Children's Community Programs of Connecticut
446A Blake St., Suite 100
New Haven CT 06515
Contact Information
Address 446A Blake St., Suite 100
New Haven, CT 06515-
Telephone (203) 786-6403 x
Fax 203-786-6408
E-mail gtest@ccp-ct.org
Web and Social Media
CCP foster parents were thrilled Governor Elect Ned Lamont visited CCP to honor volunteers on his Day of Service.
CCP's future home in the heart of Westville, New Haven - we will finally have a permanent home!
CCP is grateful for its volunteer mentors and foster parents who support youth!
Mission

The Children's Community Programs of Connecticut, Inc. is a private, non-profit, multi-service agency that provides diverse and creative social and educational support services to children and families throughout Connecticut. Every family is our focus.

A Great OpportunityHelpThe nonprofit has used this field to provide information about a special campaign, project or event that they are raising funds for now.

This year CCP hopes to raise $50,000 for technology improvements. In an environment of constantly changing technology and data requirements, CCP's computers and other technology are extremely outdated. For example, we still keep paper files on all of our clients. CCP needs state of the art technology in our new home (due to open in late 2020), to better serve children and families. CCP will purchase a number of improvements aimed at increased quality of services and efficiency. Costs for each component vary. Our first priority is to eliminate cumbersome paper files and install an Electronic Health Record to provide more accurate data, improve results, support better decision making and improve client and program data tracking. It will also reduce the amount of time staff spend on recordkeeping. In addition, we plan to 1) purchase laptops and mobile devices to replace PC's, allowing our staff to better serve clients across the state, 2) install video and audio conferencing in our meeting and training rooms, 3) install a cloud-based accounting and human resources system; 4) update our website and social media presence; 5) install state of the art building and data security; and 6) integrate video and messaging into our communications with families, staff and community partners. Ultimately we believe these changes will improve results for the children and families we serve.

A Great Opportunity Ending Date Dec 31 2020
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2001
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Brian F. Lynch MSW, LCSW
Board Chair Ms. Carole Porto
Board Chair Company Affiliation Dept. of Children and Families, Retired
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

The Children's Community Programs of Connecticut, Inc. is a private, non-profit, multi-service agency that provides diverse and creative social and educational support services to children and families throughout Connecticut. Every family is our focus.

Background

The Children’s Community Programs of Connecticut, founded in 1999, is a multi-service agency whose mission is to provide diverse and creative support services to children and families throughout Connecticut. CCP serves approximately 600 people and supports 125 foster families and 100 volunteer mentors annually. Programs include a Therapeutic Foster and Kinship Care program; Kinship Support Services Center; One on One Youth Mentoring program; Family Check-Up® home visiting for parents of children aged 2-8; Youth Transition Services (job counseling and training for youth and young adults); Pathways Academy (a school for special needs youth) and the Education Support Services program (legal advocacy for court involved youth and their families).


All CCP’s programs were designed to improve the well-being of the people we serve. CCP believes that a mix of services, tailored to each person’s strengths and needs, and provided in the home, school or community (rather than in an institutional setting), will help our clients thrive. Services may include clinical supports, education, intensive case management, legal advocacy and wraparound services such as mentoring, recreation, respite, etc.

The agency applies a philosophical framework to all its endeavors. This framework includes the beliefs that: (1) each client is a unique individual and deserves to be valued, respected and heard; (2) no client exists or should exist in a vacuum; meeting a client’s needs demands an understanding of the client’s extended family, culture and community; and (3) a key measure of the agency’s success is its ability to connect people to appropriate services. In addition, CCP is committed to innovative programming, training and supporting staff, engaging consumers in program design, and collaborating with community partners. CCP uses the Results Based Accountability (RBA) approach to track and analyze data to improve our services.

CCP is based in the greater New Haven area, but two of its programs (Therapeutic Foster Care and Education Support Services) serve people statewide. Several other programs reach beyond the Greater New Haven area to serve additional towns.

