Area Congregations Together
30 Todd Rd
Shelton CT 06484
Contact Information
Address 30 Todd Rd
Shelton, CT 06484-
Telephone (203) 225-0453 x
Fax 203-225-0459
E-mail sagamy@actspooner.org
Web and Social Media
Mission
To provide food, shelter and support services to people in need  and to foster and influence long term solutions to those needs. All of our energies are devoted to helping our clients establish a self-sufficient living situation.  We recognize the dignity of our clients, give them our respect and deliver our services without proselytizing. 
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1987
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Susan J Agamy
Board Chair Mr. Nicholas DaPaz
Board Chair Company Affiliation Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission
To provide food, shelter and support services to people in need  and to foster and influence long term solutions to those needs. All of our energies are devoted to helping our clients establish a self-sufficient living situation.  We recognize the dignity of our clients, give them our respect and deliver our services without proselytizing. 
Background Area Congregations Together (ACT) was established in 1979 to provide transportation for the elderly for medical purposes and a meal program for those unable to cook for themselves. In 1981, ACT assumed coordination of the Valley Food Bank Network. In 1982, a needs assessment was conducted in the region, indicating a need for an emergency homeless shelter. The first Valley homeless shelter opened in 1982 in the basement of First Congregational Church, Ansonia. When that site was no longer feasible, a temporary facility was opened at the Derby Train Station, housing up to 14 individuals, but with no cooking/dining facilities. In order to provide for residents' nutritional needs, an evening meal program was established in 1986. Spooner House relocated to its first dedicated facility in the renovated Hotchkiss Hose Fire House in Derby on March 1, 1988, and in 1997, rededicated the shelter as Spooner House, in memory of Michael Spooner. On August 1, 2008, after seven years of searching for a location, designing the facility, and seeing through its construction, ACT moved into its new permanent home in Shelton. In 2015, the Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network was established, of which Spooner House is a member along with homeless services providers in the Lower Naugatuck Valley, Milford-Shoreline, City of New Haven and surrounding towns.  ACT operates the only homeless shelter in the Lower Naugatuck Valley and one of the few in the State that welcomes families with children as well as individual adults. Spooner House provides shelter, meals and support services to an average of 100-150 homeless men, women, and children each year. Services include case management, life skills training and, through our network of partner agencies, services to address physical and mental health, substance abuse, education, job training, etc. Through our Valley Food Bank, more than 100,000 meals are provided annually to families and individuals from Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Derby, Naugatuck, Oxford, Seymour and Shelton, as well as any former Spooner House shelter residents. The services of the Valley Food Bank include a 10 day supply of food each month along with a wide variety of outreach services to those in need, such as help with food stamp/other assistance program applications, clothing, personal care items and school supplies when available, and referrals to other agencies for other needs. All activities are geared towards helping individuals achieve self-sufficiency.
Impact
Accomplishments:
• 100% of our adult shelter residents have been provided access to mental health care, and almost 100% of those residents engaged at least once with a mental health provider for screening.
• 75% of veteran shelter residents were assisted with securing employment in fiscal year 2017, up from 40% in fiscal year 2016.
• 18% increase in the number of individuals/families securing permanent housing.
• Serve as the emergency shelter for families in the Greater New Haven region, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
• Provided winter overnight emergency shelter and meals for individuals, and shelter access 24 hours a day during severe cold weather, along with access to mental health screening and social work support, connection with 211, CAN, and related permanent housing options.
• Fully implemented a Housing First model, including elimination of drug/alcohol testing to focus on behaviors, revision of rules, staff training, partnerships with housing providers.
• Offered programming opportunities for residents to support access to housing, e.g. credit repair assistance, financial literacy, vocational training, etc.
• Serve as the only shelter contracted by the VA in Connecticut that can provide shelter and services to Veteran families, regardless of the family composition.
• Expanded food pantry services to provide 10 days worth of supplemental food assistance to households in need each month, up from 7 days.
• Increased access to emergency food pantry services to 7 days a week, providing three days worth of food to sustain client until next available food pantry appointment.
 
