Leadership Education and Athletics in Partnership
31 Jefferson Street
New Haven CT 06511-4947
Contact Information
Address 31 Jefferson Street
New Haven, CT 06511-4947
Telephone (203) 773-0770 x
Fax 203-773-1695
E-mail development@leapforkids.org
Web and Social Media

Mission
LEAP's mission is to develop the strengths and talents of young leaders who create and implement year-round, community-based programming designed to achieve positive academic and social outcomes for children and youth living in high-poverty urban neighborhoods who might otherwise be limited by the geography of their birth: neighborhoods with high levels of violence, a massive academic achievement gap for children of color and a lack of high quality entry level jobs to help move families out of poverty. 
 
LEAP’s vision is that young people can turn inner city neighborhoods around; they can be the solution and not the problem.
 
Our goal is to create and implement a multi-tiered mentoring model where young people of all ages are welcomed, educated and provided opportunities to grow within LEAP.
 
 
At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1992
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Henry Fernandez
Board Chair Ann Baker Pepe
Board Chair Company Affiliation The Foote School, Director of Development
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $2,295,753.00
Projected Expenses $2,296,753.00
Statements
Mission
LEAP's mission is to develop the strengths and talents of young leaders who create and implement year-round, community-based programming designed to achieve positive academic and social outcomes for children and youth living in high-poverty urban neighborhoods who might otherwise be limited by the geography of their birth: neighborhoods with high levels of violence, a massive academic achievement gap for children of color and a lack of high quality entry level jobs to help move families out of poverty. 
 
LEAP’s vision is that young people can turn inner city neighborhoods around; they can be the solution and not the problem.
 
Our goal is to create and implement a multi-tiered mentoring model where young people of all ages are welcomed, educated and provided opportunities to grow within LEAP.
 
 
Background

LEAP was founded in 1992 by a group of college students, educators and community activists who were concerned about the combination of poverty, academic achievement gap and violence that impacted children in New Haven neighborhoods. These changemakers had a new vision: that young people, New Haven college and high school students, could be leaders to tackle these problems.

With New Haven's challenges comes the lack of opportunity that we see for low income African American and Latino children across America. We can anticipate that New Haven children will be less likely to graduate from high school and go to college. This will mean they will earn less throughout their lives. Unfortunately we also know that as they grow up, they will be more likely to be incarcerated than their white and wealthier peers.

These are exactly the hard challenges that LEAP looks to take on.  LEAP works with low income children ages seven to fifteen in some of the poorest inner city neighborhoods in America. We provide proven academic supports and social enrichment. But we do so in a unique way.

LEAP believes that young people – teenagers and young adults – can turn around neighborhoods. We see this group of young people as the solution, and not the problem. We provide 175 of these young people with the training and resources to run New Haven’s largest youth agency, serving some 1000 youth with high quality programming year round.

LEAP trains New Haven college and high school students to work with younger children, providing a literacy based curriculum as well as classes in the arts, computer science, swimming, athletics, camping, cooking and team building. 
 
In LEAP’s summer program, we work with children five days a week and place our college student senior counselors to live in public housing developments and other neighborhood housing so they are accessible to children, learn about the neighborhoods’ strengths and weaknesses, and infuse role models in places that benefit from the introduction of college students as neighbors.  During the school year, LEAP operates six days a week, using 5 to 1 child to counselor ratios to help children complete homework, engage in our literacy based curriculum and enjoy a wide range of opportunities in the arts, sports, and science that respect children’s “multiple intelligences” and often are no longer available in urban public schools that  must now spend the majority of their time meeting strict standardized testing goals in basic subjects.

 

Impact

Accomplishments:

  • LEAP significantly expanded the number of young people served to over 1000 unduplicated children ages 7 to 15 and trained and employed 175 New Haven public high school and college students as counselors.
  • 100% of our Junior Counselors who were seniors graduated from high school and matriculated to a 2 or 4 year college (or joined the military) in 2014, 2015 and 2016.   
  • Between 2015 and 2016, ten Junior Counselors received New Haven Promise Scholarships.
  • LEAP created three new pilot projects in the last year - an experiential science education component of our camping program in partnership with the Peabody Museum; a coding and robotics class with our female Leaders in Training ages 13 to 15; and a mutual mentoring partnership with the New Haven Police Academy where Leaders in Training are paired with police recruits to overcome stereotypes. 
  • LEAP reopened its pool and began community swim classes, allowing hundreds of low income New Haven children the opportunity to learn to swim.  LEAP hires and trains local young college and high school students to teach swim classes. This is essential as the CDC reports that 11-12 year old African American children are 10 times more likely to drown in a pool than white kids.  