Impact

CCP’s Strategic Plan includes these three key goals:  1) enhance use of current technology to better serve our clients;  2) improve use of consumer feedback and data-driven decision making to improve quality; and 3) expand CCP's kinship services and after-school supports to meet growing needs.

In its twentieth year, CCP is experiencing significant growth while responding to increased demand for services. Our biggest accomplishments over the last year include:

1) Purchasing a building to be renovated as CCP’s permanent home in Westville, with a grant from the State of Connecticut;

2) Meeting or exceeding all goals (improved behavior, reduced recidivism and improved educational outcomes) for our newly established Educational Support Services Program (funded by Connecticut’s Court Support Services Division) which offers educational and legal advocacy services for children and youth who are court-involved;

3) Nearly doubling the number of children served and foster families supported through CCP’s Therapeutic Foster Care and Kinship Care Program; and

4) Partnering with the Council on Accreditation, the largest accrediting body for social services agencies in the US, to seek accreditation by 2021.



Needs

The agency’s current greatest needs are for funds to support:

  • Technology upgrades including an Electronic Health Record ($100,000);
  • Afterschool activities for children and youth; and
  • Supports for vulnerable older youth and young adults.

CEO Statement

As CCP marks its twentieth anniversary, the board and staff remain driven to provide diverse and creative support services to children and families so that they can remain safely at home and thrive in their communities. We strive to continually assess the community strengths and needs, and collaborate with families, community partners and funders to develop responsive services. 


Recognizing the rapidly changing business and service environments, this past year we made multiple improvements. First, we secured funding to purchase and renovate a building to become CCP’s future home, in the heart of New Haven’s Westville neighborhood. In addition, we instituted several business improvements. For example, we updated our strategic plan, expanded our fundraising and development work to diversify funding, and added a Human Resources director. We launched an accreditation process which will result in improved training and safety education for staff, establishment of stakeholder advisory groups and updated policies and procedures.

We expanded services, adding the Educational Support Services Program to help families with youth at risk of suspensions or expulsions due to their behavior. We established the Kinship Service Center to provide support to the increasing number of relatives caring for their children. We also created a new weekend foster parent training program that shortens the time needed to become a licensed foster parent.

CCP also launched a community outreach program to let people know about our services, get feedback from clients and explore collaboration opportunities. For example, last year CCP collaborated with Family Centered Services and the New Haven Health Department to launch an evidence-based home visiting program for families with children aged 2-8 called Family Check-Up. This new program is funded by the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood to serve the Greater New Haven area and is the only Family Check-Up program in the state. This year CCP initiated a city-wide kinship needs assessment to identify what service gaps for grandparents and other relatives caring for children. This project is a partnership with Tufts Health Plan Foundation, New Haven Probate Court and several local nonprofits serving grandparents/kin.

We believe these enhancements will improve quality and help improve outcomes for the children and families we serve. We are excited about the future. Our board and agency leadership are committed to serving the families of the Greater New Haven area.

Board Chair Statement

CCP is undergoing exciting changes as it evolves to better serve children and families in the Greater New Haven area. Having worked with vulnerable children and families my entire career, I understand the challenges CCP staff face. As former Deputy Commissioner at the Connecticut Department of Children and Families,  I also recognize the need to be a nimble and responsive nonprofit in a changing business environment. I worked with CCP for many years before I joined the Board and am delighted to serve. Over the years I have witnessed the organization’s ability to adapt while staying true to its goals of keeping children in safe and loving families and helping them thrive in their own community. 


