Greater New Haven Labor History Association
267 Chapel St
New Haven CT 06513
Contact Information
Address 267 Chapel St
New Haven, CT 06513-
Telephone (203) 777-2756 x2
Fax 203-777-1703
E-mail info@laborhistory.org
Web and Social Media
Mission

 The mission of the Greater New Haven Labor History Association is to collect, preserve and celebrate the history, culture and traditions of working people and their unions in the city of New Haven and its surrounding communities.

At A Glance
Year of Incorporation 1992
Organization's type of tax exempt status Public Supported Charity
Organization received a competitive grant from the community foundation in the past five years Yes
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Joan Cavanagh
Board Chair Mr. Louis William Berndtson Jr.
Board Chair Company Affiliation Greater New Haven Labor History Association
Financial Summary
 
Projected Revenue $32,000.00
Projected Expenses $32,000.00
Statements
Mission

 The mission of the Greater New Haven Labor History Association is to collect, preserve and celebrate the history, culture and traditions of working people and their unions in the city of New Haven and its surrounding communities.

Background

GNHLHA brings the history of New Haven's working people to the community by
1) preserving and maintaining an archival repository of individuals' papers and local union records, documents and artifacts;
2) working with students, teachers and community volunteers to conduct oral history interviews with current and retired workers;
3) organizing film festivals, events and lectures;
4) creating traveling exhibits and installing them in appropriate venues;
5) partnering with union officers and members to identify, inventory and research their records of long-term historical significance;
6) providing reference and research assistance to students, teachers, workers, genealogical researchers and others;
7) maintaining a web site with information about working class history in the greater New Haven area;
8) holding an annual meeting with panel discussions about topics of interest to the community and
9) organizing labor history bus and walking tours

Our highly successful traveling exhibit, "New Haven's Garment Workers: An Elm City Story" opened in 2007 at the Ethnic Heritage Center and has since shown at 23 different locations including universities, public libraries, the atrium at City Hall and other local and regional venues since then.. 

At the end of 2013, LHA completed its long awaited second traveling exhibit, "Our Community at Winchester: An Elm City Story." Highly acclaimed, the exhibit has shown at Gateway Community College, Science Park, and the atrium of City Hall and is currently on view at Higher One, on the site of the old Winchester plant. The organization recently received a $1000 grant from Historic New England to help fund research and creation of eight more oral histories to include in the exhibit.
 

In 2008, GNHLHA facilitated the creation of a mural for the newly renovated Augusta Lewis Troup School on Elm Street by artist Susan Bowen. Many of the photographs used in that mural came from GNHLHA collections. In addition, the organization researched and published a booklet about the life of the school's namesake-- whose legacy had been previously unknown to its students. "Augusta Lewis Troup: Worker, Activist, Advocate" was distributed to the hundreds attending the school opening, and later disseminated to students through the efforts of a teacher at the school. It won Honorable Mention in the 2009 Connecticut League of History Organizations Awards of Merit.

Impact
ACCOMPLISHMENTS:
1) Completion of the 33 panel traveling exhibit, "Our Community at Winchester: An Elm City Story," with exhibit displayed at Gateway Community College, Science Park, the atrium at New Haven City Hall, and currently, the lobby of Higher 1. It will continue to travel to new venues for the foreseeable future.  
2) Continue to develop proposals  for teaching labor history in the Connecticut Public Schools
3) Successful and well-attended Annual Conference/ Meeting in April 2014 
4) Found  two new venues for Garment Workers traveling exhibit
GOALS:
1) Raise $50,000 for sustainability (Basic Operating Expenses)
2) Expand the Winchester exhibit by conducting eight more oral histories
3) Upgrade and restore the Garment Workers exhibit, which will travel to New Jersey's Botto House Museum in 2015
4) Process and publish finding guides for a backlog of current archival collections
5) Increase collaboration with other organizations
 
Needs NEEDS:
1) Raise $50,000 /year for sustainability
2) Recruit 3-5 new Board members
3) Recruit new volunteers
4) At least double organizational and individual membership
5)  Raise $20,000 to upgrade current traveling exhibits
 
