New Haven Preservation Trust
922 State Street
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 922 State Street
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 562 x5919
Fax 615-556-0831
E-mail info@nhpt.org
Web and Social Media
Touring one of New Haven's historic neighborhoods
Mission
The Mission of the New Haven Preservation Trust (NHPT) is to honor and preserve New Haven’s architectural heritage – historic buildings and neighborhoods – through advocacy, education and collaboration.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1963
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years No
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director There is no CEO or ED. The organization has 1 full-tme and 1 part-time employees and 1 independent contractor.
Board Chair Dr. Rona Johnston
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale University
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
The Mission of the New Haven Preservation Trust (NHPT) is to honor and preserve New Haven’s architectural heritage – historic buildings and neighborhoods – through advocacy, education and collaboration.
Background

Since its founding in 1961, the New Haven Preservation Trust (NHPT) has been a driving force behind the preservation of the City’s historic buildings and places. Through advocacy, publications, historic research, technical assistance, tours, workshops, and private consultations, NHPT is an information resource and advocate for the architectural heritage that defines our City.

For almost 60 years, the Trust staff has provided free technical preservation advice to thousands of New Haven property owners, persuaded developers to renovate all or part of architecturally significant buildings, created a Historic Resources Inventory of the City, and supported the nomination of 35 individual properties and 18 historic districts to the National Register of Historic Places.

NHPT actively collaborates with neighborhood associations, institutions such as the New Haven Free Public Library and the Festival of Arts and Ideas, and public and private preservation groups. We also provide administrative support to the City’s Historic District Commission and work closely with the City Plan Department on preservation issues throughout New Haven.

NHPT played a key role in the preservation and restoration of the New Haven Free Public Library, the New Haven Post Office and Federal Building, New Haven City Hall, the John Davies Mansion, Union Station, and countless private residences and commercial buildings throughout the City. NHPT was instrumental in preserving a number of key local landmarks and led the effort to designate the City’s first Local Historic District, Wooster Square, in 1970.

Impact
Accomplishments: 1. NHPT initiated four new listings on the National Register of Historic Places, working closely with consultants and the State Historic Preservation Offices to prepare and submit materials to the National Park Service. Nominees were Dixwell Congregational Church, Chetstone/Dr. Mary Blair Moody House, Orange Street Historic District Boundary Increase, and the Morris Cove Historic District;
2. Presented two free community lectures on preservation and architectural topics of interest to the general public;
3. Co-sponsored an all-day symposium honoring the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act led by major figures in state and national preservation organizations. Topics included saving neighborhoods and public spaces; the use of historic buildings and communities to attract business, provide jobs and create tourism and interest; and the historic impact of African American communities throughout the U.S. and ways to ensure the voices of minorities are heard within the movement to save historic buildings and places;  
3. Presented six free public tours including 'before' and 'after' renovation tours, guided presentations of buildings with significant or interesting history, and behind-the-scenes looks at New Haven landmarks. Three tours are presented each year as part of the International Festival of Arts & Ideas;  
4. Presented workshops explaining the details of the Historic Homes Rehabilitation Tax Credit Program which provides financial incentives to homeowners undertaking renovations to their historic houses. Workshops were presented in Westville, Morris Cove and Downtown at the New Haven Free Public Library.  
 
2020 Goals:
1. Increase communications about NHPT programs and preservation activity through website, email and social media;
2. Develop possible new listings on the National Register of Historic Places as well as advocate for retention of NR listings for properties at risk;
3. Present new community lectures on preservation and architectural topics related to New Haven;
4. Increase the number and neighborhood distribution of small grants for renovation of distinct architectural features from the Historic Structures fund.
  
 
 
Needs
1.  Fundraising: NHPT does not have a development officer or staff capacity to seek grants and sponsorships. The Board oversees fundraising initiatives and is discussing initiatives to increase operating support and build reserves and endowment.
 
2.  Membership Growth:  As part of our 2020 goals, our membership program is being updated, offering greater value to our members.
  
3.  Diversity and breadth of skills on the Board of Directors:  NHPT is exploring ways to attract younger and more diverse Board members, as well as attract new directors with real estate, finance, and corporate backgrounds.
 
