Branford Compassion Club
2037 Foxon Rd. (Rt. 80)
North Branford CT 06471
Contact Information
Address 2037 Foxon Rd. (Rt. 80)
North Branford, CT 06471-
Telephone (203) 483-6369 x
Fax 203-453-6728
E-mail contact_us@branfordcompassionclub.org
Web and Social Media
Ribbon Cutting
Mission

Providing for the feeding, shelter and care of homeless, abandoned and feral cats.

Educating the public about the importance of spay/neuter population control, responsible pet ownership and kindness to animals.

Establishing an ongoing community network to achieve these goals.

A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.

Branford Compassion Club annually hosts Animal Awareness Day, A Celebration of Pets, which is a wonderful free community event that draws thousands to the Branford Green. It’s scheduled for 2018 for Sunday, Oct. 7 from noon-4 p.m.

Though Branford Compassion Club is devoted to the care, rescue and adoption of felines, the Blessing of the Animals, the featured highlight of the day, draws pet lovers of all kinds to the Green. The tradition is always held around the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi, the patron saint of animals. Clergy from all denominations gather to bless animals ranging from dogs and cats and gerbils to horses, goats, rabbits and exotic reptiles and amphibians.

Attendees are entertained throughout the day with live music, a chance to learn from and patronize dozens of area and regional business vendors and animal care and rescue organizations, whose missions are similar to BCC’s: educating the public about the importance of spay/neuter programs, teaching humane treatment of animals and responsible pet ownership. There is a special tent devoted to children’s activities, live animals for further hands-on education, plus a huge bake sale. A particular push is made to involve businesses contiguous to the Green, who benefit from the increased traffic to the central area and those whose taste for food may go beyond our food truck(s).

In 2017 we added the opportunity to participate in short demonstration sessions of Goat Yoga featuring Pygmy goats from and area farm. Teddy Bear Surgery was also a big hit which will continue in 2018. A Veterinarian from Pet Shield Veterinary Hospital and veterinary technicians in full surgical garb "operated" on stuffed animals brought to the Green by their young owners in need of surgical attention. Many "repairs" were made and much was learned about the ways in which surgical interventions improve and even save the lives of animals.

Our goal is always to raise at least five figures, which we did last year, with just over $10,000 from vendor and sponsor fees, bake sale, and a special offering from the world-famed Stony Creek Quarry. Animal Awareness Day 2018 will have even more to offer. It's always a great day on the green for humans and their animal friends.

A Great Opportunity Ending Date Oct 07 2018
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2000
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Marcia. L. Turner
Board Chair Ms. Marcia L. Turner PDMM
Board Chair Company Affiliation Y.E.A., LLC
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

Providing for the feeding, shelter and care of homeless, abandoned and feral cats.

Educating the public about the importance of spay/neuter population control, responsible pet ownership and kindness to animals.

Establishing an ongoing community network to achieve these goals.

Background

In 1997, three highly motivated, civic-minded Branford residents, having in common a great love of and compassion for cats, became aware that in Branford alone there were uncountable numbers of entirely homeless, often starving, often pregnant, never spayed, neutered or vaccinated and often sick or injured cats and kittens.

At that time, the existence of these animals, their numbers and the miserable, dangerous and unhealthy way in which they were forced to exist was officially and entirely unnoticed and unaddressed by the town.
 
Undaunted by the enormity of the problem, and driven by their love for the animals and  belief that one person (or 3) can make a difference, they decided to call themselves The Branford Compassion Club and began to meet, organize, fundraise, speak out, letter-write and door-knock all over the town of Branford.
 
At the same time they began to rescue, feed, shelter, care for and provide spay/neuter, vaccinations and other needed veterinary care for every homeless, lost, feral, abandoned or abused cat or kitten they could find.
 
Two of these exceptional women (our "Founders"), Eunice Lasala and Marilyn Kennedy, have worked tirelessly for 20 years to better the lives of cats in the community and further the mission the organization they started all those years ago. Both are currently serving on our Board of Directors. Marilyn Kennedy is our Treasurer.
For many years of BCC and its growing number of members and volunteers provided Trap, Neuter and Return services for feral/community cats and "foster care" and eventually, new homes for adoptable cats.
 
