Shoreline Greenway Trail
PO Box 148
% Judith Miller
Branford CT 06405
Contact Information
Address PO Box 148
% Judith Miller
Branford, CT 06405-
Telephone (203) 481-3870 x
E-mail branford@shorelinegreenwaytrail.org
Web and Social Media
Newly completed section of trail around the peninsula in Hammonasset State Park
Mission

The mission of the Shoreline Greenway Trail is to develop and manage a public, multi-use greenway trail from New Haven Harbor to Hammonasset Beach State Park for non-motorized recreation and alternative transportation.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 2003
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Organization is made up of all volunteers. There is no CEO.
Board Chair Judith Miller
Board Chair Company Affiliation retired
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $185,000.00
Projected Expenses $185,000.00
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Shoreline Greenway Trail is to develop and manage a public, multi-use greenway trail from New Haven Harbor to Hammonasset Beach State Park for non-motorized recreation and alternative transportation.

Background

In the early 2000s a group of people came together to discuss the possibility of developing a recreational trail along the shoreline similar to the East Bay Trail that skirts the east side of Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island. They determined that it should run from Lighthouse Point in New Haven to Hammonasset Beach State Park in Madison, and began to recruit volunteers in each of the towns it would cross, organize as a corporation, obtain non-profit tax status, and raise funds. The organization is completely managed by volunteers with no office and very little overhead. Each town has a team responsible for developing and maintaining the trail in their town. Governance is handled by a board of directors drawn from all the towns.

 

Most trails of this type are built on an existing right-of-way such as a former rail corridor, or a canal towpath. There is no existing right-of-way for this trail, and thus much effort has been required to identify a suitable route. As of this writing approximately 40 percent of the trail length has been identified, landowner permission obtained, and development begun.

 

When completed, the trail will be a 25-mile, multi-purpose, recreational pathway. It will be environmentally sensitive, appropriate to the land, and acceptable to landowners. It will connect schools, parks, railroad stations, village centers, and other trails, promoting alternative transportation that does not burn fossil fuels. As an exceptional facility for walking, running, biking, cross-country skiing, and nature studies, the trail will provide a serene, pastoral respite in an area that is increasingly under pressure from development.

 

The organization strives to encourage outdoor recreation and has been very successful in developing a popular tradition, the First Saturday Walk. Walks are held on the first Saturday of each month in alternating towns with an average of fifty to sixty participants and up to more than one hundred. Biking is also encouraged with plans for several First Saturday rides each year.

Impact
Accomplishments of past year
1. The East Haven team received permission from the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection to complete the half-mile of cleared trail through Farm River State Park and continued to worked with the town of East Haven to design and construct a section of trail alongside the Bradford Preserve. 
2. The Madison team completed construction of a 600-ft trail extension with a 30-foot retaining wall in Hammonasset Park and began work on the section between park property and Webster Point Road.
3. The Guilford team completed the design for the first section of trail to be built in town.
4.  The Branford Team completed the 8/10-mile Tilcon section of the trail leading from the Stony Creek Trolley Trail.
5. The Board of Directors held extensive discussions before reorganizing itself to better meet the needs of a more mature organization.
 
Goals for Current Year
1. Build the first section of trail in Guilford to run off-road approximately 3/4 of a mile from the East River bridge on the side of Route One. 
2. Completion of the trail section across the Tabor property in Branford.
3. Secure funding to build trail through Farm River State Park in East Haven. 
4. Complete the final segment of the Hammonasset section and begin design and construction of section of trail between Lover's Lane and Scotland Avenue in conjunction with the town of Madison. 
5. Develop plans for succession in each of the key volunteer positions.
Needs

1. Trail clearing and building. 

2. Engineering and computer assisted design of specific sections. 
 
3. Wetlands, flood, and other permits for sections not yet permitted.
 
4. Trail maps and signage plans.
 
5. More donors and more funding. 

           

           

CEO Statement There is no staff executive director. The board chair fills that role. His statement is below.
Board Chair Statement

 

     Building a 25-mile biking and hiking trail along the Connecticut Shoreline is a massive undertaking. We recall advice from our National Park Service consultant, John Monroe, at our first annual meeting more than ten years ago, who told us that we were beginning a project that would not be finished for 20 years, or more!