4.  Volunteers: The Board of Directors is reviewing NHPT's project/task structure with focus on ways to attract and engage new volunteers. 
CEO Statement n/a
Board Chair Statement

Since I was a child, I have been fascinated by houses and buildings. Whether I played with blocks, Legos, or Erector sets, I built houses. I grew up in suburban Pittsburgh, in a mile-square suburb built mainly between 1880 and 1930, with one 20-house hill-top 1960's subdivision carved out of the hilly woods, where I lived. The town had little houses, big houses, and apartments, the streets were lined with trees, a central walk-in school, and a neighborhood grocery store, shoe repair shop, and drugstore. This neighborhood setting always means home to me.

I have been in New Haven since 1974--first as a student and then as professional--and it is this same neighborhood quality that makes me love New Haven so much. New Haven is a city filled with neighborhoods, each with its own charm and history and each with its own importance.

The New Haven Preservation Trust's mission under its Strategic Plan is “to honor and preserve New Haven’s architectural heritage--historic buildings and neighborhoods--through advocacy, education, and collaboration.” For New Haven to be vital and alive, the focus is not just on one building, one street, or one institution--it is New Haven's entire built environment which allows our neighborhoods to be places where we can work, live and play together. This wonderful tapestry of houses, churches, stores, parks, factory buildings and educational buildings all work together to make New Haven special--and home.

With this as our mission and outlook, the Trust works hard to reach out to homeowners, fellow non-profit organizations, municipal staff and officials, and real estate and architectural professionals in New Haven to collectively celebrate New Haven’s distinct built environment and recognize the importance of preserving the structures which we have. In a time of tight finances for everyone, it is through these collaborations that the Trust’s reach has been extended and our voice and viewpoint in the community reinforced. Our members, donors and sponsors continue to be the foundation which allow us to undertake these tasks.

Everyone deserves to grow up and live in a community as warm and vital as the one I grew up in. As New Haven grows and changes over the years, we need to remember where we have come from and recognize how all of the components of built environment must come together towards that end. New Haven must have an educated and aware citizenry who recognize that preservation is done for the purpose of maintaining the valuable buildings and landscapes of New Haven which make our city unique, which make our neighborhoods strong--and which make New Haven “home.”

Bruce R. Peabody, President

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Historical Organizations
Secondary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Historical Organizations
Areas Served
New Haven
The New Haven Preservation Trust serves the entire City of New Haven. Board and staff work vigorously to extend the Trust's reach into neighborhoods to showcase and help preserve fine structures, especially the rich array of 19th- and 20th-century housing in our city.   In addition, our professional staff is often called upon to provide consultation services to owners, architects, developers and preservation organizations in other Connecticut towns.
Programs
Description
NHPT helps to educate the community on the character and importance of New Haven's built environment through our rich offering of educational programs. We honor and celebrate all neighborhoods in the city in lectures, workshops and architectural walking tours throughout the year including tours offered during the International Festival of Arts & Ideas. Our network of contacts allows us to offer behind-the-scenes tours of historic buildings that are not well known or open to the public. Two examples are the judges' chambers in the Federal District Courthouse on Church Street and the private meeting rooms of the Masonic Temple on Whitney Avenue. Recent tours include Ingalls Rink, Behind the Scenes at the Shubert Theater & Taft Hotel; "Concrete New Haven"; Dixwell United Church of Christ, and Union Station.
 
 
Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Our network of contacts allows us to offer behind-the-scenes access to historic buildings that are not well known or open to the public, 'pre' and 'post' renovation tours, and in-depth tours of architectural gems,  Participants are drawn from city-wide neighborhoods and surrounding towns.  Since this program's inception, we have added close to 1,000 new contacts to our mailing list and increased contributions by 53%.
 
The tours have become a signature component of our education program. NHPT's Program Committee monitors these events on a monthly basis and uses information gathered from participants, presenters and staff to evaluate each tour and to guide decisions for future presentations. NHPT tours fill to capacity within 24 hours of notice to the public. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
To emphasize the rich architectural fabric of New Haven, NHPT has continued to expand our offering of free walking tours.  The tours are an ongoing program that allows us to reach a broad audience, visit diverse areas of the city, and raise awareness of New Haven's treasures.  The walking tours open participants' eyes to architectural details that may have previously gone unnoticed. 
 