Goals:

  • In the face of decreasing government funding, we hope to continue to serve at least 1300 young people ages 7 to 24 or more if possible.
  • To enhance our counselor training so we continue to effectively create a safe community for young people of color, immigrants, LGBTQ youth, and other marginalized populations.
  • To make major repairs at the LEAP community center in our 100-year-old building at 31 Jefferson Street in New Haven.  While a grand old building, it needs repairs to lower energy costs, stop leaks and keep the pool operational.
  • To start a Community Swim Team to create a way for our advanced swimmers to compete as the other options are largely not affordable.
Needs

1. Maintain or expand # of children served as government funding is cut. Fill our potential $250,000 to $700,000 funding gap if the State cuts LEAP from its budget and if the federal government cuts AmeriCorps from its budget, both of which are possible.

2. College readiness program. We would like to continue to run PSAT prep for freshmen, SAT prep for sophomores and juniors, and to provide a multi-state college tour for juniors and seniors. This will impact 100 New Haven high school students at a cost of $35,000.

3. Community Center. We desperately need to replace our roof as leaks are ruining the gymnasium and dance studio floors at a cost of $100,000.

4. Professional Development.  To run an effective academic and social development program that engages teens and young adults to work with young children, we need to maintain our focus on high quality training for our counselors. Our professional development needs for our counselors are $25,500. Advancing the professional development of our program staff is also a significant priority at a cost of $5,000.

5. Journeys. We bring our students to see cultural sites in cities such as Washington DC and Philadelphia, many for the first time. We want to extend the days of these trips from overnight to two nights at a cost of $30,000. 
CEO Statement

Twenty-five years ago, in my early twenties I was fortunate to join with a group of amazing people to start LEAP in New Haven.  I served as executive director for seven years, during a period of amazing growth. Thousands of children came through LEAP, and I met hundreds of teenagers and young adults who served as counselors.  Now almost every day in New Haven I run into talented young adults who share with me their current successes and remind me of when we first met that they were in LEAP as an elementary school student.  I also hear regularly from former college and high school students who were LEAP counselors and now serve as elected officials, business executives, teachers, principals and heads of non-profit organizations.

LEAP builds and nurtures future leaders.  It is an amazing institution.
 
When the LEAP Board approached me about once again serving as  LEAP's executive director at a time when LEAP planned a mindful expansion, I did not hesitate.  I have found the children, teens and young adults just as inspiring as two decades ago.
 
Our focus now is in growing LEAP significantly.  We have expanded the number of children served in both our summer program and after-school program.  We have added a fifth LEAP site at the Farnam Courts public housing development.  We have re-opened our pool and are now teaching hundreds of children to swim.  We have established a new initiative teaching children the basics of computer programming.  We also have increased the number of high school students working for LEAP by 66% with 50 high school junior counselors and another 50 young teens in our Leaders In Training program.  We now work with children 6 days a week, up from 4 days a week last year.
 
We still have a lot of work to do.  Our goal is to serve 1000 children in the next two years, making high quality academic enrichment and social development programs available for children in New Haven's low income neighborhoods.  We want to not only grow but do a better job, ensuring that children have more access to good books in our literacy program, that our counselors are better trained to be mentors and educators, and that we have strong partnerships to expose our children to the arts, overnight camping and other new challenges that expand their understanding of the world.
 
None of this would be possible without the generosity and support of our great donors and volunteers. So thank you for considering supporting LEAP. 
Board Chair Statement
Twenty-two years ago, while working at the Wesleyan University Admission Office, I met an impressive group of young people from New Haven on a college tour. They asked great questions, seemed well-prepared for the visit, and clearly had close relationships with their supportive counselors. Learning that the group was from LEAP, I vowed to get involved with the organization. For more than 16 years I have volunteered to reach friends and raise funds for LEAP; for the past eight years, I have served on the Board.
 
