South Central Regional Economic Development Corporation (REX)
545 Long Wharf Drive, 4th Floor
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 545 Long Wharf Drive, 4th Floor
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 821-3682 x
Fax 203-785-9900
E-mail ginnyk@rexdevelopment.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
The mission of the Regional Economic Xcelleration (REX) Development is to attract jobs and investment to the South Central Connecticut region. The region consists of the towns from Milford to Meriden to Madison. We represent the region at trade shows, communicate to a broad constituent base and provide concierge services for business recruitment, expansion and retention.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1996
Former Names
Regional Growth Partnership
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ginny Kozlowski
Board Chair David Silverstone
Board Chair Company Affiliation Science Park
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $856,268.00
Projected Expenses $856,245.00
Statements
Mission
The mission of the Regional Economic Xcelleration (REX) Development is to attract jobs and investment to the South Central Connecticut region. The region consists of the towns from Milford to Meriden to Madison. We represent the region at trade shows, communicate to a broad constituent base and provide concierge services for business recruitment, expansion and retention.
Background
Regional Economic Xcelleration (REX) Development was originally called the Regional Growth Partnership (RGP) and established in 1996 as the economic development arm of the South Central Regional Council of Governments (SCRCOG), serving the fifteen municipalities in the South Central Connecticut region.  REX Development is a public-private non-for-profit organization, a 501(c)(4), dedicated to marketing the South Central region and attracting employment and investment. 
Impact
Top three accomplishments:
1) Updating and administering the five-year Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy for the region.
2) Attracting jobs and investment to the South Central Connecticut region.
3) Financing the assessment and cleanup of  key brownfield sites in the South Central Connecticut region.
 
Goals for the current year:
1) Continue execution and implementation of the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy.
2) Attract significant number of jobs and investment to the City of New Haven and the South Central Connecticut region. 
 
Needs
1) Reorganization and development of board for the Growth Alliance for Metro New Haven.
2) Capacity building funding.
3) Development of direct funding resources for new small businesses.
4) Development of "one voice" around economic development for the South Central Connecticut region. 
5) Expand funding for brownfield assessments.
 
CEO Statement

In 2010, when Regional Growth Partnership morphed in to REX Development, the organization transformed from policy creation to implementation. The strategies from the original CEDS in 2003, with the 5 year update in 2008, provided essential information and laudable goals for the region. However, the Great Recession resulted in a completely changed environment and the need for an extremely proactive organization.

Throughout the recession, we leveraged the resources of our partners for our benefit and theirs. In addition, our pervasive interaction with a variety of both formal and informal groups increased the flow of information between organizations. Perhaps the most valuable role we play is as a knowledge repository. The current staff members are routinely assigned to attend specific meetings and events. We receive countless phone calls and emails asking for information on a wide variety of topics. As the other members of the community cannot participate to the level we do, they know they can count on us for accurate information on essential topics. And if we don’t have the information on hand, we can usually make a referral to the appropriate person. We connect people. This exchange prevents duplication of efforts and improves outcomes while efficiently managing the use of limited resources for many entities. We connect people.

Conversely, the importance of confidentiality is paramount in our communications. We respect the trust placed in us and do everything we can to preserve the integrity of our relationships. This is never more true than when working with site selectors or new/expanding businesses. Our reputation is core to our success.

Ultimately, our calling is to do as much as we can to meet the region’s needs as set forth in the CEDS. This is an ambitious goal. We know we will fall short, but we are truly committed to working toward the objectives that have been directly expressed to us from the communities. We do what we can through our own resources and are persistent in encouraging our partners to effectively play their roles in the overall strategy. We need good jobs now. We need workforce housing. We need to stop the brain drain. We need STEAM. We need to reclaim brownfields. We need to plan for the future. While daunting, we are confident that in working towards, monitoring and adjusting the economic development strategy, the Greater New Haven Region has unlimited potential and through steady, collaborative work, we can achieve our purpose.

Board Chair Statement

It is with great pride I serve as Board Chair of the Economic Development Corporation of New Haven in conjunction with REX Development. As the owner of Science Park, I saw potential for a vibrant bioscience hub with office space for entrepreneurs and expanding businesses. My investment in that project has brought countless rewards. We have been home to entrepreneurs, startups, and rapidly growing businesses. That same potential exists throughout New Haven and the entire Greater New Haven Region. Science Park is the dream that became reality.