Needs
1) ACT Spooner House meets the basic needs of food and shelter for thousands of men, women and children each year. In addition, ACT addresses the underlying issues that have contributed to a person’s or family’s homelessness and/or food insufficiency so that clients can acquire the skills and tools they need to achieve self-sufficiency.
2) In order to serve our clients, ACT requires the support of 350 regular volunteers who cook and serve meals to shelter residents, staff the three food bank locations, provide clerical and administrative support, perform basic repairs and maintenance in the facility and on the grounds, provide services such as tutoring, fundamental computer skills, etc. Additional volunteers are needed for mailings, food drives and other events. In order to maintain the current level of services, ACT needs an annual cash operating budget of $700,00 - $750,000, more than two-thirds of which comes from private sources. Additionally, ACT requires in-kind contributions of food and consumable supplies such as paper goods and cleaning products. In-kind food contributions provide approximately 95% of the meals served at the shelter and distributed through the food bank. ACT requires a sufficient number of staff members to ensure a minimum of two staff present 24/7.
CEO Statement
ACT’s Spooner House is the only facility for the homeless in the Lower Naugatuck Valley, and operates the largest food pantry in this community. Our most significant accomplishment has been the construction of our facility in Shelton, which has allowed us to expand and improve our services, including case management, mental health screening, financial literacy training, health education, parenting workshops, and more. We do not have a maximum length of stay for residents, having found that those staying at least 6 months benefit most fully from our services, gaining the skills and tools they need to achieve self-sufficiency, and are far less likely to re-enter the shelter system. Food Bank clients receive not only groceries but also services, including help with applications for food stamps and other assistance programs, referrals to agencies for needs like energy assistance or childcare, and clothing, toiletries, etc. as available. ACT’s services address the underlying causes of homelessness and hunger, and are critical in helping clients become self-sufficient. Our client stories illustrate this best:
Marie was 8 ½ months pregnant when she came to Spooner House. Shortly after her arrival, she gave birth and began receiving treatment for her serious health issues, which had prevented her from being able to care for her three older children while she was expecting. After several months of care, Marie was healthy, strong and happy. Her other children, who had been in foster care while she was ill, were reunited with their mother and new sister at Spooner House. Marie has found an apartment and will be moving soon. With the support of Spooner House, Marie has reclaimed her health, her family, her life.
For many years, Ben lived with friends, outdoors or in emergency shelters before arriving at Spooner House. Here he found stability and security that allowed him to focus on developing the skills he needed for self-sufficiency. Ben learned how to manage his time so that he could keep his appointments and accomplish necessary tasks. He learned how to handle household chores and meal planning, and developed a solid foundation for financial literacy. Ben also learned how to manage his emotions without turning to drugs, alcohol or violence. After several months at Spooner House, Ben secured his own apartment. He often shares how grateful he is that Spooner House was here for him when he needed it.
Spooner House helps people in need gain the strength, knowledge and skills necessary to reclaim their lives, achieve self-sufficiency, and embrace the future.
Board Chair Statement
  I donate my time as Board Chairman to Spooner House because as the most prosperous country in the world, I believe that we can do better for the millions of homeless residents.  We as a society must recognize that the only way to reduce the homeless population is to create an environment that teaches basic life skills to those that have never had the opportunity to learn a skill to find an adequate job, a stable family life, or adequate medical or mental health services that would allow them to be self sufficient.
   At Spooner House, the variety of programs and services that the team provides, allow the residents to understand what they need to do, where they need to go to, and how they can effectively and permanently leave Spooner House. They leave with a sense of confidence and more importantly with a sense of dignity. Matt’s story is a great example. Matt lived at Spooner House for almost a year, working part-time for most of that year. He finally secured a very good full-time position and found an apartment, enabling him to leave Spooner House. Before his departure, he came to say thank you for all of the help, support and encouragement he had received from the staff during his stay. Matt said when he first arrived, he did not always like the rules and structure here, but he realized he needed them, and that it was the support of staff and the work that was required of him that enabled him to get his life back on track.
  Two comments I have read illustrate why I volunteer my time to Spooner House:
 
“I can never thank you enough for helping my brother Steve, a current resident of the Spooner House. I would like to volunteer time soon, I am looking forward to it.” 
“Hi Guys, Just wanted to let you know that I am working for the same beverage company but now live in Chicago. Thanks again for everything you did for me!”