Two summers ago I worked with a group of nine- and ten-year-old girls and boys, teaching them to sew by hand and to use a sewing machine. I continue to be inspired by the positive attitudes and close relationships developed at LEAP. The program's mentorship model works so effectively: college students and recent college grads model successful educational outcomes for high school students, who in turn provide both support and positive role models for children. Every child deserves a chance to thrive, and all children need adults who care about them, support their interests, and encourage their success.
 
For twenty-five years, LEAP has provided that critical support for many children from impoverished neighborhoods in New Haven. I am privileged to be a part of its work. -- Ann Baker Pepe, Board Chair
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Youth Development / Youth Development Programs
Secondary Organization Category Education / Educational Services
Tertiary Organization Category Recreation & Sports / Swimming, Water Recreation
Areas Served
In a specific U.S. city, cities, state(s) and/or region.
New Haven

LEAP serves children from five neighborhoods in New Haven: Church Street South, Fair Haven, Dwight, Dixwell and Farnam Courts.  We work closely with community partners including five New Haven Public Schools that provide classroom space: High School in the Community, Clinton Avenue School, Troup School, Hillhouse High School and Conte School.  We also operate a comprehensive community center on Jefferson Street in New Haven on the edges of Downtown, Fair Haven and Wooster Square.

 

Programs
Description
The Children’s Program provides children ages 7-12 with academic year, weekend and summer programming to help them develop academically and socially.  In the afterschool component  that includes weekends, children receive a healthy snack, homework help and instructional resources such as art, dance and science; and enrichment clubs such as computer technology, swimming, healthy cooking, tennis and puppetry are taught at The Roslyn Milstein Meyer LEAP Community Center. In the summer component, the focus is on strengthening the children’s reading and writing skills and building social skills. This component features academics in the morning and enrichment activities, including field trips, in the afternoon. Overnight camping and a ropes challenge course for team building are annual summer highlights. 
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Minorities / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
By the end of the LEAP year, which runs from September through August, 100% of children will have read 10 books per component.
 
Our attendance rate will be 85% or better.  We also strive for 85% or better in the numbers of children who return each component, and who improve and/or learn new skills.
 
85% of children during the summer program will avoid the "summer slide"in reading by maintaining or exceeding their pre-summer reading test score at the end of the summer.
 
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The long-term goal of our Children's Program is to develop active readers who value themselves and education; and are locally and globally minded citizens.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

·We employ Results-Based Accountability (RBA)™ as a focused way of thinking and taking action that starts with our desired results.  

·Through the use of RBA, we have set a common language, created desired results and determined performance measures that will provide quantifiable data designed to answer: How much did we do? How well did we do it? And, is anyone better off? 

·All of our staff have been intensively trained in RBA and youth who work with children learn about the measures and results in their training.

·We track attendance, academic outcomes, specific program outcomes and survey results through the online tool, ETO (Efforts to Outcomes).

·At the end of each component (three times per year), we utilize survey data and performance evaluations as a means of determining our successes, identifying areas for growth and making adjustments when necessary for program improvement.
 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
In 2013-14, the children read 9,688 books: an average 21 books per child.
 
During the Fall 2014 component alone, 490 children read a total of 5,403 books more than half the number of books children read during the entire previous year! 
 
 
 
 
The children’s own testimonies of impact:

“I love my family very much because they take care of me and I take care of them. I love LEAP because it is my family.” Nazy,7

“At LEAP I learn how to make good choices like not to talk when the teacher is talking. It’s important so you won’t get in trouble.” Jayden, 8

“The thing I love about LEAP is that the counselors come up with creative and good activities for the kids.” Neira, 7

“I love LEAP because you get treated just like everyone else.” Alayza, 8

“I like LEAP because they have nice counselors and they show you things you never learned before.” Dante,10

“LEAP is fun and they help me with my homework.” Zharia, 8

“At LEAP I learn how to read better.” Rojae, 7

“I love LEAP because when I see everybody, I feel like a rose.” Shadae, 9

Description
The Youth Development Program is multi-tiered and targeted to meet the unique developmental needs of this age group.
* Leaders-in-Training (13-15) have their own curriculum that recognizes their social and educational needs while preparing them for leadership. LITs build peer mediation/violence prevention skills; learn to problem solve; make good decisions on health/sexuality; PSAT prep.
* Junior Counselors (16-19) are high school students who support Senior Counselors in serving LEAP children, thus gaining job experience. JCs receive mentoring and preparation for college, including SAT prep.
* Senior Counselors (19-23) are college students gaining work experience, career credentials, and support in their personal, educational, and professional development.With JCs as support, SCs serve LEAP children as teachers, counselors and mentors, creating curricula that maximize their children’s learning capacity and broaden the youngsters' worldview. All youth complete community service projects. 
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years) / Minorities / At-Risk Populations
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
By August 31, 2015:
* 100% of our eligible high school seniors will have graduated from high school and be matriculating at either a 2 or 4 year college.
 
