul.” That phrase sums up why the Shelton Historical Society needs to exist and to flourish. Adults and children alike have lost touch with their roots in the city. It is our goal of providing windows into Shelton’s past and to preserve what we can of the past for future generations to enjoy. Our school programs are incorporated into the Social Studies curriculum. They are recognized state wide for their effectiveness in bring history alive. Kids do get a feel for how hard life was 100 years ago as they turn the crank for 20 minutes to churn butter or hoe a row of beans in our tiny garden or wash clothes by hand.

The Society maintains 6 buildings at the History Center with an exhibit tracing Shelton’s history. So clearly our most pressing challenge is finances, first to keep the operation going and then to expand our scope of services. Raising $40,000 to restore 7 rooms to the way a farming family would live in 1913 is daunting. Yet that is what the Board is doing. For adults we have expanded our adult programs to 6 per year with a goal of 12. Board members do reenactments of historical events and give talks on historical topics. The Society brings in outside speakers to present topics in local and state history.

In 2012 the Society took a giant step toward bringing the organization up to national standards for historical societies by participating in the STEPS program. We are one of a small number of societies invited to participate in the multiyear training program. The program lays out the goals, procedures and methodologies needed to reach and maintain these national standards. The process has given the entire Board and staff a renewed sense of purpose and pride in our organization.

The Society has an objective of adding new docents who will help with the education programs as well as lead tours of the History Center grounds and structures (Brownson House, barn and museum, school house, carriage house, and other buildings). Training for new docents begins in April. Additional volunteers will allow the History Center to be open more frequently.

And like all small historical societies and museums there is the constant need for funds to maintain our spaces and provide additional services to the Shelton community.

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Historical Organizations
Secondary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Museums
Tertiary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / History Museums
Areas Served
Shelton

While the Shelton Historical Society primarily serves as a repository of historic elements from the City of Shelton, visitors from other places are welcome; they have included tourists from Japan, researchers from Qatar, and genealogists from California, among other places. Students from area and regional schools are able to take advantage of the curriculum-based educational programs that emphasize national trends through a local lens.  

 

Programs
Description The Shelton Historical Society emphasizes the pre-World War I year 1913 to take advantage of the bulk of its collection and to fulfill a unique niche among Connecticut's historic house museums.  Guided by oral histories, a professionally written furnishing plan, and a historic structures report, we are in the process of this exacting reinterpretation.  Appropriate wall, window, and floor coverings, furniture and examples of material culture have been obtained to provide an authentic experience for visitors. Hands-on activities and elements will be employed to illustrate a middle-class farm family's position in Shelton, their business and social activities, and their interactions with the surrounding communities. The opportunities to explore national historical trends such as women's suffrage, labor unrest in Northeast factories, and technological developments will mesh with the educational programs and mission of the Shelton Historical Society.
Population Served General/Unspecified / Families / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years)
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The reinterpretation of the Brownson House will culminate in a completed venue that illustrates how life was lived in 1913.  It will be a place in which to showcase the collections of the Shelton Historical Society in changing exhibits against the backdrop of a fully furnished and interesting interior. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The reinterpretation of the Brownson House will result in a consistent presentation by museum educators and a platform on which to layer changing exhibitions within the framework of the historic house. With the house as the centerpiece of the Shelton Historical Society, attention can be put upon more public programming to attract a wider audience, additional volunteers, and members.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. As this project is completed, we expect the number of public offerings, exhibits, volunteer interest, and visitation to increase.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. A request was publicized to the community for donations of certain items that are needed to furnish various rooms.  An entire period appropriate bedroom suite that has Shelton provenance has been obtained as well as small items that illustrate the lifestyle of the era.  A local interior designer offered services to source reproduction wall, window, and floor coverings. All funding for the project was provided by donors.
Description The Shelton Historical Society has professionally written curriculum-based programs for several grade levels that take advantage of its buildings and collections to demonstrate historical concepts.  All second and eighth grade students attend these programs which provide hands-on learning opportunities. We have worked closely with teachers and administrators to ensure appropriate content.  A summer enrichment program is also offered for ages 7-12.
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. It is the goal of the Shelton Historical Society to deliver an understanding of the passage of time, the evolution of technology that made work possible, challenges of the environment, and the development of changing economies.  At the end of a session we often hear comments such as, "It was a lot of work to live!"  That summarizes the goal of the educational programs.  Mission accomplished.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. As an historical institution, programs focus on understanding the significance of past events, appreciation of artifacts, and critical thinking skills gained through hands-on activities.  Ultimately, we want to encourage visitors to become involved in their communities, to appreciate local history, and to know that the Shelton Historical Society is a valuable resource.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We recognize that research indicates the importance of using data in the design of educational programs.  Evaluation forms are given to all teachers and chaperones for completion before they leave the program.  Ongoing assessment takes place throughout school presentations to address misconceptions and oral discussions are conducted at the conclusion of each program to gauge student knowledge. Informal interviews with teachers help identify any needed changes.  Age appropriate surveys are administered to obtain student input.  For example, the youngest students are asked to draw a picture of their favorite and least favorite activities. Common core and state standards are periodically reviewed by staff members and educators.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Student participation in the summer enrichment program has been consistent for six years with multiple participants returning on an annual basis.  Students too old to attend the summer program have organized an additional program for their age group, which is typically under served.  This has resulted in the recently established youth group for ages 12-18.  Eighth grade students return later to fulfill high school community service requirements, while college students request volunteer internship opportunities.  The most significant measure of  success is that the same teachers have returned yearly with their classes for over a decade. 
Description With an artifact collection of approximately 5,000 pieces, the majority of which are textiles such as linens, quilts, clothing and other apparel, it is a challenge to properly store and care for everything in the possession of Shelton Historical Society.  It is necessary to gain a better understanding of the artifacts that have been collected in the 45+ years of the organization's existence. Improving intellectual control will enable us to interpret the objects that are on display at various times.  Assessment of items in the collection requires an examination of such qualities as provenance, condition, and interpretive value of each item.  Cleaning, photographing, and rehousing each item in archivally safe containers is part of this time-consuming process. 
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
As a result of the ongoing textile assessment it has been discovered that many items have not been stored properly and/or are overcrowded in their containers. Those problems are being remedied immediately upon discovery during the project so that the items are stored properly for their protection.  Artifacts that do not pertain to the mission of the Society may be culled at the conclusion of the project resulting in improved storage conditions and easier retrieval for exhibition or research purposes.  Guidelines explaining the assessment criteria and procedures have been written by the curator.   
 