I am very excited about the upcoming year for Spooner House as we plan for new programs to assist our residents. Every time I walk into Spooner House I feel a sense of hope that we are making a difference. At the end of the day, I want to make a difference and make the lives of others that have not been as fortunate, better than they were the day before.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Housing, Shelter / Homeless Shelters
Secondary Organization Category Food, Agriculture & Nutrition / Food Banks, Food Pantries
Areas Served
State wide
Ansonia
Bethany
Derby
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
ACT's Spooner House shelter program is part of the Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network, and space is prioritized for individuals and families from this geographic area. Priority may be given to people from the Lower Naugatuck Valley. In addition, three beds are designated for veterans, and placement is coordinated with the VA, regardless of the veteran's geographic place of origin.  ACT's Valley Food Bank is open to residents of the Lower Naugatuck Valley towns of Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Derby, Naugatuck, Oxford, Seymour and Shelton, as well as former Spooner House shelter residents, regardless of their town of residence.  Food assistance is also provided as a diversionary measure to individuals and families with the Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network catchment area to assist with keeping people housed in place and out of the shelter system.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments As a member agency with of the Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network, Spooner House, in response to the needs of the region, has expanded our emergency shelter response policy to accommodate families with children on an emergency basis 24/7, and we have expanded our winter warming program to include daytime hours as well as overnight, effectively being open 24/7 from November 1st through March 31st. This past year, as a result of our successful implementation of a Housing First model, Spooner House senior management team members were invited to participate in the National Alliance to End Homelessness conferences for Families & Youth and Individuals, as well as a webinar for a collaborative of shelter in Georgia.
Programs
Description
ACT’s Spooner House program is one of Connecticut’s most comprehensive, and it is the only shelter facility serving the homeless in the Lower Naugatuck Valley. From the day clients arrive, they begin to learn how to prioritize goals and organize their time. Benefiting from a multi-faceted support system rather than just a shelter, each adult meets with a case manager shortly after arrival to identify and document goals, and progress is monitored regularly. Although finding a permanent home is among every client’s goals, there are often other issues that must be addressed, especially related to a client’s physical and/or mental health. To assist in identifying and addressing issues, ACT partners with many other health and human services agencies. Much time is also spent with residents working on personal financial management. ACT works with the Veterans Administration to provide shelter and services to homeless veterans enrolled in the Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program.
Population Served Homeless / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. Short-term successes include providing a safe, stable living situation, sufficient nutritious food and support services for individuals and families who have no where else to turn.  Within two weeks of admission, all adults have established an individual action plan with the Case Manager, and have been professionally screened for mental health issues, and referred for treatment as needed.  Within one month, all residents will be connected with services to help them achieve their action plan goals.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Ultimate success of the program will result in all residents departing Spooner House for an appropriate, permanent living situation, with the tools and resources they need to maintain their living situation and to participate fully in the life of the community. Clients will have engaged in necessary treatment for mental health, physical health and substance abuse. Clients will have secured appropriate child care or school enrollment for their children, employment or job training, GED/ESL/literacy classes, benefits for which they are eligible, etc.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. ACT Spooner House's programs are evaluated in several different ways. We look at: the number of people served; the types of services provided; the number of people accessing needed services, such as mental health treatment, substance abuse treatment, parenting classes, job training, GED classes, child care, legal assistance, etc.; the number of people who become employed or secure better jobs, whether in terms of stability, wages or hours; the number of positive departures from the shelter, i.e. securing apartments, reunifying with family, etc.; the number of food bank clients securing food stamps. In addition to quantitative data, we strive to secure qualitative data as well, through such tools as client satisfaction surveys, client feedback and anecdotal reports.

We also evaluate our programs and agency based on outside inspections and reports from the Veterans Administration, CT Department of Social Services, Naugatuck Valley Health District, and Connecticut Food Bank, among others. We receive regular reports from partner agencies such as Visiting Nurse Association of South Central CT and BHCare regarding clients served and progress made.


Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. A great success story is that of Marie (not her real name). Marie arrived at Spooner House 9 months pregnant and delivered a healthy baby girl a week later. Marie had serious mental health issues, but had to stop taking her powerful medication during her pregnancy. After the baby's birth, she resumed her medication. As Marie became stronger, she asked DCF for reunification with her older children who were in foster care. DCF met with Marie and observed her interactions with her baby, inspected Spooner House thoroughly, and interviewed staff and other residents. After an exhaustive investigation and assessment of Marie's health, treatment plan, living situation and services/programming through Spooner House, Marie's children were reunified with her at Spooner House, and ultimately moved into their own apartment. 20% of residents secured employment; 30% of residents secured permanent living situations; 85% of residents engaged in treatment programs.
Description
The Valley Food Bank services include distribution of a 10-day supply of food each month as well as a wide variety of outreach services to those in need. ACT has assisted clients with public assistance applications, menu planning, clothing, reconnecting utilities, school supplies, etc. Simply stated, ACT’s purpose is to help people help themselves. All activities are geared towards helping individuals achieve self-sufficiency. Services are tailored to each person’s unique situation. Staff members are trained to provide services in a caring and compassionate manner, while avoiding the creation of a sense of dependency on the part of the recipient.
Population Served Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / /
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service. In addition to providing supplemental food assistance, consisting of one week's worth of meals per person in the household, clients are referred to other programs for services as needed, e.g. TEAM, Inc. for energy assistance, the Valley Diaper Bank for diapers and wipes, BHCare for mental health services, 211 Infoline for a wide variety of services.  Food bank staff/volunteers also provide clients with information about WIC and other federal/state/local programs.  When available, clients are given items besides food, such as winter hats/gloves/scarves, toiletries, blankets, etc.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state. Success of the program will include the reduction in the number of households needing assistance from the food bank, as well as the number of households that are able to reduce the number of times they utilize the food bank each year. With the economic downturn of the last several years, we have seen many new clients, including some who had been donors to the agency.  Success will include a stronger economic outlook for our clients so that more of them can cease utilizing the food bank and once again be able to contribute fully to the community in the ways they choose.  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact. ACT Spooner House's programs are evaluated in several different ways. We look at: the number of people served; the types of services provided; the number of people accessing needed services, such as mental health treatment, substance abuse treatment, parenting classes, job training, GED classes, child care, legal assistance, etc.; the number of people who become employed or secure better jobs, whether in terms of stability, wages or hours; the number of positive departures from the shelter, i.e. securing apartments, reunifying with family, etc.; the number of food bank clients securing food stamps. In addition to quantitative data, we strive to secure qualitative data as well, through such tools as client satisfaction surveys, client feedback and anecdotal reports.

We also evaluate our programs and agency based on outside inspections and reports from the Veterans Administration, CT Department of Social Services, Naugatuck Valley Health District, and Connecticut Food Bank, among others. We receive regular reports from partner agencies such as Visiting Nurse Association of South Central CT and BHCare regarding clients served and progress made.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Mr. Clarke contacted the Valley Food Bank because he was hungry and needed help.  In speaking with Mr. Clarke, we learned that, while his most immediate need was food, he also had health issues and had been unable to get the help he needed.  Through our partnerships with other social service agencies in the region, ACT was able to secure home health care services for Mr. Clarke, and while he still requires supplemental food assistance, he is regaining his health and positive outlook. While the number of meals provided to those in need continues to grow, clients are very thankful and careful with what they have been given. Some clients receive food items that they cannot use, and will return them to the food bank so that someone else can benefit. John lives alone and is employed, but his low wage job makes it difficult to meet all of his needs. His company gave out turkeys at the holidays. It was too much for him, so he gave it to Spooner House so a family could enjoy the holiday.

CEO/Executive Director
Ms. Susan J Agamy
Term Start May 2005
Email sagamy@actspooner.org
Experience

Susan Agamy has over 25 years of experience working in the non-profit sector, primarily in the areas of administration, finance and development. She has held positions in a diverse range of fields, including education, healthcare, publishing and museum management. She joined the staff of Spooner House as the Executive Director in May 2005. Susan is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and graduated magna cum laude with a degree in cultural anthropology from Columbia University. She has received extensive professional training in strategic planning, business process reengineering, nonprofit finance and accountability, and personnel management.

In addition to working with Boards of Directors in a staff capacity, Susan has also served as a member on several Boards, including the Barnum Festival, ArtForce, the Connecticut League of History Organizations and the United Methodist Church. She currently serves as Vice Chair of the Valley Council for Health and Human Services as well as on its Executive Committee and Food Security Task Force. She served as the first Co-chair of the Greater New Haven Coordinated Access Network (CAN) Task Force and is a member of the Greater New Haven CAN work groups for homeless youth, families, and the Balance of State continuum of care integration. Her volunteer experience includes service as a Girl Scout leader, PAL softball coach, Certified Lay Speaker of the United Methodist Church, international program facilitator for the World Council of Churches and Middle East Council of Churches, and she has held several local church leadership positions.

Susan is a graduate of the Leadership Greater Valley Class of 2005 and has been honored by the Special Olympics of Connecticut, and received citations for her contributions and achievements by the City of Bridgeport and the State of Connecticut General Assembly, and is the recipient of the 2016 Diane Randall Leadership Award from Reaching Home, Ending Homelessness campaign of the Partnership for Strong Communities.

Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 4
Number of Part Time Staff 9
Number of Volunteers 350
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 75%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 3
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Senior Staff
Title Director of Operations
Title Case Manager
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
1) Visiting Nurse Association of South Central CT provides an LCSW weekly to assess and address client needs through counseling, referral to other service providers and advocacy; 2) TEAM, Inc. provides a Housing Coordinator to help clients secure and maintain apartments by assessing needs and abilities related to housing, inspecting apartments, liaising with landlords; 3) BHcare sends a worker weekly to conduct mental health screenings of adult residents, referring those needing additional evaluation/treatment to clinical services; 4) Griffin Hospital Valley Parish Nurse Program provides various services, including flu shots, blood pressure checks, nutritional/health education, etc; 5) Regional Housing Forum is a new group convened by ACT to coordinate housing options for clients. Members include ACT, Beth-El Shelter, TEAM, New Haven Home Recovery, Columbus House. Programs include Beyond Shelter, Housing Families First, Shelter Plus Care, Homelessness Prevention & Rapid Rehousing Program (HPRP); 6) Other Food Pantries: ACT coordinates services with other area food pantries, sharing client lists to avoid duplication of services, referring clients to the food pantry best able to meet particular needs, sharing operational models to achieve best practices.
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Valley United Way2011
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Community Partner AwardVisiting Nurse Association of South Central Connecticut, Inc.2007
Partner Agency of the YearThe WorkPlace, Inc.2013
Partner Agency of the YearValley United Way2015
Comments
CEO Comments
ACT has strong relationships with other health and human service agencies, allowing us to utilize the expertise of those agencies, bringing needed programs and services to our clients. In addition to the collaborations discussed above, ACT works closely with many other organizations, including Morris Foundation for substance abuse evaluation and treatment; Boys & Girls Club for afterschool and summer programs for children living in the shelter; Lincoln Tech Nursing Program, which brings nursing students to Spooner House for a semester as a clinical rotation; Rape Crisis Center of Milford, which has begun conducting informational presentations and outreach at Spooner House; Shelton Youth Services Bureau, which assists with food drives, hosts game nights and has provided babysitting services for residents; Valley United Way's Corporate Volunteer Council conducts monthly food drives, has worked at Spooner House as part of the Week of Caring projects, and builds the biannual Harvest House, a house of food, that benefits ACT and other community food pantries; local churches, synagogues, other religious groups and civic organizations that provide almost all of the meals served at Spooner House.
Board Chair
Mr. Nicholas DaPaz
Company Affiliation Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala
Term Oct 2017 to Oct 2018
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Robert Caponi Retired
Mr. Tim Foley Starbucks
Ms. Suzanne Kennard Independent Consultant
Ms. Jennifer Martin Newtown Savings Bank
Ms. Felicity Medinger Retired
Mr. Win Oppel AD-MERICA, Inc.
Ms. Cheryl Patrick Electri-Cable Assemblies
Mr. William Purcell Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce
Rev. Stanley Youngberg United Church of Christ
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Written Board Selection Criteria No
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 90%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 80%
Constituency Includes Client Representation No
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Oct 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Sept 30 2018
Projected Revenue $1,203,500.00
Projected Expenses $1,113,723.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund Yes
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$734,003$682,031$664,022
Government Contributions$296,559$262,140$298,804
Federal------
State------
Local$40,000--$20,000
Unspecified$256,559$262,140$278,804
Individual Contributions------
------
$20,546$22,657$18,202
Investment Income, Net of Losses$1,858$16$10
Membership Dues------
Special Events$22,791$16,971$12,937
Revenue In-Kind------
Other$3,256$13,726$6,944
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$927,535$893,369$890,378
Administration Expense$159,625$161,404$152,302
Fundraising Expense$105,542$95,505$84,433
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.900.870.98
Program Expense/Total Expenses78%78%79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue10%10%9%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$4,274,923$4,472,495$4,726,180
Current Assets$117,869$190,562$314,045
Long-Term Liabilities$751,560$840,304$926,659
Current Liabilities$36,419$31,558$46,151
Total Net Assets$3,486,944$3,600,633$3,753,370
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountCity of Shelton $40,000The Valley Community Foundation $150,000The Valley Community Foundation $90,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountThe Valley Community Foundation $21,642Katherine Mathies Foundation $75,000City of Shelton $20,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities3.246.046.80
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets18%19%20%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 30 Todd Rd
Shelton, CT 06484
Primary Phone 203 225-0453
Contact Email sagamy@actspooner.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Susan J Agamy
Board Chair Mr. Nicholas DaPaz
Board Chair Company Affiliation Dworken, Hillman, LaMorte & Sterczala

 

Related Information

Meet Basic Needs

A strong community not only meets its members’ basic needs but also works to create long-term solutions to their problems. Provide people with affordable housing, enough to eat and access to affordable health care and you enable them to envision a better future for themselves.