CEO Statement We are the only Labor History organization in Connecticut and one of about ten nationally. In addition to recording the history of workers who built  this country and continue to build it every day, these organizations also document the history of the work itself.
Board Chair Statement
The newly elected President, Louis W. Berndtson, Jr., writes: My father was a mainstay at the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Local 936, which represented workers on the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Line. Like many people today, I received no labor history education, so all I knew was from what I observed of my father's work. When I began organizing at Yale with the late Vincent Sirabella, I began to realize how much I had to learn, because now I had to teach it as well! A lack of a labor history curriculum in the schools, even to understanding your basic rights as a person in the work force-- this situation cries out for redress.
Our two most basic challenges as an organization continue to be to raise enough money to fund our programs and basic operating expenses and to recruit new personnel to our Executive Board. It has been exciting this year to see our membership grow by another 25%, and we will work to involve these new members in our governance.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Historical Organizations
Secondary Organization Category Social Science / Labor Studies
Tertiary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Humanities
Areas Served
Ansonia
Bethany
Branford
Cheshire
Derby
East Haven
Guilford
Hamden
Lower Naugatuck Valley
Madison
Milford
New Haven
North Branford
North Haven
Orange
Oxford
Seymour
Shelton
Shoreline
State wide
Wallingford
West Haven
Woodbridge
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments
Former Board President Nicholas Aiello writes: I was one of the founders of this organization and I have continued to be active since 1988 because I want the next generation to understand how hard it was for workers to get where we are today.
I grew up in a family of 14 brothers and sisters. My sisters all worked in shirt shops. I began as a "bundle boy." I learned from my own experience how unions helped improve lives and working conditions. I wanted to be a doctor, but I was too poor. So I became a union representative, and I realized that  a doctor only helps people when they're sick. I could help people every day.
I realized that not only was the union able to improve working conditions, but it improved members' social lives and outlook by helping them to realize that there was more to life besides work.
 There was no labor history taught in the schools when I went to school. So the idea of getting a labor history curriculum in the schools in Connecticut today, which the Labor History Association is working on, is very, very important.
The two greatest challenges we face as an organization are to raise the money to continue with our programs, and to recruit new personnel to our Board. With the help of our Outreach Coordinator, we have increased our membership by 50% over the last year, and we are getting to know those new members with a view to bringing their interests and talents to the work of the organization.
 

 
Programs
Description

The Family Work History Project is a collaboration between the Greater New Haven Labor History Association, teachers of History, English and Social Studies in New Haven's public schools, and a local professional music educator.

Over a three month span including nine project sessions, students at four schools will learn to conduct oral history interviews with a mentor in the work force, write and publish journalistic essays based on these interviews, compose an original song based on what they have learned, develop a spoken word piece based on their interviews, and present their work in a public performance.

Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / General/Unspecified / Families
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Students engaged in the project will apply skills learned in the classroom to real world situations. Classroom skills such as historical background research on an interview subject, grammatical and structural writing skills and presentation skills will be utilized outside the classroom as students research, prepare and conduct interviews with mentors in the work force. 90% of students who participate will feel increased confidence and pride while engaging with community members. Student participants will have a practical understanding of the real life components that go into career decision-making and will be better prepared to make their own career decisions. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the local labor history in the Greater New Haven its impact on the region. Students will learn to produce a historical document and will gain an understanding of the role of oral history as a primary historical resource. Students will learn to analyze and question their sources.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The GNHLHA will draw from experience gained through the project to develop a labor history resource archive for use by history teachers statewide. The resource archive would provide teachers with lesson plans and resource materials that address CT state-mandated educational standards. GNHLHA would draw from knowledge gained during the project, as well as from an extensive base of primary and secondary sources housed in GNHLHA archives, to address the following CT State Dept of Education Content Knowledge Standards for grades 6-12: Trace the evolution of citizens’ rights; Explain the changing nature of the US economy; Analyze how events and people in CT contributed to developments in US history; Describe how US history affects CT citizens; Give examples of how individuals or groups have worked to expand or limit citizens’ rights; Debate instances where rights and responsibilities of citizens are in conflict; Analyze factors that encourage a business to relocate to another country. 

