New Haven Leon Sister City Project
608 Whitney Ave
New Haven CT 06511
Contact Information
Address 608 Whitney Ave
New Haven, CT 06511-
Telephone (203) 562-1607 x
Fax 203-624-1683
E-mail nh@newhavenleon.org
Mission

New Haven/Leon Sister City Project is a progressive, binational, grassroots organization that seeks to promote social justice in Greater New Haven and Leon, Nicaragua. By sending delegations of volunteers from Greater New Haven to the rural community of Goyena, we educate local students and adults about Nicaragua, the second poorest country in the hemisphere. We raise awareness about the history of US government policies in Nicaragua and the present day effects of international economic institutions on the Nicaraguan community. We strive to educate, connect, and empower people in Greater New Haven and Leon to take action for sustainable development and the eradication of poverty. Not only do we build awareness through travel and cultural exchanges, but also we implement grassroots initiatives that address pressing community needs including climate change, hunger and malnutrition, access to education and women’s rights.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1992
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Chris Schweitzer
Board Chair Virginia Chapman
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale Office of Sustainability
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Statements
Mission

New Haven/Leon Sister City Project is a progressive, binational, grassroots organization that seeks to promote social justice in Greater New Haven and Leon, Nicaragua. By sending delegations of volunteers from Greater New Haven to the rural community of Goyena, we educate local students and adults about Nicaragua, the second poorest country in the hemisphere. We raise awareness about the history of US government policies in Nicaragua and the present day effects of international economic institutions on the Nicaraguan community. We strive to educate, connect, and empower people in Greater New Haven and Leon to take action for sustainable development and the eradication of poverty. Not only do we build awareness through travel and cultural exchanges, but also we implement grassroots initiatives that address pressing community needs including climate change, hunger and malnutrition, access to education and women’s rights.

Background

New Haven Leon Sister City Project was founded in 1984, at the forefront of a movement of sister city relationships that sprung up between Nicaraguan and US cities throughout the 1980s. At the time the US government was sponsoring a brutal and illegal war against the Nicaraguan government and people. The founding mission of NHLSCP was to enact an alternative form of foreign policy by raising awareness among US citizens about the effects of the war on the people of Nicaragua, and by supporting Nicaraguans in their efforts to create a more just society.

Every year, NHLSCP sends dozens of students, teachers, artists, health professionals and other volunteers on delegations to Leon. Like New Haven, Leon is a small, vibrant, close-knit city with a major university and teaching hospital.

After Hurricane Mitch in 1998, the municipality of Leon encouraged us to send our delegations to Goyena, a rural area established by displaced people on the outskirts of the city.

Goyena faces challenges including a lack of basic government services. The San Antonio sugar cane company owns most of the land and is a major cause of environmental destruction, worker exploitation, disease and death.

NHLSCP provides capacity-building for Goyena teachers; nutritional assistance for students; building school infrastructure; funding for after school small-group instruction; and supplementary funding for the public preschool. We support a women's rights program in Goyena that includes forum theater techniques and community organizing to tackle domestic violence. We sponsor an Environmental Youth Brigade that promotes school and home gardens, recycling, and respect for the land. Goyena projects are led by Nicaraguans and advised by the NHLSCP Board and the elected community council of Goyena. The goal is for the community to become self-sufficient.

NHLSCP implements grassroots initiatives in Greater New Haven such as the Walk Bike Transit education campaign to raise awareness about climate change, environmental justice, food security, and other issues that affect both Nicaraguan and New Haven communities. We train people in the Greater New Haven area to use forum theater as a tool for social change, and we use cultural and artistic exchanges to build understanding between the two sister communities.

Many New Haven residents make modest financial contributions every year that are invested in projects in Goyena. Ninety percent of our funds come from grassroots fundraising.