 

Over the past several years, I have personally experienced the energy that comes from a committed group of people working toward a common goal. Somewhat unexpectedly, that group consists of individuals from both the public and private sectors, sectors that are sometimes at odds. There are few on the board, if any, who don’t possess strong opinions and great pride in their enterprises. Whether they represent academia, healthcare, cities or towns, together they have forged a path that promotes the economic growth for Greater New Haven through tremendous cooperation and integrity.

 

We are extremely privileged to have world-renowned universities and hospitals within our region. With continued effort in education, workforce training and the reclaiming of contaminated sites, we can transform the research and prototypes from these entities into products and services that can be delivered by our residents, in our region. Our highly educated workforce is tremendous benefit when competing for businesses, but we have to address the education gap in the public school systems and to build the infrastructure necessary to support the industry clusters where we believe we can excel. The generosity of the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, Yale University and Yale-New Haven Health System in supporting New Haven Promise is unparalleled in providing higher education to New Haven students.

 

In the competitive market for attracting and retaining businesses, we are fortunate to have an abundance of an essential natural resource – water. The effects of climate change continue to alter the industrial landscape. The availability of this extremely vital and limited resource can be a game changer for our communities. For the Growth Alliance of Metro New Haven to have this resource in its portfolio of assets will truly differentiate this region when competing for water dependent industries. New, existing and expanding industries will give greater consideration to our region simply because they cannot survive without ample, clean water.

 

Undoubtedly there are challenges. It is precisely because of these challenges that we need the Growth Alliance for Metro New Haven. They can dig deeper, build partnerships and smooth troubled waters. They offer neutrality, experience and enthusiasm for building a more productive Greater New Haven while maintaining the excellent quality of life we all have the great fortune to enjoy.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Economic Development
Areas Served
Bethany
Branford
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Other
The region's footprint consists of 15 municipalities, they are: Bethany, Branford, East Haven, Guilford, Hamden, Madison, Meriden, Milford, New Haven, North Branford, North Haven, Orange, Wallingford, West Haven and Woodbridge. These municipalities, forming the region, have a total area size of 368.11 square miles and a population of 570,001. The region currently has an unemployment rate of 9.9% (well above both the State and National average of 9.1%), with two distressed municipalities and a majority of the population residing in municipalities either distressed or near distressed. The region’s municipalities range from large urban centers, anchored by New Haven with a current population of 129,779, to small rural residential communities, as is Woodbridge, with a current population of 8,990. 
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments We strive toward the vision set forth in the Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy.
Programs
Description
The five year CEDS for the South Central Connecticut region, required for U.S. Economic Development Administration funding and provides a road map for the region to grow its economic base. In 2013 the CEDS process committed to drive a regional economic development agenda.  The CEDS requires on-going monitoring and implementation.
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The long term success of the program will provide an economic viable and sustainable Greater New Haven, increasing the number of jobs and attracting investment. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Implementation teams will measure progress of each section of the program.  These teams will continually provide development of stated goals and objectives and measure annual success through different criteria, that will be presented quarterly. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
The program is in the initial phase, so program success is yet to be measured. 
Description
Regional tourism marketing and attraction.
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Increase of tourism, and benefits (both social and economic) in Greater New Haven. 
Description
Regional funding for brownfield assessment and clean-up. 
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The cleanup and redevelopment of all high priority brownfield sites in the South Central Connecticut region.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Success is monitored by Brownfield committee, measuring the amount of funding acquired and number of priority sited assessed and cleaned up. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Investment of 850,000 into three sites for cleanup and additional private investment of at least 30%. 
Description
Market the South Central Connecticut region, in order to attract investment and job creation. 
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals No
Program Comments
CEO Comments There is much work to be done here and the way to be successful will be through partnerships and collaborations.
CEO/Executive Director
Ginny Kozlowski
Term Start Jan 2010
Email ginnyk@rexdevelopment.org
Experience

 

Economic Development Corporation of New Haven/REX Development, New Haven, CT


Chief Executive Officer 

  • Develops and supervises the implementation of the region’s Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy, in order to promote the area to local, state, regional, national and international markets. Directs the preparation of the combined organizational annual budgets of $2.1M and work plans that supports these activities. 
  • Convenes and participates in meetings of the stakeholders and constituents, the Board and other designated committees to advance the goals and objectives described in the annual work plan.
  • Oversees a $1.8M Brownfield Revolving Loan Fund provided by the US Department of Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Establishes and maintains ongoing effective communications with members, government leaders, business and cultural institution leaders, entrepreneurs, convention and event planners, and the local tourism industry.