On February 25, 2011 BCC was finally able to open its own indoor, "brick and mortar" shelter. Since that time we have taken in over 1400 cats many of whom we have rescued ourselves from conditions and situation that would fill a book. The ranks of our regular volunteers have swelled to 80-100 active, dedicated people from all walks of life who truly care for our shelter cats and work to socialize shy or traumatized cats to help them become more adoptable. We also support 11 feral or community cat colonies from New Haven north and east with twice daily visits 365 days a year. Our network of foster homes  provide special nurturing for mother cats with kittens, abandoned kittens sometimes young enough to require bottle feeding..
Recently, we have "grown" our fundraising efforts significantly, expanded our Board and, in 2015 hired our first employee; our Shelter Manager, Pat Cotton whose daily efforts, added to those of our volunteers, permit us to continue fulfilling our mission at top speed. Pat retired as Shelter Manager on Dec. 31, 2017 and we are proud to announce our new Shelter Manager and former Board of Directors Vice-President, Lianne Soucy who took over this enormous job on January 1, 2018.
Impact

ACCOMPLISHMENTS: 

1. Adopted out 215 cats and kittens to fully approved “forever homes” in 2017.
 
2. Spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and provided all necessary veterinary care to 285 cats and kittens (total intakes) in 2017.
 
3. Directly and with collaborators, rescued  236 adoptable felines (owner releases,friendly strays, and rescues from our sister organizations) and Trapped, Neutered, and Returned (TNR'd) approximately 40 feral/community cats, and cared for daily an average of 50 felines at our brick and mortar shelter.
 
4. Created and produced Animal Awareness Day on the Branford Green, October 1, 207, our largest and most "impactful" annual event in terms of both public participation, education and fundraising.
 
5. Improved our "Catio" so that our shelter cats can safely experience the joy of being outdoors.

GOALS:

 1. Expand human and financial resources to meet the increased need for the diverse services we provide to cats and their communities throughout New Haven County and sometimes beyond.
 
2.  Increase the impact of our spay/neuter efforts through partnerships/collaborations with other rescue groups focused on TNR.
 
3.   Train and fund a professional program director/teacher to create and lead free public programs in schools and at community events in furtherance of the educational component of our mission.
 
4. Enhance our use of social media to "get the word out" about programs/help available to animal owners and rescuers in the communities we serve and throughout Connecticut.
 
5. Partner with organizations working to strengthen and implement legislation which protects animals, particularly cats, and provides improved access to affordable veterinary services to poor and/or underserved communities within Connecticut.
Needs
Needs:
 
1. Financial Sustainability: for our mission to be sustainable beyond the next two years, income of approximately $100,000 per year must be generated. 
 
2. A Strategic Plan: a Strategic Planning Task Force was recently appointed by the Board. Drafts of a 1 year, 3 year and 5 year strategic plan are currently in the working stages.
 
3. Adopters: An expanded pool of approved adopters is urgently needed for our adult and/or shy and/or elderly and/or FIV positive cats. 
 
4. Add Program Director position: initiate a program (paid program director) to train unique individuals to do Trap, Neuter, and Return (TNR), socialize very shy adoptable cats, interface with our veterinary services provider to integrate record keeping essential for obtaining grants. Anticipated first-year compensation for a qualified individual at 20/hr per week (50 weeks at $18/hour) $18,000.
 
5. Community Support: fund a Community Feline Educator to engage and inform diverse communities in furtherance of our mission.
 
6. Shelter Volunteers: expand our pool of volunteers to enhance efficiency and cleanliness and prevent "burn out" of long-term, faithful volunteers who often shoulder an excessive amount of the work of everyday feeding, cleaning and medicating cats at the shelter. 
CEO Statement  At this time, the Branford Compassion Club By-Laws do not provide for the position of  CEO/Executive Director. Revisions to our By-Laws in relation to our governance and management structures are currently being prepared for consideration by the Board of Directors.
Board Chair Statement

Operating a cat shelter is not without challenges. The difference between our expenses per cat and the adoption fee is over $100 in all cases. Every cat is tested, neutered, vaccinated and vet examined before adoption. Senior cats often need dental surgery and senior blood-work. In addition to medical bills, there is the cost for food and shelter, special diets, supplements, and medications. Every cat we take in is an unknown quantity in terms of the care it will require. And every cat receives care they need.