     Today more than 40 percent of the trail route has been established, and construction has been done on six major sections. Two of those sections are now fully finished with a crushed granite topping, and they are beautiful! 

     We are starting to access the major US Department of Transportation grant awarded to Shoreline Greenway Trail ten years ago, as we design and construct a spectacular trail section alongside the scenic Bradford Preserve in East Haven.  A second federally-funded project is in the works in Branford, and the towns of Guilford and Madison are beginning work on theirs. Momentum is building!

     Of course, it takes far more than design and construction to build a trail.  First and foremost, thanks to many individual, we have strong community support with more than 2,500 individuals and families who share the vision and support the dream with generous contributions. 

     And that broad support has motivated our town and state government officials to help us in many ways: by making land available for the trail, by approving the many required permits, and by providing all-important government grants.  It has impressed foundations and corporations to award us important grants.

     It takes a long time to design and build a trail, but as each section gets finished, it is quickly adopted by nearby residents and becomes an intensely popular resource. Thousands of people are now using this trail every year.

 

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Environment / Environmental Education
Secondary Organization Category Environment / Environmental Education
Tertiary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Community & Neighbourhood Development
Areas Served
Shoreline
State wide
Branford
East Haven
Guilford
Madison
The trail will be used primarily by residents of the towns through which it runs (East Haven, Branford, Guilford, Madison) and residents of the nearby towns, but people come from throughout the state and especially from the inland towns of New Haven and Middlesex Counties to visit the shoreline and many are expected to use and enjoy the trail. It is open to everyone free of charge.
Programs
Description Approximately 40 percent of the 25-mile trail has been identified or is under construction in the four towns. On sections of trail developed with private contributions, volunteers prepare the site, develop design and engineering plans, and work to construct the trail under the guidance of the board of directors' trail development committee and with the help of contractors as needed. On sections supported by federal grants which are administered by town governments, trail officials work with town staffs to plan trails sections and assure that designs meet appropriate standards.
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. The ultimate success will be completion of a 25-mile trail, off-road as much as possible -  for recreation and alternative transportation from New Haven to Madison
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
A route for a section of trail is identified.
Landowner permission is granted.
Each required permits that is obtained.
Finally, a section of trail is built. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. Sections of trail have been completed in East Haven and Branford. A one-mile section through Hammonasset Park in Madison is well underway.
Description Maintenance of trail sections already constructed is handled by volunteers in each town following a detailed maintenance protocol established by the board of directors. In addition to focusing on keeping the trail free of overgrowth and in good condition, the maintenance teams work to remove invasive vines and other plants that are harmful to native vegetation.   
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. In addition to maintaining completed trail sections in good condition, maintenance at this point includes a great deal of trail clearing in order to build. This work is done by many volunteers, individuals, Scout troops, other youth groups such as athletic teams and religious groups. They bring their own tools and put in thousands of hours.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The condition of the trail is the measure of success.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. When a developer built houses near a completed section of trail, the clearing of the land created run-off from the site that swamped the trail. A drainage system to alleviate the problem was undertaken.
Description
Volunteers in each town work to build public awareness of the trail and encourage its use. A First Saturday Walk every month draws 30 to 100 people to walk different sections of the Shoreline Greenway Trail and other notable walking paths in alternating towns. First Saturday Bike Rides are also offered at appropriate times of the year as well as special activities for youth such as bike rodeos and special walks during school vacations. These activities are publicized through press releases, mailings, on the trail website and Facebook. Trail representatives are active in Chambers of Commerce, participate in festivals, and make presentations to community groups interested in the trail. 
Population Served General/Unspecified / /
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
The numbers of people who respond when we ask for volunteers.
The numbers of people who participate in First Saturday Walks have ranged from a usual number of about 30 to a maximum of 110. 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Hundreds of people will learn about the trail, use it, and become active in promoting it and maintaining it. Thousands will use it for recreational leading to better physical conditioning and for alternative transportation reducing the use of automobiles and the burning of fossil fuels.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. The number and variety of users is the best measure of success, and this is gauged by observation by volunteers working on the trail
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. The section of trail in Hammonasset Park that is only partially complete has become a destination for the Park's nature study programs because it opens an area with an ecological system totally different from the rest of the Park.
Program Comments
CEO Comments
Challenges:   
    Funding: we try as many avenues as we can think of to obtain it.               Personal communication: educating property owners and government officials about the value of recreational trails to economic circumstances of a town, to real estate values, and to the health and wellbeing of citizens.   
   Public communication: managing emerging modes of communication such as an engaging and always fresh website, Facebook, and Twitter.
   Permitting: our town teams work with state and federal officials to make the trail design safe, accessible by people of differing abilities, and environmentally sound.
    Design work: volunteers who are experienced in computer assisted design have been tremendously helpful.
 