During my term as Board President we are positioning CCP for the future by updating our strategic plan, with a focus on evaluation/quality improvement, financial stability, and structural supports like improved technology. With the full support of the board, CCP is tailoring its service array to meet the changing needs of children and families, developing after school programs and supports for teens, and expanding services for kin caregivers, for example. We are establishing a community relations and outreach program to better engage and collaborate with families and community partners. We are responding to the increased demand for improved quality and evidence by pursuing accreditation, using a Results Based Accountability approach, and updating our technology. We are in the process of diversifying our funding in order to reduce reliance on state government contracts and enhancing human resources to support an excellent workforce. Finally, we are in the process of renovating a building in the heart of Westville's New Haven neighborhood that will become the permanent home for CCP as we look forward to the next twenty years.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Children's and Youth Services
Secondary Organization Category Education / Special Education
Tertiary Organization Category Employment / Job Training
Areas Served
New Haven
Hamden
East Haven
North Haven
West Haven
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Milford
Orange
Shelton
Derby
Guilford
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
North Branford
Oxford
Seymour
Shoreline
Wallingford
Woodbridge
State wide

CCP primarily serves Greater New Haven in all of its programs. Two of its programs are available statewide - Therapeutic Foster and Kinship Care, and Education Support Services.

Programs
Description

CCP's Therapeutic Foster and Kinship Care program recruits, screens, trains and approves qualified applicants to become foster parents or kin (relative) caregivers for children and adolescents who are identified as requiring a therapeutic level of support by the Department of Children and Families. Specific services include case management, foster family/kinship caregiver support, coordination with DCF regarding permanency planning, referrals for mental health services, 24/7 emergency on-call support, child and family advocacy, and coordination with schools and other service providers.

The program's goal is to improve permanency and well-being outcomes for children in foster care with behavioral needs. Ideally they will return home to their biological family.  If that is not possible, the goal is for them to be adopted or to live with a legal guardian who can act as their parent. The program recruits, trains and supports foster parents (and engages kin caregivers) who are committed, confident and capable of providing outstanding care to vulnerable children and young people, without regard to racial, cultural, religion, language, gender, sexuality and any disability they might experience. The program ensures that all children placed in CCP's foster homes enjoy a stable and consistent experience of safe, warm and caring family life offered by skilled and well-supported foster parents until a more permanent living arrangement can be determined.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

1) Clients will feel that the services provided by the program were effective.

2) The number of foster parents recruited each year will increase.

3) Fewer than 25% of the placements result in an exit that is for a negative reason (foster family asks child to be moved, child is placed in a higher level of care such as residential treatment because their behavioral health got worse, etc.).

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The mission of the Therapeutic Foster Care program is to provide children with safe and therapeutic families in which to live and to help them return home or live with a permanent family. Goals include 1) increased safety and stability for the children/youth, 2) increased % of children whose treatment goals are met; and 2) increased percentages of children/youth who exit the program for a positive reason (return home to biological family, become adopted or go to live with a legal guardian).

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.


CCP employs one .5 FTE Quality Control Manager to oversee program data and quality control efforts. In addition, the agency dedicates a portion of each program manager’s job description to quality assurance. Each agency program is required to determine (at minimum) three program goals, along with criteria by which success will be measured. CCP uses the Results Based Accountability method in partnership with Clear Impact (which provides training and technical assistance to staff). Program goals are reviewed every quarter by the CCP Management Team. Client feedback comes in the form of data from annual Satisfaction Surveys as well as through a Stakeholder Advisory Group that is being reconvened in 2020. Results are aggregated and reviewed by the agency-wide Quality Improvement Team. Each program’s practice is modified as needed based on the results.  CCP has also begun the process to become accredited. This process includes random case reviews to ensure case notes and required documentation exceed all standards required by the Department of Children and Families, the Council on Accreditation (COA) and the national Family Focused Treatment Association's standards. CCP staff recently conducted a practice case review and actual case reviews with COA Peer Reviewers will begin in late 2020.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

1) 95% of clients reported that they were satisfied with the services they received, on the most recent Client Satisfaction Survey.

2) Number of foster families (including relatives or kin families) doubled between 2017 and 2019.

3) 93% of youth discharged through the program were positive/planned discharges.