In opening its first brick and mortar shelter in 2011, the Board of Directors and the volunteers made a giant commitment to use its existing resources to carry out their mission with the expectation of success. We wanted to become a community destination: a place where visitors, adopters, animal lovers, and volunteers would be warmly welcomed, and a place where all rescued felines would be given excellent veterinary care, proper nutrition, a clean enriched environment, and personal attention. For the first five years, we functioned with an all-volunteer base. As we expanded our outreach and collaborated with similar rescues, we realized that hiring a shelter manager would be the next logical step. Lianne Soucy, is our second Shelter Manager following in the footsteps of Patricia Cotton who retired on Dec. 31, 2017.

Many of the cats we intake have health issues of some kind. Parasites and malnutrition, injuries, auto immune diseases, or illnesses such as upper respiratory infections are common.  Many cats have dental disease, especially the senior who require costly senior bloodwork and dental surgery. In November of 2016 we took in 3 of the sickest kittens we had ever seen. They received intensive care at the vet for 5 days, gradually recovered over a period of months, but their eyes were so damaged by their initial eye infections that they had to see an eye specialist at Central Hospital months later to get their tear ducts flushed.Sonny, a big FiV+ tom cat with a horrible eye wound who was abandoned at an industrial site was rescued and treated. Princess Peach, who gave birth to her kittens in the woods, was rescued with her babies on the same afternoon. Wendy and her three tiger babies was abandoned in a dark basement of an apartment complex and was luckily found by the building handyman before they starved to death. Three tiny orphan kittens known as the Sofa Kittens were found in the cushions of a curbside couch in freezing weather and nursed back to health. All of these cats and kittens have since recovered enough to be adopted into loving permanent homes.  
 
It's not all sad, though.  We delight in successful adoptions, cats that make great strides in socialization, long term residents who finally get adopted, colonies that we are able to stabilize through Trap Neuter Return policies, and cats that we are successfully able to treat for significant medical issues. Sometimes we take in a full term pregnant female cat who is given a safe place within or shelter or in a foster home to give birth and raise her kittens for 8 weeks. This brings our visitors and volunteers a sense of joy, and of course, moms are spayed after their job is done.
 
It can be disheartening that every year the volume of assistance calls for feral, pregnant, or injured cats seems to grow, and that there are hundreds of homeless and abandoned cats struggling to survive. We continue to educate the public about the importance of spay/neuter by making sure every one of our cats is fixed before adoption and by cooperating with like-minded rescue groups to rescue as many cats as we can. Caring for these animals is a labor of love and matters to each of us and each cat we rescue.

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Animal Related / Animal Protection & Welfare
Secondary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Alliances & Advocacy
Tertiary Organization Category Environment / Environment NEC
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Ansonia
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Lower Naugatuck Valley
While the majority of our rescues are from towns within New Haven County, we often respond to emergencies in other areas of the state. Increasingly, we are called upon to rescue from neighborhoods in New Haven where our largest and longest supported community cat colony still exists.
Though we cannot respond favorably to every request to take in surrendered cats or trap in far flung areas, we are proud that it is our policy and our reputation to say "yes" when others have said "no." If we can find a way to help that is what we do. There is almost always "room at the Inn." That is our mission and our organizational character.
Programs
Description

Veterinary Care Program: BCC provides full veterinary care to all cats and kittens under our care - this includes spay/neuter, vaccinations, combo test for feline leukemia and FiV, treatment of injury, illness, or disease.