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Success is measured by grade performance and completion of assignments and by attendance at the culminating program. In the two pilot schools, School A exhibited 100% classroom attendance with 80% of students turning in all assignments and receiving a score of 90 or above. School B scored lower with 100% classroom attendance but only 20% of students turning in all assignments and receiving a score of 70 or above. 50% of students from School A and 25% of students from School B participated in the extracurricular culminating performance.

The gap in success between schools A and B was due in large part to a disparity in affluence and parental support. Future implementation of the program at schools similar to School B will involve bringing interviewees to the students in the classroom rather than having the students seek out these individuals on their own, creating a more accessible experience.

Program success was measured by teacher and principal feedback surveys, which were all positive.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Many students reported within their essays that they felt inspired by their mentors. One student said: “I hope that when my time comes to begin working that I will work as hard as [my dad].” Many, such as this student, testified to a gained understanding of the components of career decisions and how these impact personal decision-making: “I really admire my mother, who managed to juggle it all, both family and jobs, in a country not her own.”

Teachers felt that the program enhanced their curriculum by adding a sense of excitement and creativity to the learning process. One teacher reported that the production of a historical document “helped provide authentic writing experiences for students which are crucial to their growth as writers.” Another teacher felt that the historical learning objectives in the project dovetailed with her work on the industrial revolution and the progressive era, ultimately “introducing them to a new way of thinking and exploring the world around them.”

Description
History lives on for those who visit "New Haven's Garment Workers: An Elm City Story," a history folded into the fabric of  nearly every Greater New Haven family, sparking collective memories and personal reflection.
Since its opening in 2007, this traveling exhibit has been displayed at 23 locations throughout the state of Connecticut. It paints a vivid portrait of the lives, victories, struggles and sacrifices of a courageous group of working people in the clothing industry in New Haven.
Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

The exhibit has been welcomed at 13 venues in the state of Connecticut and beyond over the course of its continuing tour, including: the Azoth Gallery at the New Haven Public Library, the atrium at New Haven’s City Hall, New Haven’s Cortland Wilson Branch Library, the North Branford, Branford and East Haven Public Libraries, the Wesleyan University Library, the Fairfield University Library, New Haven’s Fusco Building at the Long Wharf Maritime Center, the University of Connecticut (Storrs) library, and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst W.E.B. DuBois Library. Literally thousands of people have viewed it since its opening. There are many other venues open to receive it in the coming years.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The exhibit is part of the Labor History Association’s long term goal to increase local awareness of New Haven’s working history and of the people who built our city and our region. As it travels to hundreds more local and regional venues and as a digital version is made available on line, its already well-demonstrated impact will increase exponentially.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.
  • Comment books made available at all venues
  • Written comments by venue hosts providing an overview of patrons’ engagement and behavior in response to the exhibit
  • Number of phone calls and email queries to GNHLHA from people who have seen the exhibit
  • Number of independent queries from venues asking to host exhibit
Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

The best examples are excerpts from the Comments Book which has been placed at all venues where the Garment Workers exhibit has shown.

From East Haven:  “I am currently learning about this in school…I can’t imagine what it would have been like if I were a child in that time period.” (11 year old sixth grader). 

“We’ve come a long way, and it’s worth it to never stop fighting for what you believe in. (This) gives us hope for the future!” (an elderly woman whose sister worked in the garment industry and who is featured in the exhibit)

“The exhibit is amazing! It helps to put some faces to the stories my grandmother always tells.”

From a Fairfield University student: “Wow. Thanks for Local History. My aunt made shirts. This exhibit brings home her experience.”

From two teachers at High School in the Community who brought their classes to the exhibit when it showed at the Ethnic Heritage Center in New Haven in 2006: “This was a wonderful field trip for our students. We are studying working conditions in New Haven and this helped our students understand appreciate those who went before them, so they could have better working conditions.”

From a patron at the Branford Public Library, “Excellent. People forget how much of fair employment practices grew out of union organization—especially for women.”

From a librarian at the Branford Public Library: “I never realized New Haven had its own ‘Triangle Shirtwaist’ tragedy. What a thought provoking exhibit…kudos to the Labor Association for preserving the history and putting it together for all to see, It should be exhibited in every library in the state.” (this from librarian Celeste Kohl.)

