Arts Council of Greater New Haven
70 Audubon Street
Second Floor
New Haven CT 06510
Contact Information
Address 70 Audubon Street
Second Floor
New Haven, CT 06510-
Telephone (203) 772-2788 x
Fax 203-772-2262
E-mail info@newhavenarts.org
Web and Social Media

Mission
The Arts Council of Greater New Haven provides leadership and support to our diverse creative sector.
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1965
Organization's type of tax exempt status Exempt-Other
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Daniel Fitzmaurice
Board Chair Rick Wies
Board Chair Company Affiliation Gregg, Wies and Gardner Architects
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
The Arts Council of Greater New Haven provides leadership and support to our diverse creative sector.
Background
The Arts Council of Greater New Haven was founded in 1964 to support the New Haven Symphony’s and the Neighborhood Music School’s need of rehearsing and performing space. Working in partnership with the City of New Haven, The Arts Council took the lead in the development of the Audubon Street Arts District, a physical mixed-used development for our growing arts organizations. In 1996, The Arts Council commissioned Wolf & Associates to conduct a cultural planning study that produced the New Haven Regional Cultural Plan, a collaborative effort that addressed issues such as the growth and development of arts and audiences, advancement of arts education, and economic stabilization of arts organizations. Then in 2002, The Arts Council launched the Greater New Haven Arts Stabilization Project with major support from area arts leaders. This important endeavor led eight arts and cultural organizations through a rigorous process to learn new management and fiscal skills, helping them increase working capital and invest in infrastructure.

Today, The Arts Council of Greater New Haven’s vision is to have a thriving arts community at the heart of our region because we believe that art, culture, and creativity are fundamental human rights that also advance the economy, health, education, and tourism.

Impact
Accomplishments for FY2017
  1. In partnership with the Connecticut Office of the Arts, Department of Economic and Community Development, The Arts Council awarded eight Regional Initiative (REGI) grants totaling $29,000 to support community projects by small arts organizations and local artists.
  2. The Arts Council believes that art makes us human, catalyzing hope and empathy in our everyday life. In spite of this, government funding for the arts is under attack. In response to this funding risk, we launched our SAVE the NEA Campaign in April of 2017. This included an online advocacy toolkit as well as action steps including: Call – Tell our elected representatives why the arts matter to you / Write – Pick up your Save the NEA postcard at the Arts Council offices today 
  3. Instead of participating The Great Give 2017, The Arts Council supported and promoted our local arts and culture organizations and helped raise $316,947 for the sector. Roughly a third of all gifts (3,824 out of 11,306 total) and a third of all dollars ($1,285,376) went to 79 different arts and culture organizations.

Also during FY2017 The Arts Council went through a major leadership transition and in March of 2017 we welcomed our new Executive Director, Daniel Fitzmaurice. Since then we have been working a Strategic Plan for the next three years, which will include implementing and measuring our effectiveness as a leader and supporter of our regional creative sector. Priorities include:

  • Convening peer networking opportunities that unify and identify our sector
  • Collaborating with strategic cross-sector alliances that address community needs
  • Innovating with trends in technology, creativity, and community development
  • Strengthening with workshops led by industry experts that build sector-wide capacity
  • Promoting with one voice that enhances visibility and saturates all marketing channels
  • Advocating with specific tactics and outcomes that engage government and business support.

 FY2018 Goals:

  1. Launch our "Digital Hub" - a one-stop-shop for creative experiences and the voice for arts and culture in our region.
  2. Transition from our current fee-paying membership model to a more inclusive, broad reaching, and diverse free membership initiative.
  3. Migrate our old database to a more functional online and easier to use platform.
Needs
The most pressing needs of the Arts Council of Greater New Haven are:
  1. As a service organization that provides all our programming and resources to our creative sector at little to no cost general operating support is essential
  2. Corporate, foundation, and individual funding as well as organizational buy-in to support the launch our "Digital Hub"
  3. The "Digital Hub" will also need tech support and ideas in order to create our on-stop-shop for all creative experiences that is innovative and acts as a sector-wide collaborative marketing website
  4. Funding to help migrate from our current fee-paying membership model to a more inclusive and equitable free membership model.
  5. The Arts Council currently does not have a Major Donor Plan, we are looking to increase our high level donors by implementing a plan during FY18.
CEO Statement

Daniel Fitzmaurice, Executive Director’s Statement

At the heart of Greater New Haven is a thriving and vibrant creative arts community. The Arts Council's role within this community is to provide continued leadership and support to strengthen our arts and culture industry.
The Arts Council is the voice of the arts within the region, representing the arts and culture sector at the local, state, and national levels. We advocate for the crucial need for government support to individual artists and cultural institutions. This work is so important, especially given today's current economic climate and one of the Arts Council's top priorities for the future.
We support individual artists as well as local arts and cultural organizations by providing the valuable resources, advice, and support to help them, their programs, and their audiences grow. We are also committed to ensuring that the arts are for everyone by providing free and accessible arts programs.
We are excited to look towards the future and working together with the community to build a strong, vibrant, and diverse arts community here in Greater New Haven.