Population Served General/Unspecified / At-Risk Populations / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Healthy cats and kittens who have already received veterinary care are preferred by adopters. We disclose any known medical issues of special needs cats to potential adopters which leads to fewer returns.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Veterinary care insures that all of our adopted cats are relatively healthy and 100% of the cats are unable to reproduce, thus limiting disease, overpopulation and decreasing owner abandonment of cats due to adverse mating behaviors.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. We know that by neutering every cat before adoption they are unable to reproduce. In 2016 we adopted out fully vetted 261 cats. We provide each adopter with veterinary records at the time of adoption. Many adopters express gratitude that their cats medical needs were met before adoption.  
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. New intakes are usually given initial veterinary care when they enter our shelter. Since most cats are neutered and vaccinated at the time of intake (the exception being pregnant or nursing females or seriously ill cats or underage kittens) they don't exhibit adverse mating behaviors which would prevent them from being adopted. Our adopters often update us with stories of how happy they are with their adopted felines. Recently we took in a senior gray female cat named Stormy who was left behind in the apartment of a disabled veteran who had to go into an extended care facility. Stormy tested positive for FiV, had dental surgery, and had a senior blood panel which indicated the beginning of kidney disease requiring a special diet. A shelter supporter and cat behaviorist stopped in to visit and met Stormy at our shelter one day and fell in love.  The fact that Stormy had already received extended veterinary care provided the peace of mind she needed to make the decision to adopt her. Stormy's medical expenses were $1200 but her excellent veterinary care enabled her to get a new home.
Description

Cats are evaluated medically and socially, applications are reviewed and references are checked, we work with approved applicants to make the best possible adoption outcome. An adoption contract is then signed by the adopter.