Examining the collection is a necessary step, not only to gain knowledge of the artifacts, but to assist in the reinterpretation of the Brownson House.  The reinterpretation requires both usable reproduction furnishings and those artifacts from within the collection that demonstrate period appropriate themes.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. With the completion of the collection inventory and textile assessment the Shelton Historical Society will have a more complete view and understanding of its entire collection.  We will see where there are gaps and redundancies in the collection, which should represent various aspects of Shelton's history.  For example, for many years it was the perception of many in the community that agricultural implements were the most important items to collect.  That resulted in under representation of the city's rich industrial past.  With progress toward the assessment of the collections, informed decisions regarding collection matters can be made more easily by the staff and Board of Directors.  Improved interpretation and exhibitions will be possible.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The textile assessment was a much more ambitious project than first believed due to the discovery of the extensiveness of the holdings. Guidelines had to be developed and written by the curator with advice from others in the museum field.  This checklist includes a rubric that is used for each item to keep the assessment objective.  A count of the items assessed during each work session is necessary.  This rubric has been found a useful tool for the examination of all artifacts in the collection, not just textiles.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. One example discovered during the textile assessment is that we have in our possession several garments that did not originate in Shelton nor do they have any local provenance.  They were most likely collected by well-meaning volunteers before the professional curator was hired.  Because they do not illustrate the history of Shelton, they will be offered to another organization from their place of origin, freeing up storage space and refining the collection at the same time.
Program Comments
CEO Comments In addition to those programs already listed, the Shelton Historical Society offers a monthly book discussion group, the Shelton Reading Circle, that was inspired by a donation of notes from a late 19th century charity group of the same name.  We also host speakers whose expertise is on topics with a historical theme several times a year.  Our annual meeting held each January and an antique car show on Father's Day are examples of popular community events that raise visibility and funds and are open to the public. 
CEO/Executive Director
Mrs. Tracey C. Tate
Term Start Sept 1997
Email shcdirector@gmail.com
Experience

Ms. Tate has directed all aspects of the Shelton Historical Society since 1997 including the installation of its permanent exhibit in the Wilson Barn and coordinated aspects of the restoration of the Brownson House. Managing volunteer staff, designing and conducting educational programs, fund-raisers, and marketing initiatives are all in a day’s work. 