*  85% of the Leaders in Training and Junior Counselors attending New Haven schools will qualify for New Haven Promise scholarships.
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
The primary goal of LEAP's Youth Development Program is to develop young leaders who value education, are civically engaged, and inspire social change through education and service. 
 
The goal for the Leaders-in-Training is to develop civically engaged mentors whose academic achievements fully prepare them to succeed in high school, become responsible informed decision makers on issues of health and sexuality, and equipped with strategies in peer mediation and violence prevention. 
The goal for the Junior Counselors is for them to graduate from high school, be accepted to a 2- or 4-year college or university, and be civically engaged. 
 
The goal for the Senior Counselors is to develop young leaders who value education and inspire social change through education and service.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
The Youth Development Manager, in conjunction with School Guidance Counselors, collects school records -- including report cards, attendance records, and discipline records -- four times per school year.  This allows us to calculate the percentage of eligible youth participants who are on track to qualify for high school graduation, and measures our ability to prepare participants for college and eligibility for New Haven Promise scholarships and/or the work force.
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
2009-2014: 100% of high school seniors graduated and matriculated at 2 or 4-year college.
 
100% of seniors are on track to graduate in 2015.
 
Summer 2014: 100% of  LITs and JCs completed youth-led service learning projects.
 
Youth testimonies: 
 
"Before I became a Junior Counselor, I was extremely self-centered. LEAP has humbled me; it has taught me that it is fine to be wrong. Making mistakes allows for self-improvement and self-reflection. I now make a practice of self-reflection. I constantly check myself to see how I performed at my site. Did I cater to the kids properly? Was my performance worthy enough to be proud of? My experience has taught me to strive to be a better person than who I was the day before. The staff and kids everyday teach me traits I never knew about myself. Everyday is a learning lesson."
 
"I overcame adversity by making our LEAP motto my personal statement every morning, afternoon and evening - 'Lead by Example.'  This summer, I led by example."   
Description
LEAP is again tackling the "digital divide" that exists for inner city children. In 1994 LEAP led the nation in introducing the internet to children living in high poverty urban neighborhoods. Today we remain at the forefront nationally by teaching computer coding to children, primarily of color, ages 7-12, to address the dismal numbers of girls, African-Americans and Latinos taking the AP exam in Computer Science. (20% girls; 3% African-American; 8% Latino). http://bit.ly/1rNvokO
 
Today's software expansion has transformed reading and writing code into a new form of literacy. Preparing children for this technical revolution is crucial for their future and ours. Learning to code however is not simply about equipping the next generation to work as software engineers. Coding is not just a skill; it is an entirely new way to approach problem solving. The broader value in teaching children to code is the way it teaches them to think using a step-by-step logical flow to solve complex problems and build models.  
 
 
 
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years) / Minorities / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Girls in the inner city have a double negative, their environment and the risk of not being encouraged to learn to code.  LEAP is changing that. Given the under-representation of females and people of color in the tech field, it is particularly noteworthy that LEAP's two computer teachers are young woman, one of whom is a African American, who serve as powerful role models and mentors.
 
Children are tested on their knowledge of computer science twice during the course -- once at the beginning and once at the course's conclusion to give a snapshot of what was learned.  Examples of gains include: 
    Question                                          Pre-Test                  Post-Test
Can you define computer science?      30.6%                      77.4%
Can you successfully define a Loop?    5.6%                       83.7%
Define a bug is in computer science.     8.3%                       85.0%
Define a function in computer science.  5.6%                      64.4% 
Do you know what computer coding is? 30.6%                   84.7%
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
That girls, African-American and Latino children and youth from high poverty urban neighborhoods will achieve literacy in computer programming because not knowing the language of computers will be as challenging as being illiterate or innumerate.
That girls, African-American and Latino children and youth will take the AP Computer Science exam in the same percentages as their wealthier white suburban peers.
 