Impact
Last year, over 30 delegates and volunteers traveled to Goyena. Thirty women in Goyena completed 12 months of training on gender violence and community organizing. More than 60 residents of New Haven and Goyena completed forum theater trainings and used these techniques to resolve community problems. Ten youth in the Goyena Environmental Brigade created a documentary video based on interviews with elders about the history of the land. The video has been used to educate hundreds of New Haven public school students and other audiences. New Haven residents participated in weekly "butterfly swarms" in public spaces to raise awareness about the effects of climate change on small farming communities like Goyena. Fundraising exceeded expectations because of NHLSCP supporters raised record pledges in the annual Rock-to-Rock Earth Day bike ride ($15,500 raised).
Major goals for the current year include launching the Healthy New Haven Climate Challenge to get individuals to cut greenhouse gas consumption by 20%; implementing the fourth annual forum theater trainings in New Haven and in Nicaragua; expanding the women's program to outlying rural areas; raising the preschool enrollment to 70 children; and celebrating NHLSCP's 30th anniversary.
Needs 1. Board members who have time, energy, and a commitment to the mission and work of the NHLSCP.

2. Volunteers and interns who are available during office hours to help with outreach, special events, programming, and more. Our organization runs on grassroots participation.

3. An increased donor base, especially among younger donors.  Ninety percent of our funding comes from grassroots fundraising. We have a generous and loyal donor base, but it is an aging demographic. We need new strategies to involve young people in fundraising.

4. Individuals and groups who are interested in going on a delegation to Nicaragua. Delegations are organized around a particular theme and/or group. For example, we have organized delegations for high school groups, college groups, bicyclists, teachers, art therapists, public health students, environmental students, and inter-generational / family groups.

5.  Help with a succession plan which is under construction.
Board Chair Statement

Like so many people involved in NHLSCP, I've been active in the project for over 25 years. I first traveled to Nicaragua on a Sister City delegation in 1993. My two daughters went on delegations to Nicaragua as high school students. The experience has broadened their vision, increased their understanding of the causes of poverty, and deepened their appreciation of the dignity of all people. Serving the project has certainly enriched my life and, I trust, contributed to a more just life for the people of Leon and Goyena.

One important function of any board is to ensure that programs and activities reflect the mission of the organization.  The challenge for NHLSCP is to make sure that our work encourages the community to become self reliant and self actualizing.

Our mission is to promote social justice not charity.  While charity has its place, and meeting the immediate needs of people is undoubtedly important, what the NHLSCP aspires to is different.  We want to work with people helping them to better help themselves. To that end, we focus on education and youth development, and we also support efforts in community organizing and participatory theater that tackle the root causes of injustice.

In October 2012, another board member, a staff member and I traveled to Leon to meet with our Leon staff and spend time in Goyena. We returned to New Haven filled with renewed hope for the people with whom we work.

Nuvia Quiroz, who is a volunteer facilitator of the Goyena women's group, told us about how she had confronted her neighbor after repeatedly hearing him berate and beat his wife. She took a risk and knocked on his door at 11 o'clock at night because she could no longer remain silent. This was not a spontaneous action -- it was an action that she had rehearsed during forum theater workshops. She had created a play about her inability to confront her neighbor, and she had rehearsed some potential strategies with the women's group, and finally she took action in real life. Now she aims to organize a crisis response team to provide refuge and accompaniment for women who may want to leave an abusive home.

At the same time, in New Haven, immigrant women, mentally ill patients, and youth are creating their own forum theater plays and rehearsing for social change thanks to NHLSCP. While youth in Goyena create theater and video about environmental justice, New Haven residents respond by holding weekly "butterfly swarms" in public spaces to ask local residents to cut their reliance on climate-warming greenhouse gases.

