Guilford Art Center
411 Church Street
Guilford CT 06437
Contact Information
Address 411 Church Street
Guilford, CT 06437-
Telephone (203) 453-5947 x
Fax 203-453-6237
E-mail info@guilfordartcenter.org
Web and Social Media
Kids' class at GAC
Mission

Guilford Art Center is a nonprofit organization that inspires and promotes community participation in the visual arts, through education, exhibitions and outreach.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1967
Former Names
Guilford Handcraft Center
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Maureen Belden
Board Chair Judith Anne Young
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired development professional (Yale)
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

Guilford Art Center is a nonprofit organization that inspires and promotes community participation in the visual arts, through education, exhibitions and outreach.

Background

Guilford Art Center evolved from the first Handcraft Expo, held on the Guilford Green in 1957, in which local artisans displayed their work and demonstrated their crafts. Ten years later, the Center was incorporated as the Guilford Handcraft Center and, since that time, has become a vital part of the town of Guilford and surrounding area of greater New Haven, helping the region forge an identity as a cultured community where the arts are celebrated, bolstering the economy through tourism, and enhancing its desirability as a compelling place to live and visit. 
 

The Center’s school is central to its mission to provide community arts programming. Annually, the school serves over 2,000 students, from preschool-aged through senior citizens, in four semesters of approximately 400 classes each year. Classes are offered in a wide range of media and techniques, including ceramics, jewelry, metal smithing, fiber, weaving, glass, basketry, beading, drawing, painting, and sculpture, and are led by a faculty of more than 70 professional artists, as well as by visiting artists. Instructors also work in the community, with schools, senior citizen programs, and the local library, bringing projects off-site to these clients. The Center’s summer youth program provides week-long classes for pre-school to upper middle school-aged children, as well as volunteer opportunities for high school-aged students. A scholarship program helps insure that opportunities to study the arts are available to the greatest number of target audience members of all means.

The Center’s Gallery annually presents media-specific or thematic exhibitions, and community organizations, such as the Shoreline Arts Alliance and the Guilford Art League, also use the gallery space for their own juried or member exhibits. The gallery is open to seven days a week and all exhibits are free of charge. Works by more than 250 American artisans are sold in the Center’s shop and gallery during the annual Artistry Holiday Sale of Fine American Craft. The event helps provide these artists with a livelihood while bringing the finest in handcrafted art in all media to our audience, while also providing an opportunity for patrons to support small American businesses, eg., the participating artists. 

Craft Expo, held on the Guilford Green each July (2017 will be the 60th anniversary), is one of the Center’s most important fundraisers, at the same time putting a spotlight on high quality handcrafted work being created throughout the nation. Other programs and activities held throughout the year celebrate creativity and engage our diverse constituencies, including our annual, free Open Arts Day in January; birthday parties for children; after-school programming in the community; administration of the Shoreline ArtsTrail membership program; and fundraising gatherings that often highlight works by community artists.

Impact

The Center's top accomplishments from the past year include:

  

  • Increased number of free learning opportunities, through pre-semester “Picture Yourself at GAC” observation days in advance of enrollment, “Meet the Artist” gatherings; Farmers Market project; soon-to-be-launched series of free, “first-access” community workshops;
  • Launch of Unified Art classes for children and adults;
  • Plan for campus improvements initiated (potentially serving 2,000 students and 2,500 visitors)
  • Launch of GAC Endowment at the Guilford Foundation, with matching/challenge donation from private donor;
  • Launch of 50th anniversary fundraising campaign (potentially serving 2,000 students and 2,500 visitors through campus improvements)


 

The Center's goals for the current year include:

  • Continue to support quality programming through retention of staff, instructors and volunteers and improvements and maintenance of facilities;
  • Achieve sustainability through earned and contributed income to further support quality programming;
  • Increase and strengthen marketing efforts, to create greater awareness of the Center, improve earned and contributed income, and ultimately support quality programming;
  • Increase in programming opportunities for students with developmental disabilities;
  • Continue board development to focus on philanthropic and business arenas.




Needs

The Center's most pressing needs include:


  • Increased earned and contributed income to support programming;
  • Improvement and maintenance of facilities to support programming;
  • Retention of constituents--students, supporters--as well expansion of constituents, through offering of programs in accord with community interest/demand;
  • Strengthened marketing strategies to engage community members and ultimately support programming;
  • Continued board recruitment, in particular, representation from business and philanthropic arenas.