From a patron of Wachovia Bnak in New Haven, where the exhibit showed in the summer of 2010: “Wonderful tribute to the women who worked in the garment industry in New Haven, paving a better working environment for their children and future generations.”

Description
As one of New Haven's most important employers from the 1940s  through the 1990's, the Winchester Plant drew workers from throughout the greater New Haven area and had an enormous impact on the Newhallville neighborhood and the larger New Haven community. The exhibit is designed to be a traveling exhibit as well as an on-line exhibit. It is based on oral histories conducted by GNHLHA volunteers, photographs and documents from the records of the International Association of Machinists Local 609, which represented workers at the plant beginning in 2006, and on other donated images, artifacts and  personal recollections from those who were involved with the plant.
The exhibit is currently on tour, having opened at Gateway Community College in December 2013. It has already shown as well at New Haven's City Hall, Science Park and Higher One, and was featured as a stop on the International Festival of Arts and Ideas Farmington Canal Walking Tour in June 2014.
Population Served Adults / Children and Youth (0 - 19 years) / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Along the lines of the highly successful Garment Workers exhibit, GNHLHA envisions an exhibit which will travel to public libraries, schools and other venues in the greater New Haven area. It will also be shown at local art galleries, museums, banks, City Hall and at university libraries throughout the state. Taking it to these diverse venues will ensure that hundreds, from equally diverse populations, will encounter it. The presence of a version of the exhibit on-line and the traveling exhibit in public schools and public libraries will especially make it available to the many public school students whose parents, grandparents, and other relatives lived this history.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

In the long-term, the exhibit will increase interest and involvement of young people in learning about local history. They will learn not only that their parents and grandparents were important historical actors, but that so too are they.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

A  Focus Group of Retired Winchester Workers as well GNHLHA’s advisory board of historians and unionists will evaluate each step of the exhibit’s development. Once it is made public, teachers of American History courses will be asked to evaluate their students’ reactions, and to describe how they used it in their classes. Librarians will be asked to monitor usage, and comment books will be provided at each venue so that written comments can be made by those who view it.

The web version of the exhibit will feature a comments session. The number of “hits” on that portion of the web site will be monitored. In addition, an email publicizing the exhibit will contain a link to the page and will enable tracking of the numbers who respond.

 

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Over 200 hundred images have been digitized and 20 oral history interviews have been completed for inclusion in the exhibit. The project director has been invited to several venues to present an exhibit mock-up and to describe the long term goals of the project. There have been over 20 telephone, email and written queries from people wanting to participate in the oral histories, contribute artifacts, and/or learn of the progress of the exhibit’s development.

Comments one of the volunteer interviewers, “The enthusiasm for this project in the larger community is infectious. People are so excited to participate and to have their stories and those of their parents and grandparents passed on to future generations. Everyone who grew up in New Haven during the 1940s, ‘50s and ‘60s in particular has memories of Winchester, and 90% of the local African American community had a family member or members who worked at the plant.”

Description The Labor History Association currently holds 10 collections of records from local unions as well as individual papers which are preserved and processed to create finding guides in order to make them available to researchers. The GNHLHA Archivist is currently working to make the finding guides accessible on line.
Population Served Adults / Families / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

In a year’s time (2011, 2012), GNHLHA will have completed preserving and processing  all 10 collections currently held in the archives; acquired 5 more relevant collections; and increased by  50% increase the number of researchers using the collections.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

The ultimate goal is to provide an ongoing resource for future historians and other researchers seeking to understand the history of work and workers and their defining role in building our community.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Success will be defined by the numbers of finding guides in completed form and numbers of researchers who have used the collections by the end of the year 2012.

Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Patricia Lucan, former President of the New Haven Federation of Teachers, said of the GNHLHA archival program: “The service provided…and the countless hours given…to researching and organizing data from several unions is invaluable.”

In the past two years, 10 researchers have used the Garment Workers and New Haven Federation of Teachers Collections for papers, presentations or other projects.

Photographs from the Garment Workers, Teachers, Central Labor Council and other collections at GNHLHA were used in 2008 by artist Susan Bowen to help complete the mural which now graces the lobby of the renovated Troup School on Elm Street in New Haven.