Stories like these motivate me to continue serving the New Haven Leon Sister City Project. We constantly challenge ourselves to listen and provide tools so that people can build healthier, more sustainable communities, locally and globally.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit / Citizen Participation
Secondary Organization Category International, Foreign Affairs, and National Security / International Peace and Security
Tertiary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development NEC
Areas Served
New Haven
International
NHLSCP implements programs at high schools and universities throughout the Greater New Haven area. We also organize grassroots initiatives, cultural events, and public education programs throughout the city of New Haven and in partnership with neighborhood libraries, art galleries, theaters, and in public spaces.    
Programs
Description

Delegations are groups of volunteers who travel from the New Haven area to live with families in Nicaragua, typically for 7 to 10 days. While in Nicaragua, they learn about the causes of poverty and the US role in Nicargua's history. They work with community members on a project such as repairing school desks or painting a mural in the preschool. Delegations often explore a particular theme based on the interests and skills of the group, for example, delegations of teachers often meet with the Ministry of Education, learn about the challenges facing Nicaraguan teachers and students, and share teaching techniques.

 

Peace and Justice Internships allow individuals to live and volunteer in the Goyena community over a longer period of time, typically 1 - 10 months. Peace and Justice Interns typically are college students, graduate students, and professionals who have particular skills to offer. They volunteer in Goyena in the Education Program or Environmental Justice Programs.
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Adults / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

During the next year, at least thirty people from Greater New Haven will travel on delegations and internships to Nicaragua. At least 90% will report increased understanding of how US policies and US lifestyle choices affect the Goyena community. At least 90% will report increased ability to take action on issues of global economic and social justice.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Delegates and interns will return to the United States with an increased understanding of how their lives and choices affect the people of Nicaragua and Latin America. Many will go on to study and work in Latin America or in the fields of sustainable development and human rights. Some will stay involved with the New Haven Leon Sister City Project, volunteering to raise awareness among the Greater New Have community about issues affecting the Nicaragua people, or offering in-kind or financial contributions to support ongoing programs in Nicaragua.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

 

  • Each delegation member and intern submits a written evaluation to examine what they have learned, what went well, and what could have been improved.
  • The Program Director does an in-person evaluation with each delegation leader and Peace and Justice Intern upon their return to Connecticut.
  • We maintain communication with former delegates through newsletters, the annual picnic, and other "reunion" events. We track the number of former delegates and interns who stay involved in the project as volunteers and donors.

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Approximately 1,200 people from Greater New Haven area have participated in delegations over our 29 year history. Delegates and Peace and Justice interns have taught music and theater; built capacity for the after school programs; conducted interviews and surveys on food security; done water studies of the adjacent sugar plantation to determine pesticide contamination; organized sick farmworkers; and more.

Delegates and interns often self-report that their experience with NHLSCP is life changing. Many return to Nicaragua to visit their Nicaraguan friends and learn more. Others go on to study and work in Latin America or in the fields of sustainable development and human rights. 
 

After traveling on a delegation last year to learn about the kidney disease epidemic affecting sugar cane workers, two students wrote, "Where do we go from here? What can we, a delegation of eight students, do about this? As we begin to grapple with the overwhelming reality for these Nicaraguan sugar cane workers, we invite you to be part of our discussion. Let's bring this discussion here to New Haven. Let's work together to make our sister city in Nicaragua a safe place to call home." The students were spurred to action after meeting with the association of sick workers, seeing the environmental destruction in Goyena, and meeting with representatives of the US Embassy and USAID in Nicaragua.

Description

Forum theater is an interactive, playful tool that allows a community to identify problems and brainstorm solutions. NHLSCP trains people in Goyena and in Greater New Haven to use forum theater.

 

The Women's Rights Program in Goyena uses forum theater, community organizing and know-your-rights education to bring women together to challenge gender-based violence, including domestic violence. Women complete trainings on sexual and reproductive rights and learn how to identify and deal with different forms of gender violence. Women exercise leadership by establishing and serving on action committees and learning how to facilitate theater exercises and educational workshops for other women and children.
Population Served At-Risk Populations / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent / US& International
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

 

Forum Theater Program (Greater New Haven)
  • At least 20 people will enroll in the fourth annual forum theater training. At least three people will gain skills by leading the training under supervision of the lead facilitator.
  • At least ten people will attend monthly "joker jams" to continue developing their skills as forum theater facilitators.
  • Participants will produce several forum theater plays to educate the broader community about particular issues and engage the audience in "rehearsing solutions" on stage.
  • At least 20 people will complete a training on the "rainbow of desire" technique, a technique related to forum theater that is designed to help people identify forms of internalized oppression and "rehearse" ways to overcome it.