Description

Youth Transition Services (YTS) provides educational assistance, vocational training and employment related supports to at-risk youth and young adults aged 14-24 who reside in New Haven County and a few other towns in Connecticut. YTS consists of two discreet programs – Youth Community Development (YCD) and Pathways Academy Transition Services. Through funding sources such as Workforce Alliance, the City of New Haven, and local school districts, YCD provides participants with the opportunity to earn vocational certificates and licenses. Youth served in the program receive an assessment, participate in job readiness and occupational skills training classes, do community service and work in paid and unpaid internships in various fields. Educational support such as tutoring is provided for youth working on obtaining their high school diploma, GED, or post-secondary degree. 

Pathways Academy Transition Services offer similar supports in a school-environment, tailoring services to each youth’s abilities and interests, and offering supplemental services like job fairs, independent living skills training, supported employment and transportation.

The program goal is to assist youth/young adults served to learn self-sufficiency skills and to achieve their goals related to employment or education.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Adults / People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Short and long term goals are set with each young person, their family and, for Pathways student, educational staff. Each plan is unique to that individual, and progress in meeting those goals is measured regularlary. For the Youth Community Development program, our goal is that at least 72% of clients will be placed and remain in a job or educational program in the 4th quarter after leaving the program. 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The mission of the Youth Transition Services program is to improve educational and vocational success of the youth and young adults we serve.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

CCP employs one .5 FTE Quality Control Manager to oversee program data and quality control efforts. In addition, the agency dedicates a portion of each program manager’s job description to quality assurance. Each agency program is required to determine (at minimum) three program goals, along with criteria by which success will be measured. CCP uses the Results Based Accountability method in partnership with Clear Impact which provides training and technical assistance to staff. Program goals are reviewed every quarter by the Management Team. Client Satisfaction Surveys are distributed annually each year and the results are aggregated and also reviewed by the Quality Improvement Team. Each program’s practice is modified as needed based on the results. CCP has also begun the process to become accredited. This process includes random case reviews to ensure case notes and required documentation exceed all standards required by the Department of Children and Families, the Council on Accreditation (COA) and the national Family Focused Treatment Association's standards. CCP staff recently conducted a practice case review and actual case reviews with COA Peer Reviewers will begin in late 2020.  

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
  • 48% of clients who were placed in a job or educational program remained in that job or program (or had graduated from it) 4 quarters after leaving the program.
 
 
Description

Family Education and Support Services (FESS) provides an array of services for families with children ages 0-8, including home visiting (Family Check-Up), child development screening and education (Sparkler), parenting groups, ParentStrong community workshops and coordination of the Greater New Haven Pre-to-Three Network. The Family Check-Up ® (FCU) home visiting program is funded through a grant from the State of Connecticut Office of Early Childhood. Family Centered Services, the lead agency for this collaboration, partnered with CCP and the City of New Haven Health Department to launch this new, evidence-based home visiting program in July 2019. It is the only FCU program in the state of Connecticut. FCU is a brief, family-centered intervention for families with children ages 2-8 and is designed to reduce children’s challenging behaviors by supporting positive parenting practices.

The FCU model is strengths-based and promotes positive family management. The intervention has two phases: 1) an initial assessment and feedback and 2) Everyday Parenting (parent management training), which focuses on positive behavior support, healthy limit-setting, and relationship building. The intervention model is adaptive and tailored to address the specific needs of each child and family and can be integrated into a variety of service settings, including home visitation programs, public schools, WIC (the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children), primary health care, and community mental health settings.

FESS also provides Circle of Security parenting groups and conducts educational workshops in the community under the moniker ParentStrong. In addition, CCP offers Sparkler, a mobile app and related services that help parents, grandparents, and other caregivers harness the science of early child and brain development to make the most of the early years. Sparkler is funded by a grant from the state Office of Early Childhood in partnership with the University of Connecticut. 