CEO/Executive Director
Organization is made up of all volunteers. There is no CEO.
Email info@shorelinegreenwaytrail.org
Co-CEO
none
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 0
Number of Volunteers 250
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 0%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 0
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 0
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation N/A
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Collaborations
The Trail collaborates with a variety of organizations in each town it crosses including Hammonasset Park management, Friends of Hammonasset, town garden clubs, youth groups from various religious organizations, and community services clubs in all four towns. Boy and Girl Scout troops frequently assist with maintenance and Eagle Scout projects build trailhead signs and design and install other features along the trail. In addition town governments and the South Central CT Regional Council of Governments are involved in developing the trail.  
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Official State Greenway TrailState of Connecticut2010
Annual Greenway AwardCT Dept. of Environmental Protection2009
Voluntary Organization of the YearS. Central CT Regional Council of Governments2006
Comments
CEO Comments
There are currently no paid staff.
Board Chair
Judith Miller
Company Affiliation retired
Term May 2015 to Apr 2016
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Chip Angle retired
Pamela Bisbee-Simonds retired
Chet Blomquist retired
Ted Braun
Barbara Brow Retired
Milton Charlton retired
Glenn Gaffield
Mike Gamberdella
Peter Hawes
Brad Kronstadt
Joe Marshall
John Paulson retired
Virginia Raff retired
Peggy Thomas retired
Mary Jane Toomey
Josephine Zaehringer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 17
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 10
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Directors and Officers Policy
Commercial General Liability
Board Co-Chair
Term May 2015 to Apr 2016
Standing Committees
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Finance
Project Oversight
Nominating
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Regina Bejnerowicz Yale University
John Cox writer
Glenn Formica attorney
Craig Mullett Branison Group LLC
Karen Stark STARK marketing and communications agency
CEO Comments
As an all-volunteer organization we do not have staff to rely on to get things done. Building this trail is a very large project with many complicated facets such as permitting, funding, and government relations. We make extra effort to stay in communication. 
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01 2014
Fiscal Year End Sept 30 2015
Projected Revenue $185,000.00
Projected Expenses $185,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
Matching Gift Letter2011View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201420132012
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$67,905$129,720$126,904
Government Contributions$142,899$21,021$9,177
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$142,899$21,021$9,177
Individual Contributions------
------
$4,298----
Investment Income, Net of Losses$242$1,430$114
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$235,845$123,182$143,421
Administration Expense$876$848$832
Fundraising Expense$9,198$24,396$10,986
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.881.030.88
Program Expense/Total Expenses96%83%92%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue4%16%8%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$302,363$332,938$329,195
Current Assets$302,363$332,938$329,195
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets$302,363$332,938$329,195
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCT Dept. of Energy & Envir. Protection $120,499The Community Foundation for Greater New Haven $40,000Dorr Foundation $50,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountLong Island Sound License Plate Fund $12,500CT Dept. of Energy & Envir. Protection $21,021CT Dept. of Energy & Envir. Protection $9,177
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountJane Marcher Foundation $2,160Garden Club of Madison $1,000Chaney Family Foundation $1,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Comments
CEO Comments
We reserve a certain amount each year as working capital because much of the trail is being built using specific grants, and many of these grants are paid in arrears. That means the organization must have a significant amount of working capital on hand to spend up front while waiting for reimbursement from the granting agent. When reserves exceed the amount we think we need on hand to take advantage of grants that are paid in arrears, we spend it on trail construction. In addition, our revenue and expenses in any given year often are not equal because we often receive grants in one fiscal year that don't get fully spent until the next. 
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address PO Box 148
% Judith Miller
Branford, CT 06405
Primary Phone 203 481-3870
CEO/Executive Director Organization is made up of all volunteers. There is no CEO.
Board Chair Judith Miller
Board Chair Company Affiliation retired

 

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