The Typographical Union Local 47 Records include a number of artifacts and photographs that document the early printing trades in New Haven. These items were displayed for six months at the renovated Augusta Lewis Troup School in honor of its namesake, who was the first woman to hold office in the International Typographical Union. These artifacts are on continuous display in the lobby of the Council/ Teachers Building in New Haven.

Description GNHLHA is committed to helping individuals and organizations preserve their records of historical importance. We offer our members a free two hour consultation with our archivist/ director to discuss our Historical Records Inventory Services. The goal of the service is to document the working history of families, individuals and unions by producing a detailed listing of records, photographs, artifacts, memorabilia and other materials in a collection. Once the inventory is completed, the individual or organization receives a copy of the catalogue of materials as well as detailed recommendations about how to preserve their documents of enduring historical value.
Population Served Adults / Families / General/Unspecified
Program is linked to organization’s mission and strategy Yes
Program is frequently assessed based on predetermined program goals Yes
Short Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe near term achievement(s) or improvement(s) that will result from this program. This may represent immediate outcomes occurring as a result of the end of a session or service.

Local organizations and individuals will achieve a clear understanding of the importance of preserving their records to document their contributions to history, and will be given the tools to do so. Current records management programs will be enhanced or new ones put in place to ensure that records of long term historical value are identified and maintained.

Long Term SuccessHelpOrganizations describe the ultimate change(s) that will result from this program. This may be far into the future and represent an ideal state.

Documents, artifacts, and photographs from a variety of sources will be well-organized, well-preserved and accessible to future generations to create a full picture of local and regional history.

Program Success Monitored ByHelpOrganizations describe the tools used to measure or track program impact.

Program success will be measured by evaluations and testimonies of participants; return visits by the archivist to view organizations’ progress and make further recommendations as needed; and responsiveness of other organizations and individuals to participation in the project

Qualitatively, at least 10 additional inventories and consultations will be produced annually.


Examples of Program SuccessHelpOrganization's site specific examples of changes in clients' behaviors or testimonies of client's changes to demonstrate program success.

Excerpts from the following letters from representatives of the unions whose records have thus far been inventoried are representative of the testimonies of all the participants:

Frank Pannone, Organizer, Sheet Metal Workers Local Union Forty (now retired): “ GNHLHA conducted a detailed inventory of our records in the fall of 2001 and wrote a full report which gave us useful information about how and what to preserve…”
John Dirzius, former President of the American Postal Workers Union, Greater Connecticut Area Local (now Northeast Region Coordinator of the American Postal Workers Union): “A few years ago our local worked with the History Association’s archivist Joan Cavanagh to inventory our past records and memorabilia. Our goal was to preserve our past in a meaningful way so that our future members and our community at large could appreciate our history. We also wanted our records to be a depository of material and information that would be available for research. Joan did an excellent job in providing our local with a number of helpful suggestions to store our records, our photos, and our priceless relics from our past. Many of her suggestions have been implemented and others are still under development. Our inventory and the inventory of other labor unions that participated in this process were compiled into a report which provides useful information about what to preserve and how to properly preserve one’s history. This guide provides a valuable overview of our labor movement past and present.”

Chuck Appleby, President and Business Manager, Carpenters Local 24: GNHLHA is “the only local organization that combines historical information from many different unions into a broader picture of the history of a movement…They support the work of amateur historians and archivists within the membership of each union by means of information, encouragement, and direct help.”