Ms. Tate holds a Fine Arts degree from Syracuse University and has a background in design/illustration and retail management.  
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 54
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr. Christopher Nevins 1993 - 1996
Ms. Mary Solomon 1996 - 1998
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Collaborations

Since the inception of the educational programs for intermediate school students approximately 16 years ago, the Shelton Historical Society has enjoyed a collaborative relationship with the Shelton Public School system, welcoming all 8th and 2nd grade students for age-appropriate programs each year. Shelton High School requires volunteer hours for their students which can be fulfilled at our facility. We have mentored developmentally and/or emotionally disabled students in a work experience program.

The monthly book discussion group partners with the Plumb Memorial Library to obtain books for its participants and uses the conference room at the Huntington Branch Library for the meetings.  Attendance is growing for the Shelton Reading Circle, in existence for fifteen years.  This year we will be initiating an experimental program with the children's librarian to present programs in the Trap Fall School during the summer. 

Professional development opportunities offered by the Connecticut League of History Organizations (CLHO), Connecticut Humanities, and the American Association for State and Local History are attended by staff. Information is shared with area historical societies including Seymour, Derby, and others in the region. We have presented workshops at the New England Museum Association, CLHO, and for educators from Fairfield and New Haven counties in a Teaching American History initiative with Yale University and the Gilder-Lehrman Ctr.

Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Bronze Certification, AudienceAmerican Association for State and Local History2012
Certificate of Commendation (exhibit and publication)American Association for State and Local History2007
Certificate of Commendation (publication)American Association for State and Local History2007
Certificate of Commendation (exhibit and publication)American Association for State and Local History1999
Award of Merit (exhibit and publication)Connecticut League of History Organizations2007
Award of Merit (exhibit and publication)Connecticut League of History Organizations1999
Honorable Mention Award of Merit (publication)Connecticut League of History Organizations2006
Bronze Certification, Mission/Vision/GovernanceAmerican Association for State and Local History2013
Bronze Certification, InterpretationAmerican Association for State and Local History2013
Bronze certificate for Stewardship of Historic Structures and LandscapesAmerican Association for State and Local History2016
Bronze certificate for Stewardship of CollectionsAmerican Association for State and Local History2016
Bronze certificate for ManagementAmerican Association for State and Local History2016
Silver certification for Stewardship of CollectionsAmerican Association for State and Local History2016
Silver ceritfication for Stewardship of Historic Structures and LandscapesAmerican Association for State and Local History2016
Board Chair
Mr. Martin E. Coughlin
Company Affiliation Retired
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2020
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mrs. Paula Anthony Bercham, Moses & Devlin, P.C.
Mrs. Joyce Donnelly Retired
Mrs. Cheryl Dziubina Community volunteer
Mr. Marc Feeley Retired
Ms. Linda Hooper Farm Owner
Mrs Carolyn Ivanoff Shelton school administrator
Mrs. Susan Mauriello Apicella, Testa, & Co., P.C.
Mr. Robert Mayernick Retired
Mrs. Linda Mulford Retired Librarian/Archivist
Mr. David Munson Retired
Mrs. Sandra Nesteriak Retired
Ms. Renee Protomastro The Ad Pros Agency, LLC
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 9
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Insurance
Fine Arts and Collectibles
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Standing Committees
Collections
Building
Education
Membership
Executive
Finance
Nominating
Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $96,000.00
Projected Expenses $96,000.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$81,875$73,009$38,213
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions------
------
$8,545$3,765--
Investment Income, Net of Losses$4,425$4,037$2,774
Membership Dues$2,935$2,510$2,570
Special Events$1,878$3,156$9,618
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$7,649$12,211$12,137
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$72,768$80,539$56,054
Administration Expense$17,720$13,768$12,922
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.191.050.95
Program Expense/Total Expenses80%85%81%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$485,239$443,593$443,809
Current Assets$152,288$110,642$110,858
Long-Term Liabilities$58,103$23,526$28,123
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets$427,136$420,067$415,686
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets12%5%6%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
CEO Comments In an unsettled economy, donating to preserve the history of the Shelton community is not the first priority of a person's charitable donor list.  Our strategy is to approach local families who have long term ties to Shelton and offer them the opportunity to restore a room and memorialize that space to their family members.  Donations can be given over a six year period.  The Board is constantly seeking grants to fund projects outside of the normal operations of the Society.  Solicitations are made to companies whose market area is local or who have shown an interest in donating to local non-profits.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 70 Ripton Rd.
P.O. Box 2155
SHELTON , CT 064841155
Primary Phone 203 925-1803
Contact Email shcdirector@gmail.com
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Tracey C. Tate
Board Chair Mr. Martin E. Coughlin
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired

 

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