That girls, African-American and Latino children and youth from high poverty urban neighborhoods will take advantage of the fact that computer science is a top paying college degree and computer programming jobs are growing at 2 times the national average. hhttp://code.org/stats. 
 
That the success of LEAP's Learning to Code program for children and youth from high poverty urban neighborhoods will impact public policy by advocating mandatory computer programming lessons in public school at both the elementary and secondary school levels as even Albania does and Great Britain in 2014. 
  
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
We use Results-Based Accountability (RBA) as a focused way of creating desired results by determining performance measures that provide quantifiable data.  
 
A pre and post program test on computer programming vocabulary will be administered.  The goal is for children to demonstrate significant improvement in the post course test, with 85% providing correct answers at the end of the program.
 
A qualitative evaluation will also be administered such as having each child program their own design. 
 
Children ages 7 through 12 are grouped by gender.  Feedback from both the girls and boys after LEAP's inaugural Learning to Code program in the summer of 2014 has permitted our instructor to make adjustments to tailor lessons to meet gender specific needs and interests, such as incorporating a coding activity based on Elsa and Anna from the Disney animated movie Frozen for girls or lego projects for boys.   
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.
Children let LEAP know what they liked about their Learning to Code class: 
 
"I like LCLC because we get to go on computers and have fun" -- Jessica, age 11
 
"I like LCLC because we get to create our own games and there are challenges on the games to help with our math."  -- Ron'Nasia, age 11
 
"I ilke LCLC because I like the games and figuring out how to solve my problems."  -- Mattiah, age 11 
Description
As part of extending our Healthy Living initiative, LEAP now offers swim instruction 6 days a week. http://bit.ly/1EFU5Bo. Not only is swimming a new skill most of our children would not otherwise learn, it is also a healthy and affordable sport and can be continued throughout life.
 
LEAP teaches swimming because to combat the high drowning rate among African American children, which the CDC reports is 5.5 times times that of their white peers overall and 10 times that for 11-12 year olds. Participation in formal swimming lessons reduces the likelihood of childhood drowning by 88%.
 
Swimming also enhances the mind/body connection through exercise and increased self-esteem, both of which promote stronger school performance. The Community Alliance for Research and Engagement (CARE) found that students with healthier personal practices are more likely to perform better on the Connecticut Mastery Test, a key indicator of whether students meet the academic benchmarks for their age/grade. 
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / Minorities / Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.
Teaching children simple techniques -- how to float, kick and tread water - and water safety basics will teach them to save their lives.  
As children advance beyond basic water safety skills, they learn different swim strokes, diving and deep water skills. 
 
Performance Measures:
(1) % of youth who perform Basic Water Safety Skills measures the #   who understand dangers in the water and reduce chance of drowning. Water Safety Test administered 3 times per year at the end of each component. Goal: 85% pass rate.
(2) % of youth who will improve swimming capacity as measured on Swim Level Guidelines. Scorecard: end of each component.
Each Swim Level requires children to add new swimming and safety skills. When children have fully mastered the skill set at their assigned level, then LEAP moves them up to our next swimming level.
 
To provide employment for urban youth as life guards/swim instructors, affording them significant responsibility and opportunity to serve as role models. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.
Children who are learning to swim at LEAP today will be LEAP's life guards and swim instructors of tomorrow.
 
Children who are learning to swim at LEAP today will embrace swimming as a lifelong physical activity to stay healthy, especially because water supports the body so there is no pressure on joints.
 
USS Swimming conducted research as to the lack of diversity and inclusion on the competitive pool deck, which study revealed that the swimming ability in urban children of color is dangerously low, a clue to the disproportionate drowning rate of African American youth reported by the CDC.  Children who are learning how to swim at LEAP today will participate on high school and college competitive swim teams.     
 
Children will exhibit more self-confidence to try something new, and to try and try and try again because learning how to swim is hard work, thereby mastering the readily transferable value of perseverance.
Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
We use Results Based Accountability (RBA) as a focused way of creating desired results by determining performance measures that provide quantifiable data. 
 
Each LEAP Swim Level has a distinct swimming and safety skill set that children must master before being promoted to the next level. Basic Water Safety Skills tests are administered at the end of each component.  All children receive a personal scorecard based on the criteria to master at their assigned Skill Level.    
 