CEO Statement

As executive director of Guilford Art Center, I often say, “I love what I do.” And I know our board members and small staff feel the same way. It is a privilege to see our audience of all ages and abilities engage in the Center’s programs. By offering opportunities for creative expression and art appreciation, we are confident that our organization contributes to the vitality and wellness of our community, supporting an open-minded, creative and well-rounded citizenry.

Research regarding the benefits of the arts continues to grow, and the Center is proud to promote and provide the essential values of the arts in our community. We know that they help develop critical thinking skills, social tolerance, civic engagement, holistic problem solving, visualization of complex ideas, and divergent thinking that are essential competencies in today’s global world. We also know that they promote neurological, emotional and physical wellness that further contribute to the health of our community. As noted at the March 2, 2017 Connecticut Arts Day in Hartford, more than 50% of Connecticut residents consider themselves to be artistic; and our aim is to “up” that figure so that even more of our citizens reap the benefits of creative expression!

We depend upon the support of our audiences--students, donors, teachers, visitors, and hundreds of volunteers—to keep the Center vital, by engaging in our many programs, suggesting new ones, introducing friends, and bolstering our efforts with donations of money, time and materials. We are here for longtime students who find camaraderie and constructive critique as they practice and enjoy their craft, as well as for first-time students—children and adults—who discover their love, talents, and creativity. We are here for students of all abilities, including those with intellectual disabilities, through new and popular Unified Art programming we have launched in the past six months, to learn and work and create together. Through our gallery, shop and Craft Expo, we present inspiration to our audiences in the form of nationally-recognized works that demonstrate the breadth and range of contemporary practice in the United States. And we provide outreach programs, collaborating with other educational and nonprofit organizations for the greater good of our community, including the Community Dining Room, the Yale Medical ICU, local schools and others, as detailed in our profile.

The Center has a new, board-approved strategic plan, guiding our path for the next three years and designed to ensure our continuing vital role in our community. These next years will be an exciting and important time in our history, designed to strengthen our Center and to enable it to thrive, to the benefit of our community.

2017 is the Guilford Art Center 50th anniversary. We celebrate in full realization of our history, our challenges, and our achievements.   The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven’s operating support is vital to our success moving forward.


Board Chair Statement

President of GAC Board statement

In 2017, the Guilford Art Center is celebrating our 50th Anniversary of teaching, promoting, and energizing the visual arts. Our constituents are community members of all ages, who participate as students, teachers, and artists, as well as thousands who engage as members, volunteers, and participants. We serve New Haven County and a broad Connecticut community.

I am pleased to be the president of the Guilford Art Center (GAC) Board of Directors at a time of celebration and renewal. Our board of directors is committed, knowledgeable, and effective. Members have careers in business, law, fundraising, industrial design, architecture, management, and art, all of direct value to GAC. With the help of a consultant, we have a board-approved new strategic plan, guiding our path for the next three years.

As a nonprofit, we are blessed with outstanding staff leadership: an Executive Director with past experience at renowned museums and art centers, as well as with GAC. Our Operations Director/CFO has an MBA and a thorough history of the operations of GAC and its budget.  Our very small paid staff accomplishes miracles every day.

To celebrate our 50th Anniversary, our goal is to raise $250,000 to renew our school building and update our equipment. Addressing these needs is an exciting prospect and will lead to significant improvements in our ability to serve our community.  Like most nonprofit educational institutions, GAC needs philanthropic support to thrive. With lean budgets and few paid staff, the infusion of gifts from donors makes all the difference.

Guilford Art Center serves our many constituents as a premier community arts center. Via the School, we offer 500 educational programs and creative opportunities to a broad range of 2000 children and adults of all ages all year. Financial assistance is available to help ensure that the Center’s programs are accessible for community members of all means. Our Gallery and Shop show the work of regional artists and provide audiences year-round access to juried American crafts, 7 days a week. Our EXPO on the Guilford Green is a national show that draws close to 8,000 people annually to see and buy the best of American crafts. More than 100 volunteers, working with our dedicated staff, help make all these programs possible.

The breadth and depth of GAC’s programs and community events is beautifully illustrated on our website: www.guilfordartcenter.org. Please explore our site for a fuller understanding of all we offer.