 

 

Women's Rights & Theater Program (Goyena)
  • Approximately 45 women will enroll in the next round of trainings, including women from rural areas of Troilo and Abangasca.
  • At least 80% of them will complete the training and report increased understanding of sexual and reproductive rights.
  • At least 80% will be able to identify different forms of gender violence and strategies for dealing with it.
  • At least 80% of them will participate in direct actions, for example attending marches in the city of Leon to decriminalize abortion, hold abusers accountable, etcetera
  • At least five women will exercise facilitation skills, imparting exercises and trainings with other adults and with children in the after school programs.
  • At least ten women will establish and serve on action committees, such as a violence response committee, outreach committee, and facilitators committee. 

 

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

We began this program so that people in both Greater New Haven and Goyena could use theater as a tool for social change, awareness raising, and community empowerment. We envision binational exchanges in which residents of New Haven and Goyena will use theater as a tool to communicate across borders about the issues they face locally and globally.

To that end, we strive to build an active network of forum theater facilitators in the Greater New Haven area who are trained to use this technique. These facilitators will establish forum theater troupes with at-risk populations, in collaboration with agencies that serve at-risk populations, such as youth, homeless, immigrants, former prisoners, etcetera. Forum theater troupes will produce plays to educate the general public about community problems and to engage the public in "rehearsing solutions" onstage.

The Women's Rights Program in Goyena gives rural women a platform to educate one another and come together for the betterment of women, girls, and the community. The long-term goal is that once women build awareness about gender discrimination and violence, they will develop their own initiatives to increase their well-being, such as cooperative income-generating projects; crisis response for women who are victims of violence; action committees to change laws and policies; forum theater plays to raise awareness; and other kinds of trainings to educate children and adults about gender discrimination.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Forum Theater Program (Greater New Haven)
  • We track the number of people who complete our forum theater trainings and the number of people who continue to use apply skills learned, for example, by establishing a forum theater troupe with a particular at-risk community.
  • Throughout the forum theater training process, participants evaluate what they have learned and how they will apply it in their communities.
  • We evaluate the diversity of the participants; the number of agencies that collaborate; the number of audience members who engage in the interactive forum play performance; and the diversity of themes that emerge in the forum theater plays.
Women's Rights & Theater Program (Goyena)
  • We track the number of women who enroll in and complete the forum theater / women's rights trainings.
  • During group sessions and one-on-one sessions with staff, women self-report on their knowledge of gender-based violence; their ability to challenge violence in their lives; and their ability to exercise leadership in the community.
  • We track the number of women who stay involved in community organizing efforts, for example by participating in the elected community council and women's action committees.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

 In the past three years, NHLSCP has produced three intensive Forum Theater workshops in New Haven and two in Goyena. In New Haven, more than 70 teachers, social workers, mental health professionals, activists, and youth workers have learned this technique. In Goyena, five women have graduated as Forum Theater Facilitators ("promotoras") and 50 women and youth have created original Forum Theater plays.

This year, 30 Goyena women completed a 12-month series of trainings and workshops to learn from experts about how to use the law, direct action, and forum theater to defend their rights. Five women graduated as Forum Theater Facilitators. They also completed a week-long training by CANTERA, one of the oldest Nicaraguan feminist organizations, to facilitate interactive workshops about gender justice in their community.

Nubia Quiroz, a participant in the women's trainings who is now a facilitator, says that the workshops have "allowed me to loosen up my body and my mind and think outside the box." She woke up every day at four in the morning and walked half an hour to Leon plus a two hour bus ride to Managua to attend the CANTERA training. With help from NHLSCP, she is helping establish a rapid response group to offer refuge and accompaniment to women who want to leave abusive partners.