LEAP only promotes children up our LEAP Swim Level Guidelines when they are fully ready. 
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success. LEAP's Aquatics Program began in the summer of 2014. Of note, none of the children in the Fall component who had swimming lessons at LEAP during our summer program used a flotation device because they had mastered that level of skill and self-confidence.
Program Comments
CEO Comments

LEAP children live in neighborhoods in which concentrated poverty could define their life opportunities.  Our goal at LEAP is to put in place a unique infrastructure of young leaders to change those opportunities.  But it is important to understand some basic facts about LEAP kids as well as the realities our children and their families face.

LEAP children are 75% African American and 20% Latino and range in age from 7 to 15.  

Poverty

While the national poverty rate hovers around 14.5%, the rates are much higher in the neighborhoods LEAP children call home.  According to the smallest available either census tract or census block level data for LEAP’s sites – Fair Haven, Dixwell, Farnam Courts, Dwight and Church Street South have poverty rates of 45%, 35%, 37%, 41% and 56%, respectively. 

New Haven as a whole has a child poverty rate of 43.7% compared to a national child poverty rate of 20%.  New Haven’s child poverty is concentrated in the neighborhoods where LEAP children live.  Thus it is safe to assume that the child poverty rates in LEAP neighborhoods far exceed 50%.  Indeed, at least 86% of LEAP children receive free or reduced lunch (a common measure of poverty) – though the number is likely much higher since this relies on parents’ willingness to self-report this information to LEAP.

 Academic Achievement

Academic success is an essential element of social mobility in the United States, particularly if it leads to high school graduation and ultimately college graduation.  A college graduate earns on average 134% more than someone without a high school degree and 70% more than someone with only a high school degree.  New Haven in 2014 had a high school graduation rate of 80.5% overall but only 70.5% for youth of color.  The disparity in academic achievement is one of both race and class.  In Greater New Haven, 17% of low income students are reading at grade level while 58% of high income students are doing so according to research by Data Haven.  

Violence

While it is our hope that New Haven’s return to community policing will have significant impacts on reducing violence in our neighborhoods, and the early signs are quite positive, our city is still too violent.  This year has already witnessed the murders of multiple teenagers.

Research has long shown that exposure to violence in the community has significant impacts on children.  Children exposed to violence may exhibit academic and cognitive problems as well as aggression, depression, anxiety, nightmares, post-traumatic stress and other health concerns.  


 

CEO/Executive Director
Mr. Henry Fernandez
Term Start May 2014
Email hfernandez@leapforkids.org
Experience
  • Current Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress
  • Current CEO, Fernandez Advisors consulting firm, advising non-profits, government agencies, and companies on management, planning and strategy
  • Former  economic development administrator, City of New Haven
  • Member of the Obama/Biden transition team stationed at the US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development
  • Former executive director of LEAP
  • Graduate of Yale Law School 
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 20
Number of Part Time Staff 200
Number of Volunteers 235
Number of Contract Staff 3
Staff Retention Rate 50%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 90
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 7
Hispanic/Latino 19
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 53
Female 64
Unspecified 0
Former CEOs and Terms
NameTerm
Mr. Erik Michael Clemons Dec 2008 - June 2011
Ms. Esther Massie June 2011 - May 2014
Senior Staff
Title Finance Manager
Experience/Biography


Title Interim Director of Programs
Title Youth Development Director
Title Director of Development
Title AmeriCorps Director
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Non Management Formal Evaluation Yes
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Collaborations
  • Partners critical to LEAP's success are:
  • Housing Authority of New Haven and Neighborworks New Horizons - free housing for senior counselors to live in children's neighborhoods during the summer.
  • The New Haven Public School System - free classroom space in 5 public schools in LEAP neighborhoods.
  • Connecticut Dept. of Transportation - free bus passes for all LEAP participants to get around to all of the resources New Haven has to offer. 
  • Gateway Community College - free space for our two week intensive summer training for counselors and staff.
  • New Haven Bar Association - free law camp for students
  • Eli Whitney Technical High School - students teach cooking classes to LEAP children.
  • Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History - partner in outdoor experiential science program.
  • USA Swimming - assistance with establishing community swim team.
  • Planned Parenthood - teaches health classes to teens
  • Neighborhood Music School - provides art and music classes.
  • Neubert, Pepe, & Monteith, LLC - provides college scholarships for select Junior Counselors.
  • New Haven Fish and Wildlife Services - provides enrichment class and field trips.
  • Bank of America - runs Student Leaders Training Program for select counselors.
Comments
CEO Comments
Although at first glance, our staff retention rate might seem somewhat problematic, by definition our staff turnover is high because we include our Junior Counselors (ages 16 to 19) and Senior Counselors (college students ages 18 to 23) into our count as our theory of change model develops and empowers these young leaders to create and implement year round community based programming designed to achieve positive academic and social outcomes for children and youth in high poverty urban neighborhoods. Teens and young adults are supposed to move on and LEAP is proud to serve as that springboard. 
   