Recent studies have verified what arts organizations already knew: art education is not just a luxury. Rather, exposure to art and art education helps develop critical thinking skills, social tolerance, and creative thinking. Holistic problem solving, visualization of complex ideas, and divergent thinking are essential competencies developed in art education programs. These skills are exactly what employers are looking for in today’s global economy. Guilford Art Center is proud to promote the essential values of art and art education in the wider community.


 


Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Arts Education
Areas Served
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
Branford
Guilford
Ansonia
Bethany
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
Most students and visitors to the Center hail from the New Haven and greater New Haven areas, east to New London county, though some travel from as far away as Fairfield County, New York, and Rhode Island.
Programs
Description Guilford Art Center’s school serves over 2,000 students of all ages in four semesters each year. Classes are offered in a wide range of media and techniques, including ceramics, jewelry, metalsmithing, fiber,weaving, glass, basketry, beading, drawing, painting, and sculpture and are led by more than 70 professional instructor-artists, as well as by visiting artists, who provide intensive workshops and master classes. Instructors also work in the community, with schools and senior citizen programs, bringing projects off-site to these clients.
Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Program short-term success will be increased enrollment by students in classes, including returning students and first-time participants. For students taking classes, 40% will enroll again in a similar class or in another class of interest.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Guilford Art Center's target population will be provided with a variety of opportunities for self-expression through arts classes. Success will be tracked by increase or decrease in enrollment numbers and survey results, including comments. For students taking classes, 60% will enroll again in a similar class or in another class of interest.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success will be monitored by enrollment numbers through registration program and student survey comments. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Examples of program success include positive student survey comments, student artists setting up businesses in community, participating in gallery exhibits, arts trail programs, etc.
Description The Gallery promotes and supports the work of American artists and artisans annually, by  presenting juried and invitational, media-specific or thematic exhibitions of contemporary craft and art that are generated by Art Center staff or borrowed from local, regional or national arts organizations. In addition, community arts organizations, such as the Shoreline Arts Alliance and the Guilford Art League, also use the gallery space for their own juried or member exhibits. The gallery is open to seven days a week and all exhibits are free of charge. Works by more than 300 American artisans are sold in the Center’s shop and gallery during the annual Artistry Holiday Sale of Fine American Craft. The event helps provide these artists with a livelihood while bringing the finest in handcrafted art in all media to our audience, while also providing an opportunity for patrons to support small American businesses, eg., the participating artists. 
Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Program short-term success will be positive visitor commentary and feedback, visitor numbers increase, number of artists applying to juried exhibit increases. Of gallery visitors, 10% will enroll in an Art Center class.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Program long-term success will be that visitors are inspired by works presented to further study or pursue an art form, media, or technique. Of gallery visitors, 25% will enroll in an Art Center class. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success is monitored by visitor comments and number of artists applying to juried exhibits and school enrollment numbers.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Examples of program success include positive visitor comments; target audience interest reflected in class enrollment increases inspired by media featured in exhibits.
Description

The Center’s outreach programs helps insure that our educational programming is reaching our widest potential target audience. In January 2017 the Center held its fifth annual Free Open Arts Day, in which community members are invited to visit the Center’s studios and classrooms, and to meet instructor-artists demonstrating their crafts and offering hands-on art projects. Projects such as these are designed to offer a first access to arts programming for those not ready or able to commit to a class without trial exposure and guidance. The Center is also continuing a program with the Guilford Before and After School Care program to offer on-site art instruction in three Guilford elementary schools, to students who would not otherwise have the opportunity to enroll in after school programs. We also participate in a project with the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Yale New Haven Hospital, in which GAC potters create small ceramic hearts for memory boxes given to families of terminally ill patients. We received funding for 2017--our 50th anniversary year--to provide free workshops to community members and to participate with free projects in community events on the shoreline--for example, the Branford Festival, the Guilford Civic Women Fall Festival--to further familiarize community members with our programming. The Center also collaborated with the Branford Alps Farmers Market in summer 2016, providing weekly art projects for children, connecting health and wellness with creative expression. GAC instructors also work in other settings in the community, including at the Madison School for Young Children and Evergreen Woods retirement home. The Center also helps administer the Shoreline ArtsTrail membership program.

Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Program short-term success will be to receive positive and enthusiastic response to offered programs by 90% of participants, and to increase number of outreach opportunities available.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Program long-term success would be to provide increasing numbers of opportunities for interested members of our target audience to engage in arts programming, despite limitations of financial and transportation ability, for examples. 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success is monitored by enrollment and participation numbers in programs and feeback received.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Examples of program success include increasing numbers of target audience members enrolled in or participating in programs as a result of first-access exposure.
Description

The Shop promotes and supports the work of American artists and artisans through presentation and sale of handmade works. More than 300 American artisans are represented in the Center’s Shop year-round, and in an expanded event during the annual Artistry Holiday Sale of Fine American Craft, November through early January. The Shop and Artistry help provide participating artists with a livelihood while bringing the fine quality examples of contemporary work to the Center’s audience, as both example and inspiration.

 

Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Program long-term success will be for the Shop to attract visitors who in turn help support the work of participating artists, and for audience to be inspired by works on offer.
 
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success is monitored by POS system, and staff direction in scouting participating artisans.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Example of program success would be that the Shop has been reopened since 2010 and currently breaks even while bolstering the Center's mission to support American artists.
Description

Craft Expo, held on the Guilford Green each July (2017 will be the 60th annual event), is a weekend-long community event that features fine quality handmade crafts by more than 180 American artisans, at the same time serving as one of the Center’s most important fundraisers. The event offers visitors the chance to connect with living artists, be inspired by their creativity, and support the work of the artists as small American businesses. At the same time, the continuing legacy of the event has helped Guilford and the greater New Haven and shoreline areas forge an identity as a cultured community where the arts are celebrated, bolstering the economy through tourism, and enhancing its desirability as a compelling place to live and visit.

Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Program short-term success will be for the event to be approved by town for 2018; 70% of participating artists will re-apply to event and overall application rate will increase by 10%; attendance will remain stable. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Long-term success of the program will be that the shoreline community continues to support the event by their attendance. For event attendees, 70% of those surveyed will plan to visit again in subsequent years.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Program success is monitored by approval of town for event; visitor and artist survey feedback; number of artists applying; and attendance figures.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Examples of program success would include enthusiastic visitor feedback; continued town approval for holding event on public town Green, supported by visitors, participating artists, area business sponsorships; event continuing to attract visitors as a signature summer event for area and therefore a contributor to economic vitality.  
CEO/Executive Director
Maureen Belden
Term Start Mar 2005
Email mbelden@guilfordartcenter.org
Experience

Maureen Belden, Executive Director, has served at the Center as Program Administrator and Expo Coordinator since 2005, and as Program Director since 2009. She oversees all programmatic aspects of the Center, including the school, gallery, and community outreach programs. She holds an MA in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts, New YorkUniversity, and a BA from the University of Michigan. She has served as Director of the Historical Society of Newburgh Bay & the Highlands, Curator at Storm King Art Center, as well as in curatorial positions at the St. Louis Art Museum and the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA, NYC). She lives in Guilford with her husband and two children. She is also a member of the board of the Guilford Fund for Education.

 

Co-CEO
Suzanne Hens-Kaplan
Term Start Sept 2003
Email shens-kaplan@guilfordartcenter.org
Experience Suzanne Hens-Kaplan, Operations Director & CFO, has served as the Center’s Finance/Technology Manager since 2003, and as the Operations & Finance Director since 2009. She oversees the Center’s facilities and general day-to-day operations and is responsible for all financial procedures and reporting, as well as oversight of the Center’s IT functions, including the website and email promotions. She holds an MBA fromSacredHeartUniversityand a BA from the State University of New York,Albany. She has served as Business Manager at the Pine Brook (formerly Wightwood) School and has held a variety of accounting and technical support positions during her career. She lives with her husband in Madison, and volunteers as a mentor in the Guilford Youth Mentoring program.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 3
Number of Part Time Staff 10
Number of Volunteers 120
Number of Contract Staff 70
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 12
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mary O'Connor Apr 2004 - Feb
Jean Perkins Apr 2007 - Jan
Senior Staff
Title Registrar & Education Coordinator
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Semi-Annually
Collaborations