In New Haven, NHLSCP provides ongoing training and support to more than ten Forum Theater Facilitators who work with the homeless, immigrant women, at-risk youth and mentally ill patients. 

 

Description

NHLSCP provides financial support, school supplies, and teacher training for the Goyena preschool, after school and school lunch program serving children from preschool through grade 6. The after school program consists of small group academic instruction, including advanced work for students who need more rigor and remedial help for students who are behind.

Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5) / Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
  • Boost preschool enrollment from 55 students to 70 students.
  • Continue supporting the volunteer-run school lunch program.
  • At least 80% of students participating in our after school programs will stay in school and be promoted the next grade level.
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Our goal is to increase enrollment in the public schools, improve access to education, and improve graduation rates in the rural areas of Leon that are underserved by the Ministry of Education. Many adults report that they did not finish school after the sixth grade because of the need to work and the difficulty paying for transportation and books in order to finish their studies. Our ultimate goal is to engage parents, teachers and volunteers in improving educational access and outcomes for the next generation.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

School retention and promotion rates (the percentage of students who stay in school and proceed to the next grade) are the measures of success. NHLSCP staff maintain constant communication with teachers in the preschool, primary school and afterschool, and require teachers to keep records for evaluation. We also keep track of any participants in our programs who go on to enroll in university, which is rare but increasingly within the realm of the possible. The Board's standing committee on Education oversees the program.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Most of the parents in Goyena have no formal education beyond sixth grade because rural people have to travel great distances to attend school, and they often drop out of school to work and support their families. Several mothers who are active in the Goyena parents group told NHLSCP Board members that their children would have dropped out of school without the extra instruction and support offered by the after school program.

Marta Osejo created the Goyena preschool in her house when she was 16 years old, more than ten years ago. Five years ago, NHLSCP built a one room schoolhouse for the preschool right next to the primary school. Marta continues to work there, and she is one of three preschool teachers who are now funded by the Nicaraguan Ministry of Education. Fifty five students attend. Goyena parents and New Haven volunteers lovingly maintain the building. New Haven volunteers donate supplies and teacher training. 

NHLSCP recently built a kitchen at the primary school, in an effort that was spearheaded by Goyena parents. Mothers who take turns cooking lunch for all the students. As in the United States, school lunch provides an incentive for kids to travel great distances to attend school and ensures that kids have the nourishment to excel in their studies. 

Description
Walk Bike Transit is a public education initiative in which New Haven residents educate their neighbors about the global benefits of reducing carbon emissions by shifting to "active transit" (walking, biking, and public transit). Through posters, tabling, public service announcements, news coverage, and public events, volunteers educate their neighbors about climate change; inform them about solutions; encourage them to "take the pledge" to reduce their personal car use; and provide them with postcards to send to state and local elected officials in favor of active transit policies.
  
The Environmental Brigade in Goyena is comprised of youth ages 17-22.  They study and raise awareness about the environmental issues affecting their community. When delegations of New Haven volunteers visit, they give a walking tour of the river and farmland to teach about how environmental destruction threatens the health and food security of the Goyena community. The Brigade also conducts age appropriate workshops and actiivities with school age children on recycling, the water supply, and more.
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Adults / US& International
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
  • At least 200 New Haven residents will sign a pledge to reduce their car use by 5, 10 or 15 percent
  • At least 4000 postcards / letters / signatures will be sent to elected officials to increase active transit funding. Members of the public also will be mobilized to attend public meetings with elected officials.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
Walk Bike Transit
  • We will analyze data collected by the City of New Haven annually on bikers, walkers, air quality, obesity and other public health / environmental indicators
  • We will have volunteers self-report on their ability to mobilize neighbors to take action, including contacting elected officials
  • We will evaluate the number of municipal and state policies that are influenced by our grassroots mobilization efforts
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Yara Perez, 21 years old, has been a leader in the Environmental Youth Brigade for three years and is now working as an assistant in the preschool. She just began her first year of college at UNAN Leon to study natural sciences. Yara remembers whem her family was displaced from their farm by Hurricane Mitch in 1998, and she talks about that experience when she leads international visitors on the environmental justice tour of Goyena.