The majority of our tours are free and open to the public in addition to a few that are for members only. While we will always offer events that are free to all attendees, "members only" tours provide added value for our members and an incentive for others to join, thereby boosting our membership numbers and revenue. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Tour participants are asked to sign-in with their names and addresses. Participants may also be added to our mailing list. This allows NHPT staff to evaluate the audience we are reaching and compare it to our target audience. In addition, participants may be asked to participate in a brief survey on tour experience and satisfaction. The Program Committee evaluates the data along with information from tour presenters and staff and this analysis guides future events.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

In 2016, we offered 15 public and members-only tours. Our smallest tour had 22 people, while our largest tour, given as part of the International Festival, welcomed more than 130. Tours traditionally fill to capacity within 24 hours of announcement and average 30 - 35 attendees - - a number often dictated by the maximum allowed for a particular property. When available, we have offered up to three additional time slots for the same tour in order to accommodate a larger demand. This trend is becoming the norm as more people become aware of the high-quality, interesting programs that we offer.

Tracking tour participation has shown that a significant portion of new members reach us through these events.Tour participation can signal the beginning of a relationship, with financial support coming several years later. 

Description
NHPT works to make the public aware of the many programs, loans and grants available that provide financial support and guidelines for historic preservation. We offer hands-on workshops each year for homeowners, developers and others that explain how to use "Homeowner's Historic Tax Credits," a Federal program which reimburses construction costs for historic exterior renovations. These workshops. presented in partnership with the CT Dept. of Economic and Community Development, are offered free and open to the public.
Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
We have an ever-increasing demand for our Tax Credit Workshops. Data shows that individuals have attended more than one workshop and the discussions have become much more participatory. Attendees are becoming more aware of the types of professional and financial assistance that is available to help bring their project to completion and are arriving armed with specific questions and scenarios that drive a lively question and answer period.
 
In addition, we have been tracking increased interest in membership and other programs offered by NHPT. Our Heritage Date Plaque program made possible by generous support from Seabury Hill Realtors and Betsy Grauer Realty, invites property owners to attach a customized ceramic plaque to the exterior of their home, acknowledging the date of construction. Structures built at any time in all New Haven neighborhoods are eligible, celebrating the strength and longevity of our community and its buildings.
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
NHPT has presented an average of three Tax Credit workshops per year, subject to staff availability at the State Historic Preservation office.  As a result of these efforts, more applicants for this valuable program come from New Haven than from any other municipality in the state. New Haven properties represent 50% of all applications and a total of $17.1M in completed renovations in New Haven to date.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
NHPT tracks number of attendees, neighborhoods, and regions represented at each workshop. Each year, since the program's inception, we have noted increased demand for and interest in the information presented at these workshops. The success of this program is evident by the  high volume of completed New Haven house rehabilitation projects in relation to other communities throughout Connecticut.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
The State Historic Preservation Office began tracking data on applications to the Historic Homes Rehabilitation Tax Credit Program in 2000. Since that time, New Haven has made up 50% of applications received, the largest percentage for any municipality in Connecticut. Since 2010, $17.1M has been spent in New Haven on completed renovation projects.
Description

NHPT provides technical assistance to individuals and organizations with questions about historic preservation, restoration practices, and state and federal preservation standards.  We respond to property owners, realtors, architects, developers, city officials, and others who ask for information on historical and architectural significance of structures and sites in the area.  We offer guidance on rehabilitation standards and economic incentives for preservation projects. 

Working with the City Planning Department, NHPT staff meets with applicants to the Historic District Commission to advise on construction and renovation plans.  Our involvement has improved the application process for residents of Local Historic Districts and resulted in a smoother path to securing Certificates of Appropriateness. 
 
NHPT occasionally advocates for preservation of buildings scheduled for demolition, negotiating with owners, architects and developers to incorporate the historic property in a proposed development rather than demolishing it. 
 
Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
This program is directly linked to NHPT's core mission of educating the public and advocating historic preservation as a means of neighborhood stabilization and economic development.

Input and consultations with the NHPT staff has ensured that more property owners take the steps necessary to comply with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards for Rehabilitation, thereby ensuring the preservation of the City's architectural fabric.

We have continued our successful collaborations with local and regional partners on a variety of projects that affect the historic architecture of New Haven and Connecticut, and we have expanded the number of organizations with which we collaborate and who benefit from our consultations.  