Guilford Art Center collaborates with the Guilford Before and After School Care program on a joint project to provide art instruction on-site at their three elementary school locations, for students who would not otherwise have the opportunity to enroll in after school programs. We have also provided instructors to teach at the Guilford Center for Children, the Madison School for Young Children, the Country School, and in the Guilford Free Library’s “Teen Art Lab.” Also with the Library, the Center jointly presented with the Library two film series, “Artists in the Movies,” in Fall 2016 and Winter 2017, to be continued in the Fall. GAC participates in a project with the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Yale New Haven Hospital, in which potters create small ceramic hearts for memory boxes given to families of terminally ill patients. Annually we collaborate with the Community Dining Room on our "Soup for Good" event, which celebrates the GAC potters and jointly benefits both organizations. The Center also collaborated with the Branford Alps Farmers Market in summer 2016, providing weekly art projects for children, connecting health and wellness with creative expression. In the past the Center has collaborated with the Guilford PTA on their annual art show; with SARAH Kidsteps to provide youth instructor training for working with differently-abled children; and in outreach programs with Evergreen Woods for senior citizens. We continually seek opportunities to collaborate with local organizations to harness relative strengths in order to offer high quality programming for our target audience.


Board Chair
Judith Anne Young
Company Affiliation Retired development professional (Yale)
Term Dec 2016 to Nov 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Susan Brady Guilford Savings Bank
Stephanie Dietz Realtor, cooking instructor
Chris Goetsch Green Homes, CT
Alexandra Gross Attorney
Sara O. Nelson Nelson Edwards Company Architects
Amy Peters Guilford Art Center instructor
Cathy Seibyl Public health professional, weaver
Pam Stoddard Community Volunteer, foundation trustee
Nina V. Tower Jewelry designer
Richard Tuchman Development professional
Mace Vitale GAC instructor
Stephen Yardan Industrial Designer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 3 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 9
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 70%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Board Co-Chair
Stephen Yardan
Company Affiliation Industrial Designer
Term Dec 2016 to Nov 2017
Email sjyardan@gmail.com
Standing Committees
Board Governance
Finance
Building
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Sept 01 2016
Fiscal Year End Aug 31 2017
Projected Revenue $1,021,550.00
Projected Expenses $1,017,527.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$123,843$106,992$69,997
Government Contributions$13,467$805$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$13,467$805--
Individual Contributions------
------
$842,965$810,811$808,299
Investment Income, Net of Losses$9,560$7,851$7,733
Membership Dues$43,170$39,157$41,180
Special Events$36,328$44,435$44,371
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$860,228$847,334$819,767
Administration Expense$82,677$81,154$86,547
Fundraising Expense$43,248$38,361$33,130
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.081.041.03
Program Expense/Total Expenses87%88%87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue25%25%29%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$1,373,251$1,262,522$1,232,262
Current Assets$268,005$177,605$135,069
Long-Term Liabilities$101,842$113,037$123,747
Current Liabilities$69,820$61,964$62,283
Total Net Assets$1,201,589$1,087,521$1,046,232
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Stoddard Family Foundation $25,000The Stoddard Family Foundation $35,000The Stoddard Family Foundation $18,250
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $15,000The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $20,000Connecticut Arts Council $7,714
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountYvette & Arthur Eder Foundation $5,000Prospector Partners $5,000New Alliance Foundation $5,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities3.842.872.17
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets7%9%10%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Goal $500,000.00
Amount Raised To Date 152000 as of June 2017
Comments
CEO Comments

Guilford Art Center had an operating profit for the fiscal year ended 8/31/16. All programs (school, gallery, Craft Expo, and special events) had a positive variance from budget except for our year-round shop of American-made craft, mainly due to lower-than-expected sales during the December 2015 holiday season. Our shop exists so that American, particularly local artists, can have their work seen and acquired by art lovers. A shop marketing plan is being implemented to help boost sales. 

 

Guilford Art Center’s budget for the 2016-17 fiscal year projects a profit of less than $5K, which does not leave much of a cushion against a wide scope of possible income shortages and expense overages. However, should a profit be realized for the fiscal year, part or all of it would be spent on new or expanded programs, facility improvements, and/or increasing the Center’s cash reserve.

 

2017 marks the Center’s 50th anniversary. In celebration, GAC has received and is continuing to seek donations for a building project that will allow for expansion of the Center’s most popular studios, thereby enhancing the experiences of our students.


 

Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 411 Church Street
Guilford, CT 06437
Primary Phone 203 453-5947
CEO/Executive Director Maureen Belden
Board Chair Judith Anne Young
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired development professional (Yale)

 

Related Information

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