Board Chair Statement
Rick Wies, Board President's Statement
Through arts promotion, advocacy, community engagement and support of artists and organizations, the Arts Council supports over 700 artists and 200 cultural organizationsWe work to deliver innovative methods to market and promote the arts and culture sector, expanding traditional capacity and outreach. We host knowledge-building opportunities, bringing together decision-makers from arts throughout our regionAdditionally, we create unique programs uniting community members with artists in collaborative work that increases access to the arts.

As we look towards the future of our creative sector, the Arts Council of Greater New Haven is committed to increasing the ways in which we support artists, arts organizations, and audiences in our region and strengthening and sustaining our diverse and vibrant creative ecosystem. We invite you to join us in ensuring that the arts are for everyone.   
  
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Arts & Humanities Councils & Agencies
Areas Served
Bethany
Branford
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
National
Other
Cheshire
The Arts Council of Greater New Haven primarily serves 15 towns in South Central Connecticut, primarily Milford, Orange, Woodbridge, Branford, Bethany, Cheshire, East Haven, Guilford, Hamden, Madison, Meriden, New Haven, North Haven, North Branford, Wallingford and West Haven. The Arts Council also participates in several statewide and national initiatives.
Programs
Description

The Arts Paper printed ten times a year, distributed to 200 locations, mailed to members, and sent electronically to over 5,000 subscribers. The Arts Paper helps keep our members and general public informed of the events and happenings of our creative sector. The Arts Paper helps boost ticket sales and registrations, increase audience attendance, and foster collaborations.

Weekly eNews is sent to nearly 5,000 subscribers about the week’s creative happenings as well as artist opportunities and job openings.

Arts ON AIR is our monthly talk radio show in partnership with WPKN 89.5 that highlights and promotes various artists and arts organizations within the creative sector. 

Digital Presence is actively maintained through our website and social media: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. 



 
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Short-term success is measured by the increased number of “hits” on our website; increased number of “likes” on Facebook (4,069); Twitter (4,386 followers); Instagram (1,353 followers) YouTube (135 videos posted, 57 subscribers, and 18,087 views) and increased number of users of the ANDI app (2,230).

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Long-term success is measured by keeping current with the social media trends. As social media rapidly changes the way information is received and disseminated, the Arts Council needs to make the appropriate technology upgrades to keep pace with current communication trends and tools.
 
For The Arts Paper, success will be measured by more diverse content, increased readership, increased membership and expanded advertising sales.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Social media is monitored by digital analytics. We can now monitor how many people read The Arts Paper online because it now lives on Issuu, a site for easy access that provides stats of uploads.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. 1. Implemented new design of website and The Arts Paper

2. Launched the app ANDI for smartphone devices and developed link to Facebook
3. Launched a curated page on Kickstarter that drives traffic and donations to fund projects by Greater New Haven performing and visual artists

Description

Support for artists and creative organizations includes workshops, technical assistance and advice. The executive director is continually advising and assisting leaders of arts organizations (both large and small) with questions on issues of board development, funding, and staffing. The director of development is available to help artists and arts organizations with fundraising advice as well as grant research, writing, and budgeting. The marketing director offers social media and marketing assistance. The operations director assists artists and audience members with daily question ranging from available artist space and artist opportunities to local events and happenings.

In early 2017, we developed a new Technical Support Workshop Series for artists and arts organizations centered on topics such as tax preparation, financial planning, promotion, grants, and more. These workshops are designed to provide necessary training and advice for career and organizational development.

We also convene networking opportunities for the whole sector as well as create cross-sector alliances that address community needs.


Population Served Adults / Elderly and/or Disabled /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
At a workshop titled How to Do a Grant Budget  we had students working on their arts administration degrees from a local college, individual artists interested in how to support their professional artistic careers and small arts organizations wanting to secure vital funds for a project within the community. We asked what the most valuable aspect of the workshop was, answers included:
 
"Concrete examples that will help us apply for grants intelligently. Thanks."
 
"It made it simple - thank you!!!"
 