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Recent studies show that preserving historic buildings has a handsome economic payoff. One study of the State’s three tax credit programs for historic properties showed that $32 million in credits triggered nearly $160 million in private investments – creating 560 job and nearly $30 million in wages – and generating more than $12 million in state & local taxes.

A second study looked at the effects of property values for properties in a local historic district. In no district, did being in the historic district reduce property values, and in 75% of the cases, properties in an historic district increased in value faster than those in the surrounding communities.

Historic Preservation is a good, smart, engine for economic development for every community.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Our staff and Board monitor the success of building projects on which NHPT consults via constituent correspondence, site visits, and photographic documentation. In addition, we receive communications from citizens, peer organizations and City departments about buildings in their purview, particularly those changing hands or where demolition is proposed. The Preservation Committee actively works with owners of buildings under observation or discussion. The Preservation Committee meets with developers, makes presentations to agencies such as the Board of Zoning Appeals, and occasionally writes Op-Ed pieces for publication.
 
We continue to assist the public, advertising the availability of expert technical assistance with increased publicity, online information, news stories, and follow-up at NHPT events.  Growth in the number of requests for advisory services is clear evidence of  increased awareness that such services exist.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
NHPT offers fee-for-service consultation for private rehabilitation projects throughout New Haven and the region. Clients have included Neighborhood Housing Services, Center Church on the Green, Habitat for Humanity, architectural firms, preservation developers and other non-profit institutions.
 
NHPT provides a reliable source of information on local history and historic preservation. The City of New Haven and NHPT have a partnered to create a searchable database project, hosted on the City's website, to allow easy access to the New Haven Historic Resource Inventory (HRI).  The HRI is a vast professionally-written database covering most historic structures in New Haven, currently available only in paper form.  
 
Description
For the last 10 years, NHPT has been showcasing Modernist buildings and sites in New Haven.  We completed a detailed inventory of more than 140 sites and buildings (c. 1930-1980), many nationally known. This was the first comprehensive architectural survey undertaken in New Haven in 30 years. NHPT's Modernism survey received a prestigious national award from DOCOMOMO (an international organization furthering the Documentation and Conservation of Monuments of the Modern Era).
 
The culmination of the project, a professionally-designed educational, gallery-style website of New Haven's Modernist sites is available at http://newhavenmodern.org/.  Content on this site continues to be updated and enriched, including rare mid-century photographs and oral histories from architects and historians. Grant funding and generous donations of time by architects Kevin Roche, Cesar Pelli and Herbert Newman bolstered this project. 
Population Served Adults / General/Unspecified /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. This project has a role in both education and advocacy. Its online, technology-driven nature increases the Trust's profile both locally and nationally.  Anecdotally, the website http://newhavenmodern.org/ draws more distinct online views than Modern Pizza, a renowned New Haven dining establishment.  The Modernism survey generated professionally-written Historic Resources Inventory forms for over 140 buildings; this effort has given each of these structures some local protection by ensuring a 90-day-delay of demolition period will be granted by the City should any of these properties face a threat.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Our goal for the Modernism study is two-fold.  We hope to increase awareness and appreciation of New Haven's extensive Modernist architecture in order to aid in its care, preservation and, ultimately, its protection.  We also hope to draw another audience to our organization, one which may think of historic preservation as staid and old-fashioned, not a current-day concern. Showcasing Modernist icons and placing them in a preservation context is designed to attract new NHPT members and friends. Historic preservation is for the future, not just the past!
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Online analytical tools and messaging features have shown us our local and national reach via the website (http://newhavenmodern.org/). This information it logged and tracked by the Communications Committee.
 
Since the launch of New Haven Modern, we have seen a substantial increase in online traffic, as well as increase in social media followers across all platforms. In its first year, the Modernism site had more than 6,300 unique visitors from around the world. In 2018, there were 8,959 distinct visits and in 2019, there were 9,192 distinct visits.
 
We have also added several new volunteers who were made aware of our work through this site, and have many new members who participate in associated Modernism-themed tours and events. 
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. The NewHavenModern website was awarded a Merit Award from the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation and an Award of Excellence from DOCOMOMO in America (DOcumentation and COnservation of buildings, sites and neighborhoods of the MOdern MOvement).  These awards were covered in print and electronic media and drove more visits to both nhpt.org and newhavenmodern.org.
Description

NHPT manages a Historic Structures Small Grant Program, which awards construction funding ($1,500 - $5,000) to property owners for restoration of distinct architectural features on the exterior of their historic houses or buildings. Grants have been given for renovation of porches, windows, wooden architectural detailing, masonry repairs and other historic features.  Applicants are advised as to construction methods and finishes by NHPT staff and must complete work within one year of approval.  Historic Structures grant applications are reviewed on a rolling basis and are overseen by the Preservation Committee.