Last year, Yara was one of ten youth in the Goyena Environmental Brigade who created a video based on interviews with community elders about the history of the land. The students previously knew nothing about how their grandparents had fought with large plantation owners and the government to reclaim farm land that rightfully belonged to them as small farmers and indigenous people. With help from a New Haven theater delegation, the Brigade created a Forum Theater play and documentary video about the history of the land, and the current struggle to keep the land from being sold to the San Antonio sugar plantation.

CEO/Executive Director
Chris Schweitzer
Term Start Jan 2008
Email cschweitzer@newhavenleon.org
Experience Chris Schweitzer is Program Director and Co-Executive Director. He has 30 years of non-profit work and management experience including community organizing, human rights, public health, youth development, community art, international development, sustainable agriculture, homelessness, and fundraising. He has a Masters in Social Work from Temple University.
Co-CEO
Patricia L. Nuelsen
Term Start Sept 1988
Email pnuelsen@newhavenleon.org
Experience Patricia L. Nuelsen is Development Director and Co-Executive Director. She has 21 years of experience with NHLSCP in various capacities and 10 years in the current position of Development Director. Prior to that, she worked as a high school teacher and administrator for 13 years. A New Haven native, she holds a Masters in Divinity from Yale Divinity School and a Bachelor of Arts from Albertus Magnus College.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 3
Number of Volunteers 60
Number of Contract Staff 0
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 3
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 2
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Sydney Frey Jan 2007 -
Kate Landon Jan 2006 -
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Tri-Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation No
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Gandhi Peace AwardPromoting Enduring Peace1996
Board Chair
Virginia Chapman
Company Affiliation Yale Office of Sustainability
Term Jan 2014 to Jan 2016
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Susan Bramhall Yale University
Jesse Greist USNH
Henry Lowendorf Community Volunteer
Melissa Martinez Optimus Healthcare
Roy Money The Consultation Center
Ray Pagliaro Grand Paint
Michael Soares Fair Haven School
Lori Sudderth Quinnipiac University
Susan Power Trucksess Branford United Church of Christ
William Vazquez Mazariegos Fairfield University
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 4
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 6
Unspecified 0
Risk Management Provisions
Directors and Officers Policy
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Medical Health Insurance
Board Co-Chair
Ray Pagliaro
Company Affiliation Grand Paint
Term Jan 2014 to Jan 2016
Email ray.pagliaro@snet.net
Standing Committees
Finance
Program / Program Planning
Education
Personnel
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Community Outreach / Community Relations
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2016
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2016
Projected Revenue $147,067.00
Projected Expenses $147,033.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Form 990s
Form 9902014
Form 9902013
Form 9902012
Form 9902011
Form 9902010
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Determination Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Program Expense$107,362$126,747$119,474
Administration Expense$50,848$49,832$51,205
Fundraising Expense----$2,148
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.991.041.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses68%72%69%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%2%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201420132012
Total Assets$173,371$142,379$140,521
Current Assets$117,688$101,514$91,500
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$46,430$12,611$17,232
Total Net Assets$126,941$129,768$123,289
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201420132012
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Stock $19,793
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Phoebe Foundation $10,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Stock $9,772
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.538.055.31
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201420132012
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Goal $30,000.00
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments
The New Haven Leon Sister City Project is exempt from conducting annual audits due to their budget size. 

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 
Address 608 Whitney Ave
New Haven, CT 06511
Primary Phone 203 562-1607
Contact Email nh@newhavenleon.org
CEO/Executive Director Chris Schweitzer
Board Chair Virginia Chapman
Board Chair Company Affiliation Yale Office of Sustainability

 

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