Finally, FESS coordinates the Greater New Haven area Pre-to-Three Network, which holds monthly meetings for over two dozen local parenting programs.
Population Served Adults / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Connecticut's Office of Early Childhood has a comprehensive set of goals for its early childhood programs and FCU requires tracking of a number of other measures as well. Here are a few examples from over 25 program goals that FESS measures:

-Reduce challenging behaviors of children in the program;

-Increase percentage of parents who report increased use of positive parenting practices;

-90% of parents enrolled in the program will not have a substantiated case of child abuse or neglect; and

-90% of enrolled children are up to date on their well-child visits with healthcare provider.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The goal of Family Check-Up is to reduce children’s challenging behaviors by supporting positive parenting practices.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

CCP employs one .5 FTE Quality Control Manager to oversee program data and quality control efforts. In addition, the agency dedicates a portion of each program manager’s job description to quality assurance. Each agency program is required to determine (at minimum) three program goals, along with criteria by which success will be measured. CCP uses the Results Based Accountability method in partnership with Clear Impact which provides training and technical assistance to staff. Program goals are reviewed every quarter by the Management Team. Client Satisfaction Surveys are distributed annually each year and the results are aggregated and also reviewed by the Quality Improvement Team. Each program’s practice is modified as needed based on the results. CCP has also begun the process to become accredited. This process includes random case reviews to ensure case notes and required documentation exceed all standards required by the Department of Children and Families, the Council on Accreditation (COA) and the national Family Focused Treatment Association's standards. CCP staff recently conducted a practice case review and actual case reviews with COA Peer Reviewers will begin in late 2020. 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

This program began in July 2019. Initial results will be available in 2020.

Description

The One on One Mentoring Program provides mentors to youth who are court-involved or involved with the Department of Children and Families. Last year CCP matched 81 youth with mentors. Mentors come from all walks of life and include police officers, youth workers, teachers, chefs, architects, hairdressers and clothing store owners. Staff recruits, screens, trains and matches prospective adults to mentor youth. Youth are referred by probation officers or social workers. Youth mentees are referred to receive support from either a traditional (volunteer) mentor, 4-6 hours a month for one year, or from an intensive (paid) mentor, 5 hours a week for up to 6 months. The program is funded by CSSD (Court Support Services Division) in conjunction with GPP (The Governors Prevention Partnership).


Every youth matched with a mentor will have the opportunity to work on academic goals, career navigation opportunities, socialization, and support in life’s challenges. In addition to one-on-one activities, group activities are made available to the mentors and mentees on a quarterly basis. Incentives such as gift cards to sports centers, museums, boat rides, movies, restaurants and gas cards support mentor/mentee time together. A mentor appreciation dinner and awards ceremony occur annually to honor and show respect for the mentor’s time and dedication to the youth.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Offenders/Ex-Offenders / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Program success measures, which are based on national standards for successful mentoring programs, and state standards for the funder, Connecticut’s Governor’s Prevention Partnership, include:

# of youth matched with a mentor;

% of youth who participate in group activities with other youth and mentors;

% of matches that last at least six months;

% of youth who report mentoring has increased their ability to be successful; and

% of youth satisfied or highly satisfied with their mentoring experience.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The mission of the One-on-One Mentoring program is to provide youth with a positive mentoring experience to increase the youth's educational, vocational, and daily life skills.

The goal is to help young people become more successful in life and reduce recidivism.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

The CCP employs one .5 FTE Quality Control Manager to oversee program data and quality control efforts. In addition, the agency dedicates a portion of each program manager’s job description to quality assurance. Each agency program is required to determine (at minimum) three quality improvement goals for the year, along with criteria by which success will be measured. CCP uses the Results Based Accountability method in partnership with Clear Impact (which provides training and technical assistance to staff). Program goals are reviewed every quarter by the CCP Management Team. Client feedback comes in the form of data from annual Satisfaction Surveys as well as through a Stakeholder Advisory Group that is being reconvened in 2020. Results are aggregated and reviewed by the agency-wide Quality Improvement Team. Each program’s practice is modified as needed based on the results. CCP has also begun the process to become accredited. This process includes random case reviews to ensure case notes and required documentation exceed all standards required by the Department of Children and Families, the Council on Accreditation and the national Family Focused Treatment Association's standards. CCP staff recently conducted a practice case review and actual case reviews with COA Peer Reviewers will begin in late 2020.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

For the most recent year for which data is available:

· 80% of participants reported satisfaction with the program's services through the Customer Satisfaction Survey.