The Historic Structures Fund has been generously supported by The Seedlings Foundation for the past 7 years.

Population Served Adults / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. The Preservation Committee, which oversees this program, has a goal of three to four grants each year, as funding allows.  A portion of the permanent funding for this program is held at the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven.  The HSF has been generously supported by The Seedlings Foundation, enabling us to increase the number of annual grants.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Our goal is to continue to give an average of three grants each year, as funding allows.  Each successfully completed grant helps to stabilize historic neighborhood fabric and strengthen awareness of the importance of preservation, even at a small-scale. The overall objective of the Historic Structures Fund grant program is to visibly demonstrate that preservation is a fundamental component of home ownership, regardless of the style, prominence or market value of the property.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Program success will be monitored by the number of viable applications awarded and completed each year. The Preservation Committee, aided by staff, keeps extensive records of each application and meets with applicants several times. At the completion of each preservation project, the work is inspected by staff and volunteers to ensure that it meets The Secretary of the Interiors Standards for Preservation, as well as the agreed upon terms of the grant.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Between 2013 and 2019, the Trust awarded 15 Historic Structures Fund grants.
Program Comments
CEO Comments

The New Haven Preservation Trust faces a continuing challenge to educate and persuade the public that its mission is vital for quality of life.

Most of the programs undertaken by the Trust are unique in the city, not offered by other public or private entities.  The Board of Directors recognizes that this is both good and bad, good because it gives the Trust responsibility for upholding an entire field of endeavor, and bad because that position is not well understood in the community.  Unlike organizations providing food, shelter, health care or activities for young people, the Trust aims to enhance quality of life.  We believe that appreciation and upkeep of its historic environment is crucial to the economic well being of a healthy urban center.  However, the role of an agency supporting the city's diversity and appeal through preservation of its architectural heritage is fairly subtle, and not as easily portrayed as other charitable activity.  NHPT addresses this challenge by balancing its free education and awareness programs with essential principled advocacy for the future of neglected or undervalued historic structures.  Popularizing this role takes leadership and longstanding commitment, assets we are in the midst of growing. 

CEO/Executive Director
There is no CEO or ED. The organization has 1 full-tme and 1 part-time employees and 1 independent contractor.
Term Start Jan 1961
Email info@nhpt.org
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 1
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 32
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 1
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 2
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director of Preservation
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation N/A
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Collaborations
Collaborations with city, state, and regional organizations are key to  NHPT's educational and advocacy work. The Trust is an active  member of Connecticut Preservation Action, a policy-oriented organization which monitors the ebb and flow of legislative and executive support for preservation matters. 
 
On a programmatic level, current partners include: The National Trust for Historic Preservation; CT Department of Economic and Community Development; CT State Historic Preservation Office; The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation; New Haven City Planning Department; New Haven Historic District Commission; The Arts Council of Greater New Haven; Neighborhood Housing Services of New Haven; The New Haven Free Public Library; The New Haven Museum; Historic Wooster Square Association; Westville Village Renaissance Alliance; the Garden Club of New Haven; Trinity Church; DOCOMOMO US; and The International Festival of Arts & Ideas.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization2017
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
President's AwardThe National Trust for Historic Preservation2011
Merit AwardCT Trust for Historic Preservation2015
Award of Excellence (NewHavenModern.org)DOCOMOMO US2015
Comments
CEO Comments