 
Program Comments
CEO Comments
The Garment Workers Exhibit was produced in 2007, and has been traveling since then almost continuously. It costs about $3000 a year to move and set it up in new venues. It currently needs to be refurbished in order to go to the Botto House Museum in New Jersey in 2015. The Winchester Workers exhibit  has been produced and is circulating.We are hoping to raise additional funds to be able to produce it as a book.
 Our biggest challenge for the year 2014-2015 is to be able to raise enough money to move all our programs along. This includes staff time and operating expenses as well as production costs.
CEO/Executive Director
Dr. Joan Cavanagh
Term Start Sept 2008
Email joan@laborhistory.org
Experience Joan Cavanagh holds a PhD in American History from Yale University and a Master's Degree in Library Science with a concentration in Archival Management from Simmons College.
Staff
Number of Full Time Staff 0
Number of Part Time Staff 1
Number of Volunteers 10
Number of Contract Staff 1
Staff Retention Rate 100%
Staff Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 1
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Staff Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 1
Unspecified 0
Formal Evaluations
CEO Formal Evaluation Yes
CEO/Executive Formal Evaluation Frequency Annually
Senior Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Senior Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation N/A
Non Management Formal Evaluation Frequency N/A
Collaborations
In the past year, we have worked with 15 public schools to model the Family Work History Project; collaborated with the International Festival of Arts and Ideas to produce a walking tour; joined the May Day Celebration of 2012; cosponsored a book signing with the New Haven Public Library; and worked with several CT AFL-CIO affiliates on a couple of statewide events.
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Award of MeritConnecticut League of History Organizations2009
Award of MeritAmerican Association for the Study of Labor History2000
Board Chair
Mr. Louis William Berndtson Jr.
Company Affiliation Greater New Haven Labor History Association
Term July 2012 to July 2014
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Nicholas Aiello retired
Ms. Dorothy Johnson Retired
Mrs. Mary Johnson New Haven Federation of Teachers, Retirees
Mr. Stephen Kass New Haven Federation of Teachers Retirees
Dr. Troy Rondinone Southern Connecticut State University
Mr. Anson Smith Housatonic Community College
Ms. Lula White Retired
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 5
Female 3
Governance
Board Term Lengths 6
Board Term Limits 0
Written Board Selection Criteria Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy Under Development
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Constituency Includes Client Representation Yes
Board Co-Chair
Mr. Stephen Kass
Company Affiliation New Haven Federation of Teachers Retirees
Term May 2004 to May 2014
Email steve@laborhistory.org
Additional Board/s Members and Affiliations
NameAffiliation
Dr. Jeremy Brecher Community Volunteer
Dr. Cecelia Bucki Fairfield University
Ms. Deborah Elkin Community Volunteer
Mr. John Hiller Retired
Dr. David Montgomery Retired
Mr. John Olsen CT AFL-CIO
Mr. Anthony Riccio Yale University
CEO Comments
We are actively seeking new members for both the advisory and executive boards. We seek to broaden our representative base and to further diversify in terms of age and experience of our boards.
 
 
Financials
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2014
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2014
Projected Revenue $32,000.00
Projected Expenses $32,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Credit Line Yes
Reserve Fund No
Documents
IRS Letter of Exemption
IRS Letter
Detailed Financials
Prior Three Years Expense Allocations Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Program Expense$30,368$74,914$82,701
Administration Expense$5,200$3,925$2,216
Fundraising Expense------
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.831.251.05
Program Expense/Total Expenses85%95%97%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Prior Three Years Assets and Liabilities Chart
Fiscal Year201220112010
Total Assets$51,785$57,812$37,980
Current Assets$51,785$57,382$37,980
Long-Term Liabilities------
Current Liabilities------
Total Net Assets$51,785$57,812$37,980
Prior Three Years Top Three Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201220112010
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --Foundation (private) $10,000
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- --CT Humanities Council $6,000
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Solvency
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capitial Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
Comments
CEO Comments
Because of its small budget, GNHLHA was not required to file a 2008 990 E-Z and has never been required to have an audit.
 
In order to fully realize the goals of our five major programs, we need to raise $50,000.
Foundation Staff Comments

This profile, including the financial summaries prepared and submitted by the organization based on its own independent and/or internal audit processes and regulatory submissions, has been read by the Foundation. Financial information is inputted by Foundation staff directly from the organization’s IRS Form 990, audited financial statements or other financial documents approved by the nonprofit’s board. The Foundation has not audited the organization’s financial statements or tax filings, and makes no representations or warranties thereon. The Community Foundation is continuing to receive information submitted by the organization and may periodically update the organization’s profile to reflect the most current financial and other information available. The organization has completed the fields required by The Community Foundation and updated their profile in the last year. To see if the organization has received a competitive grant from The Community Foundation in the last five years, please go to the General Information Tab of the profile.

 

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