· 75% of participants attended a minimum of two group activities.

Description

Pathways Academy is an approved private, special education school that provides programming designed to meet the educational, social and emotional needs of its students. It serves a diverse student population, including those students identified as emotionally disturbed, learning disabled or having other health impairments. The school serves middle and high school students between the ages of 11-21; last year it served 51 students. Pathways uses a trauma-focused approach to behavior management, conducts home visits and collaborates with local employers, vocational programs and community agencies to provide transitional services. Its experienced staff understand that all students have unique learning needs and focus on ensuring that all students have an opportunity to improve academically, socially, and emotionally. Pathways has a history of collaborating with school districts, parents and other state and local organizations to plan for and ensure that students receive a well-rounded, nurturing program that enhances self-esteem and promotes academic success. It has a comprehensive Transition Services program that provides volunteer and job opportunities, vocational training, and life skills development such as financial literacy education. In addition, Pathways and Connecticut Health Centers collaborate to provide an onsite school clinic that offers behavioral health services to students and their families.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Other Health/Disability /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

The program's goals are 1) to meet or exceed the instructional goals for each student and 2) return the student to their home school or graduate from Pathways.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

The CCP employs one .5 FTE Quality Control Manager to oversee program data and quality control efforts. In addition, the agency dedicates a portion of each program manager’s job description to quality assurance. Each agency program is required to determine (at minimum) three program goals, along with criteria by which success will be measured. CCP uses the Results Based Accountability method in partnership with Clear Impact (which provides training and technical assistance to staff). Program goals are reviewed every quarter by the CCP Management Team. Client feedback comes in the form of data from annual Satisfaction Surveys as well as through a Stakeholder Advisory Group that is being reconvened in 2020. Results are aggregated and reviewed by the agency-wide Quality Improvement Team. Each program’s practice is modified as needed based on the results. CCP has also begun the process to become accredited. This process includes random case reviews to ensure case notes and required documentation exceed all standards required by the Department of Children and Families, the Council on Accreditation and the national Family Focused Treatment Association's standards. CCP staff recently conducted a practice case review and actual case reviews with COA Peer Reviewers will begin in late 2020.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

All instructional goals were met or exceeded. In 2019, 5 seniors graduated from Pathways Academy.

Description

ESS is a program created in 2017, launched in 2018 and funded by the State of Connecticut's Court Support Services Division, part of the Judicial Branch. CCP is the sole grantee for this program, serving all of Connecticut. In consultation with Juvenile Probation, our Program Manager with contracted educational advocates and attorneys, review the educational needs of each youth referred for services and provide advocacy and representation. On an individual basis, the program assesses the educational needs of court-involved youth. Families are matched with an educational advocate and/or attorney, depending on assessed need. Educational advocates and attorneys represent families of referred youth in school meetings, assist in navigating the special education system, and provide guidance about appropriate placement and programming. The ESS team also provides training in the community to educate parents of justice system-involved youth about educational issues.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Offenders/Ex-Offenders /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Measures include number of students served, number of school meetings attended, number of trainings provided and recidivism rates.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The goal of ESS is to identify and address the educational needs of court-involved students (all of whom have special needs) to improve pro-social behaviors and reduce recidivism. In addition the program trains professionals parents and assists in developing more effective policies.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