Population Served Adults / Aging, Elderly, Senior Citizens / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The longterm success of this program is largely dependent on our ability to become financially sustainable within the next two years.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Our Excel tracking of sources of intake and animal outcomes indicates that the number of our shelter residents over the course of each of the last three calendar years (2014, 2015, 2016) has grown by approximately 30% per year. The number of adoptions during those same three years has increased by numbers roughly equivalent to our intakes. There were 158 adoptions in 2014, 192 adoptions in 2015, 261 adoptions in 2016.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. The number of animals returned to us within two weeks, under the terms of our Adoption Contract, is less than 2%. This indicates that our adopted animals go to their forever homes healthy, well socialized, and suited to the homes in which they are placed.
Description About 45 feral cats in 11 managed colonies along the shoreline are fed daily by our volunteers. Branford Compassion Club feral feeders are scheduled by our feral care coordinator. BCC provides a monthly food allotment (both dry and canned) to the feral feeders who pick it up at our shelter. The community cat/feralcaregivers monitor the health and safety of the colony cats.  Any new cats are trapped, neutered, vaccinated and returned to the colony, but if they are deemed suitable for adoption we accept them into our shelter.  Any injured or sick cats are trapped and brought to the vet for treatment.
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The number of cats at an individual colony will not continue to grow because we have neutered the existing cats.  They will not be spreading disease because they have been vaccinated.  They will not be a nuisance to the community because their mating behaviors are curtailed by neutering.  Neutered cats that have an adequate supply of food and access to warm shelters hunt less and are less likely to roam, and perceived to be less of a public nuisance.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. With ideal conditions, over a period of time the population of a managed cat colony will become zero and the colony will become obsolete. Ideal conditions mean vaccinating and neutering every cat in the colony and  not adding any new cats to the population. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Ideal conditions do not exist in the real world.  Although we strive to monitor the status of any new cats that make their way to a colony, we can't control the element of human abandonment.  Sometimes people become aware of the location of a feral cat colony and drop off unwanted cats.  Just the addition of one unspayed female and one intact male can wreak havoc on population numbers. Some cats are extremely wary and will not go into a trap. These factors can keep prevent a colony from getting smaller over time.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Due to close daily monitoring by our feral caregivers, the numbers at most of our colonies have decreased over the years.  For example, one of our larger colonies had over twenty cats in 2010, but today there are about seven. Cats become victims of weather events, prey, sickness, traffic accidents, and human cruelty. Just a few months ago one of these colony cats was found with a serious leg wound.  At the vet it was determined that the cat's pelvis and leg were fractured by someone using a shotgun.,  A police report was filed, the bullet was submitted to the police for evidence, and the cat had to be humanely euthanized because it was suffering. Although it was a tragic event, the fact that this cat was discovered quickly by one of our volunteers is a comfort since the cat did not have to suffer long.  Another one of our former colonies right in a high traffic area of Branford had about a dozen cats in the year 2000 and was closed last year. 
Description Feral cats and abandoned house cats that have turned wary and distrustful of humans often show up in people's backyards seeking food to survive.  Many Good Samaritans feed these helpless animals, who sometimes form small colonies in which they share their food source and shelter together to survive. Many people seek assistance from us to trap, neuter and release these cats, either in financial form or by needing an experienced trapper to pick them up.
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Cats stop breeding when they are trapped, neutered, and returned, and become less of a public nuisance.  They are less likely to spread disease.  Since there are fewer cats, people are more willing and financially able to provide food for them.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. If cats are spayed and neutered they will not reproduce, which will eliminate overpopulation and lessen perception of cats being a public nuisance.  One female cat and her offspring can produce between 100 and 400 kittens in a seven-year period, based on a reproductive rate of six kittens per year and assuming 75% kitten mortality in each litter.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Last year the Department of Agriculture issued 50 spay/neuter certificates that need to be used between August 1, 2016 and April 1, 2017.  We used all of the certificates , and also paid for neutering additional cats at our shelter vet and at Nutmeg Spay Neuter Clinic in Stratford. The hard part is responding to the number of assistance calls that we receive each week, scheduling appointments at the vet, trapping cats for the appointments (cats are unpredictable), transporting the cats, providing a recovery area, and paying the bills for theses services. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Last year in 2016 we trapped and returned over 70 cats with the help of our collaborators.  After the vouchers were used up, Branford Compassion Club absorbed the extra expense.  
Description A list of fully evaluated foster homes for both mother cats with kitten, pregnant mother cats, motherless or older kittens and special needs adult cats is maintained by our Shelter Manager. These fosterers form the backbone of what we do particularly from March through October (kitten season) when the need for placement is overwhelming. Kittens with or without a momcat do best when they are socialized and cared for in a homelike environment where they learn to trust and be comfortable with their foster-caregivers. Recruiting and training appropriate individuals for this work is vital to our mission.
Population Served General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Our Foster Care Program is enormously successful as evidenced by the scores of healthy, well-cared for, well-adjusted kittens we are able to send out to new "forever homes" each year. Without the recruitment, training and tireless efforts of the fosterers themselves this would not be possible.
Program Comments
CEO Comments
Board Comments:
 
The commitment, will and devotion to our mission by our Board and our volunteers is truly inspiring. Branford Compassion Club has been and continues to be a welcoming place for cats and humans alike.  If we are able to become financially sustainable over the next two years, we will be able to move forward with new programs and community initiatives which will carry our mission forward for another 20 years.  The needs are greater than ever, the imagination needed to meet them is within us. We will be out of business in under three (3) years if significant additional funding is not obtained. As a Board, we cannot allow this to happen.
CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Marcia. L. Turner
Term Start Jan 2018
Email mlturnerpdmm@outlook.com
Experience
*Marcia Turner is not CEO, but is President of the BOD.  Branford Compassion Club does not have a CEO.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 110
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 0%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title President and Shelter Manager
Experience/Biography Lianne Soucy has been volunteering with Branford Compassion Club since 2012 and quickly assumed the role of Volunteer Coordinator.  Lianne was in charge of training shelter volunteers. She also fosters cats and kittens in her home, and assists with direct shelter care. Lianne received her graduate degree in education from Eastern CT State University in 2001 and has since taught in several school systems in Connecticut.
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation N/A
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Collaborations
The Greater New Haven Cat Project, Cheryl DiFillipo
Fix & Feed North Haven Inc., Lisa Comeau, President
Feline and Education Exchange, Virginia Henry, President
PetShield Veterinary Hospital, Dr. Kelly Shanley, Lead Veterinarian 
CT Humane Society, Westport branch, Bliss Kern, Shelter Manager
Comments
CEO Comments