Board Chair
Dr. Rona Johnston
Company Affiliation Yale University
Term May 2017 to Sept 2021
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Leon BaileyCommunity Foundaiton for Greater New Haven
Ms. Margaret ChambersMJ Chambers Architect, LLC
Ms. Elsie B. ChapmanCommunity Volunteer
Mr. Michael ChiarappaQuinnipiac University
Mr. William ChristmasRetired, AT&T Corporation
Mr. Duo DickinsonDuo Dickinson Architect
Ms. Susan E. GodshallRetired, Great New Haven Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Robert W. GrzywaczDeCarlo & Doll, Inc., Architects
Mr. Channing HarrisTowers/Golde Landscape Architects
Mrs. Susan JacobsonCAPA/Shubert Theater
Dr. Patricia E. KaneYale University Art Gallery
Ms. Karin KrochmalKarin Krochmal Graphic Design
Ms. Jill MartinQuinnipiac University
Dr. Roberta PiletteYale University Library
Mr. Alan J. PlattusYale University School of Architecture
Ms. Charlotte ReaCarney, Sandoe & Associates
Mr. Glenn TrunkfieldRetired, Bank of America
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 15
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 10
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Directors and Officers Policy
Commercial General Liability
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Nominating
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Membership
Program / Program Planning
Preservation
Additional Boards: Advisory Board Members
NameAffiliation
Ms. Katherine BennettBetsy Grauer Realty
Mr. Edward S.K. BottomleyCAMA Inc.
Ms. Karyn GilvargNew Haven City Planning Department
Ms. Melanie GinterBoard of Governors, Association of Yale Alumni
Mr. John Herzan
Ms. Katharine Mace LearnedFacilities Dept., Wellesley College
Mr. Preston MaynardUS Department of Veterans Affairs
Ms. Marianne Mazan
Mrs. Doris B. TownshendCommunity Volunteer
Mr. C. Michael TuckerC. Michael Tucker Associates, AIA
Mr. Christopher WigrenCT Trust for Historic Preservation
CEO Comments

The NHPT relies on a strong, working Board of Directors. All Board members serve on one or more committees or lead special projects. Committees meet monthly with members of the staff and other volunteers to share information and set program priorities. Committees develop and refine the governance and management policies that will lead us into the future.

The Board continuously reviews organizational goals and objectives. Areas under review include strategies to increase visibility in the community; promote our mission and develop compelling success stories; better inform the general public of our services and programs; increase membership, particularly with regard to diversity and younger members; improve our effectiveness in preservation advocacy; and strengthen our financial support through grants sand sponsorships. 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2020
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2020
Projected Revenue $131,900.00
Projected Expenses $156,315.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
2019 Preservation Awards Event2019View
Lecture Flyer - William Earls2019View
DOCOMOMO Tour & Lecture2019View
Lecture Flyer - Christopher Wigren2019View
News - Lenox Street to be Restored2019View
Historic Structures Fund Flyer2018View
2018 Preservation Awards Event2018View
Lecture Flyer - Rick Wies2018View
Lecture Flyer - Brent Leggs2017View
NHPT Date Plaques on three houses2015View
DOCOMOMO Award of Excellence2015View
N.H. Register Article re Preservation Awards Event2015View
N.H. Register article re Plaque Program2015View
CT Trust Award of Merit2015View
State of CT Official Recognition2011View
President's Award - National Trust2011View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201820172016
Total Assets$298,361$350,339$388,428
Current Assets$60,623$132,842$218,350
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$30,930$74,826$141,684
Total Net Assets$267,431$275,513$246,744
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201820172016
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Economic & Community Dev. $38,750CT Dept. of Economic & Community Dev. $65,000CT Dept. of Economic & Community Dev. $68,750
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Seedlings Foundation $6,000The Seedlings Foundation $6,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $7,500
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --The Seedlings Foundation $6,000
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments
NHPT's revenue is comprised of membership dues, donations during the GreatGive in May and Annual Appeal in November, grants from the State of Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development and others, small sponsorships, certain CFGNH funds and bequests, and event admissions and sales.
 
Expenses include administrative costs, programming costs, and personnel costs. 
Foundation Staff Comments This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Some financial information from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved has been inputted by Foundation staff. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. A more complete picture of the organization’s finances can be obtained by viewing the attached 990s and audited financials. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.
Address 922 State Street
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 562 5919
Contact Email info@nhpt.org
CEO/Executive Director There is no CEO or ED. The organization has 1 full-tme and 1 part-time employees and 1 independent contractor.
Board Chair Dr. Rona Johnston
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale University

 

Related Information

Support Arts & Culture

Greater New Haven is home to a thriving arts community that includes theatre, music, dance and the visual arts. It is invested in its museums, historic preservation and the celebration of its members’ ethnic and cultural diversity.