Board Chair
Ann Baker Pepe
Company Affiliation The Foote School, Director of Development
Term Oct 2014 to Oct 2017
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Sharon Brooks
Anne Tyler Calabresi Community Volunteer
Ed Cleary CPAT.M. Byxbee Company
Hon. William Dyson State Representative, Retired
Louise Endel Community Volunteer
Susan Biel Kerley Community Activist
Cynthia Mann M.D.Pediatrician
David Mayhew
Marcus A. McFerren M.D.Dermatologist
Jerome Meyer Artist; Community Volunteer
Roslyn Meyer Psychologist
Tai Richardson Juvenile Probation Officer
Kenneth Russell
Deloris Vaughn Evaluations and Strategic Learning Consultant
Steve Wizner Yale Law School, Prof.
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 5
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 11
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Board Co-Chair
Steve Wizner
Company Affiliation Yale Law School, Professor
Term Oct 2014 to Oct 2017
Email stephen.wizner@yale.edu
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
CEO Comments

In the Spring of 2014, as LEAP’s board looked to pursue a significant expansion both in terms of quality of programming and number of children served, it reached out to Henry Fernandez, who served for 7 years as LEAP’s executive director to return in that role on an interim basis. This period, which was originally set as a 6 month transition period, went extremely well from the perspective of both parties and Henry agreed to continue serving in this role.


Henry’s background in youth programming, fundraising and knowledge of community leadership and institutions has proved invaluable. But most importantly, he brings a willingness to let a new generation of young people to take leadership of LEAP, helping to shape its programming and strategic direction.


We are excited about the quality of young leaders who are carrying the mantle of LEAP. We continue to invest in their educational growth and professional development, ensuring that LEAP and New Haven will have a cadre of leaders committed to social justice who will be around for generations to come.

 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Sept 01 2016
Fiscal Year End Aug 31 2017
Projected Revenue $2,295,753.00
Projected Expenses $2,296,753.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Credit Line No
Reserve Fund Yes
Documents
Form 990s
LEAP 9902015
LEAP 9902014
LEAP 9902013
LEAP 9902012
LEAP 9902011
LEAP 9902010
LEAP 9902009
LEAP 9902008
IRS Letter of Exemption
LEAP IRS Tax Exempt Letter
Other Documents
Other Documents 3
NameYear
LEAP RBA Dashboard2013View
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Revenue Sources ChartHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,247,511$874,191$758,580
Government Contributions$690,875$735,464$891,026
Federal----$131,221
State--$726,750$759,805
Local------
Unspecified$690,875$8,714--
Individual Contributions--$50,000--
------
$9,000$3,575$14,906
Investment Income, Net of Losses$17,087$24,134$1,649
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind------
Other------
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$1,646,838$1,403,268$1,219,348
Administration Expense$341,858$300,009$237,145
Fundraising Expense$104,897$212,723$234,535
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.940.880.99
Program Expense/Total Expenses79%73%72%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue5%13%14%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$1,565,873$1,730,704$1,940,453
Current Assets$1,122,396$1,219,012$3,180,794
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities$37,696$64,694$61,533
Total Net Assets$1,528,177$1,666,010$1,878,920
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount --CT Dept. of Education $726,750CT Dept. of Education $726,750
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --Seedlings Foundation $125,000Seedlings Foundation $125,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount --The Sassafras Foundation Inc. $85,000The Sassafras Foundation Inc. $85,000
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities29.7718.8451.69
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

Address 31 Jefferson Street
New Haven, CT 065114947
Primary Phone 203 773-0770
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Henry Fernandez
Board Chair Ann Baker Pepe
Board Chair Company Affiliation The Foote School, Director of Development

 

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