CCP employs 1 .5 FTE Quality Control Manager to oversee program data and quality control efforts. In addition, the agency dedicates a portion of each program manager’s job description to quality assurance. Each agency program is required to determine (at minimum) three annual quality improvement goals, along with criteria by which success will be measured. CCP uses the Results Based Accountability method in partnership with Clear Impact which provides training and technical assistance to staff. Program goals are reviewed every quarter months by the CCP Management Team. Client Satisfaction Surveys are distributed twice each year and the results are aggregated and also reviewed by the Quality Improvement Team. Each program’s practice is modified as needed based on the results.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

In its first year the program, of the 228 clients served, 65% achieved improvement in attendance, compliance with school rules, and academic performance after any program involvement (even incomplete involvement).

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Brian F. Lynch MSW, LCSW
Term Start Jan 2001
Email blynch@ccp-ct.org
Experience
Brian has been the Executive Director since 2001
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 49
Number of Part Time Staff 5
Number of Volunteers 100
Number of Contract Staff 6
Staff Retention Rate 80%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 28
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 28
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 18
Female 42
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Chief Operating Officer
Experience/Biography

CCP's Chief Operating Officer has over 25 years’ experience working in a clinical and managerial capacity. He received his Psy.D. in Clinical Child/School Psychology from Yeshiva University. He currently oversees all operational and systemic functions of CCP including, but not limited to financial, regulatory, human resource and service delivery elements within all programs operated by the agency. He has extensive experience and knowledge in quality improvement, including but not limited to utilizing performance metrics, data based outcomes measurement, and organizational strategies, focusing on continually improving quality outcomes, productivity, and overall compliance and risk awareness.  

Title Chief Financial Officer
Experience/Biography

CCP's Chief Financial Officers has held several positions in the business office relating to human resources, payroll administration, financial reporting and payables. She received her MBA with a concentration in Finance from Hawaii Pacific University, Honolulu, Hawai'i.

Randi has been the CFO since 2015 and has led many strategic initiatives to reduce costs, increase revenue and improve performance of various programs within the agency.  She oversees all accounting and financial reporting, budgeting, business systems, rental agreements, human resources and contracts.  
Title Director, New Program Development
Experience/Biography

Director of New Program Development Gretchen Test manages the agency’s fund development, community relations and strategic planning. Before coming to CCP, Gretchen served as Operations Director for Youth Law Center in San Francisco. From 2003-2017 she was Senior Associate with the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Child Welfare Strategy Group (CWSG) where she managed large public child welfare system consulting projects and grants to support child welfare reform around the US. Her areas of expertise include child welfare, kinship care, parent involvement, immigration, race equity and domestic violence. Formerly she directed the National Association of Public Child Welfare Administrators at the American Public Human Services Association and several Seattle area domestic violence programs. Gretchen has an MSW from the University of Washington has served as a practicum instructor for four graduate schools.

Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations

The agency's main collaborations are with its program funding sources, which include Connecticut's Department of Children and Families, Connecticut Court Support Services Department, Workforce Alliance, The Governor's Prevention Partnership, Connecticut Office of Early Childhood, and multiple public school systems (New Haven, East Haven, West Haven, Hamden). Our new Family Check-Up Home Visiting program is a formal collaboration with Family Centered Services (the lead agency for our grant with the CT Office of Early Childhood) and the City of New Haven Health Department. In addition, we partner with the ConnCAT, Community Action Agency, the Food Bank of East Haven, New Haven Adult Education, Bridges/ IICAPS, Clifford Beers, Wheeler Clinic, AFCAMP, New Haven Housing Authority, Westville Valley Renaissance Association, Center for Child Advocacy, New Haven Legal Assistance Association, CT Parent Advocacy Center and many more. We have job training partnerships with ConnCAT, New Reach Inc., Creative M.E. Daycare, Excel Academy, Southern Connecticut State University, LJB Security, CVS, Walgreens, TJ Maxx, Goodwill and the East Haven Food Bank. We coordinate the Birth to Three Network and participate in others such as local LIST network, CT Nonprofit Alliance, Westville Village Renaissance Association, and many more. Finally, we collaborate with 8 local colleges and universities to provide 15-20 undergraduate and graduate field placement and internships annually. 

Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Connecticut Community Nonprofit Alliance2020
Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization2020
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Certificate of AppreciationConnecticut Department of Children and Families2019
Comments
CEO Comments
1. CCP is undergoing significant positive growth. We are currently updating all our policies and plans as part of our work to become accredited through the Council on Accreditation; we expect to become accredited in early 2020. This work includes a comprehensive revision of all policies and plans (fundraising, management succession and training, communications, technology, quality improvement, etc.).   
2.  CCP was honored to be chosen as one of thirteen Connecticut nonprofits by Governor Ned Lamont during his Day of Service event highlighting the importance of volunteering, during the week of his inauguration. Governor Lamont, Lt. Governor Bysiewicz, Mayor Toni Harp, Senator Richard Blumenthal and Representative Rosa DeLauro all visited with CCP foster parents, children and staff.  
Board Chair
Ms. Carole Porto
Company Affiliation Dept. of Children and Families, Retired
Term Dec 2017 to Sept 2020
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Steven AraujoSTART Bank
Michael CruzHICCUP
Steven Errante JDLynch, Traub, Keefe & Errante, P.C.
Vivian Chris HiltonRetired
Kay KazmaierRetired
Everson MacielCommunity Volunteer
Sharon MacKinnelRetired
Glen MaleriIndependent Insurance Co.
Vincent MeluzioJP Morgan Chase Bank
Ann PratsonRetired
Taiwan RichardsonState of Connecticut Judicial Branch
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 8
Hispanic/Latino 2
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 5
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 0
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 0%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Liability
Automobile Insurance and Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Professional Liability
Improper Sexual Conduct/Sexual Abuse
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Investment
CEO Comments

CCP recently created a formal Community Outreach program. This program is working to engage youth, families and community members and other stakeholder to offer feedback, advice and input. As part of this work CCP will reconvene an advisory group, constituent advisory groups (including foster parents, mentors, young adults and parents who receive our services) and a youth advisory group. This effort will also help CCP comply with the Council on Accreditation standards for Stakeholder Engagement and Quality Improvement. In addition, as part of our Results Based Accountability approach, we measure client, volunteer and stakeholder satisfaction at least annually. Feedback is incorporated into our Quality Improvement Plan so that we are continually working to respond to consumer and community feedback and improve services.

 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2019
Fiscal Year End June 30 2020
Projected Revenue $7,520,876.00
Projected Expenses $7,314,996.00
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201820172016
Total Assets$2,109,293$1,621,662$1,762,809
Current Assets$2,058,862$1,549,157$1,675,316
Long-Term Liabilities$300,000$50,000$100,000
Current Liabilities$454,942$346,950$332,995
Total Net Assets$1,354,351$1,224,672$1,329,814
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201820172016
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountState of Connecticut $334,771State of Connecticut $384,233State of Connecticut $334,711
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign PurposeHelpCapital Campaigns are defined as a fundraising efforts over-and-above an organization's annual operating budget. Campaigns might include the purchase of land or a building, major renovations, and major equipment purchases. Endowment campaigns may also be included if the funds are legally restricted. The purpose of the capital campaign is to raise funds to complete Phase 2 renovation of our building on Whalley Avenue in New Haven (2nd floor training facility and basement offices).   
Goal $500,000.00
Dates Sept 2020 to Sept 2021
Amount Raised To Date 0 as of Feb 2020
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 446A Blake St., Suite 100
New Haven, CT 06515
Primary Phone 203 786-6403
Contact Email gtest@ccp-ct.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Brian F. Lynch MSW, LCSW
Board Chair Ms. Carole Porto
Board Chair Company Affiliation Dept. of Children and Families, Retired

 

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