"It was great to hear breakdowns and artists fee suggestions - so clear and very helpful." 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Evaluations are distributed after each Make.Art.Work. session. High marks have been given for the instructors, the topics and the materials. Feedback includes “exceeded expectations.”

Description

The Arts Council helps build a vital arts community where strong arts organizations create relevant programs, artists are valued and supported, and art is part of everyday life, seen and heard in schools and in the streets

This initiative was designed to engage community members in making and experiencing art that is relevant to their lives. We believe that participatory art making experiences can have a profound impact on our community. They can enrich the quality of community life, enhance the lives of individuals, and build connections between people. 

Population Served General/Unspecified / Families / Minorities
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The long-term goal is to expand arts programming that reaches a broader, more diverse audience and to facilitate access of arts events to underserved audiences.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The program is monitored by staff with feedback from participants, both artists and audiences.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

The artist led doll making workshops have been particularly meaningful because we were able to engage with different populations: the elderly, mental health clients, women in recovery, formerly incarcerated men, and families in the neighborhood of Stetson Library. Surprisingly, several fathers and sons participated in creating Afro Caribbean Dolls which was a celebratory program during Black Heritage Month. Also, with the success of the workshops at Project More, the agency has express interest in pursuing a partnership with the Arts Council.

At Virginia Wells House, clients and staff created beaded dolls that expressed images of people they know. Staff commented that the art project offered to their clients fostered self-esteem and encouraged positive staff/client interactions as they worked side by side.
Description

“Art is a nation’s most precious heritage. For it is in our works of art that we reveal to ourselves, and to others, the inner vision which guides us as a Nation.” – President Lyndon B. Johnson

The Arts Council plays a pivotal role in communicating to private, public, and corporate leaders that the arts are important in the lives of our citizens.  We stress that the arts create vibrant communities, providing educational and leisure opportunities for our residents and appealing attractions for visitors.

Art makes us human, catalyzing hope and empathy in our everyday life. In spite of this, government funding for the arts is under attack alongside policies that will change our community. With so much at stake, the role of the arts is more important than ever. 

Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Short-term success is evident when the Arts Council forges both regional arts and cross-sector partnerships and sustains ongoing communication within the cultural community. Our efforts should yield concrete achievements such as sustained state funding and clarity about issues that concern all of us.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Evidence of long-term success is in the strengthening of the organization as a leader in the community and in specific achievements such as sustained funding for the arts and in increased awareness and visibility of the arts in various sectors of the community.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. Successful advocacy is monitored by positive feedback from the state legislature that will increase funding.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. •  The arts are part of the Chamber of Commerce’s regional legislative agenda.  
•  Though arts funding was decreased in the last legislative season, Connecticut fared better than many other states.
 
During the summer 2013, in response to the mayoral campaign in New Haven, we coordinated, with the Arts Industry Coalition, an arts forum. The well attended event enabled the public to hear the candidates’ views on the importance of the arts in schools and neighborhood communities, and how to sustain funding for the arts throughout the city.
 
Program Comments
CEO Comments
Cuts in state funding have resulted in staff cuts over the last few years, and have challenged our business model that has been dependent on grants and contributions to pay for our free services and programs.   Staff spend thousands of hours each year lending advice, conveying information, and attending meetings. An ongoing challenge is to prioritize so that our small staff can offer a diverse array of programs and services effectively. Like many arts organizations, we continually reflect on how we work and how we might do things differently.   
CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Daniel Fitzmaurice
Term Start Mar 2017
Email daniel@newhavenarts.org
Experience Daniel Fitzmaurice is Executive Director of the Arts Council of Greater New Haven. Daniel received a Bachelor of Music in education and piano from Temple University in Philadelphia, PA. He has held leadership positions at the Elm Shakespeare Company and Creative Arts Workshop both in New Haven, CT, and hosts a radio show on WNHH called Artbeat. He was raised in Milford, CT and returned back to New Haven County after several years working in Portland, OR in 2013. He and his family now live in Orange, CT.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 2
Number of Part Time Staff 2
Number of Volunteers 35
Number of Contract Staff 2
Staff Retention Rate 80%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 4
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 3
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Ms. Cynthia B. Clair Nov 2006 - Sept 2016
Elizabeth Monz July 2002 - July 2006
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation No
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
The Arts Council seeks cross-sector collaborations frequently, recognizing that art plays an important role in everyday life. Many of the exhibitions we curate include artwork from special populations; we have worked with IRIS (Integrated Refugee and Immigrant Services), CT Mental Health Center Foundation, Alzheimer’s Resource Center of CT, Yale Program for Recovery and Community Health, the Community Services Network of Greater New Haven, and Haskins Laboratories. For community programs we collaborate with the Creative Arts Workshop, Neighborhood Music School, ACES, New Haven Ballet, CT Transit, City Wide Youth Coalition, Whitney Center and The Future Project.
 