Please see: Board of Directors Comments under FINANCIALS

As stated earlier, BCC does not have a CEO/Executive Director

Our organization's principal Officer for both Governance and Management is Marcia Turner, identified as President of the Board of Directors.
Board Chair
Ms. Marcia L. Turner PDMM
Company Affiliation Y.E.A., LLC
Term Jan 2018 to Dec 2023
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Ms. Patricia Cotton Past President, Branford Compassion Club
Ms. Christine Gagne Community Volunteer
Ms. Margaret Johnson Community Volunteer
Ms. Leslie Johnston Community Volunteer
Ms. Marilyn Kennedy Founding member
Ms. Eunice Lasala Founding member
Mr. Harold Nyren
Dr. Kelly Shanley DVMPet Shield Veterinary Hospital-Lead Veterinarian
Ms. Lianne Soucy Branford Compassion Club Shelter Manager
Ms. Cheryl J. Wilcox Esq.Cheryl J. Wilcox, Attorney at Law
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 10
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 5
Board Term Limits 0
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Insurance
Board Co-Chair
Ms. Lianne Soucy
Term Dec 2015 to Nov 2020
Email liannesoucy7@hotmail.com
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Strategic Planning / Strategic Direction
CEO Comments

As stated elsewhere, the By-Laws of BCC do not provide for a CEO/Executive Director.

Please see: Board of Directors Comments under FINANCIALS
 

 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $105,000.00
Projected Expenses $199,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$217,857$327,513$73,235
Current Assets$216,957$326,613$72,335
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets$217,857$327,513$73,235
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Bartlett Foundation $2,500Trailviews Foundation $5,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Loeb Foundation $2,000The Trico Foundation $5,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --The Trico Foundation $1,590 --
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Anticipated In 3 Years
Comments
CEO Comments

Board comments:

Branford Compassion Club's most critical challenge is to become and remain self-sustaining. The urgent need/demand for the services and assistance we provide continues to exceed the availability/supply of those services and of our ability to afford to pay for them.

The cost to BCC for veterinary services provided to the cats and kittens  taken under our care is, by far, our largest expense and also the most necessary. It currently accounts for 50% of our annual expenses or about $100,000.00 per year and rising.
 
Since late 2015 we have added to the size of our Board and are now a 11-member Board. We meet monthly and every member in attendance at almost every meeting.
 
Our Board is committed, passionate about the work of our organization, fully engaged and determined to meet and overcome the challenges we must address in the next two years.
 
To that end, the Board has recently taken a number of steps to position BCC for a brighter financial future: We have invested 50% of our organization's funds with The Organization Fund at The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven. We are now actively soliciting grants from several different sources including the Konapacke Fund at TCFGNH,  The Petco Foundation and are seeking larger corporate donations to supplement our smaller personal donations and regular fund raising efforts.
 
We have taken steps to enhance our social media presence to increase awareness of our work including feline rescue, sheltering and feline adoption services and TNR (Trap, Neuter, Return) programs in conjunction with the State of CT Department of Agriculture Voucher Program for feline population control.
 
Our fundraising events are designed to increase awareness of our mission as well as to raise money. These events are enthusiastically undertaken, well-received by the public and generally very successful. But the funds they produce do not begin to meet the financial needs of our organization. We have many loyal supporters and are making new friends and creating new partnerships all the time. But we know we must increase that base of support and connect with new funding sources is we are to become "sustainable".
 
We will not allow this organization to fail. The cats are still depending on us.
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 2037 Foxon Rd. (Rt. 80)
North Branford, CT 06471
Primary Phone 203 483-6369
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Marcia. L. Turner
Board Chair Ms. Marcia L. Turner PDMM
Board Chair Company Affiliation Y.E.A., LLC

 

Related Information

Promote Civic Vitality

Greater New Haven’s vibrancy is linked to its communities’ support of its neighborhoods, public gardens and sports, as well as its commitment to the protection of its people and pets.