 

Greater New Haven Convention & Visitors Bureau, New Haven, CT

May 2007 – December2009

President/CEO

  • Developed and supervised the implementation of an annual operating and marketing plan, in order to promote the destination to local, state, regional, national and international audiences.  Established and maintained ongoing effective communications with members, government leaders, business and cultural institution leaders, convention and event planners, and the local tourism industry.
  • Developed and maintained effective organizational policies and ensured Bureau activities were implemented within these established policies, guidelines, laws and ethical standards.


 

 

COO/Director of Finance & Administration  

           

     
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 6
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 27
Staff Retention Rate 0%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 4
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 5
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director of Marketing
Title Director of Tourism
Title Manager of Business Development
Title Business Director of Finance & Innovation
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation No
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

 15 Municipal Economic Development Staff and/or municipal commissions of the So. Central CT Region, Regional Chambers of Commerce, Regional Alliance, New Haven Works, Workforce Alliance, Project Storefront, Regional Leadership Council, Arts Council of Greater New Haven, Central Regional Tourism District, CT State Office of Tourism, Arts Industry Alliance, Milford Progress, Inc., New Haven Manufacturer's Association, CURE, New Haven Festivals, Inc., Market New Haven, Inc., Town Green Special Services District, Southern Connecticut State University, Gateway Community College, Discover New England, University of New Haven, South Central Regional Council of Governments, Regional Water Authority, UIL, University Properties, Connecticut Economic Resource Center
 

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2007
Greater New Haven Visitors Bureau1993
Comments
CEO Comments

 Continuing to promote growth in a region that is still suffering the effects of the Great Recession.  Looking to increase participation in identifying regional opportunities.

The South Central  region was the first region in the State of Connecticut to obtain the US Economic Development Administration's Economic Development District designation.

 
Board Chair
David Silverstone
Company Affiliation Science Park
Term Jan 2014 to Dec 2015
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Marna Borgstrom Yale New Haven Hospital
Jamie Cosgrove Town of Branford
Michael Freda Town of North Haven
William Ginsberg Community Foundation of Greater New Haven
Toni Harp City of New Haven
Scott Jackson Town of Hamden
Jeff Klaus Webster Bank
Virginia Kozlowski REX Development
David Ring First Niagara
Ellen Scalettar Town of Woodbridge
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 4
Governance
Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Standing Committees
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
Marketing
CEO Comments
As part of the reporting requirements, the CEO must report monthly on economic activities to the South Central Regional Council of Governments.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2013
Fiscal Year End June 30 2014
Projected Revenue $856,268.00
Projected Expenses $856,245.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund No
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$173,033$216,455$219,040
Government Contributions$217,665$890,756$114,571
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$217,665$890,756$114,571
Individual Contributions------
------
----$4,171
Investment Income, Net of Losses$3,753$2,675$1,828
Membership Dues$144,474$123,978$123,738
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$302,341$712,789$344,494
Administration Expense$180,372$179,107$184,272
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.121.380.88
Program Expense/Total Expenses63%80%65%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$952,431$874,642$681,506
Current Assets$945,875$869,344$405,702
Long-Term Liabilities$235,696$227,666$425,531
Current Liabilities$62,580$49,033--
Total Net Assets$654,155$597,943$255,975
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Environmental Protection Agency $781,148Regional Leadership Council $115,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Regional Leadership Council $154,005United Illuminating Company $63,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --SCRCOG $53,000Central CT Tourism District $58,310
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities15.1117.73--
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets25%26%62%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments With 169 towns and cities competing for economic development opportunities it is difficult to bring the financial resources together to create a more coordinated effort.
 
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

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