 
 Statewide, we work closely with the Connecticut Office of the Arts and the other nine arts councils as well as the Connecticut Arts Alliance.  Our Make.Art.Work program is a collaboration with the Cultural Alliance of Fairfield County and the Greater Hartford Arts Council.   Citywide, we work collaboratively with Market New Haven, Visit New Haven, the Chamber of Commerce, Yale University, the Town Green Special Services District and the City of New Haven Office of Arts Culture and Tourism. The annual Cultural and Visitors Guide to Greater New Haven is produced through partnership of the Arts Council and Visit New Haven.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits2010
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2010
Connecticut Association of Nonprofits2011
Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce2011
Board Chair
Rick Wies
Company Affiliation Gregg, Wies and Gardner Architects
Term July 2017 to June 2019
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Daisy Abreu Writer
Wojtek W Borowski Edgehill Realtors
Robert Dannies Retired
James Gregg BetterITS LLC
Todd Jokl Lyme Academy College of Fine Art
Mark Kaduboski Wiggin & Dana
Greg Marazita Marcum
Ms. Rachel Mele Metropolitan Interactive
W. Frank Mitchell Historian and Curator
Greg Nobile Seaview Productions
Eileen O'Donnell Odonnell Company
John Pancoast Schaffer Consulting
Mark Potocsny Wells Fargo Advisors
Ken Spitzbard Bard Financial Services
Genevive Walker ConnCAT
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 1 (Cuban)
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 11
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Standing Committees
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Nominating
Technology
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Frances (Bitsie) Clark Executive Director, East Rock Village
Cheever Tyler Non Profit Strategies
CEO Comments
The Council seeks individuals to serve who are representative of the community, passionate about the arts, and bring talents to the organization.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2017
Fiscal Year End June 30 2018
Projected Revenue $481,855.00
Projected Expenses $524,895.00
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Erasing Boundaries with Language of Art2015View
Annual Report 20152015View
New Haven Independent Review of Crosby Gallery exhibition2014View
NHI Review2014View
Annual Report2014View
Annual Report2013View
From Daily Nutmeg2012View
Exact Change2012View
Review of Ripple Effect2012View
ANDI2012View
NEA Article2010View
NY Times Article2010View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$239,668$290,930$294,483
Government Contributions$87,159$97,028$263,019
Federal------
State$87,159----
Local------
Unspecified--$97,028$263,019
Individual Contributions------
------
$69,057$108,410$99,955
Investment Income, Net of Losses$5,290$5,261$4,293
Membership Dues$29,135$29,574$26,800
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$155,749$182,942$144,912
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$527,419$512,155$680,364
Administration Expense$71,901$99,007$93,588
Fundraising Expense$24,604$82,415$82,316
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.941.030.97
Program Expense/Total Expenses85%74%79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue8%21%15%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$542,572$614,593$660,370
Current Assets$432,355$464,389$435,174
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$60,928$95,083$161,426
Total Net Assets$481,644$519,510$498,944
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountDept. of Economic & Community Dev. $87,159Dept. of Economic & Community Dev. $93,548Dept. of Economic and Community Dev. $262,519
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountTremaine Foundation $50,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $25,000Tremaine Foundation $50,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $20,000Werth Foundation $15,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $25,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities7.104.882.70
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
CEO Comments

The Finance Committee adopted a larger deficit budget for FY2017 because of a planned leadership transition to a new Executive Director. For FY2018 we have adopted a balanced budget and our strategic plan for the next three years is to expand on our core earned revenue through increased digital and print advertising.

 

In 1986 The Arts Council purchased several parcels of land for development of the Audubon Arts District. This 99 year land lease generates steady annual income for the Arts Council.

 

In addition to our strategic alignment of staffing and a strong cash reserve, The Arts Council relies on direct line-item funding from the State.

Foundation Staff Comments
The Arts Council changed their fiscal year in 2008 from a calendar year to July 1st - June 30th.  Financial information for 2008 is a short year (6 months of financial data).
  

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation.  The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

 
Address 70 Audubon Street
Second Floor
New Haven, CT 06510
Primary Phone 203 772-2788
Contact Email info@newhavenarts.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Daniel Fitzmaurice
Board Chair Rick Wies
Board Chair Company Affiliation Gregg, Wies and Gardner Architects

 

Related Information

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